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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, August 10, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 3

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M’CORMICK WAS GAME'
But Big Peter Jackson
I Knocked Him Out in a
Round and a Half. ‘
WORK OF THE ATHLETIC CLUBS.
Amateur Ball Games—News of
the Professional Leagues.
The set-to between Peter Jackson, the
Australian champion, and Ginger McCor
mick at Cronheim’g Theatre, Hoboken,
last night was witnessed by nearly three
thousand people. Jack Fallon, of Brook
lyn, was the referee, and Messrs. Smith
and Husemeyer were timekeepers. Mc
Cormick was knocked out in a very short
time. He was not in condition. Sports
say that he is not heavy enough, anyhow,
for a big fellow like Jackson. He was to
get 8100 if he could stand before Jackson
for four rouuds. He was knocked out in
a round and a half.
Time was called at eleven o’clock.
Jackson held his body back, while Mc
Cormick stood erect. Both men sparred
cautiously for some seconds. Jackson
seemed to be somewhat shy of McCor
mick. The latter led off, but failed to
reach, but a moment afterward the men
were at close quarters, and McCormick
landed a nice blow on Jackson’s right
law. This evidently rattled Jackson, and
he went for McCormick hammer and
tongs, landing each time.
The spectators cheered McCormick.
They said he was the pluckiest little fel
low they ever saw. Jackson kept ham
mering away on Ginger’s jaw, while “Lit
tle Mac” went for his opponent’s stomach,
giving him one or two solid blows there.
McCormick continued to force the fight
ing, but Jackson at last got in a heavy
left hander on his mouth and sent him to
grass. When he arose he went pell-mell
again for his opponent. Most of his blows
fell short, however, and even those that
he did get in didn’t seem to have much
effect on the Australian.
Jackson rushed him back behind the
scenes, when the referee ordered them out
to the middle of the stuge. Then McCor
mick rushed in and jabbed Jackson two
or three times. When time was called
Jackson didn’t seem to have been put out
in the least. “Little Mac” was, however,
! winded.
After a minute’s rest Mac made another
rush, but was met with two blows from
Jackson, delivered in quick succession.
McCormick, instead of trying to protect
himself, kept going for Jackson’s
stomach. Mac was ilnallv forced to a
corner and a heavy blow laid him low.
He was not able to respond in ten seconds
and Jackson was declared the winner.
Monday’s Schedule.
National League.—New York at Cleveland.
Boston at Pittsburg. Philadelphia at Chicago,
Washington at Indianapolis.
American Association. —Brooklyn at St. Louis,
Athletic at Louisville, Baltimore at Cincinnati,
Columbus at Kansas City.
Atlantic Association.—No games scheduled.
Rank of the Clubs.
To date the standing of the clubs in the
I four big baseball aggregations is as fol
lows:— _
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
CLUBS. W. L. PCT. i CLUBS. W. L. PCT.
Boston .51 30 .030 | Chicago.43 43 . 500
New York_50 80 . 635: Indianapolis ..86 51 .413
Philadelphia..46 36 .560 i Pittsburg.34 51 .41X1
Cleveland_48 39 .5411 Washington..80 52 .833
AMERICAN ASSOOLiTION.
CLCBS. *• L. PCT. I CLUBS. W. L. PCT.
St. Louis.60 81 .659 Athletic.46 87 .554
Brooklyn.58 30 . 659 | Kansas City..85 53 . 397
Baltimore... .51 87 . 580 I Columbus . ...35 57 .880
Cincinnati... .50 40 . 555 1 Louisville ... .20 70 .222
ATLANTIC ASSOCIATION.
CLUBS. W. L. PCT. | CLOBS. W. L. PCT.
Newark. 86 28 . 563 1 New Haven.. 27 39 . 409
Worcester... 88 81 -550 I Lowell. 36 41 .388
Hartford.... 38 31 .550 1 Norwalk. 0 1.000
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE.
CLUBS. W. L. PCT. CLUBS. W. L. PCT
Detroit.47 23 .671 Toledo.84 38 .468
Syracuse.46 31 .605 London.81 42 ,424
Toronio.42 30 .583 Buffalo.31 47 .807
Rochester....89 87 .513 Hamilton ....27 49 .355
Tomorrow’s Games,
National League.—No games scheduled.
American Association.—Brooklyn at St. Louis,
Athletic at Louisville, Baltimore at Cincinnati,
Columbus at Kansas City.
Atlantic Association.—No games scheduled.
International League.—No games scheduled.
Yesterday’s Championship Games.
• National Leabue.—At Indianapolis — New
York, 8; Indianapolis, 1. At Chicago-Chicago,
»■ Boston, 0. At Pittsburg—Pittsburg, 15;
Washington, 8. At Cleveland—No game; wet
grounds.
American Association.—At Kansas City—
Kansas City, 11; St. Louis, 7. At Louisville—
Cincinnati, 15; Louisville, 8.
Atlantic Association.—At New Haven—New
Haven, 8; Newark, 0. At Worcester—Worcester,
3; Lowell, 1. At Norwalk—Hartford, 2; Nor
walk, 1.
International League. — At Toronto-To
routo, 10: Hamilton, 5. At Toledo—Buffalo, 2;
Toledo, 1 <10 innings.).
Amateur Hall Clubs and Players.
Several days ago the Summit Juniors,
of New York City, were beaten by the
Weehawken Juniors at Weehawkeu. The
score was 87 to 7. The Jersey hoys batted
so hard that four pitchers were knocked
out of the box. All clubs wishing games
with the victors can address John M.
Kelly, No. 9 Prospect street, tins city.
Clubs whose players are under eighteen
years old are preferred.
