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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, August 27, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 3

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MANY KEBRY PASTIMES
The Scots to Open the Box
ing and Wrestling Sea
son Hereabouts.
STOCKTONS SWÂMPED ON LONG ISLAND.
Pennant Records, Games and Sched
ules-Palisades Tlirash Weehaw
keu's Pet Team--Othor Games
and Sporting Features.
The (all season of boxing and wrest
ling competitions in this vicinity is to be
inaugurated at the club rooms of the
Scottish-American Athletic Club in this
city, commencing September 25.
Ï here will be seven classes in boxing
and three in wrestling. The weights in
boxing are at 105, 110. 115, 125, 135, 145 and
158 pounds, while in wrestling it is 115,
130 and 145 pounds. A handsome gold
medal will be awarded to the winner in
each class, and as the competitions are
open any one will be allowed to enter.
"We want to make this thing as big a
success as the one we gave in 1887, when
our club turned out so many champions."
said Secretary Henry S. Tuthill, of tie
organization, several days ago. "Our
main idea is to get a chumpionship team
out of this tournament, the same as we
did two years ago, when we carried away
nearly all the championship medals in
the different classes. -
"The winners of our team in that year
were 'Chappie' Moran, Cal McCarthy, Ed.
Cahill, 'Ginger' McCorniick aud Pat
Cahill, who still holds the American
championship in the middle-weight class.
Every club should hold such a tourney,
uuuc uuu me ucaii me a wuuiu uc
entered in the several big championship
competitions."
The Pennant Races.
Boston was given a tough tussle for
victory in the Quaker city yesterday, and
although she ultimately won, New York
gained a couple of points upon her in the
National league race. Chicago moved
ten points further forward from Cleve
land, while Indianapolis lessened Pitts
burg's advantage by" ten points. In the
American Association competition, St.
Louis' lead over Brooklyn was decreased
six points. Cincinnati gained five Doints
upon the Athletics, and Kansas" City
bettered her lead over Columbus by six
points.
Newark surrendered her lead in the At
lantic Association to Worcester, through
the results of yesterday's games, and
dropped to Hartford thirteen points of
her prestige. Lowell got the same num
ber of points nearer to fourth place, being
now only five points behind New Haven.
By dropping two games to Syracuse yes
terday Detroit also lost twenty-live
points to the Salty City's Stars. Roches
ter made another gain of eleven points
over Toronto, upon whom Toledo also
gained thirteen points. London widened
the gap between herself and Buffalo by
eleven points. The record follows:—
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
CLUBS. W. L. PCT. ! CLUBS. W. Γ,. PCT.
Boston . .. .01 33 .HIS Cleveland....49 50 .494
New York. ...59 36 .621 : Pittsourp.... .44 50 .440
Philadelphia..52 45 .580 , Indianapolis..42 58 .420
Chicago 51 49 .5101 Washington. .31 02 .333
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
CLUB3. W. L. PCT. I CLUBS. W. L. PCT,
St. Louis 70 34 . 073 I Cincinnati... .56 48 538
Brooklyn 07 34 . 063 | Kansas City..43 00 417
Baltimore 58 42 . 580 j Columbus—39 66 .37i
Athletic 55 43 . 561 I Louisville ....22 S3 .209
ATLANTIC ASSOCIATION.
CLUBS. W. L. PCT. i CLUas. W. L. PCT.
■Worcester... 47 33 .587 ; New Haven.. 30 47 . 3»)
Newark 44 32 . 578 i Lowell 30 48 .384
Hartford.... 40 35 , 567 i Norwalk 2 10 .166
Wilkesbarre, Jersey City and Easton dis
banded.
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE.
CLUBS. W. L. PCT. I CLUBS. W. L. PCT.
Detroit 67 28 .670 ! Toledo 42 42 .500
Syracuse M 37 .633 ! London 40 4ÎI .410
Rochester....49 41 .544 i Buffalo 30 55 .395
Toronto 45 42 .517 I Hamilton 32 60 .317
STOCKTONS SWAMPED.
They Tackle the Long; Islands and Come
Home Disappointed.
Confident of their ability to vanquish
the strong Long Island team, of Long
Island City, and full of vim,developed by
their confidence, the crack Stocktons, of
this city, journeyed on Sunday afternoon
to Hunter's Point. AVhen they returned
home several hours later their confidence
had surrendered to disappointment, and
their vim had wilted beneath the burden
01 a CrilbUlUJÇ ucicai. mo vuouauxc vuau
prevented the Jerseyites from scoring a
victory was Parker, the twirier for ilie
home team.
He had the heavy hitters of the Stock
tons at his mercy, aud until the fourth
inning they did not, bat out a single safe
hit. Then, with Beck on first. Cheque,
drove the ball over the picket fence, but
the umpire declared the hit foul. Cap
tain Cheque kicked at the decision, but
was forced to ouce more toe the rubber
only to drop a pop-up fly into Joe Smith's
hands. Steinbruck then hit to centre aud
Beck sprinted home, Steinbruck stealing
second, where he was stranded.
The eighth inning netted the Jersey
men two additional runs. McKenna got
first on balls. Landmann made a neat hit
aud McKenna scored. Landmann was
met at third by the ball aud Cotter fauned '
out. Corbliss hit safe, stole second aud
third and tallied on a passed ball. McKee
closed the inuiug by striking out. The
home uiue played all around the visitors.
