OCR Interpretation


The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, August 27, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068097/1889-08-27/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

W,ORK OF A RICH MAN'S SON
ARRESTED IN TRENTON FOR FORO
ISO NOTES AND CHECKS.
Influence Secured His Discharge —The
Trenton Homicide—Λ Variety of Hew»
from All Parte of the State.
William B. Cadwallader, eon of William1
B. Cadwallader, the Trenton carriage
manufacturer, was arrested yesterday at
the store of H. L. Caullett by Policemen
Pilger and Leahey on a charge of forgery.
He recently ordered a suit of clothes from
Mr. Caullett, which was to cost Î23. When
he came after the suit he offered Mr. Caul"
lett a three months'note on the Mechanics
National Bank for $57, and wanted the
change in cash. The note was signed by
J. A. Brown, an upholeterer. Mr. Caullett
was suspicious of the note from the fact
that it was so much larger than the cost
of the suit, and that the man wanted cash
in change. He told Cadwallader to come
around a few days later, and in the mean
time, he took it to the bank. There it was
found to be worthless.
Caullett notified the police authorities
and it was so arranged that they were to
be at the store the same time that Cad
wallader was to come—yesterday. The
young man was arrested, and when
charged with the fraud he admitted that
he had forged the name of J. A. Brown.
On his person were found blank notes
and checks on all the banks in the city
and one three months' note was drawn on
the Trenton Bankiug Company.
When arraigned before the Police Jus
tice this afternoon, Cadwallader would
not admit his crime. Brown was sent
for and said he did not sign tne note.
The hearing was adjourned until nine
o'clock last evening at Cadwallader's re
quest, and in the meantime Mr. Caullett
was induced to withdraw the complaint.
Cadwallader was thereupon discharged,
though Justice Tyrrell stated that he
would present the complaint to the
Grand Jury.
A Case οΓ Razzie Dazzle.
Last night, about eight o'clock, Detec
tives Carroll and Walker, of NewarK, ar
rested a stylish young man, who gave his
name as Richard C. Harms, and age as
twenty-three. The man was arrested on
a charge of larceny, lodged against him
by Mrs. Julia Lipman, of No. 142 Chrystie
street, New York. The man comes from
New York, and while there boarded with
the woman in question, and a few weeks
ago left the boarding house. When he
disappeared about £300 worth of diamonds
and jewelry went at the same time. Mrs.
Lipnian at once began search for the ab
sconder and located him at No. 35 Clinton
street, this city, where he has been board
ing since last Tuesday. The detectives
arrested him at his boarding house aud
brought him to Police Headquarters,
where he gave his business as a cigar
salesman, and said his business place was
at No. 102 Maiden lane, New York. When
brought in he denied the charge, saying
that it was another case of "razzle
dazzle."
Harms was traced to this city through
a woman with whom he had been living
m New York.
Claude B. Lagell Again.
Claude B. Lasell, who formerly lived in
Orange, who has made himself notorious
for more than a year by his extensive
dealing with crime, being accused in
rapid succession of forgery, horse stealing,
bigamy, embezzlement, passing spurious
money, robbery, and a host of lesser
crimes, has turned up in Montreal, Can
ada, in abject poverty. It is even alleged
that he, with his wife, has walked the
streets of Montreal for two nights in ab
solute want. His wife is said to be a very
estimable woman, the daughter of a
wealthy gentleman residing in Boston,
and she is said to be heartbroken by her
husband's downfall.
The Trenton Homicide.
Dr. Lalor, assisted by several other
physicians, made a post-mortem examina
tion upon the body of George Fite, who
died at Trenton on Sunday, it is said, of
injuries alleged to have been inflicted by
Jacob Wagner at his saloon, No. 667 Broad
street, on the evening of Decoration Day.
County Physician Lalor did not desire to
have his testimony before the Coroner's
jury anticipated, but said that the ex
amination developed the fact that the
brain was diseased and that the affection
was such as might result from a concus
sion upon the head.
Jacob Wagner was re-arrested when it
was learned that Fite had expired. Yes
terday morning he was taken to the Coun
ty Jail. H. N. Barton, his counsel, was at
tjnut! reiegrapnea ior ana came nome îm- |
mediately, but Wagner will have to stay
at the jail until the verdict of the
Coroner's Jury is given, when he may be
admitted to bail. Wagner has a good de
fense, and when he was informed that he
would have to remain in jail a few hours,
he received the news with cheerfulness.
ENLISTING THE PAINTERS.
They Are Asked to Join tlie Union and
Its Benefits Are Kxplained.
Every seat in the upper club room of
Cooper's Hall was filled at eight o'clock
last evening, when James A. Stuart
called the mass meeting of painters to or
der. Mr. Stuart explained that the ob"
ject of the meeting was to enlist the
active co-operation of such non-union
painters as were present in making Labor
Day a great success. He said he would
not make a lengthy speech, but would
turn the matter over for treatment to
those whom they had invited to address
them.