The following team was taken to Cape
May last night by the New Jersey Ath
letic Club for this afternoon's game with
the champion nine of the Cape May
Athletic Club:—Pitcher, Walter J. Beebe;
catcher, Joseph Reilly; first baseman,
Archibald A. Smith; second baseman.
James F. Reilly; third baseman. George
O’Flyn or J. Small; shortstop, William
Wild; left fielder, M. Small: centre
fielder, George Smith; right fielder, Sam
uel J. Mack; extra man. E. E. Barnes;
manager, Charles E. Annett; scorer,
George 0. S. Bogert.
The teams of the Jersey City and
Greenville Young Men’s Christian Asso
ciations will cross bats this afternoon at
Greenville.
The Bay Ridge club and the Emeralds,
of this city, will play tomorrow afternoon
on the Emerald’s grounds on Jersey ave
* nue. Eckert and Cregan will be the
battery for the Emeralds, while Linehan
and Kelly will fill the points for the Bay
Ridges.
On Thursday nftemoon the Centrals, of
this city, and the Dauntless club, of
Staten Island, played the last series of
five games for a silver ball The Centrals
won oy this score:—
Centrals.1 0 0 1 0 8 0 0 1 8—7
Dauntless.8 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 1—0
The nine of the Iroquois Athletic Club,
of Bergen Point, look very striking in
their uniforms of black and white, and
the players are all young gentlemen, be
sides good and honest ball players. They
make friends wherever they play.
Undslejr A. C. vs. Morris B. B. C.
The following will be the teams for the
game on Wednesday, August 14, at Oak
land Park, between the Llndsley Athletio
Club, of this city, and the Morris Base
ball Club, of Morristown:—
Llndsley A. C.—Gallagher, r. f.: Gorm
lev. 1. f.; Marsh, c. f.; Daly, c.; Shoehan,
s 8.; McNally, 2d b. ; Brigane, 1st b.;
Smith. 3d b,; Hughes, p. Morris B. B.
C.—Meehan, p.; Righter, c.: Riley, s. s.;
Lowe. 3d b.; Ayers, 2d b.: liegeman, 1st
b.: Burling, 1. f.; Stillwell, c. E; Skelly,
r. f. _
Tomorrow’s Game at AHerton Park.
The semi-professional Acmes, of New
York city, and Manager Van Valken
burg’s Alleitons, champions of the West
Side, will meet tomorrow afternoon at
AJlerton Park, Weehawken, in the second
ot the series of games for the entire gate
receipts and the semi-professional cham
pionship of this vicinity.
Each team will put up a good game, the
Acmes battling for revenge for last Sun
day’s defeat. Manager Van Valkenburg
has arranged to locate the club perma
nently at Allerton Park, and if his ven
ture pays he will only play strong local
clubs.
.Jersey City Pigeon Fanciers.
The Jersey City Pigeon Flying Associa
tion has arranged a schedule, for the
flight of young birds, which will include
races as follows:—From Philadelphia, on
August 11; Wilmington, Del., August 18;
Havre de Grace, August 25; and Washing
ton, September 1. The last race will be
open to birds from neighboring clubs.
The Newark Association had a flight
from Princeton several days ago, and one
from Bristol yesterday. It has also
arranged for the following flights:—
August 13, Frankfort, Pa.; August 16,
Wilmington, Del., August 26, Magnolia,
Ind.; September 5, Washington. The
birds which are sent to Washington are
received, and released by General Greely,
of the Signal Service, who is very much
interested in the subject of hoining
pigeons. _
Another New Sporting Club.
A new sporting organization called the
Hudson Athletic Club has been formed
by a number of athletes living upon the
Heights. Twenty members signed the
roll and elected the following officers:—
President, A1 Shaw; vice-president, Rich
ard Irvine: treasurer, G. Van Winkle:
secretary, w. Skinner; captain, J. Van
dermast. The club has secured the dress
ing room at Caledonian Park for their
meeting room. _
Oarsmen to Race Today.
A novel race will be rowed on New York
Bay, off the Communipaw shore, at five
o’clock this afternoon, the contestants
being Miss Jennie McMahon and P. Camp
bell against Miss Annie Ryan and Sol
Campbell. Each couple will use a double
scull working boat. The course will be
one mile long, the start being off Murphy’s
pavilion.
The LorillartPs Coining Games.
The Lorillard Debating and Athletic
Association will hold games on Septem
ber 7 at Caledonian Park. The club at
first intended to hold open games, but on
account of the Amateur Union holding
theirs on the same day it was decided ad
visable to open only to members. The
all-round athletic competitions among
the members will be settled at these
fames, aud four or five other events will
e open to the employees of the factory.
The prizes for the all-around events will
be useful as well as ornamental. A. C.
Grabo, J. Salters, A. I.ewkowttcz, E. J.
Rlordan, R. J. Ackerson, W. Farrell, Joe
Hartnett, J. Moran, G. Vandermost are
already in training. The Games Commit
tee will meet next Monday night and
make the preliminary arrangements for
the games, which at present are the sole
topic among the majority of the factory
employees. _
uvoou Vi; xuxi viiViAj*
Chit-Chat About th© Doings of Hudson
County Sporting Men.
William Crowley, Jr., and G. Hummel]
are two of the best long distance runners
in the Lorillard Debating and Athletic
Association.
The Hudson County Wheelmen have
the following whistle code:—Attention,
mount, or dismount, one long blast and
one dash; single file, one long blast; by
twos, two long blasts; by fours, four short
whistles; ride faster, five short whistles;
ride slower and report for accident or
trouble, three long blasts.
The annual picnic and games of the
Hudson county organizations of the An
oient Order of Hiliernians will bo held on
Thursday afternoon and evening, August
15, in Caledonian Park, on the Heights.
The events are open to all amateurs,
and are as folllows:—100 yards dash, one
mile run, running hi^h jump and a sack
race. Entries for each event will remain
open until the competitors are called to
the past.
