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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, August 20, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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— THE —
fjersjoj Cilij JJrnrs.
JAMES LUBY, - - - Edito*.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
bt tm
JERSEY CITY NEWS COMPANT,
OFFICE, No. 80 Montoowrt Btrmh
rwXLDOX BUU.DIMU.)
•Tm JmsitT Cm N*wn:~ Single copte*, two
cent* ; «ubeeription, «is dollars per year ; postage
free.
Thk Sunday Morntno News : — Published every
Sunday morning ; single copies, three cents ; sub
scription, one dollar and fifty cents per year;
postage free.
Entered in the post office at Jersey City as
second olaes mai lmatter.
Ail business communications should be aa
drefeed to Thk Jepsky Cm· News Company; all
others to the Manaeing Editor.
BRANCH OFFICES:
Advertisement», Subscriptions and Newsdealers1
Orders received : —
Hobokijn—No, Newark Street: C. H. Jackson.
Union Hill—H. Fischer, No. 62 Palisade Avenue.
Bergkn Point—T. W. Dobson, opposite Railway
Depot.
Bayonne — J. Η. Β rower, No. 481 Avenue D.
IXVI Co&wirs—G. W. Pheiffer, No. 663 Newark
Avenue.
SHILLING
INVESTMENT.
STAKED ON EYE8
It Realised T-wo Marriage®,
SOTOETTE Sa 12.
BE AO XT IN
THE SUNDAY MORNING NEWS
NEXT SUNDAY·
PRICE, 3 CENTS.
ORDER IT IN ADVANCE
FROM YOUR NEWSDEALER.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 30. 1889.
Τ hit paper Is Democratic in principle»
and is independent in its view» on aU
local guettions. _______ ,
A Guerilla Campaign.
Evidently the policy of the so-called
!New County Committee is to make
trouble wherever it can. That ie the
only construction that can be placed
upon its demand for election officers
and its threat of legal proceedings in
case its absurd and unreasonable re
quest is denied. To throw embarrass
ment in the way of the Democratic
campaign—that is the plan.
The demand, which we are told is
to be made, for representation in the
State Convention is simply another
example of this policy. The commit
tee, of course, will not get represents
tion. It does not expect it. It simply
■wants, in the first place, to make
trouble in the convention. In the
second, to have an excuse for kicking
and growling through the election,
perhaps for bolting the Democratic
nominee.
To be forewarned is to tie forearmed,
end doubtless the regular Democracy
■will lay its jjlans to counteract this
plan of campaign. The exact amount
of damage it may do cannot accurately
be gauged at this time. It will largely
depend upon the character of the local
nominations made by the regular com
mittee, as well as on those made by
the recalcitrants.
Latk supper and illuminating gag
are a bad mixture to take to bed with
one. Miss Mattie Hornby, of Chicago,
knows all about it now. Hereafter
she will probably behave in more strict
accordance with the conventional
practices of coryphees and chorus
gingers. ' ________
It is said that Mr. JohnW. Griggs,of
Paterson, stands a good chance of
the Republican nomination for Gov
ernor.
Oh, no, he will never get there
Our only competitor is backing him.
How sorry all the tramps in Illinois
are that they were off duty when that
mail pouch fell upon the weary rail
way ties, which they have counted so
often with no richer ttnd than a bottle
whence the spirit had departed.
Was There Conspiracy?
The New York Herald prints today
a statement about the Mavbrjek case
which can hardly fail to raise a doubt
in the mind of any thoughtful and
unprejudiced reader—such a doubt,
perhaps, as would entitle a prisoner
at the bar to a verdict of acquittal.
Not that it proves Mrs, May brick
innocent, but that it shows how essen
tially deficient is the proof of her
guilt.
The statement Is made in the form
of fifty-three question» addressed pri,
marily to the Home Secretary. The
strongest point brought out relates to
the possibility of a conspiracy against
the prisoner. It is not necessary to
suppose that anyone intended to con
vict her, guilty or innocent, but that
someone -who thought her guilty took
pains to bring out all the evidenoe
against her and to cover up that
>vhjcb might have served her. If any
such person was at work it is im
possible to deny that the circumstan
tial evidence in this case shrinks till
it becomes very weak for conviction.
It is definitely proven that May
brick was an arsenic eater. He
bought the poison in the form of
white powders, and frequently—we
may say constantly—carried them in
his pockets. Immediately after hie
death his clothing disappeared. \Vho
took it? Is it conceivable that Mrs.
Maybrjck should do so? If not, then
somebody interested in proving her
guilt did It. True, the powders could
have been taken from the clothing;
but is it not eaay to uiitieratuad how a
person who did not see the danger of
going too far might have taken
clothes and all? It Is like a woman's
blunder—the blunder, let us say, of
that servant who set the whole
machinery against Mrs. Maybrlck in
motion.
The fact that Edwin Maybrick
found a pill box which had contained
arsenic, and on which the druggist
had written Mr. Maybrick's name,
was not discovered until the last mo
ment, and then almost by accident.
Why, if all was fair and above board,
was not tliis important fact given out
at once?
If this shows a desire to conceal
evidence in Mrs. Maybrick's favor on
the part of those most likely to have
it, is it not more than probable that a
great deal of such evidence is still
withheld?
As the date when this unfortunate
woman is to die approaches, these
considerations gain an awful interest.
Nothing can so offend the sense of
justice in the human heart as this sus
picion that she dies the victim of base
conspiracy.
Chicago is a great city when It gets
to faking. That toy balloon story
was a daisy In its way. Presently that
other big fake, the Chicago Exposi
tion, will collapse just the way the
balloons did, when old Diedrich
Knickerbocker brings his artillery to
bear upon it.
