OCR Interpretation


The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, July 13, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068097/1889-07-13/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

A CAT YARN FROM CAMDEN
PUSST IS GT.EA.XED PTTHE SHAIZ
POT TO PEED THE 3IENAGERIE
ZION.
Postmaster Fielder Replies to All Ac
cusations—An Infamous Coal Deal—
Trenton Bridge Toils—A Little Girl’s
Shocking Fate.
Camden is all worked up over a wild,
weird ynra regarding the feline popula
tion of that thriving city.
Here and there all over the city mys
terious disappearances have occurred, and
doting owners of furry pets have sent
their anxious voices ont into the night,
from front and back doors, in vain.
“Where can pussy be, she never staid
away so before,’’ is the Question upon the
lips of many housewives.
The answer is almost too horrible for
the losers of gentle puss to contemplate.
The Koyal Menagerie has been and is
still in town with its collection ot wild
animals. Meat is costly and the pockets
of the proprietors uro presumably uot
deep. Cats are plentiful and cats are
meat; also inexpensive. That is the ex
planation of the mysterious disappear
ance of tabby.
A little army of small- boys have been
enlisted iu the service of the circus for
the express purpose oi gatheriug the daily
rations of the African lion and Bengal
tiger. , ,
The boys go out armed with bags anu
wherever a cat can be located, she is
“laid for” until in a fateful moment she
is popped into the bag. ft makes uo dif
ference to the urchins as to what pussy s
standiug in feline society is, all are gar
nered ia, wherever found.
The depredations of these boys upon tne
household pets were discovered by several
citizens noticing that the gamins seemed
to be intent, just now, upon making
pussey’s life more miserable than usual.
Several exciting races and captures were
witnessed. Then a policeman saw a boy
bring a cat, wrapped in heavy paper, to
the circus and hand it over to the em
ployees of the show.
It has now become the common talk of
the boys that two, sleek plump cats would
nr, nlrtrtciainir trr fhf- shnW. Jtlltl a
crusade has begun which threatcus to
depopulate the city of cats, unless the
outraged owners descend In a body upon
the circus men and sweep them from the
face of Camden.
The cats have also “caught on and
they dart from one hiding place to an
other and flee for their lives upon the
approach of a boy. Many a mother and
daughter have already been notified to
look out for their pets aud will hardly
give pussy a chance to get a sniff of fresh
air. and it is said that several highly
valued, cats have nearly choked to death
by being tied up for safe keeping.
The cats are stored away in a cage until
dinner time in the menagerie arrives.
Then they are taken out and distributed
among the hungry beasts.
Whim pussy is thrown into the lion’s
cage there is a deadly pause, during
which the feline dinner has just time to
view the feline diner. Then liis majesty
makes a spring, there is a screech aud a
growl and all is over. The cat’s death is
generally a quick oue and she is after
wards devoured at leisure.
It is unnecessary to say that all boys,
and particularly boys with bags, are
looked upon with suspicion, and if cat
owners would save their pets from a
terrible fate it behooves them to be upon
the watch. _
Postmaster Fiedler in Rebuttal.
“I had nothing to do with assessing any
of my men,” said Postmaster Fiedler, of
Newark, speaking of the evidence taken
at the recent secret investigation into the
management of his office. “I did not
assess them for campaign purposes, nor
did I know that they were assessed. The
charge that I sent men to the polls to see
that my men voted the democratic ticket
is a lie. 1 never followed my men to the
polls, nor did I hire any one to do so, nor
Is there a man in the service who can say
that I ever asked his political opinion.
“In regard to the Civil Service rules re
garding appointments I adhere to them
strictly. On three occasions Civil Service
Inspectors visited the office, and each
time theyjleft me fully satisfied that I was
living up to the laws. In making up lists
of men eligible for certain positions in the
service there are three men to choose
from. Before making my choice I did
not ask a man’s politics. Formerly four
men were certified as eligible. If I chose
one of the four, aud now if I choose one
of the three, I am conforming to the law.
The Inspector lays stress on tiie finding of
beer kegs in the building, and one would
infer that he charged the men with im
bibing beer on the premises as a regular
thing. That is false. On four occasions
the men had refreshments, but each time
after regular hours. On two occasions
they requested, through the superintend
ent, permission to use the cellar for recep
tions to men who hud been promoted or
married, I don’t remember which. I gave
the permission conditionally.
“The superintendent was ordered to bo
with them to sec that iny orders were
obeyed. After eight o’clock at uight they
assembled and no one was at all disor
derly nor did they, behave boisterously.
Their receptions did not last longer than
one and one-half to two hours. The two
other occasions were of my own creation.