The score follows:—
STOCKTONS. j LONii ISLANDS.
Π.ΙΒ.Ρ.ΛΛ.Ε. Κ. Ιΰ.ΡΟ.Α.Κ.
Corbll«a, S8....1 1 2 5 i Wood, rf 2 n s ο ο
McKee, cf υ U υ 0 0 J. Smith, lb.. .2 υ Γ 1 0
Keck, 2b 1 0 2 4 U; Parker, ρ 2 2 U ·1 1
Checque, c 0 0 9 1 0; Calender,cf..U 1 1 a υ
Steinbruck, p.O 1 1 4 O T. Smith. 2b.. .1 2 2 10
Dooley, lb... .0 i> !> <> 3!Thome, If 1 2 0 ο 1
McKenna,sb..i ι ο 3 l Menehuer, 3. ..l 3 10 ο ο ι
Landman, rf..« 110 0 McKay, ?b 0 0 0 3 1 1
Cotter, If 0 U 1 1 l Hussell, 3b... .0 15 0 2
Totale 8 4 27 15 7! Totals 9 11 27 10 5
Stocktons 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 I)—3
Long Islands .0 3 0 1 2 0 2 0 1-9
Earned runs —Stocktons, 0; Long Islands, 4,
Two-bast· hits—Wood and Parker.
Three-base hit—Menchner.
Stolen bases—Corbliss, McKee, Beck, Cheque, Me
Kenua, 2; Landmann, J. Smith. Parker, 2; 'Γ. Smith, ι
Menchner, McKay, Λ. and Russell.
First base on balls—Off Steinbruck. 1; off Par
ker, 6.
Struck out—By Steinbruck, 8; by Parker, 10.
Double pjays—Corbliss to Beck, Corbliss to Mc
Kenna, Mencnner to Smith,
Passed balls—Cheque, 2; Menchner, 1.
Tomorrow's Game*.
National League.—Washington at New York
Boston at Philadelphia, Chicago at Cleveland,
Indianapolis at Pittsburg.
American Association.—Brooklyn at Balti
more, Athletic at Columbus, Louisville at Cincin
nati. Kansas City at St Louis.
Atlantic Ass0ciATi0N.~Ij0.vell at Newark,
Worcester at Hartford, Norwalk at New Haven.
Yesterday's Championship Games.
National League.—At New York—New York,
11: Washington. 1. At Philadelphia—Boston, 5;
I'liiliuieipniH, ι; lhc»c
Indianapolis, <; Pittsburg, ji. At Cleveland—
Chicago, 8; Cleveland, Γ.
Amekican Association.—At St. Louis—Kansas
City, à; St. Louis, S. At Cincinnati—Cincinnati,
19; Louiurille, 8.
Atlantic Association·.—At Hart/ord—Hart
ford, H: Newark, 4. At Now Haven—Lowell, 10;
New Haven, 8. At South Norwalk—Worcester, il;
Norwalk, 1,
International Leaoce. — At Buffalo—Roches
ter. 0; Buffalo, 7. At Toronto—Toledo, ti;
Toronto, 5. At London— London. 19; Hamilton,
7. At Syracuse (flint game)—Syracuse, il; De
troit, 1; (second game) - Syracuse, 8; Detroit, 8;
seven innings.
After Jersey City Hall Tossers.
The following letter was published in
this morning's Issue of the New York
Sun—
I am in New York lookiug for a few
good players and liuve not been able to
find what I want outside of the Stockton
Baseball Club. If their manager has
any idea of Jetting those players go I will
pay him a fair prii:e. The players I need
ere Corblss. short stop; their battery,
Steinbruck and Moylan, and Cotter, left
nelder. Those are good, reliable men,
and if Manager Sthorer would like to sell
lie can do so by dropping me a line.
Address William if. Mjîade,
1J. O. box 74, Camden, N. J
Manager of the Camden Baseball Club
£oinc Amateur Baseball Games,
At Weehawken tlie Wellingtons, of
New York city, were defeated Sunday
afternoon by the Weehawken Juniors
the score being 23 to 11. As the Welling
tons were strengthened by ttv* players
from the Barnetts, formerly the Wa
verlys, of New York city, the Juniors are
quite elated over their victory.
By a score of Ρ to 7 the Orients worsted
the Arlington* ou Suturday afternoon ou
the Heights. Muck and Vcrriden were
the battery for the victors, while Boyce
and Donnelly filled the points for the
other team.
The Cottagers, of Marion, won a victory
from the Actives, of Bergen, yesterday
afternoon by the following score:—
Cottagers 4 8 0 0 2 0 1 0 8—Ιίί
Actives 2 0002001 0—6
Yesterday afternoon the Wyaudottes,
of West Brighton, Staten Island, were
beaten at Bergen Point by the Edge waters
by this score:—
Wyandottes 1 Η 2 0 1 0002—9
Edliewaters 8 0 0 0 5 0 2 3 *—13
The Wiltons, of this city, took theTwtg
gers, of the Horseshoe, into camp yester
day afternoon at Cominunipaw by the
annexed score:—
Wiltons 0 S 1 1 1 0 6 4 0—IS
Twiguers 4 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3—0
ûmior i»ay sports in ιιοοοκθη.