Saturday, September 7, lias been se
lected by the GamesCommittee of the Loril
lard Debating Athletic Association as the
the date for holding the organization’s
annual fall games.
The Toffey Guards, of the Hill, and a
large contingent of their friends went on
a fishing excursion yesterday to the Fish
ing Batiks. They left the Morris street
dock, this city, at seven o’clock in the
morning aboard the steamboat John E.
Moore. They had a jolly time, und hooked
several hundred pounds of finny beauties.
The road officers of the Hudson County
Wheelmen are:—Captain, Edwurd J. Day;
first lieutenant, James L. Robertson, Jr.:
second lieutenant, George E. McLaughlin;
color bearer, Edward T. McLaughlin, Jr.;
bugler, W. N. Allen.
Thomas Bergen, of the Lorillard De
bating and Athletic Association, is one of
the best short distanco swimmers in Hud
son county.
David Entwistle, of the Scottish-Amer
icau Athletic Club, will come out next
fall as a wrestler. He is now training for
several of the forthcoming boxing and
wrestling tournaments.
During her last cruise the cabin sloop
yacht Christine sprung a leak. Since
then the owner, Vice-Commodore Smith,
has had the craft on Communipaw beach
undergoing repairs.
The cabin sloop yachts. Tam O’Slianter,
belonging to Archibald Mclnness, and
Growler, owned by Messrs. Bijour and
Arnold, are offered for sale. Both craft
belong to the Pavonia Yacht Club’s fleet.
Janies Vandermast, of|the Hudson Ath
ILIMJ ViUU) AO (tUAiUUO LU UilllU^V U lUMtt/li
with Johnny Rumpf, the crack hulf-mile
runner, of the Scottish-American Ath
letic Club, fora half-mile race, to be run
at Caledonian Park, for a $28 medal and
the championship of Jersey City.
George C. S. Bogert sporting editor of
The Jersey City News, has gone to
Capo May with the New Jersey Athletic
Club.
The glove contest set for last Thursday
evening at a well known sporting resort
in Bergen county, between Bryan King
and George Morash, of this city, did not
occur, but was postponed for a week m
order to give an injury to one of King’s
bauds an opnortunity to heal. Both are
in good condition und the battle will be a
good one when the men come together.
The Young Sluggers beat the Carterets
23 to 12. The batteries were James
Gormley and Frank Gallagher for the
Carterets, and John Gormley and Patrick
Tobin for the Young Sluggers.
The Crickets would like to hear from
all shop nines and uniformed clubs. J.
Culver is secretary of the Crickets.
Please send challenges to him. His ad
dress is Nos. 810 and 318 Central avenue.
The Metropolitans and Monitors
crossed bats at the new Polo Grounds
yesterday, and the Mets won hands down.
The next regular meeting of the Scot
tish-American Athletic Club will be held
on August 16.
At four o’clock tomorrow afternoon a
large delegation of the Hudson County
Wheelmen will leave the Pennsylvania
Railroad depot in a special car en route
for Philadelphia, where they will be the
guests of the Pennsylvania Wheelmen foi
two days. The boys anticipate a glorious
time. T_
A Happy Uniuu.
Brown—What changes the years
have brought since I met you. And
you’re married and have got a for
tune. Did you get your fortune be
fore or after you got your wife?
Jones—Neither. I got them at the
! same time.—Omaha World.
A Plain Definition.
Mrs. Brown—What is a buncc
steerer, my dear?
i Brown—A man who always offers
I to give something for nothing and
I often succeeds in giving you nothing
| for something.—Evening Sun.
ORPHANED BY EIRE.
An Incident of Life on the
Prairie and in the Min
ing Camp.
When tho rush for the Kansas farm
ing lands was at its height, and eastern
farmers, tired of the red soil at home,
were selling out at a sacrifice in order to
join the pilgrimage to a land rumored to
be literally flowing with milk and honey
—where broad and productive acres
could be had for the asking—Andrew
Wright, an honest, practical young
Granger who had spent all his life in the
Mohawk valley, was taken with the
western fever. lie was not wealthy in
the goods of the world, but ho had a
wifo and 2-year-old boy that helped to
more than make up for the lack of
financial resources.
By shrewd bargaining he found after
he had sold everything he owned that he
had enough crisp bank bills in his hands
to go to tho west and make a start on the
new place. His objective point was Kan
sas, but when almost there he was in
duced by a land agent to go over into
Nebraska and take a quarter section
within three miles of that muddy and
erratic stream dignified by the name of
Platte river.
Once settled, and with a three room
sod house built on his claim, he started
in to work with a will, and at the expira
tion of two years he found himself well
on the road to tho complete ownership
of as fine a farm west of the red Missouri
as “lay outdoors.”
His one great trouble was the scarcity
of farm hands in the busy season; so it
was not at all surprising when one day a
tramp who applied for work was taken
in as almost one of tho family and looked
upon as a veritable godsend by tho over
worked youDg emigrant.
“Tony” Williams, as the newcomer
called himself, was a hard looking, un
couth sort of individual, who worked
with a will during tho day and at night
romped with little 4-year-old Joey until
the lad used to watch for his coming,
and find the most pleasant hour out of
the twenty-four when Tony was with
him.
It was rather a queer sort of friend
ship, but it lasted all through the win
ter, and until one spring night, when
the old restless spirit came back upon
him and tho farm hand packed up his
little bundle and quietly stole away in
the darkness.
A year upuuu m iuo uiiumg uiomilw
did not increase “Tony’s” financial con
dition nor his appearance, either, for that
matter, but it found the young farmer
just so much nearer to the complete own
ership of his quarter section, and at the
expiration of that time the tramp turned
his face to the rising sun, and by dint of
sundry “lifts” and stolen rides on freight
trains, found himself one fitful night
treading the land he *>ad plowed some
months before. It hardly seemed like
the same place to him, for instead of the
sod house there stood a one story frame
building, and less than a hundred yards
away was a big roomy barn.