Each occurred ou New Year’s eve, after
hours, when the men were fatigued after
a day’s hard work. I invited them to
have refreshments. When beer was in
troduced at the church building it was
Government property. I knew nothing of
the intended presentation of the album.
It was a surprise, but I was compelled to
decliuo it when I learned that- it was
against the laws.”
Mr. Fiedler is awaiting developments
Sow. All the other charges had been
made and discussed before the investiga
tion.
An Infamous Coal Heal.
A sensation was created ut the meeting
of the Board of Education of Elizabeth
last night ou the announcement being
made that Egbert & Young, who were
awarded the contract for furnishing the
public schools with coal, were unable to
comply with their bargain, as Whitney &
Kemmerer, of New York, the coal Arm
that supplied them, had given them to
understand that they must pull out in
favor of the next lowest bidder, or other
wise they would not in the future ho sup
plied with coal.
This announcement caused a sensation
in the Board, aud several Commissioners
denounced the affair as an outrage. Un
der the circumstances all bids were re
jected and new ones advertised for.
Trenton Bridge Tolls.
The complaints about the methods
Adopted by the managers of the Penn
eylvauia Railroad bridge over the Dela"
ware at Trenton are very uumeious, and
the promoters of the free bridge feel con
fident that when the contract price is
known and the scheme in a little more
definite shape, they will have plenty of
money to complete the work. One
instance of the Pcnnsvlvaula’s methods
was told by Captain William II. Skirm
yesterday. He is superintendent of
Greene street M. E. Sunday school. On
■Wednesday they held their annual picnic
in Morrisville Grove. In former years
Sunday school superintendents were
furnished with free passes for their chil
dren, but when the Inter-State Commerce
law went Into effect the company said
they could no longer do this. Then they
charged for each person who walked
ccross the bridge aud for the wagons.
Last year nearly all the children of the
Sunday school In question were conveyed
to the grove in wagons, and the bill for
toll amounted to nearly Si). On Wednes
day, Captain Skirm supposed ho could do
the same way, but was informed by the
gateman that he must pay for every child
in the wagons as well as for the wagons.
So they all had to be counted aud puiil
for. The bill for toll amounted to
about $15. Captain Skirm said:—“I did
not say a word to the men, who tvero
•»*ttdy obeying orders, but it is this
which makes the methods of the com
pany managing the bridge obnoxious to
the public, aud when the public know the
facts they will want a free bridge.”
Dragged by a Runaway Horse.
While Martha Johnson, the seven-year
old daughter of James Johnson, of Round
Valley, Hunterdon county, was untying
the horse for her father to take to the
pasture field, sho met with a terrible ac
cident. From some cause the halter
caught around her neck and the horse
started out of the stable for the field on a
gallop, dragging the child for over a hun
dred yards, striking her aguinst several
farming implements in its course and
jumping on the child with its feet. The
norse was finally caught. The child's
clothing was nearly uil tom from her
body. She lay In an unconscious and
terribly mangled condition. Her skull
was fractured and several deep cuts were
found around her head and face, besides
several internal Injuries. There was
scarcely a part of the body but what was
bruisecl aud lacerated.
Plainfield's Demented Waif.
Chief of Police Tunis J. Carey has dis
covered the identity of the unfortunate
woman whom he found Tuesday evening
at the North avenue railroad station,
Plainfield. Mrs. Lynch and Mrs. Mattox,
who have taken charge of the patient aud
have devoted to her incessant kind
hearted attentions, leurned from a letter
found on her that she was acquainted
with a Mr. Edner, of No. 4.17 Third ave
nue, Brooklyn, aud to him the Chief tele
graphed.
A response came in the shape of a letter
from Charles Merkllu, of No. 1,5S!> First
avenue, New York city, who is a brother
in-law of Mr. Edner, and who replied be
cause Mr. Edner is ill.
Mr. Merklln writes that the demented
woman’s name Is Lena Fliege and that
Mr. Edner is her nephew. She came to
America from Germany twelve months
ago to take charge of Mr. Edner’s house
hold uud to teach his motherless children,
she herself being well educated.
Eventually Lena was taken ill aud was
sent to her" brother, W. R. Benson, a
wealthy cigar manufacturer, at No. 3,003
North Market street, St. Louis. Later,
Lena’s letters came to be dated from the
St. Louis Insane Asylum, aud she com
plained of abuses ut the hands of her
brother and his servants. Mr. Edner met
with business reverses and was taken 111,
yet it seemed that Mr. Benson has shipped
Lena back to the nephews care, without
an escort, unprotected, though she was
clearly not fit to travel alone.