How many buildings are there in
Jersey City just as badly provided in
the matter of fire-escapes as that
death trap in New York. We wonder
if even Mr. James 185 Clarke, the
alleged building inspector, knows.
Harrisons threatened revolt
against the action of ttye County Tax
Board in imposing a twenty per cent,
addition upon the figures of the rate
able» of that city as fixed by the local
Assessors will be short lived. The
people there assume that a general
raise will not lie against all the assess
ments indiscriminately. The luckless
feature of the claim is that it is one
that has already been adjudicated.
— ♦
PERSONALS.
Editor William Wall, of the Hoboken News'
sails for Europe on the Teutonic tomorrow.
Chief Engineer Farrier is listening to what the
wild wave» are paying. The Chief likes to be
where there is an abundance of water. He is
recuperating at Asbury Park.
Mr. Silas C. Halsey, a brother of ex-Congress
mau Halsey, has accepted the appointment of
Consul at Sonneberg.
Jesse McLoughton has lost "Danger.1' The dog
weighed a poimd.
Assistant Prosecutor Noonan is convales
cent.
Ex-Assembly man James Malone, of Essex,
who died in Newark yesterday, was once the
Democratic party leader in the Seventh ward of
Newark. He was a member of the Legislature
of 1877-78.
City CollectorJP.H. O'Neill,Deputy County Clerk
John H.Fisher and Mr. Fred Bleum are delegates
the National Encampment of the G. A. R., which
convenes at Milwaukee on the 27th Inst.
EUROPE'S DOINGS.
lSoulanger's Iïl£ Loan and Balfour and
the Irish Land Bill.
By Cable to the United Press.
London, August 20, 18S9.—A very inti
mate friend of General Boulanger scouts
jhe inference drawn from the General's
lavish expenditures that he must have
been guilty of the embezzlement of public
funds of which he was convicted and
asserts that Boulanger less than six
months ago secured the ' loan of £100,000
from a Arm of French bankers in New
York city who had and who still have
faith in his ultimate success. According
to this statement Boulanger'» present in- '
debtedness to these confiding New
Yorkers is ov«r a million dollars.
It is stated that Lord Salisbury has
already prepared his long promised bill
dealing with the land questioninireland,
but it will not be introduced until next
seesion. It is also stated that the Cabinet
are far from being united on the provl- 1
sious of the measure, and that Mr. Bal
four particularly objects strongly to 1
many of its leading features. j
Notwithstanding tills, however, it is
expected that the ministers will be able ,
to reach common ground before the next
session by a few judicious modifications. 1
In the meantime Mr. Balfour will bring 1
in his bill fixing judicial rents
in Ireland, .which is intended as ι
a provisional measure, to remain In force ι
until the other can become operative. ,
This bill will, in all likelihood, be intro
duced this week, and it is expected that it
can pass without opposition, excepting
perhaps that of the Radicals, who will
probably oppose it because, it' for no other
reason, the Irish members will support it.
A London publishing house has already
received the first instalment of the manu
script of the Shah's forthcoming book on
his travels in Europe. It will be published
in the original at Teheran, but the trans
lation to be brought out will probably pre
cede the other by several months, lis the
Persian bookmakers are uot as spry as
the English.
ALARMED THE SISTERS.
A Violent Father's Demand for His Child
Refused.
ΛΛΐηιπιΐϊο v/uucioijjmi »» tw ocuu uy a tio
tioe Stilsing this morning to tlie peniten
tiary for thirty days for disorderly con
duct. He went to St, Francis' Hospital
yesterday afternoon and demanded a
child of his who was at the institution.
The Sisters refused to let him have the
child because on a previous occasion
when they permitted him to talte the
child he abused her so that she ran awav
from him and back to the hospital.
Ondersiglit then called the Bisters vile
names and acted in such a disorderly
manner that they sent for a policeman.
Policeman Dodson, who happened to be
near the hospital, responded to tne Sis
ters' summons and arrested Ondersiglit.
It is said that Ondersight's wife is now
lying at the hospital suffering from in
ternal injuries inflicted by her liusband.
Is Tills BulldiliK » I>e»th Trap?
To the Editor of The J cruel/ City Neu>n:-~
Is there not any law or ordinance in
Jersey City regulating the construction
of buildings!1 If so, is It not openly vio
lated by those parties who are now con
structing the four-story death traps
(frame), double decked tenement houses
no 3 in courue of construct ion on Grand
stretft?
No four-story dpuble tenement houses
(frame) should be allowed on u twenty- <
live foot lot. In case of lire by accident
or otherwise how could eight families
escape down the narrow stairs and hall!1
There ia culpable negligence some
where and should be stopped ere it Is too
late. Tuke warning of such a catastrophe
as that which occurred yesterelay in New
York, where nine human beings lost
their lives iu daylight.
J. C. McBl u.sûv.
HERE'S Λ SMART CAT.
Kirn μ α η κ a rxitr istki.ljoexx
MKMHAUK HE A JlEJi.
A Dodge to Beat Letter Tlilcve·—.Tour
naliaui Sadly Sligapplleil—The Hello
of I'iirjKli et- Park—A Atueical Yarn.
Over at tile Went End there lives a
colored family which is noted for pos
sessing a breed of cats which it seems
to have a monopoly of—remarkably
intelligent animale they are, if not
always sleek and handsome. Not long
ago a lady on Beacon Hill was in need
of a servant, and to whom a daughter
of this colored house hold had been
recommended, called one evening a4
the little house up an alley where the
people lived. A stout black woman
came to the door.
"Does Eliza Orangeblossom live
here?" the lady asked.