“I’ll jest crawl into ther barn,” solilo
quized Tony, “so’s not to wake ther
folks. I wonder how the little chap is
and if he will be glad to see me. They’re
pretty white sort of people, and I guess
I’ll stick by ’em this time and take ther
old man’s advice an’ make a man outer
myself.”
Thus satisfying his conscience at hav
ing run away, he crept into the barn,
and half burying himself in a pile of
straw which had been left near the open
door, was soon asleep.
It was hours later when a lurid red
glow, which lighted up the sky and
heated the air for miles around, caused
Tony to shift uneasily on his rough but
comfortable bed and to finally open his
eyes and an instant later jump to his feet
with a bound.
The prairie was on fire!
Away off, on what seemed like the
lower edge of the horizon, was a sheet of
flame which had formed itself into a bar
rier through which none might pass and
live. Forked tongues of fire, leaping
from the mass, licked at the air as if to
find more food for their greedy appetite.
The tall, dry grass swayed and shivered
as if each particular stalk was endowed
with life and was making an effort to
escape a certain fate.
As the tramp looked, particles of
burned herbage floating down the wind
fell about him and he heard distinctly
the crackling of the consuming element
as it ate its way through the matted
growth.
The grandeur of the sight stupefied
him, and ho was lost in contemplation of
the awful spectacle. The uneasy lowing
of the cattle, and the fretful whinnying
of the horses aroused in him a sense of
the danger, and he instinctively turned
and looked towards tne nouse.
There was no sign of life.
It was time for action now, and he had
already lost many valuable minutes. He
ran to the house and beat with both
hands on the door.
“Mr. Wright, the prairie’s on fire—the
prairie’s on fire!”
There was no answer. Time was pre
cious now, and when Tony saw a spade
standing up against the side of the
house it seemed to him like a provi
dence, and he took advantage of it. The
door went in with a crash and as ho
jumped through the opening he met
Wright coming out of the bed room.
The room was brilliantly lighted by
the reflection, but not a word of recog
nition was spoken.
“Get the horse3," said Wright, in a low
tone, and when the tramp went through
the door Wrright turned back to the
room.
“Our only hope is the rivw.” he said
to his wife, who with a white, drawn
face, was hurriedly dressing Joey, but
her poor, trembling, nervous fingers
made little headway with the task.
When Tony came with the two horses,
Wright and his wife took one while the
tramp held Joey in place on the other.
There were three miles to ride to the
river and safety, and all but the boy
looked with anxious eyes at tbe line of
thundering flame, while the farmer
sighed os he thought of the destruction
that fringe of ragged firo would do his
place.
But there was no time for sentiment,
so away they started, leaving all but
hope behind. For two miles the horses
kept almost side by side, and then it
began to look as if the race was not
going to be an easy one for the heavy,
well fed animals. Steadily the fire had
gained until now, as they were almost
iu sight of tbe river, a sweep of tbe wind
seemed to hurl the flames at them and
their throats became so parched they
could hardly breathe. Tony’s horse,
bearing the lighter burden, sped ahead,
but the struggles of the other animal
were becoming so labored that hf
slacked. Wright beat with his fists at
the tired beast, who, faithful enough
under his double burden, tried hard tc
respond by an increase of speed, but 11
was no use, for with the effort he wen1
down on his knees, throwing the twe
heavily to the ground.
As the woman shrieked In her down
ward flight the tramp heard, and turn
ing in his uncertain seat he looked ir
time to see two motionless forms, the
struggling horse, and then, like a tliinp
of life bending to grasp its prey, th<
wave of death swept over them.
Everything seemed a blur to the tram;
after that, for when ho opened his eyei
an hour later he was lying on the oppo
site side of the creek, with Joey near by
watching with wondering eyes the glare
of the embers on the blackened waste
He remembered nothing but the goinj
down to death of the farmer and hii
wife, and realized the fact that he had c
new burden to bear In the care of the
orphan boy.
When strength came back to him h(
picked Joey up in his arms with a feel
ing of tenderness he had never knowi
before and made for the ranch of thi
nearest neighbor, some miles away
where he told the story and found will
ing hands to help in the sad ceremony
of consigning the charred remains to i
decent grave.
As for himself, Tony was for goinj
over into the Colorado diggings, leaving
the boy with the new friends, but Joey
refused to be separated from his pro
tector, so with a little purse donated by
the big hearted farmer and with a re
solve to devote himself to his charge
the tramp took the orphan up into thi
mines and prospected with the hundred
of others for nature’s wealth.
The erection of a new cabin announce!
the fact that he had come to stay, am
during the months which followed thi
boy grew strong and hearty under hi
foster father’s care and became the Ufi
of the camp. As a miner, poor, lnex
perienced Tony was an indifferent sue
cess, although he managed to keep i
sack of flour and a rasher of bacon h
the provision box, and occasionally madi
a barter with a wandering Jew for littli
delicacies for Joey.
But even this poor luck was not des
tined to last, and when one night thi
boy cried because he was hungry, am
the tramp knew there was nothing ii
the little nl.ioe to eat. he became desner
ato and walked out In the cool night ai
of the mountains to think what was h
be done.
There had been days in his life whei
he had little respect for the eighth com
mandment, and it was very natural then
at this critical period, that his uneducat
ed mind should urge him to take fron
others to supply himself and the boy
He tried to reason that it was righ
enough under the circumstances, but hi:
logic was not powerful enough, and hi
put an end to the whole matter by say
ing to himself as a sort of mental apol
ogy:
“Ef it wasn't for Joey it ’ud be diff’r
ent, but he’s got to be looked after some
how.”