Chief Carey is seeking to have the
woman returned to St. Louis.
Tooth Doctors to Talk.
The New Jersey State Dental Society
will convene at the West End Hotel, As_
bury Park, on Wednesday, the 17th_
This will be the nineteenth annual ses
sion of the society, and a very interesting
programme will be carried out. Some of
the most noted dentists in the State and
from elsewhere will be present and read
papers. They will also exhibit new den
tal appliances and give practical illustra
tions of their advanced mothods. Morn
ing, afternoon anil evening sessions will
be held on Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday. The society has a very large
membership, and among its ranks are
some of tlie leading dental lights. A
Clinical Conference has been formed by
the society, and some of the Clinical Com
mittee will meet every day during the
session in the session rooms. The society
lias sent out a neat pamphlet containing a
programme of the exercises to be earned
out.
For Abusing His Wife.
The people of “Fairview," Bloomfield
are much excited over the arrest for abus,
ing his wife, of Stanford Farrand, at one
time a very popular citizen of the town.
Farrand has lately been drinking very
heavily, aud, it is Jcharged, has beeu
abusive to liis wife. Thursday, while
under the influence of liquor, he drove
her out of the houso. Mrs. Farrand, who
is u daughter of Henry Spear, a promin
ent citizen of Bloomfield, went to the
residence of her mother-in-law, Mrs.
Charles Farrand, next door, where she
told her story, and declared that she was
afraid that her husband would take her
life. She was directed to cause his arrest,
and accordingly she was driven to tlie
office of Justice William It. Hall, where
she told her story and had a warrant
issued for her husband.
The warrant was placed in the hands of
a Constable, who that night captured
Farrand at liis home, and took him before
the magistrate, where he was placed un
der bail for a hearing. On being asked
why he had acted ns he did, he said that
liis wife was too high spirited, and that
he wanted to show her that it was his
house she was living in, and that he in
tended to run it himself.
Farrand was formerly superintendent
of the Morris Canal Company. While
acting in this capacity he was also em
ployed by the Lehigh Valley Coal Com
pany. At one time he was a member of
the Republican County Committee. He
was defeated for the office a short time
ago by Harry E. Richards, lie has ulso
been at the head of Bloomfield’s Town
ship government as chairman of the
Township Committee, and has served
many times as a member of tlie body, tlie
last time being in tlie Board of last year.
The Ramibril Silk Failure.
The failure of Bamford Brothers, the
silk manufacturers of Rip Van Winkle
“*>-uuv auu vim DUitct, i iU/CIBUU, IIS Btlii
the principal topic of conversation among
silk men and others in that city. As a
rale they were surprised when tliev heard
of it, although some of the silk men
claimed to have been expecting some
thing of the kind.
“They had a novel way of doing busi
ness,” said a prominentmanufacturer to
a reporter. “They always paid spot cash
and consequently wanted no rating with
the commercial agencies. When any tier
son approached them with any questions
about their property they declined to give
any information on the ground that they
did not want any credit. Some people be
gan to imagine that there was something
in this way of doing business.
“1 expected to see them go up long ago,
but they held ou so long that 1 myself be
gan to think that perhaps there was
something iu their way of doing business.
I have no doubt that they were held un bv
some firm iu New York, who stood by
them until the time came for them to
drop, mid then away they went. There
are others in a similar predicament. I
knew from what I heard lately that Ham
ford Brothers could not last, as they were
selling goods nt less than it cost to make
them. This, of course, is an injury to
the whole silk Industry, for we cannot
compete with men who sell goods for less
than cost.” _
Raraton River Railroad Enjoined.
The Raraton River Railroad Company
has been served with an injunction re.
straining them from crossing the East
Brunswick turnpike through a 70 foot
tunnel, thus compelling the construc
tion of a bridge of that length.
The turnpike company Insisted upon a
50 foot tunnel which it is believed the
railroad company agreed to construct, but
when the work began it wus found that
the projectors of the railroad were laying
plans for a 70 foot crossing.
As the attorney for the turnpike com
pany Mr. Alan btrong laid the case be
fore Judge E. \V. Scudder at Trenton on
Tuesday, and secured a mandatory in
junction compelling the railroad men to
construct the tunnel 50 feet wide, and to
follow the specifications of the contract In
other particulars.
BASEBALL,
OAKLAND PARK.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY,
JULY 15th and lCth,
JERSEY CITY vs. LOWELL.
Game called 4 p. m. Admission, B cants
.Ladles Fie.