The following Is a list of the games that
will take place on the grounds of the
Church of Our Lady of Grace, in Hobo
ken, on Labor Day:—100-yard run, hand
icap; sack race, 100 yards; running high
jump, throwing the stone, and hop, step
and jump.
There will also be reel and jig dancing.
The winner in each event will be awarded
an appropriate prize. Kntries must be
made with I). P. Foley, No. 91 Adams
street, Hoboken. The Committee of Ar
rangements are P. H. Kafferty, D. P.
Foley, M. J. Clines, William Bahey, John
Cassidy, Kiernai Beelian, John Leahey,
James Belaney, Martin Mansfield, James
Culkin, S. B. Butler, P. Kutledge, M.
Cassidy, λν, Barcy, J. Geoghan, J. J.
Marnell and Thomas Murphy.
Palisades Worst the Weehawkens.
The Palisades, the crack nine of WesjJ
Hoboken, and the Weehawkens, the
champions of Weehawken, crossed bats
at Schuetzen Park yesterday afternoon.
Both nines played a loose game until the
end of the fifth inning. After that they
put up a perfect game.
The nines had intended to play seven
innings, but sharp fielding work on both
sides prolonged the game until the ninth
inuing, when the Weehawkens got rat
tled and the Palisades scored the winning
run.
The features of the game were the
pitching of Barkens and Naefie. the
catching of Monahan and the excellent
field work of Braesdorf. Mike Shannon,
of Weehawken, was the umpire, and he
did his best to give his townsmen the vic
tory.
The score by innings was;—
Weehnwkeus 8 1 1 80000 1—8
Palisades 1 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 Ϊ— 9
Mayor Kelly, of Weehawken, and Free
holder Xoonan witnessed the game. It is
whispered that the defeat of the over
confident Weehawkens cost the genial
Mayor a new hat.
There is much rivalry between the two
clubs and they will play a return game in
the near future.
MRS. KELLAIt'S ACCOUNTS.
She In Suspended lVoin flic Treasurer,
ship of a Union Hill Ln<lg«.
The members of Union Hill Lodge, No.
l23, of the Knights and Ladies of Honor,
were much excited over the shortage re
cently found in the accounts of their
treasurer, Mrs. Ida Kellar.
Airs, -tvt'iiar ans Dec 11 a memoer or tlie
lodge for the past four years, and this is
her second term as treasurer. The lodge
has nearly one hundred and fifty mem
bers on the roll, and the financial business
is correspondingly large.
Mrs. Kellar was highly esteemed by her
fellow members, and her election to the
office of treastu'er was almost unanimous.
When her books were sent on to the
Supreme Lodge to be examined a short
age of $18 was discovered and the subor
dinate lodge was immediately notified.
The latter had but one course open, and
that was to suspend Mrs. Kellar from
membership pending an examination.
Mr. J. Baader, the secretary of the
lodge, expressed regret at what had hap
pened, and said:—
"Of course we had to suspend Mrs. Kel
lar, but I cannot believe her guilty of in
tentional embezzlement. Even should the
investigation prove such a thing, we
would simply expel her, and avoid all
legal measures."
Mrs. Kellar feels deeply hurt at the
accusation and claims that the discrep
ancy was caused by clerical errors. Her
husband is a respected gentleman of the
town and feels keenly the annoyance of
the unfortunate affair.
Ί lie lodge will urolmbly hold a special
meeting this weeTi in Beck's Hall, at
which the matter will be thoroughly
sifted.
The N. J. A. C. Team at Huilxon.
The team of the New Jersey Athletic
Club left Bergen Point yesterday morn
ing for Hudson, Ν. Y„ where it will play
two games with the Hudsons, of that
city.
Young George Sliter, the left-handed
pupil of clever Walter Beebe, is twilling
for the Hudsons. The New Jerseys took
the following players:—Walter Beebe,
pitcher; Joe Keilly and Billy Wild,
catchers anil short stops; West
Roberts, first baseman; Jim Rellly, sec
ond baseman; A1 Williams and O'Brien,
third basemen: Small, left fielder; George
Smith centre fielder, and Bam Muck,
right fielder. _
More Ktiquette Than Dinner,
The Boston Transcript says:—"The
evils of etiquette were lately illus
trated at the Paris Exhibition, where
that portion of the Commission which
undertook to look after newspaper
men gave a banquet to visiting cor
respondents from abroad. There
were about thirty guests and many
nations were represented. For music
the band of the Tsiganes had been en
gaged. The guests were seated, and
gave every sign of hungry expectancy.
Suddenly the band began to play the
national ail· of Belgium. At oncë the
representatives of that nation rose
and remained standing until the tune
was ended. (Jut of politeness all the
other guests followed suit. A few
minutes later the strains of 'God Save
the Queen' resounded. These- brought
tin» Knirlishmen to their feet, and of
course everybody else rose. As though
possessed of devils, or else «ο that no
one would be touched by jealous feel
ings, the indefatixahle band went
through its repertory of national airs,
and, as each tune came up, up went
the people of the corresponding na
tionality, in special recognition of the
courtesy, and up went everybody else
in general recognition of the special
recognition. At eleven o'clock the
concert, which had begun at seven
o'clock, ended with the 'Marseillaise.'