After that the provision box in Tony’i
cabin was always full to overflowing
and the tramp grew so extravagant as t<
send to a far away city for a new sui
for the boy, who, delighted at the nev
prosperity, was happier than ever anc
forgot entirely the pangs of hunge:
which had racked his little frame. Om
morning, however, the boy, who wa
well on to 0 years old, woko and founc
himself alone. He lay a long while wait
ing for Tony and then dressed himsel
and went out.
It was but natural when he saw i
crowd around the Red Light saloon tha
he should make for that point, and hi
did, calling all the while with his shril
little voice for “Uncle Tony.”
One of the men picked the boy up an<
carried him back to the cabin, while tin
rest were gathered about the prostrati
figure of a man which lay partly proppei
up by a folded blanket in front of tin
saloon. The man on the ground wa
saying in a weak, thin voice:
“I alius tried to do ther squar thing
pards, although I hev made some slip
in my life. I don’t mind going hungr
myself, for that’s nothing new, but
couldn’t see the kid want, and I had ti
do somethin’."
After a brief pause he continued, al
though in a fainter voice:
“I don’t blame Jim for pullin’ on me
cuz I admit I was in his place to do him
but he done me. I know I’m going fas
now, but, pards, look after ther kid
He aint got nobody now, and I done the
best I"
The rest was indistinct, and when thi
convulsive twitch which had stopped th
sentence enaea, lony was aeaa.
He had been as faithful to his trust a
he knew how, but hits lifo had been thi
price of his sin.
It was a long time before Joey becami
reconciled to have any one else taki
Tony’s place, but the griefs of childhocx
are not lasting, and it was not until late;
years that the boy fully realized the sad
ness of his early lifo.
An Old Nurse nor Children —Don’t fall t
procure MRS. WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRC
for children teething. No mother who has evi
tried it will consent to let her child pass throng
this critical period without the aid of this invaii
able preparation. Gives rest to the mo" her an
rcj iel and health to the child. Cures wind coli
di arrhcea, and regulates the bowels. TwentJ
live cents a bottle. *»*
Notice to Contractors.
SEALED PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED A
the ofllco of tho Board of St root and Water Con
missloners on Monduy, August 19, 1PS9, at ten o’cloc
a.m., for the construction of a 24 Inch sewer In
HANCOCK AVENUE, FROM HUTTON STREET T
THE CORNER OF BOWERS STREET
AND HANCOCK AVENUE,
in accordance with plans and specifications on fl!
in the office of the Chief Engineer, corner of Jcr.se
avenue and Mercer street, where blank forms c
bid and agreement of surety must be obtained.
ESTIMATE OF QUANTITIES.
About 1,000 cubic yards of rock excavation.
About 1,100 lineal feet of 24-1 uch brick sewer.
About 5 new receiving basins.
About 25 cubic yards or concrete.
Time allowed for competition of tho work, tw
hundred [21©] working days.
The making of the above improvement and awot
for th»* contract therefor, will be subject to the r
monstrance of the owners of tho property liable l
more than one-half of the assessment therefor.
Proposals must be enclosed in sealed envelope
endorsed, “Proposals for buildlug Brick Sewer 1
Hancock avenue,” diroetod to ”£. a. Dugan, Esq
chairman of Committee on Streets and Sewers,
and handed to the clerk of the Board in open inee
Ing when called for iu the order of business rein
lug to sealed proposals.
No city official will bo accepted as surety.
The attention of bidders Is especially called 1
"Section 13, of the New Charter of 1839,® under tl
terms wheroof.no contract shall be binding upon tt
city until tho bondsmen oflerod bv the contracts
have l»een approved by the Board of Finance, tL
President of said Board having power to examit
the proposed bondsmen under oath.
By order of tho Board of Street and Water Con
missiouers.
GEORGE T. BOUTON.
Clerk.
Dated Jerset Crrr, N. J., August 3, i860.
STEAMBOATS.
POUGHKEEPSIE BRIDGE!
STOPPING AT
YONKERS, WEST POINT
AND
NEWBURC.
Every Sunday During
August
THE PALACE STEAMER
ST. JOHNS,
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF
J. C. KASTENDIEK.
MAGEBST OF THE POPULAR BARITOSE,
Mr. EDWARD CLARANCE,
In connection with
DITTMAR’S ORCHESTRA.
FARE, Round Trip. - - 50 Cents
BOAT LEAVES
Pier 8,North River, foot of Rector Street 8.80 a. m.
Morgan Street, Jersey City.8.45 “
i Fifth Street, Hoboken.9.00 “
Twenty-first Street, North River,.9.30 “
129th street, Manhattanvllle.10.00
Hotel Restaurant at Popular Price*.
This Boat Returns by Daylight.
Excursionists will have three hours at Wes
Point or one hour at Nexrburg.
FARE, ROUND TRIP, 50 CENTS.
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[ BOATS LEAVE FOOT WHITEHALL STREET. N
. Y., terminus of the Elevated, Broadway and Belt
, Line Railroads, at 7:10, 8:10, 9:10 a. m., and half
hourly (Sundays every 20 minutes) until 9.40, and at
l 1050 p. m.
Returning, leave Sea Beach Palace, Coney Island,
1 at 752, 852, 952, 10:22 a. m., and half hourly (Sunday
I every 20 minutes) until 9:52, and at 1052and 11:12 p.m
| Excursion Tickets, /0 Gents.
To the Sea in Minutes.
Wonderful Attractions
. TWO EXHIBITIONS DAILY AT 2 AND 4:30 P. M.
by a World-Renowned French Athlete,
who will Jump from a tower 150 feet in height in
front of steam boat landing.