About Boiling Clothes
and Disease-Breeding Germs
Dr. H. M. Lassing, in an
article in American Analyst,
says: “The dirt and all
soap must be entirely re
moved from the interstices
of the clothes, and all mi
crobes must be destroyed.
The only and easiest way to
do this is by heating the
water in which the clothes
are contained to the boiling
pohit. The boiling water,
by constant self-agitation, is forced through the inter
stices of the fabrics, and thus cleanses them from dirt and
disease-breeding microbes as they can be cleansed in no
other way, undwithoutmany manner injuring the fabric.”
James Pyle’s Pearline will wash in hot or cold,
hard or soft water, and by any of the so-called “ new
labor-saving methods but for the easiest and best way
of washing, refer to the directions for washing by boil
ing given on back of each package of Pearline.
Beware of Imitations. 14a JAMES PYLE, New York.
69 NEWARK AVE. THE 69 NEWARK AVE.
Star Clothing Co ipany,
MEN’S, BOYS’ AND CHILDREN’S FINE CLOTHIN G
Ready Made and to Order, CASH or CREDIT, at Cash Prices.
LADIES’ CLOAKS, WRAPS and DRESS GOODS.
Separate and Exclusive Ladies’ Department.
A CALL EARNESTLY SOLICITED.
WE MANUFACTURE ALL OUR OWN GOODS.
Owing to the increase in our Clothing Department we were
compelled to get rid of our Hat Department to make room for a
New and Full Line of Summer Clothing.
Turner & Bennell,
ESTARZjISZZEI} 23 YEARS,
£3 <fc £5 NEWARK ATTENUE, J.C.
AMUSEMENTS. ^
PROCTOR’S 23D STREET THEATRE.
25c., 50c., 75c., #1.00, #1.50.
“AMERICAN JUVENILES,”
“ H. M. S. PINAFORE.”
Matinee Saturday at 2.
PALMER’S THEATRE. B’way and Thirtieth St
COOLED BY TONS OF ICE.
McCAULL OPERA COMPANY
IN
CLOVER.
Evenings at 8. Saturday Matinee at 2.
DOCKSTADER’S THEATRE,
Broadway and Twenty-ninth St.
GOOD RESERVED SEATS. CO CENTS.
Dockstader’s Minstrels.
Evenings at 8.15. Saturday Matinee, 2.15.
Sunday Evening, Griswold’s Stereoptlcon Enter
tainment.
John J. Km,
66 Newark Avenue, J. C.
We Cali Special Attention to the
Goods and Prices Below.
The balance of our Latest and Finest
Imported and Domestic
WRAPS
«
Reduced 50 per cent, in pricc—$4.95, $5.00,
no nn ^ ah
FINE IMPORTED JAOKETS,
Silk Lined, Plain, or Trimmed with Fine
Braid, with or without Vests, Black
and all New Shades, $3.00, $5.00, $7.00
and $9.00; cost $15.00 to import.
TAILOR-MADE JAOKETS,
Black and Colored, $3.98.
SUITS. SUITS. SUITS.
SUITS in Surah, Nuns’ Veiling, Brillian
tine, Silks, Cashmeres and Henrietta
Cloths; must be sold regardless of cost
or value.
100 Stylishly Trimmed Suits, $4.00; re
duced from $8.00.
100 Black Cashmere Suits, $0.00 and up
wards.
Ladies' White Suits, from $3.50 to $13.00.
Ladies’ Jersey Waists, the Latest Novel
ties.
Cashmere Shawls, in Cream, Blue, Car
dinal and All Colors.
IIOSIEIlV.
A large lot of Ladles’ Lisle Thread Hose,
39c.; worth 50c.
Ladies’ and Gents’ Ballybriggan Under
wear, very cheap, and all the popular
and best makes in Corsets.
Great bargains in Sun Umbrellas and
Parasols.
Embroidery, Flouncing and Laces.
Lace Curtains, at the Popular Prices and
Latest Designs.
A great variety of Housekeeping Goods.
Silks, Plushes and Velvets.
High-Class Novelties in Dress Goods.
Silk Wrap Henrietta Cloths, in Black and
500 Pieces of High-Art Novelties in Sat
teens, former, price, 30c,
Gingham and Outing Cloths.
Ladies’ Embroidered Underwear at a
sacrifice.
JOHN J. KEANE,
66 Newark Avenue, J. 0.
AN
IRRESISTIBLE
IMPULSE!
THE SIXTH
OF
OUR SERIES
OF
S
By Eminent Authors,
WILL APPEAR
Next Sunday.
It Is by the Noted Writer
of Romance,
RHODA BROUGHTON,
And it is a Thrilling Tale
of Spiritual Ad
monition.