"Yes, she do, ma'am; but she ain't
In jes' dis minute," said the stout col
ored woman. "But ef you'll step in,
I'll sen'out arter her."
She led the way in and seated the
lady in the living room of the house.
There were several cats present, one
of which, a scrawny but alert-looking
Maltese with green eyes, rubbed up
umiably and inquiringly against the
visitor's dress.
"You come 'way from dere; you
Malty!" exclaimed the colored woman
to the cat. "You hvah me? Now
you go ober t1 de chu'cli and git 'Lizy
und bring her home. You go fetch
Lizy," she repeated, holding the door
j y vu.
The cat, after sidling and wavering
an the threshold a moment, as cats
llwayg do in order not to appear too
:>bedient, disappeared through the
ioor.
"Will—will the cat bring your
laughter?" the lady asked in astonish
ment.
"Laws bless ye, ma'am, you wait
tnd see!" said the colored woman.
Some minutes went by, and the
ady began to think the mission was
luite a failure, when the door opened
arid a strapping colored girl came in
with the Maltese cat at her heels. The
Sfirl had hardly got in when she broke
jut:—
"Mammy, did you send dat 'ar Malty
to fetch me?"
"Cîo'se I did."
"WaT, now, I'm tired o1 havinfdat
3at follerin' jne up wherever I go.
Seems like I can't go nowhere but you
send her after me. L)ere I wus in de
pra'r meetin' sittin' quiet in de pew
fistenin' to Matildy Johnson relatin'
lier 'speriences wid grace, an' all 't
once in walks dat cat right up de
aisle, and begins mewin' and yowliu'
at de pew door. Oh, dey wus all
lookin' and laughin', and nothin' fer
me ter do, o' co'se, but ter went right
out. 1 hope ye'U 'scuse me, ma'am,
but 1 reckon you wouldn't like ter be
fotclied home 'way f'om de pra'r
meetin' by a little screechin' Maltese
sat, neither!"
The visitor could not help inwardly
reckoning that she wouldn't. But her
admiration for the cat was so great
that she made a point afterward to get
one of her kittens. The animal, how
aver, was a great disappointment. Not
that he seemed to be lacking particu
larly in intelligence—he was intelli
gent enough, on the contrary, he got.
[limseli lodged and fed and petted
without rendering any return wliat
3ver. He sits in the window pretty
nearly the entire day, watching the
panorama on the street with evident
interest, and never appearing to dreaui
tor a moment that he has any social
iuties.—Boston Transcript.
A Dodge to Beat Letter Thieves.
A gentleman who is in business in
this city ha» a correspondent in a
rexas town who, whenever he trans
nits money in any form by mail, cov
ers the envelope with an astounding
irray of hieroglyphics, evidently in
;ended to scare off thieves.
He showed me one of those queerlv
Jecorated envelopes. Along the top
)f the reverse side was written "De
ioy Letter No. 10—lkm, P. O. J."
Vcross the flap of the envelope were
Irawn rough pen lines, and siuesways
rom the centre the words "private
narks." Below these signs was the
nscription:—"Witness—Ο. K., at 34,"
vith a formidable flourish beneath
t.
"My Texas friend always ornaments
lis envelopes in this fashion," said my
informant, "and he appears to believe
,liat postal pilferers will not dare to
ouch a letter so embellished. It is a
jueer notion to get into a business
nan's head."
Talking of marking envelopes, I had
% little experience with a British mail
ilerk in London last year which bears
m the subject.
I usually mailed my letters to the
Dispatch at the Post Office at Charing
J roes. It was always necessary to
lave them weighed, and the saine
nan, a florid individual of whose
'eatures 1 can only recall a singularly
julbous eye, performed the service
'or me, In order to insure the letter's
•eaching the bands of the proper au
thority in the Dispatch office with the
east possible delay, I was wont to
write along the top of the envelope,
'News, Important." Every time I
[landed one of these big missives to the
meaty-eyed clerk in the Charing Cross
jfflce, 1 noticed that lie looked hard
it the legend, "News, Important," and
χ smile of scorn would curl his upper
lip.
One morning I gave a letter to this
ilerk to be weighed, and business be
ing a little slack he took time to
fay"Hi suppose you think that
writin' 'News! Himportant' on that
lettor'll make hus 'urry hit through?"
"No," said I, "1 know of nothing
that would make you hurry, unless it
were dynamite."
Ever afterward when I went to
Charing Cross office I noticed that the
ρ rominent eye of the facetious clerk
watched me warily. I think he sus
pected me of being an Invincible,—
Vittsbura Dispatch.
An Abuse of Journalism.
When savage people first coine in
•ontact with the whites, none of the.
wonders that they see is regarded
with more suspicion than large sheets
:>f paper. The native Is apt to regard
[taper as a sort of cloth, and the fact
that it tears easily anil is worthless
tor most of the purposes to whjçh
sloth is put convinces him that it is
ι fraud. One or two Consro travellers
liave told of the disgust with which
the natives at first regarded paper,
file Congo tribes, by the way, are on
the lookout for sharpers, and it is
pretty hard work for anybody to sell
them a· bad quality of cutlery ôr cloth,
lavages soon find, however, that
paper is not intended to serve the
purposes of cloth. Then they cease to
took upon it as a fraud, but they do
not think it ranks high among white

I men's manufactures, and they lmvc
little use for it.
itfr. I,mnholU was travelling in the
Ulterior of (Queensland, Australia,
where he met many natives Who had
never seen a white man before. One
day a crowd of natives were in the
■white man's camp carefully inspecting
the explorer and hi* baggage when a
newspaper happened to drop out ol
his pocket. The natives unfolded
and spread it out on the ground.