GRAND REPUBLIC and CRYSTAL WAVE land at
the Sea Side Dock, directly in view of the per
’ formanoe.
, Jewell’s
L West 22d st. West 10th st. Pier G, N. R. Dock.
. 8.40 a.m. 8.5* A. M. 1 9.15 A.M. 9.35 a.m.
10.00 a. M. 10.15 a.m. I 10.35 a.m. H.HOa. m.
> 1.80 P.M. 1.40 P.M. I 1.55 p.m. 2.15 r. m.
Returning from Roekawav 11.30a. m.. 5, 6.30 p.m.
1 Brooklyn Annex from Jersey City 8.55 a. m., 10.83
I a. M. and 1.55 p. m.
1 Tickets for sale on all Elevated Roads.
FARE, FOR ROUND TRIP, 60 CENTS.
‘ SOUTH BEACH,
; OCEAN SIDE. STATEN ISLAND.
NEW DAY RESORT-FINEST ON THE COAST.
STEAMER ELIZA HANCOX.
FROM DEY STREET WHARF (near C’ortlandt and
Barclay streets), 10:00, 11:30; 1:80, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30.
1 RETURNING, LEAVES BEACH, 12:13, 250, 4:30, 6:30,
1 850.
) FARE, ONLY 15 CENTS ONE WAY.
Extra trip, when travel demands, at, 10:30 p. m.
I Rate for Excursion Parties. Dey street uier.
DROVIDENCE LINK FOR BOSTON,
* i PROVIDENCE, WORCESTER, and all
» points Ea.st. Most direct route for WHITE MOUN
TAIN POINTS. Limited White Mountain Express,
with parlor cars, leaving direct from steamers'
wharf for Fabyaus and intermediate points.
. steamers CONNECTICUT and MASSACHUSETTS
l leave Pier 29 N. K., foot of Warren street, at 5:30
p m. daity, except Sunday, connecting at wharf
’ with express train for Boston. Tickets aud state
r rooms secured at principal ticket offices in New
l York and Brooklyn; at all offices New York Trans
, fer Company, who will call for and check baggage
' from hotels or residences, 8end to P. O Box 8,011
for Excursion Book, which will be mulled free.
0 TON INGTON LINE FOR BOSTON,
O PROVIDENCE, NarraKausett Pier, and
Watch Hill.—Steamers RHODE ISLAND and NAIt
i RAGAN8ETT leave new Pier 38 N.R.,one block above
Canal str» et, at SOI) p. m. dally, except Sunday.
1 Tickets atm staterooms secured at principal ticket
* offices in New York and Brooklyn, and at all offices
* oiNew York Transfor Company, who will call for
and check baggage from hotels and residences.
Send to P. O. Box 3,1)11 for Excursion Book.
I YOUR CHOTCR FOR
’ 8H0H0U $1.00.
. GLEN
’ GREENWOOD <.e«Ura<!Weave8 Erle
) WEDNESDAY, 9:20 a. m.
. LAKE SUNDAY. 9:45 a. in.
Returning, leaves Shohola,
: EXCURSIONS.
v Greenwood Lake train leaves
n, \ nn x Jersey City, Erie depot,
, Wednesday WEDNESDAY, 9:30 a. m.
I *"D SUNDAY, 10:15 a. m., 2:15 p. m.
l' Sunday. Returning train leaves Wed
l * nendays, 5:40 p. m.; Sundays,
i 4:55 and 1 p. m.
1 MBBmMBBaiM iiiwr»CKWJwa!^inMyBHMMg»MB»awagaB»
D
Notice to Contractors.
? OEaLED PROPOSALS will BE RECEIVED AT
O the office of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners on Monday, August 19.1889, at teu
o’clock a. m„ for the rocoastructiou of Monticello
r avenue, from Belmont avenue to Fall mount avenue,
in accordance with pious and sped!.cations on flic
t In the office of the Cider Engineer, corner of Jersey
avenue «ud Mercer street, where bleak forms of
bid and agreement of surety must be obtained.
3 . ESTIMATE OF QUANTITIES.
About 800 cubic yards of earth exea>utlon.
0 About 1.100 cubic 3 ai da of sand or gravel filling.
About 3,$i0 square yards of stone paving.
f About So lineal feet of new euih stone.
About (500 square feet of new bridge stone.
About 5U square yards of repaving.
About l,40u lineal feet of new curb stone.
About 50U square feet of relnid ilagglng.
About 159 lineal feet or cribbing.
About i receiving basin to be reset.
About 0 manhole heads »o be ieset.
5 Time allowed for the completion of the work fifty
(50) working days.
1 The making of the above Improvement and award
». of the contract therefor wilt bo subject to the ro
0 monstrance of the owners of the property liable to
more than one half the assessment th'refer.
1 Proposals must be enclosed in scaled envelopes,
i endorsed "Proposals for repaving Moutlccllo ave
nue,” directed to "E. A. Dugan, Esq., Chairman of
•» Committee on Streets and Sewerf, und handed to
•- the Clerk of the Board in open meeting when called
for in the order of business relating io sealed pro
posals.
No city official will be accepted as surety,
o The attention of bidders Is especially called to
e "Section 18 ’ of the "Now Charter of 1SS9,” under
e the terms whereof no contract shall be binding
r upon the city until the bondsmen offered by the
e contractor have been approvo-l by the Board of
e Finance, the President of said Board having power
to examine the proposed bondsmen under oath,
t- By ordci of the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, N. J. August 2, X8S9.
CASH OR CREDIT
Special Sale
" FOR THE
NEXT 30 DAYS
Mullins <fe Go.,
121,123,125 Newark Avenue, J. C.
TO REDUCE
Our Immense Stock
OF
Carpets, Furniture, Bedding,
Lace Cnrtains, Cornices,
Oilcloths, Blankets, Clocks,
Refrigerators, Baby Carriages,
Stoves, Ranges, Ac., Ac.