READ IT IH THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE
Sunday
Morning
News.
Price, 3 Cent*.
Order It in Advance From Your
Newsdealer to Prevent
Disappointment.
N. B.—Back Numbers containing these Excellont
Stories can be obtained at the office of Tiif. Jersey
City News, No. 80 Montgomery Street. They will
afford excellent summer reading.
BDRR BREWING CO.
LAGER BEER.
227 West 18th Street,
3XT3B-W YORg.
OT1CK TO STEAM PUMP MAKERS.
Mealed proposals will be received by the Board of
Street and Water Commissioners on Monday, July
*8, 1889, at 10 o’clock a. m„ for furnishing, delivering
and erecting
One 11] compound condensing pumping engine,
'with all water and si earn appendages complete, of a
•capacity to pump ti ve m 111 ions [5,OU),UUOl V. S, gallons
of water in 24 hours, while pumping directly Into
Jthe service mains, against a pressure not exceeding
dlfty pounds per square Inch, according to specifica
tions on file In the office of the Chief Engineer, cor
. ner of Jersey avenue and Mercer street, where blank
form of proposals and agreement of sureties may l>e
obtained.
Proposals must be enclosed In sealed envelopes,
^endorsed, “Proposals for furnishing Steam Pump,”
directed to Benjamin Van Keuren, Esq., chairman
lof Committee on Pumping and Reservoirs, and
handed to the Clerk of the Board In open meeting
when called for in the order of business relating to
sealed proposals.
No city official will bo accepted os surety.
The Board reserves the right to reject auy or all
bids, if deemed for the best Interest of the olty so
S, GEORGE T. BOUTON, Clerk.
IY Uttod Jersey cut, Juuo 28,1889.
NOW
IS THE TIME TO HAVE DEFECTIVE TEETH
EXTRACTED WITH
PURE, FRESH GcAS WITHOUT CHARGE
PREPARATORY TO HAVING OTHER MADE.
25c. Extracting. 25c.
50c. With Gas. 50c.
A-A
ELEGANT FULL GUM RUBBER SETa
$5, $8, $10 AND UP.
<3>-❖
E. F. HANKS GIVES HI8 WHOLE TIME AND PER
SONAL ATTENTION TO HIS JERSEY CITY
OFFICE. A YOUNG LADY, WHO SPEAKS GERr
MAN, IN ATTENDANCE AT EACH OFFICE.
E. F. HANKS,
«- DEKTIST, -«
York and Grove Streets.
THE HANKS CO., DENTISTS,
C. A. DAVIS, Manager 203 Sixth Avenue, N. Y.
HANKS BROS., DENTISTS,
J. C. HANK8, Manaoeh. Broad and Market Sta.,
Newark. N. J.
A-r»AX>-a
Pure Wines
and Liquors
CALL AT
LEWIS FISCHERS,
109 Newark Ave.,
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
Monogram
Whiskey,
Full Quarts, One Dollar per Bottle.
Henry Albers,
JERSEY CITY
WINE
-ROOM
Imported Mnes, Liquors
and Segars.
, 70 MONTGOMERY ST.,
iWlllllBlllllIB JERSEY CITY.
.A~....
Jr^HOOS ft 3CHPLZ^\^
^7 Furniture & Carpet^.
HOTJSEJ,
71 Newark Are., Jersey City.
^ 167 Washington Street,
yVAre. D. A 25th
100 Baby Carriages,
$7.00 XJ3PWA3R.X>.
Try 91.50 and 92.00 Ladles* and Gents
Shoes, In' all styles, as good as sold
elsewhere for 92.00 and 93.00.
ALL GOODS WARRANTED.
ID. S\illiYra.Li,
MONTGOMERY STREET, near cor. Washington,
20 NEWARK AVENUE, and
228 NEWARK AVENXJE, cor. Coles Street.
Morrow Day & Co.,
BAKERS & CATERERS,
Ice Cream and Fruit Ices iu Variety.
Bricks to Carry Home.
RESTAURANT, 7 A.M. TILL 11 P.M.
Morrow, Bay & Co.’s Hotel, Oceau
Grove, N. J., Opens Juno 27.
JOHN DUST,
-Dealer In
Beef, V eal, Mutton,
T LAMB AND PORK, POULTRY, < *
VEGETABLES, ETC.
--^
263 Grand St., near Grove.
GLOCK’S MARKET,
The Favorite place for families to get
their Groceries, Meats and Provisions.'
So, 176 Mercer Street,
H. cz J. STELvI-IN.G-,
81 MONTGOMERY STREET.
(STELLING BUILDING.)