Then, anil not until then, the starved
guests, who were ready to'faint, were
able to attack the side dishes left on
the table. Everything else had been
duly served in its turn and taken
away by the well disciplined waiters.''
Brewster—That younsr fellow seems
to know more than you do.
Barclay—No wonder; I'm his father.
Monarch of Fine Mountain.
The Story οΓan Old Grizzly's Ad
venture with a Bull and
Two Hunters.
For several yearn an enormous grizzly
has roamed through the rugged moun
tains in the northeastern part of Ven
tura countt·. Cal., raiding the cattle
ranges and sheep camps, and occasion
ally falling afoul of some hunter or
miner. His range extends from Mount
Pinos, the highest peak of tho coast
range, to the Sespe canyon, and from
the Matillja to the Lieber mountain,
comprising a tract forty miles long by
twentv-five miles wido of the roughest
and wildest country in California. Every
old settler knows this bear and lias a
name for him, and he goes by as many
aliases as a burglar in active practice,
but he is best known as the Monarch of
Pine Mountain.
Jeff Howard, a cattleman who lived in
a valley back of the Topa-topa range, had
the luck to meet tho Monarch several
times. Jeff was a good shot, and a man
of nerve, but he never could knock out
the old grizzly. When the Monarch
didn't win the fight was a draw. Jeff
had an old buckskin horse that would
follow a bear track ae readily as a burro
will follow a trail, and could be ridden
up to within a few yards of the game.
Jeff and the old buckskin met the Mon
arch on a trail near the hot springs, and
started a bear fight right away. The
Monarch, somewhat surprised at the
novel idea of a man disputing his right
of way, stood upright and looked at Jeff,
who raised his Winchester, and began
working the lever with great industry.
Jeff never was known to lie about a bear
fight, and when he told how he pumped
sixteen forty-four caliber bullets smack
into the Monarch s shaggy breast, and
ηοφΓ "fazed" him, nobody doubted Jeff's
etory.
He said the Monarch stood up and
took the bombardment as nonchalantly
as he would a fusillade from a pea
shooter, appearing to be only amazed at
the cheek of the man and the buckskin
horse. When Jeff's rifle was empty he
turned and spurred his horse back down
the trail, followed by the bear, who kept
up the chase about a mile and then dis
appeared in the brush. Jeff's theory
was that the heavy mass of hair on the
bear's breast effectually protected him
from the bullets, which do not have
great penetrating power when fired from
a forty-four Winchester with a charge
of only forty grains of powder.
About a week after that adventure the
Monarch called at Howard's ranch to get
some beef. It was about midnight when
he climbed into the corral. The only
beef in the corral that night was on the
bones of a tough and ugly bull, and as
soon as the Monarch dropped to the
ground from the fence he got into
trouble. The bull was spoiling for a
fight and he charged upon the bear
without waiting for the call of time,
taking him amidships and bowling him
over in the mud before the Monarch
knew what was coming. Jeff was
aroused by the disturbance, and went
out to see what was up. He saw two
huge bulks charging around in the cor
ral, banging up against the sides, and
making the dirt fly in all directions, and
he heard the bellowing of the old bull
and the hoarse growls of the bear. They
were having a deuce of a time all by
themselves, and Jeff decided to let them
fight it out in their own way without
any interference. Returning to the
cabin, he said to his son Jess and an In
dian who worked for him:
"It's that old grizzly having a racket
with the bull, but I reckon the bull is old
enough to take care of himself. We'll
bar the door, and let 'em go it."
So they barred the door and Listened to
the sounds of the battle. In less than a
quarter of an hour the Monarch got a
beautiful licking and concluded that he
didn't want any beef for supper. The
bull was tough, any way, and he would
rather make a light meal off the grub in
the cabin. Jeff heard a great scratching
and scrambling as the Monarch began
climbing out of the corral. Then there
was a roar and a rush, a heavy thud as
the bull's forehead struck the Monarch's
rear elevation, a growl of pain and sur
prise, and the fall of half a ton or more
οι veal' iueui vu L-Jiu giuuuu uutsiuu ui
the corral.
"I reckon the old bull has made that
cuss lose his appetite," chuckled Jeff.
"He won't come fooling around this
ranch any more. I'll bet he's the sorest
bear that ever woro hair."
The three men in the cabin were laugh
ing and enjoying the triumph of the bull
wh;n "whang!" came something against
the door, and thoy all jumped for their
guns. It was tho discomfited but not
discouraged Monarch breaking into the
cabin in search of his supper. With two
or three blows of his ponderous paw tho
grizzly smashed the door to splinters,
but as he poked his head in ho met a vol
ley from two rifles and a shotgun. He
looked at Jeff Reproachfully for the in
hospitable reception, turned about and
went away more in sorrow than in
anger.
Jeff Howard's next meeting with the
Monarch was on the Sespe. He and his
son Jess were hunting deer along the
side of the canyon, when they saw a big
bear in the brush about a hundred yards
up tho hill. Both fired at the same mo
ment, aud one ball at^ lqast hit the bear.