They decided that it must be an
article of wearing apparel and one of
them tied it οη. He wrapped it
around his shoulders like a shawl and
sat down on the ground, arranging
his covering this wav and that and
watching· the faces o"f the crowd to
see what they thought of his elegant
garment, covered as it was with many
thousands of curious marks.
Presently, however, an accident hap
pened. While the savage was rear
ranging his shawl and trying to bring
the corners together in front of him
the garment began to tear at the nape
of the neck. A howl from the crowd
called attention to the disaster, The
blanket, or whatever it was, was evi
dently made of the poorest sort of ma
terial. The savage took his covering
off, examined the mischief he had
wrought, made the tear a little longer,
and then with his finger poked a hole
through the paper. That settled the
fact that the article was worthless.
The newspaper suddenly lost all in
terest for the natives, who turned their
attention to lees destructible objects.
The Be)Je of Paradise Park.
A most charming picture of uietro.
politan life was seen in Paradise Park
last evening, the occasion being the
weekly concert by Billy B.'iyne and
his band. The concert began at
eight o'clock, just as the moon rose
over the tall tenements and lit up a
crowd of about 5,000 persons.
Kariged around the railing of a circu
lar platform in the centre of the park
sat the musicians under three electriç
lights. Before his stand, in the centre
of the platform, stood Leader Bayne,
bending and swaying in unison with
fho hiuv/ûii mnai'n
There were more pretty girls pres
ent than one could shake a stick (it,
representing all types and national
ities. The most pleasing type of
beauty vai seen in the commingling
of Italian and Irish blood. But the
belle of the occasion was Miss Nellie
Kelly, of Madison street, who sorts
metal in a Beekman street type
foundry. Miss Kelly wore a dress of
some light material which accentu
ated the curves of her graceful figure.
Around the ivory tower of her throat
was a dainty lace collar of cobwebby
lace. There were no rings in her ears
and no circlets of gold upon her
fingers, but the coil of hair which
drooped upon her neck was wound
about with a band of yellow metal
which wax certainly gold upon the
outside. Black lace mitts covered her
hands, leaving the tinkers bare. There
may have been a little powder upon
Nellie's face, but the pallor which lay
upon her blonde features may have
been caused by the moonlight. A
bashful young man stood beside Nel
lie, and there came an added glow in
his eyes when he looked down upon
the trim young woman at his side.
Even Sergeant Mulholland, despite
his stern dignity as an officer, admired
Nellie from a distance. AVhen the
band played "Some Day" Nellie
hummed under her breath a vocal·^
compauiment to the music. She
seemed to be very happy. Indeed,
everything seemed to be propitious for
happiness. There was the giddy
moon, the delightful music, and the
good looking young man.
To tell the truth, Nellie did not
seem to take special interest in the
did she go into ecstacies when Kreut
zer'» "Night in Grenada" was played,
but the ."Burnt Cork Minstrel Extrav
aganza" affected her materially. In
time with the witching strains her lit
tle feet stole out froui under her skirts,
keeping time, time, time, in a sort of
twinkling rhyme to the melody of the
sad trombone.
Then came the closing, "Home,
Sweet Home," and Nellie wandered in
that direction on the arm of lier es
cort. There is no absolute certainty
in the matter, but it is suspected by
many that Nellie and her beau stopped
at an ice cream saloon on then· way
home. She had been known to do so
before.—livening Sun.
Sensibility Is a Nuisance.
An English writer lias recently sug
gested that we were wont to give exces
sive praise to the faculty of sensibility,
while we depreciate its opposite, or the
want of it, insensibility. It is clear
lie maintains, that almost every shade
of insensibility lia* a side of advantage
as well as of disadvantage. The world
forgets how very much tender sensi
bility often interferes with the calm
judgment necessary for right action
and the cool presence of mind which
is essential to effective execution.
What shall we say of the surgeon or
the nurse who is so sensitive that the
sight of suffering disturbs the judg
ment and makes the hand tremble
when a steady hand is most essential
to efficient work? It is obvious that,
for every purpose of alleviating pain
itself, a certain measure of insensibility
to svmnatlietic nain is in the liiirhesf,
decree advantageous, if riot necessary.
The best nurses are the calmest
nurses, and they are very seldom the
ones who suffer most at the sight of
their patient's suffering· and "one of
the great advantages which patients
feel on entering a hospital is that
their sufferings do not come back re
ileoted from the faces of those around
them; that the sympathy they exeite
is only a mild sympathy, and not one
wljicU heightens their owu pain.
Hardly a sufferer exists who is not the
better instead of thy worse for seeing
that those around him are not over
whelmed by his sufferings—that, so
far as he can go out of himself at all,
he may get a little relief by entering
into the less overshadowed lines
around him, and tasting indirectly
another's enjoyments."
RoHsini'e Sstimtite of Appearances.
The Temple liar says that Rossini,
who had always le mot pour rire.,
used to say:—"In olden time they
used to compose music for the brain
and for the ears; but it seems to me
that nowadays people are quite con
tent when the thing looks well." This,
1 feel confident, was often his guiding
opinion. For instance, when Meyer
beer gave "The Huguenots," his
lawyer and coreligionnaire, Creinieux,
gave a luncheon, where he invited
some influential friends to meet
Meyerbeer. Rossini, one of the
guests, ate nothing.
Mme. Omnieuj, with the lynx eye
of any hostess who ha· people round
her table invited for a meal, suddenly
bounced upon her abstemious guest
with that question which every lady
imagines must go straight to the
heart of her guest:—'Ί am sure, M.