FINE WINES AND OLD WHISKIES,
Fine Ales, Beat Brands of Imported and
Domestic Cigars.
Mtster Beer on Draught and ia Bottles
LIFE-LIKE PHOTOGRAPHS^
BY
COSTELLO,
588 Newark Avenue,
Ori*08iTK Count House. Jersey Citt.
PLUMBERS._
M. A. SHANAHAN,
Practical Plumber,
Sanitary Work a Specialty.
515 Grove Street, Jersey City.
All orders promptly attended to.
;M. 3P. M03RA1T
Plumber and Gas titter,
653 Grove Street, J. C.
Estimates for all work cheerfulljr given and order*
PRepairs "Vor^stovea and ranges furnished. Alto
proofs, leaders, etc. made and repaired.
CASH OR CREDIT,
SPRING OPENING

Furniture, Carpets, Ac.
AT
MULLENS & OO.
Ill t Hi Itnrt hi., test, CD,.
Owning the Property we Occupy,
AND HAVING
UNLIMITED CAPITAL,
We are determined to
Lead the Market, Sell Cheaper,
And Give Better Terms of Credit
THAN ANY OTHER HOUSE IN AMERICA.
A11 parties are respectfully invited to make ns a visit of Inspection, price
our goods In the various department* of our establishment, and they may rest
assured of being politely waited on, whether they purchase or not.
OUR STOCK CONSISTS OP
Furniture, Carpets, Oil Cloths, Matting, Bedding,
Stoves, Ranges, Baby Carriages, Refriger
ators, Lamps, Crockery, China,
Glassware, Clocks, etc.
The stock has been specially prepared for the Spring Trade. Every taste
pun be gratified and every style found in profusion.
The Carpet Department
contains an elegant assortment of Axminsters, Moquettes, Wiltons, Velvets,
Body Brussels, Tapestries of the latest styles and Choicest Patterns, with
Superb Borders to match.
Also a full line of Ingrain Carpets, Smyrna and Turkish Rugs, Linoleum,
CREDIT GIVEN at CASH PRICES.
MULLINS & CO.
_ SHERIFF SALES.
SHERIFF’S SALE — NEW JERSEY SUPREME
Court, Hudson county.
George D. Meeker, treasurer, etc., vs. James Buck
master.
On oontract.
Fi Fa., Ac.
Returnable November Term, 1887.
Geo. L. Record, Attorney.
New Jersey Supreme Court,
Hudson County.
Eugene Vanderpool vs. James Buckmaster and
Charles H. Buckmaster.
Covenant, alias.
Fi Fa., Ac.
Returnable November Term, 1837.
Geo. L. Record, Attorney.
By virtue of the above stated writs to me directed
and delivered, I have levied upon, and shall sell by
public vendue, at James W. Whelan’s Real Estate
and Auction Rooms, No. 47 Montgomery street, Jer
sey City, on
THURSDAY, the twenty-second day of August next,
at two o’clock In the afternoon, all the right* title
aud estate of the above named defendants, tu and
to all the following described laud and premises,
with the appurtenances, that Is to say:—
All those certain lots, tracts or parcels of land and
premises situate, lying and beiug In the City of Jer
sey City, in the county of Hudson and State of New
Jersey, and which on the register or map of said
company styled “Plan of the New York Bay Ceme
tery ComDuny” are known and distinguished as lots
numbered twenty-five (25), twenty-six 126), twenty
seven (27), twenty-eight (28). twenty-nine (29), thirty
(3U), thirty-one (til), thirty-two (32), thirty-three (33).
thirty four (84), thirty-live (35), thirty-six (36), thirty
seven (37), thirty-eight (38), forty-three (48), forty-four
(44), forty-five (45), forty-six (46) and forty-seven (47)
in Section J, north.
Lots eighty-nine (89), ninety (90), ninety-one (91),
ninety-two (92), ninety-three (93). ninety-four (94).
ninety-five (95), ninety-six (96), ninety-seven (97) and
ninety eight (98) in Section J, south.
Lots two hundred and fifty-five (255), two hundred
and fifty six (256), two hundred aud eighty-three
(283). two hundred and eighty-four (284), two hun
dred and eighty-five (285), two huudrod and eighty
six (286), two hundred and eighty-seven (287), two
hundred and eighty-eight (288). two hundred aud
eighty nine (289), two hundred and ninety (290), two
hundred and ninety one (291), two hundred and
uiuety-two (292). two hundred und ninety-three (293),
two hundred and ninety-four 1294), aud ninety-seven
(97). in Section I, north.