Uttering a roar of pain, the grizzly snap
ped viciously at his shoulder where the
bullet struck, and as he turned his head
he saw the two hunters, who then recog
nized the Monarch by his huge bulk and
grizzled front. The Monarch came with
a rush like an avalanche down the moun
tain side, breaking through the munza
nita brush and smashing down young
trees as easily as a man tramples down
glass. His lowered head offered no fair
mark for a bullet, and ho came on with
such speed that only a chance shot could
have hit hiru anywhere. Jeff and his
"«»> Τλγ.». Λ ',1 wrtf oMtt ovnorlmanfa nf
that kind, but dropped their rifles and
shinned up α tree as fast as they could.
Thoy were none too rapid, as Jeff left a
piece of one bootleg in the Monarch's
possession. The Monarch is not a bear
to fool away much time on a man up a
tree, and as soon as he discovered that
the hunters were out of reach ho went
away, und disappeared in the brush.
The two men came down, picked up
their guns, and decided to liave another
shot at the Monarch if they could find
him. They knew better than to go into
the brush after a bear, but they hunted
cautiously about the edges for some time.
They were sure that tho Monarch was
still in chore, but tliey could not ascer- : ι
tain at what point. Jeff went around to
w indward of the brush patch and set lire
to it, and then rejoined Jess on the lee
ward side to watch for tho reappearance :
of the Monarch. The wind was blowing >
fresh up the canyon, and the fire ran j
rapidly through the dry brush, making
a thick sinoko and a great noise. When
the Monarch came out he came rapidly
and from an unexpected quarter, ntid
tho two hunters had just time enough to I
break for their troo again and get out of
reach.
This time the Monarch did not leave ;
them. He sat down at the foot of tho ;
tree and watched with malicious pa- :
tience. The wind increased and the Are :
spread on all side3, and in a few moments
it became uncomfortably warm up the
tree. The bear kept on the side of the
tree opposite the advancing fire, and
waited for the two men to come down.
Jeff and Jess got a little protection from
the heat by hugging the leeward side of
the trunk, but it became evident that the
tree would soon bo in a blaze, and unless
they jumped and ran within the next
minute or two they would be surrounded
by fire. They hoped that the grizzly
would wealjen first, but he showed no
signs of an intention to leave. When
the flames began crawling up the wind
ward side of the tree and the heat be- l
came unbearable Jeff said:
"Jess, which would you rather take 1
chances on, grizzly or fire?"
"Dad, I think I'll chance the bear." I
replied Jess, covering his face with his
arm.
"All right. When I say go, jump and
run as though you were scooting through
hi>ll with a keg of powder under your j
arm."
Jeff and Jess crawled out on the limbe
and swung by their hands for a moment,
anil at fhe word they dropped to the
ground within ten feet of the bear, and
lit out like scared wolves. They broke
right through the burning brush, getting
their hair singed as they went. The
bear started after them, but was afraid
to go through the fire, and while he was
finding a way out of the circle of burn
ing brush and timber Jeff and Jess struck
out down the mountain side, making
about fifteen feet at a jump, and never
stopped running until they got to the
creek and out of the bear's sierht.
À SIN
ATONED
Will be the thirteenth of
THE SUNDAY MORN
ING NEWS series of
NOVELETTES,
and it will appear
Next Sunday
It is the touching story
of a young business
man's terrible tempta
tion, and it is by
J. T. McKAY.
READ IT IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE
Sunday
Morning
News.
Price, S Cents.
Order It In Advance From Your j
Newsdealer to Prevent
Disappointment.
Ν. B.—Back Numbers containing these Excellent
Stories can be obtained at the office of Thk Jkiisey
City News, No. SU Montgomery Street. They will
afford excellent Rummer reading.
H.& J. STELLING,
81 MONTGOMERY STEKKT.
(8TELLING BUILDING.)
FINE WINES AND OLD WHISKIES,
Fine Alee» Beet Brands of Imported and
A/UIUDIUU vi^nre.
Rochester Beer 011 Dranslt anâ m Bottles
Corporation Notice.
■\TOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT ON THE
1Λ aotli day of July, 1889, the Commissioners of
Assessment filed In the office of the Clerk of the
board of Street and Water Commissioners their
ilnal assessment map and report for the
CONSTRUCTION OF A SEW EH IN LINCOLN
STREET.
from Summit avenue to a point 10 feet eaet of Mil
ton avenue, and the same Is now open to inspection
in the office of the Clerk of said Board; and notice
is also given that the following streets and avenues,
or particular sections thereof, are Included in said
assessment:—
LINCOLN STREET,
from Summit avenue to Milton avenue.
And that Monday, the Irtb day of September, 1889,
at ten o'clock, a. m., and the meeting room of the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners ore
hereby llxed as the time and place wheu and where
the Board of Street and Water Commissioners will
meet to hear, consider aud adjudicate upou all ob
jections to said assessment and report.
All objections thereto must be presented In writ
ing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jkrsey City August 2. 188*.».
Corporation Notice.
Notice is hereby given that on τπε
eighteenth day of July, 1889, the Commissioners
of Assessment tiled iu the office of the Clerk of the
final assessment map and report for the
IMPROVEMENT OK MORRIS STREET.
fromGreene street toWashington street,by repaying
With Belgian block pavement, an<l the same is now
Open to publie inspection iu the office of the Cleric of
said Hoard,
And notice is also given that the following streets
or avenues or particular sections thereof are in
cluded in said assessment:—
MuRRLS STREET.
from Greene street to Washington street;
And that the ninth day of September, 1889, at
10 o'clock a. m., and the meeting room of the Board
Of Street and Water Commissioners «re hereby
fixed as the time and place when and where the
Eoard of Street and Water Commissioner* will meet
to hear, consider and adjudieate upon ail objections
to said assessment und report.