Rossini, you don't like that dish; one
«mnot eaaily please such a fine con
noisseur an you ar·,'' "Pardon,
madame, that is not at all the reason,
but I never eOit between my breakfast
and my dinner. Of course, you will
ask nie, why, then, did 1 come to a
luncheon party? I will tell you. The
other day ] was invited to see a per
formance of my 'William Tell' over
ture. At the moment where the
allegro begins I saw two men in
the band putting their trumpets up,
but, 1 could not for the life of me hear
one note; so I asked the manager why
they did not play. 'Oh, that is very
simple,' he said. "'I could not get two
trumpeters, but I thought I'd get
some men to hold up the trumpet. It
always looks well to see trumpets in
an orchestra; but, of course, as they
can't play, you can't hear them·'
Now, X can't eat any more than they
could play; but as Meyerbeer, who is
so superstitious, would* have taken it
for a bad omen if I had sent an ex
cuse, I thought I would just nit be
hind my plate, because it looks well to
have old friends sit round one's table."
SUM Μ Ε RINGS,
Misses Grace and Mattie Woodcock, of
Jjifuyette, are spending the summer at
Watkin's Gleu.
Miss Mary Jordan, of Summit avenue,
is summering in Pike county, Pa. j .
Miss Jennie Butler is spending the
month of August at Meriden.
Miss Ella Clark, of Montgomery street,
Is summering at Hunter, in the Catskille.
Miss Jennie Baltis lias gone to Meriden
to remain several weeks.
Mr. George Hartwell, of Ocean avenue,
has gone to Portland, Me., to spend his
vacation.
Mr. Cusick, formerly principal of School
No. at and family are at Hunter, in the
Catskills.
Mr. and Mrs. William Scott, of Grand
street, are summering at Kichiield
Springs.
Mrs. John H. McGrath has gone to 1
Hunter, Ν. Y for the summer.
Mrs. Joseph Nevius, of New York av
enue, has gone on a trip to Niagara Falls.
Mr. I .arry O'Brien and family are in
ιαιο
Mies Mabel Evans, or Tonnele avenue,
box gone to Mount Holyoke to remain
several weeks.
Mrs. W. H. Latham, of Cottage street,
is spending the summer in a popular ;re
sort on the Shrewsbury River.
Mr. Thomas Carey, of the United States
Express Company, is at Cornwall, Ν. Y.
Mise Mary Manslield is summering at
Hurley in the Catskills with her friend,
Miss Lulu Havens.
Mr. laud Mrs. Schoonmaker of "Tenth
and Willow streets, are at Rockfort,
Hackettstown, Warren county.
Miss Anna Ramsay, of West Side ave
nue, is spending August at Lake Hopat
oong.
Miss Annie Perriqe, of Vroom street, is
visiting friends at Newark.
Mr. and Mrs. James Tompkins, of Sum
mit avenue, are spending several weeks
at East Chatham, Ν. V.
Mrs. Datero, of Cottage street, is sum
mering in the Catskills.
Mr. and Mrs. E. p. Hart, of Monticello
avenue, have gone to Ellenville, Ν. Y.
Mrs. William Hamilton, of Hoboken
avenue, has returned from a trip to Spar
kill.
Mr. and Mrs. George Lewis, of Bergen
avenue, aresummeriug at Sharon Springs,
Miss Maud Thompson, of Central ave
nue, has returned from Orange.
Mrs. Howard Forbes, of Crescent ave
nue, is summering at Spring Lake.
Mrs. Eager, of Jefferson avenue, has
returned from Sea Cliff.
Mrs. L. S. Seamau and daughter, Lot
tie, after a pleasant visit to friends in this
city have returned to their uome in Haiti
more.
Misses Irene and May Baxter, of Wayne
street, are summering at Howells, on the
Erie road.
A Very Smart Bov to He " I.eft."
"Where's j'our pa, sonny?" "He's
out." "Ma in?" "No; she's out."
"Brother in?" "No; he's out.1'
"Then you're the only one jn?'
"Naw; I ain't in; three out, side; I'm
just left on bases."—Brooklyn Eagle.
Til© Tank School of Drama.
"That actor you introduced me to,"
remarked Giles, "can drink more than
any man I ever met."
"He belongs to the new school, you
know," returned Merrltt. "He's a
tank actor."—Judge,
Much in Ht Nawe.j,
"What shall I call my play?" asked
the man who had stolen one from the
French; and his friend at 1 vised him to
call it Kli.jah, because it was trans
lated. r-Siftint) a.
Τ Ν VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF 'ΓΙΙΕ COURT OF
1 Chancery made on the day of the date hereof, I
hereby give notice that the creditors of the Now
Jersey Steam Laundry Company are required to
present to me and prove before me. under oath
or Hibernation, or otherwise as 1 mav dirent, and to
m ν satisfaction, their several claims uiid demands
against The New .Jersey Steam LaBnery Company
within four months from the date hereof and that
in default thereof they be excluded from the bene
tit of such dividends as may hereafter be made and
declared by th·' Court of Chancery upon the pro
ceeds of the effects of said corporation.
Dated August 3, 188J.
Ο. B. THURSTON,
Receiver of the New Jersey Steam Laundry Com
pany.
SHERIFF'S SALE - NEW JERSEY SUPREME
ία Court, Hudson county.
George D. Meeker, treasurer, etc.. vs. James Buek
raa*ter.
On contract.
Fi l a., &c.
Returnable November Term, 1887.
Geo. L. Record, Attorney.
New Jersey Supreme Court,
Hudson County.
Eugene Vanderpool vs. James Buckmastw and
Charles H. Buckmaster.
Covenant, alias.
Fi Fa., Ac.
Returnable November Term, 1887.