Lots ninety-four (94), ninety five (95), nlnety-aix
(96). ninety-seven (97), ninety-eight (98). ninety-nine
(J9). one huudred (io0),oue hundred and one «lol),
one hundred and two (102), one huudred and three
Coue hundred and four (104), one hundred aud
'(105). one huudred and six (106), oue hundred
aud seven(U)7) undone hundred and eight (108) in
^Lot^flve^nmVlred and twenty-six (526) and five
hundred aud thirty-uiue (539), in Section k, north.
Lots three hundred and forty-four (344), three
huudred and forty-five (345), three hundred
and forty-six (346), three huudred and forty
seven (347), three hundred and forty-eight (348),
three hundred and forty-nine 1849), three hun
dred and fifty (350), three hundred and
fifty-one (351), three hundred and fifty two (352).
three hundred and fifty-three (368), three hundred
aud fifty-four (354). three huudred and fifty five
(355), three huudred and fifty-six (356), three hun
dred and fifty seven (357). three hundred and fifty
eight (358), three hundred and fifty nine (369), three
hundred und sixty (360). three hundred and sixty
oue (361)! anil three hundred and sixty-two (362), In
BeAndUlot3n<seVen hundred aud fifty-three (758),
seven hundred and fifty-four (754), seven huudred
and fifty-five (755), aud seven hundred and fifty six
(756). in Section P. north.
- ferdIsand heintze,
Late Sheriff.
SHERIFF’S SALK-HUDSON CIRCUIT COURT.
' Henry G. Reeve et ala., va. Robert McFerran.
In Case.
Returnable'September Term, A. D„ 1839,
Douglass A Kennedy, Attorneys.
Ily Virtue of the above Btated writ to me dlreetol
and delivered. I have levied upon and shall sell bv
public vendue at F. G. Wolbert 8 Real Estate and
Auction Rooms, No. « Montgomery Street, Jersey
City, on
THURSDAY, the Eleventh day of July nest, at two
o’clock In the afternoon, all the right, title and es
tate of the above-named defendant. Robert Mo
Ferran, In and to all the following described land
and premises, with the appurtenances, that la to
“fir that certain lot or land sltuato in Jersey
City, In the county of Hudson, and State of Now
Jersey, being designated as lot numbered thirty
two (82) In block numbered two bundled and dx
(206) and colored blue on a certain map on file In the
office of the Register of the county of Hudson,
showing the partition of the land at Pnvonla, to the
sahl city of Jersey City, among the heira of John
K, Coles, deceased, said lot being bounded and de
scribed as follows:—Beginning at a point on the
southerly side of Tenth street distant one hundred
feet fluty ft.) westerly from the southwesterly cor
MtiltM avenue and said Tenth street twenty
five (25) feet- thence southerly and parallel with
Jersey avenue one hundred feet (llB Tt.) thence
easterly and parallel with Tenth street twcnty-tlve
Te“th 8trMt
Dated June 1.1889.
&. SXJ3R3S CXJ3RKT
Hammel’s Hair Balsam,
THE EXTRACT OF SAGE
Is a sure cure for Dandruff and Scurf — a sura pre
ventative against the Failing and
Turning of the Hair.
Sure Cure for Baldnesst
and the Finest Hair Dressing In the market.
SOLD AT
J. HAMMEL’S,
15 Exchange Place (Taylor’s Hotel).
SHERIFF’S SALE-IN CHANCERY OF NEW
Jersey.
Between the Provident Institution for Savings In
Jersey City, complainant, and Augustus Brown et
alu defendants.
Fi fa., for dale of mortgaged premises.
Returnable October Term, 1889.
Earle Insley, Solicitor.
By virtue of the above stated writ, to me directed
and delivered, I shall sell by public vendue at F. Q.
Wolbert’s Real Estate and Auction Rooms, No. 47
Montgomery street. Jersey City, on
THURSDAY, the First Day of August, A. D. 1889,
at two o’clock in the afternoon, all the following
described land and premises, with the appurten
ances, being the same described in said writ, that is
to say —
All that certain lot of land and premises situate
In Jersey City. In the county of Hudson and State
of New Jersey, bounded as follows:—Beginning on
the northerly line of Graud street, at the distance of
one hundred and twenty-eight [128] feet west of the
westerly line of VanVorst street: thence running
northerly parallel with Van Vorat street one hun
dred [100] feet, be the same more or less, to the mid
dle of tne block; thence westerly parallel with
Grand street twenty-one [21] feet; thonce southerly
parallel with Van Vorst street one hundred [1UU] feet
to Grand street; thence easterly along Grand stt-eet
twenty^one [21] feet to the point of beginning. Be
ing lot numbered seven [7] on a map of property of
Andrew Clerk and William Irvine on block num
bered sixty [60], showing the division of the same
between them.