All objections thereto must bo presented In writ
ing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners.
UEO. T. BOUTON. Clerk.
Jersey City, July 2*. 168a.
~OOD LUCK TO ALL
WHO USE THEM.
MEDICAL SOCIETIES
Endorse Them,
PHYSICIANS
Prescribe Them,
EVERYBODY
Praises Them, and
DRUGGISTS
Sell Them.
r. A. AEOHES, Prop., Saratoga 8pri«g«, 8. T.
R. H. WEAVER,
KAinjy ACTU RER Off
AWNINGS,
ξ FLAGS =2
of all natlonalMaa.
Horse, Truck and Wagon Covers.
TENTS FOR HIRE.
26 and 28 Gregory Street, J. C.
* hoos & scHtnz *
'Furniture & Carpet'
e:otjsk,
^ 71 Newark Are., Jersey City. i
167 Washington Street,
HOBOKKN.
Aye. D. A 2oth St*
^ ΒΑΥΟΝΚΒ.
100 Baby Carriages,
$2.00 TT3PWA3Rr>.
JOHN DUST,
—Dealer in—
Beef, Veal, Mutton,
Τ IAMB AND FORK. POULTRY. Τ
VEGETABLES, ETC.
φ
263 Grand St.. near Grove.
jr. e.
RESTAURANT AND DINING-ROOM.
TABLE BOARD, $8.50 PER WEEK.
356 Grove Street, Jersey City.
Tables Reserved for Ladles
Notice to _Contractors.
DEALED PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED AT
Ο the office of the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners ou Monday, September 9, IBtfU, at ten
/clock a. ra„ for the improvement of
. COOlt STKEET,
Between Newark avenue and Hoboken avenue, In
xccord au ce with plans and specifications ou file
In the office of the Chief Engineer, corner of Jersey
Etvenue aud Mover street, where blank form of bid
lud agreement of sureties must be obtained.
ESTIMATE OF QUANTITIES.
About 600 cubic yards of eartn excavation.
About 75 cubic yards of earth filling.
Au>ut am cubic yards of sand or gravel filling.
About 1,100 square yards of stone paving.
About 95i' lineal fe«t of new curb stouc.
About 3.S00 square feet of new Hugging.,
About 2u liueal feet of reset curbstone.
Time allowed for tne completion of the work fifty
[SU) working days.
The making of the above improvement and
award of the contract therefor will be subject to the
remonstrance of the owners of the property liable
to more than one-half the assessment therefor.
Proposals must be enclosed In Healed envelopes
endorsed, "Proposais for the improvement of
r.ci(i« sthp.f.t "
tuujv .unati ,
directed to "E. A. Dugan, Esq., Chairman of
Committee |on Streets and Sewers," and handed
to the Clerk of the Board in open meeting when
culled for in the order of business relating to sealed
proposals.
No city official will be accepted as surety.
The attention of bidders is especially called to
'Section 18" of the "New Charter of 1889," under
the terms whereof no contract shall be binding
upon the city until the bondsmen ottered by the
contractor have been approved by the Board of
Finance, the President of said Board having power
to examine the proposed bondsmen under oath.
By order of the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners.
GEORGE T. BOUTON, Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, N. J., August 23, 188».
^N ORDINANCE.—
To amend "An Ordinance to licence and regulate
Inns and Taverns and Restaurants, and the sale of
splritous, vinous, malt and brewed liquors," passed
June 11, 1889.
The Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City do ordain
as follows:—
Section 1. That Section four of the ordinance
bearing the title above recited be amended so as to
read as follows:—
Section 4. No license to sell, furnish or eupply
splritous, vinous, malt and brewed liquors to per
sons or families in dwellings shall be granted un
less the application for such license shall be accom
panied by acertificate recommending the applicant
for said license as a lit and suitable person to be li
censed, signed by at least five Freeholders In and
resident or Jersey City.
Section 2. That Section fourteen of the ordinance
bearing the title above recited be amended so as to
read as follows:—
Section 14. That every person licensed under the
provisions of this ordinance shall cause the license
to be kept iu a conspicuous part of the place of bus
in ess, under the penalty of five dollars for every
neglect so to do, and every licensed person engagea
in furnishing or supplying liquors to persons or
lamilics In dwellings, shall carry with him while so
engaged the license for inspection, under the peu
alty of five dollars for every neglect ho to do, and
when the licensee shall find it necessary iu the
prosecution of his business to use more than one
vehicle for the delivery of splritous, vinous, malt
and brewed liquors, or any of them therotofore or
dered from such licensee at his place of business,
the City Clerk shall issue to such licensee a certifi
cate for every such additional vehicle, which certifi
cate shall be carried by the driver of such vehicle
lor Inspection, under the penalty of live dollurs for
every neglect so to do.
The City Clerk shall demand such evidence as
he may deem necessary before iasulug ui. y certifi
cate.
Section 8. That the loan of any certificate, as
aforesaid, to any person not authorized to use the
same shall subject the offender to the penalty of a
revocation of tne license under which such certi
Johs E. Scott.