TO MAKE ROOM FOR FALL GOODS,
WE HAVE
REDUCED EVERY ARTICLE Z5 PER CENT,
This is a Great Inducement for Housekeepers to
Purchase at the Present Time.
CASH OR CREDIT.
MULLINS & CO.
i2l, 123, 125 Newark Avenue, J, C,
l
SCliltOO ATE’S NOTICES.
Notices of Settlement.
■VTOTICE OF SETTLEMENT.-NOTICE IS HEREBY
given that the final account of the subscriber,
surviving executor of John McEldery, deceased,
will be audited and stated by the surrogate of the
County of Hudson, and reported for settlement on
Saturday, the 21st day of September next.
Dated July 19, A. D. 1889.
_HARRY LOUDERBOT7QH.
Notice of settlement.-notice is hereby
given that the account or the subscribers, ex
ecutors of Johann C. Sandmann, deceased, will be
audited and stated by the Surrogate of the County
of Hudson, and reported for settlement on Satur
day, the 7th day of September next.
Dated June 15, A. D., 1889.
JOHANN C. SANDMANN.
DOROTHEA C. S. E, SANDMANN.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT.-Notice is hereby
given that the final account of the subscriber,
administratrix of John McCarren, deceased, will be
audited and stated by the Surrogate of the County
of Hudson, and reported for settlement on Satur
day, the 27th day or July next.
Dated May 17, A. D. 1839.
CATHARINE McCAF.REN\_
Notice of settlement.-notice is hereby
given that the finul account of the subscriber,
administratrix of Michael Fallon, deceased, will be
audited and stated by the Surrogate of the County
of Hudson, and reported for settlement on Satur
day, tne 7th day of September next.
Dated May 31, A. D. 1889.
_NELLIE FALLON.
Notice of settlement.-notice is hereby
given that the final account of the subscriber,
administrator of Jacob Newkirk, deceased, will be
audited and stated by the Surrogate of the County
of Hudson, and reported for settlement on Satur
day, the 7th day of September next.
Dated Junes. A. D., 1(489.
_ GEORGE W. BIRDSALL.
Notice of'settlement.-notice is hereby
given that the first account of the subscriber,
trustee of the estate of William Gardner, deceased,
will be audited and stated by the Surrogate of the
county of Hudson, and reported for settlement on
Saturday, the 5th day of Ootober next.
Dated July 31, A. D. 1839.
FREDERICK H. SPENGKMAN.
Notices to Creditors.
jyOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of John W. Harper, Deceased.
Richard T. Bnttersbee. administrator of John W.
Harper, deceased, by order of the Surrogate of Hud
son county, dated June 1L 1889. hereby gives uo
tice to the creditors of said decedent to bring in
their debts, demands and claims against the es
tate of said decedent, under oath or affirmation
within nine mouths from the date of said order, or
they will bo forever barred of any action therefor
against said administrator.
RICHARD T. BATTERSBEE.
V'OTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate or Bernard conion or ton ley, deceased.—
John McKenna, administrator of Bernard Conlon
or Conley, deceased, by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson county, dated June28, 1889. hereby gives no
tice to tho creditors of said decedent to bring in
their debts, demands and claims against the estare
of said decedent, under oath or affirmation within
nine months from the date of said order, or they I
will be forever barred of any action therefor against
said administrator. JOHN MeKENNA.
^ OTICK TO CREDITORS;
Estate of Putrick Fraser. Deceased.
James Moloney. Administrator of Patrick Fraser,
deceased, by order of the Surrogate of Hudson
county, dated May 6, 1889. hereby gives notice to the
creditors of said decedent to bring in their debts,
demands and claims against the estate of said de
cedent, under oath or aitlrmatiou within nine
months trom tho date of aald order, or they will bo
forever barred of any action therefor against said
Administrator.
JAMES MOLONEY.
N OTICE TO CREDITORS.—Estate of Peter Spring
sted, deceased, Emily Springsted, adminis
tratrix of Peter Springstod. deceased, by order of the
Deputy Surrogate or Hudson county, dated May 2,
1889, hereby gives notice to the creditor^ of said de
cedent to bring in their debts, demands and claims
ugaiust tho estate of said decedent, under oath or
animation within nine months from tho date of
said order, or they will be forever barr**d of any ac
tion therefor against said administratrix.
EMILY 8PRIN GSTED._
XfOTICB TP CREDITORS. -ESTATE OF "MARY
IN A. Roney .deceased.-Nancy A. Roney, executrix
of Mary A. Roney, deceased, by order of the Sur
rogate of Hudson county, dated July 18, 1889,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said decedent
to bring in their debts, demands and claims ugaiust
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said order,
or they will bo forever barred of any action therefor
against aald tjjtt'cutrix. NANCY A BONK
XTOTICE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE OF JAMES
IN Clerkin. deceased.—Annie Clerkin, executrix
of James Clerkin, deceased, by order of the Surro
gate of Hudson county, dated June 7, 1889, hereby
gives notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said
order, or they will be forever barred of any action
therefor against said executrix.
ANNIE CLERKIN.
XTOTICE TO CREDITORS —Estate of John San
IN ders. deceased. Margaretha C. Sanders, execu
trix of John Banders, deceased, by order of the Dep
uty Surrogate of Hudson county, dated May 1, 1889
hereby gives notice J.o the creditors of said decedent
to bring iu their debts, demands ami claims against
tho estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said order,
or they will bo forever burred of any action there
for against said executrix.
MARGARETHA C. SANDERS.