Dated J une 22, 1889.
ROBERT DAVIS, Sheriff
SHERIFF’S SALE—IN CHANCERY OF NEW
Jersey.
Between Richard C. Washburn et als. (Washburn
Brothers), complainants, and Catherine O'Neill, de
fendant.
Fi fa., for sale of mortgaged premises.
Returnable May Term, 1888.
William A. Lewis. Solicitor.
By virtue of the above stated writ to me directed
and delivered, I shall sell by public vendue at F. O.
Wolbert's Real Estate and Auction Rooms, No. 47
Montgomery street, Jersey City, on
THURSDAY, the First Day of August, A. D. 1889,
•at two o’clock in tho afternoon, all the following
described laud and premises, with the appurten
ances, being the same described in said writ, that is
to say—
All that certain lot, piece or parcel of land and
f>reinlses, situate, lying and being in Jersey City, in
he county of Hudson and State of New Jersey, in
the block designated and numbered one hundred
and seventy-two (172) on a certain map made by
Joseph F. Mangln for John B. Coles, and duly tiled
in the Clerk’s office of Bergen County, in the State
aforesaid, uud bounded aud described as follows:—
Beginning at a point on the north side of the Turn
pike road as it now runs from Jersey City to New
ark [now known as Newark aveuue]; thence [11
running northerly parallel with the westerly line or
said block oue hundred and seventy-two, until It
reaches a point fifty [50] feet southerly from the
northerly line of salu block land said course, if ex
tended or continued In a direct line through said
block, would strike a point on the northerly side of
said block seveuty-ftve [75] feet from the northwest
erly corner of said block, being eighty feet four
inches 180 feet 4 inches] more or less deep from tho
point of starting on Newark avenue: thence |2) west
erly twenty-five [25] feet; thence [81 southerly on a
lino mirullt‘1 with mid Olxtunt fift.v Iriill fn«r from tho
■westerly side of said » lock until it strikes said New
ark avenue or turnpike, sixty-seven feet seven
luches (B7 feet 7 inches] more or less, and thence [4]
easterly along said avenue or turnpike twenty-seven
feet eight Indies [27 feet 8 Inches!, more or less, to
the point or place of beginning. Balug a lot or piece
of land fronting on tnc northerly side of Newark
avenue, twenty-seven feet eight inches [27 feet 8
Inches], more or less, in width in front, eighty feet
and four inches [8U feet 4 inches], more or less, in
depth on the easterly side, twenty-five feet In
width in the rear, and sixty seven feet seven luches
i(t>? feet 7 inches], more or less. In depth on the
westerly side. Being the same prem
ises conveyed to Henry O’Neill by
Bernard Meissner and wife by deed dated April
24, 1875, and recorded In the Register’s office of the
County of Hudson, on pages 57, etc., in Book 284 of
Deeds for said county, of which said premises the
said Henry O’Neill,.died, seized, and which by hU
last will and testament, duly admitted to probate
and recorded, etc., were devised to the said
Catherine O’Neill, sole devisee of said Henry
O’Neill, deceased, to have und to hold to her, her
heirs and aswigus forever.
Dated June 22, 1881*.
__ROBERT DAVIS, Sheriff.
A SUPPLEMENT TO AN ORDINANCE, ENTITLED
an Ordinance regulating the use of Streets,
Sidewalks and Public Grounds In Jersey City, ap
proved March *20, 1874.
f he Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City do ordain
as follows:—
Section 1. No person shall cart or carry coal dust
or flue coal through Suydam avenue or Communi
paw avenue, from Suyrtnm avenue west to the Mor
ris Canal, in any vehicle or conveyance except a
cart or wugon so constructed as to prevent the spill
ing or dropping of Such coal dust or coal on the
street, under the penalty of Five Dollars for each
offence.
Passed July 9,1889.
John E. Scott. CHAS. W. ALLEN,
City Clerk. President.
Approved July 10. 1899.
ORESTES CLEVELAND, Mayor.
3P. 3S. M&RTIN,
Practical Sanitary Plumber
AND STEAM FITTER.
BEATERS AID RANGES A SPECIALTY.
189 Montgomery St., Jersey City
PETER T.~DONNELLY,
PRACTICAL PLUMBER AND BIS FITTER,
Sanitary Plumbing a Specialty.
2BS Washington Street, J. G.
I Sail unis ftunaiuB au. Wobk Qbabaktcu

xml | txt