City Clerk.
Approved August 13, 1989.
CHAS. W. ALLEN,
President.
ITO.
ORESTES CLEVELAND.
BUJU I.
IN VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF THE COURT OF
Chancery made on the day of the date hereof, I
hereby give notice that the creditors of the New
Jersey Steam Laundry Company are required to
present to me and prove before mo. under oath
or affirmation, or otherwise as I may direct, and to
my satisfaction, their several claims and demands
ugalnst The New Jersey Steam Laundry Company
within four months from the date hereof and that
In default thereof they be excluded from the bene
fit of such dividends as may hereafter be made and
declared by the Court of Chaucery upon the pro
ceeds of the elfects of said corporation.
Dated August 3, 138J.
C. B. THURSTON,
Receiver of the New Jersey Steam Laundry Com
pany.
CASH OR CREDIT
Special Sale
m
FOR THE
NEXT 30 DAYS
Mullins & Co.,
121, 123, 125 Newark Avenue, J. C.
TO REDUCE
Our Immense Stock
OF
Carpets, Fnrnitnre, Bedding,
Lace Curtains, Cornices,
Oilcloths, Blankets, Clocks,
Refrigerators, Baby Carriages,
Stoves, Ranges, <k, &c.
TO MAKE ROOM FOR FALL GOODS,
WE HAVE
REDUCED EVERY ARÏÎCLE 25 PER CENT,
This is a Great Inducement for Housekeepers to
Purchase at the Present Time.
CASH OR CREDIT,
MULLINS & CO,
121, 123, 125 Newark Avenue, J. C.
Turner & Bennell,
ESTAUXjISIIED S3 YEARS.
S3 & 35 NEWARK ATTENUE, J. C.
S UBliOGA TE'S NOTICES.
Notices of Settlement.
Notice of settlement.—notice is hereby
given that the final account of the subscriber,
surviving executor of John MeKldery, deceased,
will be audited and htated by the Surrogate of the
County of Hudson, and reported for settlement on
Saturday, the 21st day of September next.
Dated July 19, A. D. 1889.
HARRY LOUDERBOUQH.
"\[OTICE OF SETTLEMENT.-NOTICE IS HEREBY
i-i given that the account oi the subscriber*, ex
ecutors of Johanu C. Snndnp&nn, deceased, will be
audited and stated by the Surrogate of the County
of Hudson, and reported for settlement on Satur
day, the 7th day of September next.
Dated June 15, A. D.. 18tf>.
JOHANN C. SANDMANN.
DOROTHEA C. S. K. SANDMANN.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT.—NOTICE IS HEREBY
given that the final account of the subscriber,
administratrix of Michael Fallon, deceased, will be
audited ami stated by the Surrogate of the County
of Hudson, and reported for settlement on Satur
day, tne 7th day of September next.
Dated May 31, A. D. 1889.
NELLIE FALLON.
Notice of settlement.-notice is hereby
given that the final account of the subscriber,
administrator of Jacob New kirk, deceased, will be
audited and stated by the Surrogate of the County
of Hud-sou. and reported for settlement on Satur
day. the 7th day of September next.
Dated June 3. A. D., 1889.
GEORGE W. BIRDSALL.
Χ] UT1CK OK SETTLEMENT.—NOTICE W HEREBY
,αΛ given that the first account of the subscriber,
trustee of the estate of William Gardner, deceased,
will be audited and Stated by the Surrogate of the
county of Hudson, and reported for settlement on
Saturday, the 5th day of October next*
Dated July 31, A. D. 1889.
FREDERICK H. SPENGEMAN.
Ν
OTICE OF SETTLEMENT.
Notice is hereby given that the final account of
the subscriber, executor of Ann M. Lynch, deceased, |
υβ ported" to^Mttïement on |
County Of ai"»·»™ of October uext
DutcU, August 13. A. HORACE LYNCH. I
Ν
—iS»,o nl?_SFTTLKMENT.—
- *h SSLfjiSSS»· de^di hJcïunw
SSlïSdïnd"^. ^WueUatouSatu,
oi Hud»™L »ud ™y°£$K.r nuxt.
dBUyiffliuîudSUr-. A. 1)·. I^tricK MCOOVERS.
Notices to Creditor*.
jyOTICB TO CREDITORS.
Estate of John W. Harper, Deceased.
Richard T. I latter» bee, administrator of John W.
Harper, deceased, by order of the Surrogate of Hud
son county, dated June 11, 188·, hereby gives no
tice to the creditors of said decedent to bring in
their debts, demands and claims against the es
tate of xaid decedent, under oath or affirmation
within nine months from the date of said order, or
they will bo forever barred of any action therefor
fiKuinst said administrator.
B RICHARD T. BATTERSBEE.
VfOTICE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE OF JOHAN
li Meisner. deceased. Christian Melsner. admin
istrator of Jonan Jleisner, ueceasea, t>y order or the
Surrogate of Hudson Coudty, dated July 31, 1889,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said dece
dent to bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, under oath or
aflirmation within nine months from the date of
said order, or they will be forever barred of any
actiou therefor against said administrator.
CHRISTIAN MEISNER.