Geo. L· Record, Attorney,
By virtue of the above stated wrijs to me directed
ami delivered, I have levied upon, aud shall sell by
publie vendue, at Jame« W. whelan's Real Estate
and Auction Rooms, No. 47 Montgomery street, Jer
sey City, on
THURSDAY, the twenty-second day of August next
at two o'clock in the afternoon, &JJ the right, title
and estate of the above named defendants, iu and
to all tlm following described land nud premises,
with the appurtenances. that is to say:—
All those certain lot·*, tracts or parcels of land and
premises situate, lying and being in the City of Jer
sey City, tu the county of Hudson and State of New
Jersey, aud wftlçh on the register or map pf said
company styled ''Plan of the Hew York Kay Ceme
tery ComDHuy" are known and distinguished as Jots
numbered twenty-five (25), twenty-six (2U), twenty
seven ('il), tweutyeii;ht «0. twenty-nine (29), thirty
(3u), thirty one (31), thirty-two (■%), thirty-three (331,
thirty-fotir (81>, thirty-five (35). thirty-six (3fï), thirty ,
se von (37), thirty-eight (38), forty-three (4.1), forty-four '
(fl), forty-Ûvp M)t forty-six (46) aud fortysoven (47) I
in Section J, north, a|
Lots eighty-nine (SO), ninety (90), ninety-onfc (91).~
ninety-two (92), ninety-three (93). ninety four (94).
ninety-five (95). ninety-*!* (96). ninety-seven (97) and
ninety eight (98) In Seçtifm J, south.
Lots two hundred ana iffty-fivo (2f>5), two hundred
six (286), two hundred and eighty seven (287). two
hundred and eighty-eight C$8), two hundred and
eighty nine (281»), two hundred and ninety (290), two
hundred and ninety-one (#1). two hundred aud
ninety-two (292), two hundred and ninety-three (293),
two nuudred and ninety-four (304), and ninety-seven
(^7), in Section I, north.
Lots ninety-four (94), ninety·live (95), ninety-gur
(96), ninety seven (97), ninety-eight (98), ninety-nine
(99), one hundred (U*>), one hundred and one (101),
one hundred and two (102) one hundred and three
(lu8), one hundred and four (104), one hundred and
live (10:>>, one hundred aud six (lOtt), one hundred .
and seven (107) and one hundred and eight (198) in
Section K, south,
l,ota live hundred and twenty-six (526) and five
hundred and thirty-nine (53W), in Section K, north.
Lots three hundred and forty-four (344), three
hundred uud forty-five (345), three hundred
and forty-si* (346), three hundred and forty
seven (347), three hundred and forty eight (348),
three hundred and forty-nine (349), three huu
died and fifty (350), three hundred and
fifty-one (.351), three hundred and fifty two (85ίί).
three hundrep and fifty three (353), three hundred
and fifty-four (354), three hundred and fifty five
(&5), three hundred and fifty-six (856), three hun
dred aud fifty-seven (3jS7). three hundred and fifty- ,
eight (358), three hundred and fifty nine (35!)), three I
hundred and sixty (800), three hundred and sixty
one (301). und three hundred and sixty-two (£62), fn
Section L, north.
And lots seven hundred and fifty-three (71581 I
seven hundred aud fifty four (?W), seven hundred
and fifty-flve (755), and seven hundred and fifty-six
(136), in Section P. north.
Dated July (L 1839.
FEBDISAiifc
William Delaket, Fpniîshinz Un<iert*»cer, car
riages and camp chairs to let. p« Grov^ itreet, Jer
sey City, N. J. Telephone call. Ko. !».*«*
ADVEBOTBEMPNTS UKDKB THE H ΕΑΡ 09
MARKIAGE8 AND DEATHS
Win be inperted fn the Jersey City News and
the Sunday Morntvg News at the rate of ten
cents a line for the first insertion ; Jive centβ aline
for each KubscuueiiL insertion.
DIED.
KENNEDY.—May A. Kennedy. beloved wife of
James Kennedy,
Funeral from residence, No. 850 Grove street» ou
Tuesday. 20th inst., at nine o'clock a. m.
M. J. BOYLAN,
Funeral Director,
188 Pavonia Ave., Jersey City.
I·*·»———rnmmmmmmmm^^mmummmmm——»—■———
HEAL ESTATE.
For houbes and lots in jerbby city
BERGEN, GREENVILLE, ΒΑΥΟΝΝΕ ANB BKR·
gen Point, call oh write to
JOHN N. BRUNS,
HD. 137 Ocean ATS8M, JdWT CUT.
Ho. 77 Wrffl Ayenne. eirawflu,
SEND FOR LIST OP CITY AND COUNTRY PROP
KRTY
TO LET.
Two and one-half story and basemept frame
house; 9 rooms; împrovemets; In first class order.
Jones street, $2ïM
Two story and basement brigk; Improvements;
good order. Bergen avenue. «JO.
Two story and oas'tfr.; 9 rooms. Newark av. $28.
Suites of five rooms; improvements. Nq. 1U7 New
York avenue. First class, f 11.
Three-story brick; improvements; eight rooms
and cellar; improvements. #17. 1'alisaoe avenue.
Suites of rooms ip every direction.
p. C, JEWELL & CO.,
[Successors to G. P. Howell A Co.], opposite Court
House and Bergeu Square.
TO LET.
ELEGANT SIX-ROOM PLATS, all modern Iro
provements, at to $23—Noa. $10-14 Pavonia
avenue.
Four-room Flats at $15 to $18—Nos. 906-12 Grove
street.
Six-room Flats at $15 to $18—N09. 151 and 153
Pavonia avenue.
beautiful Stores, plate glace windows, with din
ing room. kitchen aud bedroom, at $85—Nos. 151 and
153 Pavonia avenue.
Desirable Apartments, ai $7 up.