■\TOTICETO CREDITORS—ESTAfE OF MARGARET
IN Prior, deceased.—Otto Grouse, administrator
of Margaret Prior, deceased, by order of the Deputy
Surrogate of Hudson county, dated May 20, 1&$,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said decedent
to bring iu their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine mouths from the date of aald ;
order, or they will be forever barred of any action j
therefore against said administrator.
OTTO CROUSE.
Claims to be presented to the Administrator, at
the office of Blair & Crouse, Counsellors at Law, j
76 Montgomery street, Jersey City, N- J- 4
NUTIUH TO UKKU1TUKB-ttHIATK U5 JAUUH l
Roberts, deceased.—Silas Hopper, admlnlstra
tor of Jacob T. Roberts, deceased, by order of tho
Surrogate of Hudson county, dated May 20, 183^
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said decedent
to bring In tneir debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said deeedeut, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said
order, or they will be forever barred of any
action therefor against said administrator.
SILAS HOPPER.
Notice to creditors.—estate op john h.
Bahrenburg, deceased.—Gesche Bahrenburg,
Claus H. Bahrenburg and John Bahrenburg, execu
tors of John H. Bahrenburg, deceased, by order of
the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson county, dated
July 23, 1889, hereby gives notice to the credi
tors of said decedent to bring In their debts, de
mands and claims against the estate or s&iddece
dent, under oath or affirmation within nine mouths
from the date of said order, or they will be forever
burred of any action therefor against said ex
ecutors.
GESCHE BAHRENBURG,
CLAUS H. BAHRENBURa
JOHN BAHRENBURG.
TVTOticE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE OF LOUIS A.
±y Llenan, deceased:—Pauline Lienau, executrix
oi’ Louis A. Lienau, deceased, by order of the Sur
rogate of Hudson county, dated May 27, 1889. hereby
gives notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said
order.or they will be forever barred of any action
therefor against said executrix.
PAULINE LIENAU.
Claims to be presented at the office of WaillA
Edwards & Bumsted, No. l Exchange place, Jer
sey City.
MASTER’S SALE.—IN CHANCERY OF NEW
Jersey.
Between Cornelius Duncan and others, complain
ants, and Cornelius Duncan, Jr., and others, de
fendants.
ou bill for partition and decree for sale, Collins ft
Corbin, solicitors.
By virtue of a decree of the Court of Chancery of
New Jersey, made and filed in the ahove cause on
the twentieth day of June, eighteen hundred and
eighty nine, by which it was among other things or
dered, Judged and decreed that ull and singular tho
premises mentioned in the bill of complaint In said
cause and therein described, together with all and
singular the hereditaments and appurtenances
thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining,
be sold at public vendue to the highest bidder, m
the presence and under tho direction of the sub
scriber. one of the Special Masters of said Court of
Chancery, I, Isaac Ronmine, Speciul Master as
aforesaid, shall expose to sal<* at public vendue, to
the highest bidder, ou Thursday, the fifteenth day
of August next [18891, at two o’clock In the after
noun, at my office [Weldon Building, fourth floor,
room 57]. No. 76 Montgomery street, Jersey City.
All that certain lot of land and premises situato
lying and being In Jersey City, in the County of
Hudson, and .State of New Jersey, whioh on a map
of the farm of Cornelius Van Vorst, made for him
by Joseph F. Bridges, of New York, June, A. D.,
1835, aud filed in the office of the Clerk [now regis
ter] of the County of Hudson, April 24,1847, is known
and distinguished as lot numbered twenty-nine [29L
iu block numbered forty three [48], bung twenty
deep throughout, and fronting on the east side of
JERSEY STREET,
now
JERSEY AVENUE,
as laid down on said map, together with all and
singular the hereditaments and appurtenances to
the said premises belonging or in anywise apper
tainiuii. ISAAC ROMAINE,
Special Master in Chancery.
JN CHANCERY OF NEW JERSEY.
To John Caynor:—
Dy virtue of an order of the Court of Chancery of
New Jersey, made on the day of the date hereof, la
a cause wherein James Coyle is complainant, and
you and another are defendants, you are required
to appear, plead, answer, or demur to the bill of
said complainant, on or before the thirtieth day of
July next, or the said bill will be taken os confessed
against you.
The said bill Is filed to foreclose a mortgage given
by John Coyle to Edmund C. B ram hall, dated
December tenth, eighteen hundred and sixty eight,
on lauds In the city of Jersey City (that part thereof
formerly called Hudson City), In the county of Hud
son and State aforesaid, and you, John Uaynor, ar#
made a defendant In said cause, because you hold a
mortgage on said lands subsequent and subjeot to
said first mortgage.
THOS. F. NOONAN, JR., Solicitor,
Jersey City, New Jersey.
Dated May 28,1389.
fN VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF THE COURT ON
I Chancery made on the day of the date hereof. I
hereby give notice that the creditors of the New
Jersey fctuum Laundry Company are required to
present to me and prove before me. under oath
or affirmation, or otherwise as I mav direot, and'to
my satisfaction, their several claims and demands
against The New Jersey Stcaiu Laundr* Company
within four mouths from the date hereof and that
In default thereof they be excluded from the beno
flt of such dividends as may hereafter be made ana
declared by the Court of Chaucery upon the pro
ceeds of the effects of said corporation.
Dated August 3,18Si.
C. B. THURSTON.
Receiver of the New Jersey Steam Laundry Com
paay. ,
WM. H. MILLER,
FlorisT,
LATE OF THE JERSEY CITY FLORAL DEFOE
335 Barrow street, near Hewarl Lima.
ARTISTIC FLORAL DESIGNS.
Handsome Funeral Work a specialty. All klndsof
seeds and plant*. The choicest of Flowers at mod
erate prices. Fresh Flowers daily.__
LAWYBm*^
THOaAS F. NOONAN, "jilC/LAWYER. OFPOBIT*
Court House. Jersey City HelAte.

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