Notice to creditors—estate of"ahthur
S. Athow, doceased—Charlotte E. Athow,
Executrix of Arthur S. Athow, deceased,
by order of the Deputy Surrogate of Hud
son County, dated August 12, 188» nereby
gives notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion. within nine months from the dato of said
order, or they will be forever barred οί any action
therefor against said executrix.
CHARLOTTE E. ATHOW.
Claims to be presented to the Executrix at her
residence, No. 108 Glen wood avenue, Jersey City,
N. J.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.-E8TATE OF LOUIS
Lienan, deceased:—Pauline Lienau, executrix
of Louis A. Lienau, deceased, by order of the Sur
rogate of Hudson county, dated May 27, 1889, hereby
Kives notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims against
the estato of suid decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said
order.or they will be forever barred of any action
therefor against said executrix.
PAULINE LIENAU.
Claims to be presented at the office of Wail is,
Edwards & Bams ted, No. 1 Exchange place, Jer
sey City.
Ν
OTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Bernard Con] on or Conley, deceased.—
John McKenna, administrator or Bernard Conlon
or Conley. deceased, by order of the Surrogate or
Hudson county, dated June 28, 1889. hereby gives no
tice to the creditors of said decedent to Dring In
their debt*, demands and claims against the estate
of said decedent, under oath or affirmation within
nine months from the date of said order, or they
will be forever barred of any action therefor against
said administrator. JOHN McKENNA.
OTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate of Patrick Eraser, Deceased.
James Moloney. Administrator of Patrick Fraser,
deceased, by order of the Surrogate of Hudson
county, dated May 6, 1889, hereby gives notice to the
creditors of said decedent to bring in their debts,
demands and claims against the estate of said de
cedent, under oath or affirmation within nine
months from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of any action therefor against said
Administrator.
JAMES MOLONEY.
N OTICE TO CREDITORS.—Estate of Peter Spring
sted, deceased, Emily Sprlngsted, adminis
tratrix of Peter Sprlngsted, deceased, by order of the
Deputy Surrogate or Hudson county, dated May '2,
1889, hereby gives notice to the creditors of said de
cedent to bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, under oath or
animation within nine months from the date of
said order, or they will be forever barred of any ac
tion therefor against said administratrix.
EMILY 8PRINGSTED^_
TV OTIC Κ TO CREDITORS.-ESTATE OF MAR*
li A. Roney-deceased.— Nancy A. Roney, executrix
of Mary A. Rouey, deceased, by order of the Sur»
rogate of Hudson county, dated July 18, 1889.
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said decedent
to bring in their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirmar
tion within nine months from the date of said order,
or they will be forever barred of any action therefor
against said executrix.
NANCY A BONK"*
NOTTCE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE OP JAMES
Clerkin, deceased.—Annie Clerkin, executrix
of James Clerkin, deceased, by order of the Surro·
gate of Hudson county, dated June 7, 1889, hereby
Kives notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma»
tlon within nine months from the date of sala
order, or they will be forever barred of any action
therefor agalust «Id executrlx.^^ CUSBKIN
Notice to creditors.—e*uw at John su
ders, deceased. Margaretha C. Sanders, exec α
trix of John Sanders, deceased, by order of the Dep
uty Surrogate of Hudson county, dated May 1,1881
to bring In their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said order,
or they λυ-111 be forever barred of any action there
for against said executrix.
MARGARETHA C. SANDERS.
Noticeto creditors—estate of m a ro are?
Prior, deceased.—Otto Crouse, administrator
of Margaret Prior, deceased, by order of the Deputy
Surrogate of Hudson oounty, dated May 20, 1689L
hereby gives notice to the creditors of saia decedent
to bring in their debts, demande and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said
order, or they will be forever barred of any actif»»
therefore against said administrator.
OTTO CROU8K.
Claims to be presented to the Administrator, at
the office of Blair & Crouse, Counsellors at Law,
76 Montgomery street, Jersey City, N. J.
Notice to creditors-estate op Jacob τ
Roberts, deceased.—Silas Hopper, administra
tor of Jacob T. Roberts, deceased, by order of the
Surrogate of Hudson county, dated May 30, 1889,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said decedent*
to bring in tneir debts, demands and claim* against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said
order, or they will be forever barred of anj
action therefor against said administrator.
SILAS HOPPER.
Notice to creditors.-estate of johnTE
Bahrenburg, deceased.—Gesche Bahrenburg,
Claus H. Bahrenburg and John Bahrenburg, execu
tors of John H. Bahrenburg, deceased, by order of
the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson county, dated
July 23, 1889, hereby gives notice to tne credi
tors of said decedent to bring in their debts, de
mauds and claims against the estate of said dece
dent, under oath or affirmation within nine mouths
from the date of said order, or they will be forevei
barred of any action therefor against said ex·
ecutors.
GESCHE BAHRENBURG,
CLAUS H. BAHRENBURG
JOHN BAHRENBURG.
Notice to creditors.-estate of hznry
Duderstadt, deceased.—Johanna Duderstadt,
executrix, of Henry Duderstadt, deceased, by order
of the Surrogate or Hudson county, dated August 3.
l«S9, hereby gives notice to the creditors or saia
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the estate of said decadent, undei
oath or affirmation within nine mouths from the
date of said order, or they will be for ever barret]
of any Action therefor against said executrix.
Johanna dubebstad*.
gppp^* . m
ÉÉÉ

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