1), J, HL'LSHIZER, Cents' Furnishing Goods.
No. 190 Pavonia aveuue.
For Sale.
A BARGAIN—A PLOT IN CORONA, N. J., 50x100
χ» chcap for cash. Address John T. Burke, Jersey
News Office.
For salb-$?,5oo, two-story extension
house, cellar, ten rooms, water, gas. suitable for
two familles. John G. Uaffney,- No. 391 Tonnele
avenue, near Marlon station.
SITUATIONS AND WORK
WANTED,
Three Lines FREE
under this heading
until September 1st.
QERMAN PIONEER VEREIN,
LABOR DEPARTMENT.
Employers needing help and employees needing
work may apply to or ail dress
LOUIS L. FINKE, Secretary.
No. 564 Jersey Ave., corner 2nd' St.
No charge.
Female.
A YOUNG GIRL, SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE,
wishes a situation to miud children, or make
herself generally useful around a house. No. 159
Wayne street. J. C.
A YOUNG WOMAN WISHES WORK OF ANY
kind; washing, ironing or office cleaning or
day's work. Call at No. 347 Thirteenth street, second
floor.
A POOR WOMAN. WITH ONE CHILD, WOULD
like a place to work; good washer, lroner. etc.:
wages no object? homo desired. Enquire No. 3U7
Fifth street.
ί ι GOD SEWER WILL BE GLAD TO HAVE RE
VJ pairing and children's clothes. Address Com
panion, Jersey City News Office.
When you call at the above addressee
mention this paper.
j is s ru ucno xs.
NEW JERSEY
STATE NORMAL and MODEL SCHOOLS
TRENTON.
Fall term will eommonce Monday, September 16.
The Normal School prepares for teaching; the
Model for business, the drawing room or college.
Total cost at the Normal, including board, wash
ing. books, etc., $156 to 61«u per year. At the
Model φίυυ per year. Buildings lighted by gas and
heated by steam. Dormitories elegantly furnished,
provided with baths, etc.
For circular containing full particulars, address
J. M. GREEN. Principal,
Trenton, N. J.
A YEAR-BOARD AND TUITION; BOYS !
IPZiUU and girls. Address Episcopal Schools,
Haddonfleld, N. J.
1 CHOMAS F. NOONAN, JR., LAWYER^OPPOSITB
Court Houe·. Jersey City Heights.
FOR THE NEXT TWO M0NTH8
Any one presenting this ad. will be entitled, by
paying $3, to οηυ dozen flnely executed and finished
Photographs of himself, and will receive a tlokofc,
which will entitle any person, except himself
again, to oue dozen Imperial photos. Frke of
charge. First class work is wirictly guaranteed. I
do this to iuduce as many new customers as possi.
ble to try my new quarters, GUSTAVE THOMMEN,
sucoessos to Qu.iXTUELL, Studio, Ho. aja Sixth ave
nue, New Yoric.
"SPECIAL·"
WE HAVE ON HANP THE LARGEST
AND FINEST STOCK Ο Y
DRY GOODS, LAUNDRY, BOmilfO.
BAKERS', MUTÇHERS*, CARPEN
TERs,· AND AIILK WAGONS IN
THE UNITED STATES.
BEST MATERIAL ANP FINEST WORK. SPECIAL
WAGONS BUILT TO ORDER. ALL WORK WAR
RANTED. CALL AND EXAMINE.
RACINE WAGON AND CARRIAGE COMPANY,
153 and 155 SPRING ST.. NEW YORK
&SJ SMS
MANTELS! MANTELS!
John C. Eox & Sons,
The leading house for the j
manufacture of all kinds
of SLATE MANTELS.
BEAUTIFUL IN COLOR.
EXCELLENT IN FINISH.
MADE IN ANY STYLE.
AN IMMENSE STOCK.
AT LOWEST PRICES.
And warranted the boat In tbe market.
our traced lino mantels are Oilt, with best Gold
Leaf, which last* forever, and not with Bronze
powder or Metal le»if, which κοοη turns Black, and
the Beauty of the [Yiantel Destroyed.
Don't be deceived. See pur mantels before pur
chasing elsewhere.
FACTORY AND SHOW ROOMS.
Address 527 ά 529 Grand St.,
2 & 4 Woodward St., Jersey City»N. J
GEORGE W. LAB AW,
ARCHITECT!
» AN» 06 WSUDOS liUIUHHO,
76 Montgomery Street.
φφφφφφφφφφφφφφφφ φφφ ♦ φφφφφ
! WANTS 1
φφφφφφ<»φφφφφφφφφφφ φ» φφ φφφ
Ihe Jersey City News
AND
i The Sunday Morning News
ϊ '*
Are at present making a special
ty of Short Advertisements,
and are therefore taking them
for the summer season, at ex
ceedingly low rates, as fol
lows
ΓΕΒ llffl,
Marriages, ■ 10 Cents
Deaths, . - 10 "
Lost and Found, . 10 "
For the second and subsequen
insertions, half rate?.
Special contracts for long
runs,
FOR
THBIB urn
Help Wanted Male, to Gents
Help Wanted Female. 10 u
Boarders Wanted,. 10 "
Furnished Booms, - 10 u
Rooms Wanted, . 10 "
Board Wanted, - 10 "
For the benefit of the unem
ployed, three lines will be in
serted
FREE
under the head of Situations
and Work Wanted, until further
notice.
THE SUNDAY MORNING
NEWS has the largest circula
tion in Hudson County.
THE JERSEY CITY NEWS
is the leading Democratic Daily
in Hudson County.
These papers offer unequalled
facilities for advertising. Simi
lar value has never before been
given at so moderate a rate in
the State of New Jersey.
XUUNJSHMD BOOMS.
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
Nicely furnished boom to let. ko, 8»
Sussex street.
-pHftEE NICELY FPRNISHBD ROOMS TO RENT
I baud y to bath, etc. Meals can be obtained in
the immediate vlnclnlty If désirable. Apply to No.
23» grand street, near Grove.
^pÔLET~NΚΑΤLY FURNISHED FRONT ROOM.
JL for one or two gentlemen. No. 558VÎ Jersey
ovenue.
fro LET-A.V ELEGANT F0KNI3HED PARLOR
JL suitable for a physician. No. figg Jersey aveane
rpo LifcT-PLEASANT"PÛRNÏSHED FRONT ROOM;
X corner house. No. 259 Fourth street. ..
SUPERIOR ACCOMMODATIONS. NO. 11 GRAND
street.
When you «nil ufc the above adtlresse
mention this paper.
HELP WANTED.
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
ΤΤΤΛΝΤΒΟ-Α BRIGHT BOY. WRITING A GOOD
V? hand autl \vith good references, Address Ε
H. S., Postoffice, Jersey City.
Female.
BEAD WORK HAND8 WANTED.
To ladies that employ girls we will give It out in
quantities. Louis Metzger & Co., No. 621 Broadway,
Ν· Y. _____
An agent in every churobTnd organiz
Htlon of Hudson county; lady or gentleman.
Address M, Pa vonia Station, Jersey City.
W ANTED-GOOD EMBROIDERERS ON PLAÎT
nel and merino; learners talfen; also improv
ers on dressmaking, Apply with samples to the
tersey Embroidery and manufacturing Co., No. 43
ineoln street, Heights.
HOUSEWORK.~WANTl£i>, A STRONG ACTIVH
girl who U a good wanker and ii uuur at Ny. 101
Sip avenue.
When yon call at the above «ddraHM
mention thia paper.
^OÀMH^S WAJ^TEJJ^
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
I7UBN18HED ROOM WITH BOARD FOR TWO
1 gentlomen; also table board. No. W7 Jersey
avenue.
F'RONT BOOMS, SlNOI,tt OR DOyHUS, WITH og
without board ; table board. No. W Grand
Street. .
Front aloovb and sou abb booms to ueti
cioelleot^<^._N«^6M Jersey »veB(le.
URU>T ALCOVB BOOM OVÏfR PARLOR; OOOD
Γ board; bot and cold water. No. 43 ocean ave
nue.
jCrkfciiLt Κνβ«ίΚ«Κβ'ή'Λί)ΐ( ϊό tEV; Tib Aft» St
Pi desired. No. 141 Mfreer street.
Two"GENTLEMÊirïÂN'HAVE ROARD IN A
private family. No. $3 Waverly street.
GROVE STREET-NICETY FURNISHED
4J*T. i. room, with board, for two gentlemen or
young couple; terms moderate.
<) Q7~XONTGOMiS? 8TRBBT - ROOM A SB
Ο 4 board for gentleman or lady; table board,
170 beSgeîî avSnde-good coUNTK?
J- I Ο board; large rooms and grounds.
When you call at the above addresses,
mention tills paper.
ftmrntmiismmmmmim- jJiiL.. ι n..
iufl η λ îjTj.
X yÎRsr-cL^ œi^a'i^uoa'sTÔBs "oif
4\ Newark ave; five years lease; doing a good
UusJness; ha» been a liquor at ore foi· forty years.
Bud health φ« reason for s^lUna;. Apply at No.
?l(j Newark *yvy.
FOR MUhA FANCY GQQDB BTOKK; WILL·
sell cheap for cash. Address No, 417 Monmouth
street, Jersey City.
!W!»H."SP.·! !!■■_ 1 !.. L._ ..Li"!. "«if. .HMfiJHl
j^HBRIi'F'S BAWfi-HUDSON CIRCUIT COURT.
Horace H. Furrier vs. William H. Katoa.
In Case.
Fl. fa. etc. '
Returnable September Term, 1880.
J. Herbert Pott*, Attorney.
By virtue of the above stated writ to me directed
and delivered, I have levied upon and shall sell by
publie vendue at F. G. Wolbert's Real Estate and
Auction Rooms, 47 Montgomery street, Jersey City,
on
THURSDAY, the Fifth day of September next
at two o'clock I» the afternoon, all th» rlvlic. Mil*
and estate of the above named defendant, William
H. Baton, In and to all the following described
land and premises, with the appurtenances, that Is
to say:—
Ail that certain traat of land and premise
situate, lying and being In the city of Jer
sey City, in the county of Hudson and
State of New Jersey, beginning on the
easterly side of Warrfu street at the distance of
one hundred feet northerly from the northeasterly
corner of Warren street and Bergen street: thenc·
fl] running easterly along the Uni of lands now or
formerly of ieorge S. Gardner, and parallel with
Serge η street twenty-five feet; thence 12] southerly
aud parallel with Warren street twenty-tlve feet;
thence m westerly and parallel with Bergen street
Kfventy nve feet to the easterly line of Warren
Street; thence [4] northerly along the eagerly line
Of Warren street t wenty feet to the point or pfaeç
of beginning. Jtoing a lot of land twenty f«et wjdp
lu front and rear, and seventy-live feet deep on
each side. Being the same premises copveyed to
the said William H. Raton by F, O. Mutthieson A
Wpicharfiueaf ttennin# comeaiur by deed dated
Si^ote^'^nLiberS s County Rvw
^DÎteTSWa. w*. ,ρ"^
ROBERT DAVIS, ShwUL

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