He then introduced as the first speaker
Mr. P. T. O'Hara, secretary of the
United Brotherhood of Carpenters. That
gentleman made a vigorous plea to those
who had not yet joined the union to do so
nt once. He showed how trusts of capi
tal, by concerted action, were raising the
prices of the necessaries of life, and made
a logical deduction that labor, in order to
receive its just compensation, must com
bine also and sell its stock in trade at the
highest figure. Mr. O'Hara drew a
vivid picture of the struggles of the non
union workman, and then reversed the
picture, showing the fraternal relations
of those united for the common weal.
The speech was frequently punctuated
■with applause.
Mr. J. W. Jake way spoke on the same
theme, and gave evidence of having
thought much about trades unions and
how they could best accomplish the pur
poses for which they were created.
Then Joe Fullem made a brilliant off
hand uddress. and asked the κηηΒ..η ni
all present lor liis organization, the Sur
face Railroad Employees' Association,
showing how those present could be of
material assistance.
When the meeting adjourned Secretary
Thomas Flanagan received a number
of applications for membership from the
non-unionists who had attended.
TAB FIKEMEN'S PICNIC,
l'ohlmami'M Pavilion Held a Large and
Jolly Party Last Evening.
Pohlmann's pavilion was crowded last
night with locomotive firemen, their
wives and sweethearts. Conductors, en
gineers and brakemen united in making
the snmmernight's festival of the Adopted
Daughter Lodge No. 3, B. of L. F., a rat
tling success.
Delegates were present from Washing
ton Lodge, No. 13, of the Jersey Cen
tral: "Just In Time" Lodge, of New
Tork; Fairmount Lodge, No. 333, of
Philadelphia ; Hoboken Lodge, No. 354,
and Hudson River Lodge, No. 349. The
Bralceman's Brotherhood was represented
by Hoboken Lodge, No. 144, and Jersey
City Lodge, No. 119.
Prominent in the gathering were Con
ductors Carley, Kelty and Keenan, Yard
Masters McNally and Mullane, Signal
Knglneer Fred Stein, John Reynolds, of
the Pennsylvania Round House; Track
Supervisor Charlie Jackson, Assistant
Yard Masters John West and Martin
Purcell, Engineers Lincoln Bates, Frank
w
/~~ " Ί Ύ ~~~Τ" *—■ V —W \
Learning a Useful Lesson
To use PEARLINE is a lesson that young and old
should learn. Millions know it well and are happier
because of the knowledge.
Every honest grocer knows well and will tell you
that PEARLINE is the original, best and most popu
lar Washing Compound. It saves time, labor, drudging,
wear and tear, and is harmless to fabric and hands. „
Peddlers and some unscrupulous grocers are
offering imitations which they claim to be Pearl
ine, or "the same as Pearline." IT'S FALSE—
they are not, and besides are dangerous. PEARLINE is never peddled, but
Sold bv all good grocers. "8 Manufactured only by JAMES PYLE, New York.
Beware
Shipinan and Thomas Maypotter, In
spector Smith and Detective McNally, of
the Jersey City police force; Firemen
Howard Backman, Dewayne Carr, Harry
YanArsdaie, ïim Eagan, M. B. Hagan
and John Meanan.
Of the officers Master Charles W. Mar
tin, Past Master Joseph Capner, Jr., Vice ,
Master George Burke, Secretary D. W.
Mahoney aud Treasurer J. W. Sweet were
present.
James B. Doyle was floor director and,
with Miss Connors,led the march. George
Burke was floor manager, assisted by
Edward Devlin.
Firemen C. Martin, J. Reilly. F. Hop
per, E. McMalion, T. O'Connor, T. Kealey,
T. Mooney, T. Eagan, B. Wayne and F.
Rawson were the Floor Committee. H.
Fliegauf was chairman of the Reception
Committee, assisted by H. A. Decker.
Other members were Firemen R. K.
Thornhill, E. P. Button, J. O'Neill, J. W.
Fredricks, George Walker, F. Davis, J.
Connelly, W. Curran, J. Isaacs and P.
R.nffpr
ΠΟΡΕ COUNCIL'S FRIENDS,
The Ladies Give a Pleasant Entertain
ment for Its Benefit.
A very pleasant affair was that of the
Summerniglit's festival, arranged by
ladies in the interests of the Hope Coun
cil, A. L. of H., at Kroebel's Park last
evening. There was no crush. It was
simply a social gathering of clever and
agreeable people, who passed the hours
pleasantly in conversation ana an occa
sional trip of the fantastic toe over the
mirror-like plazetta. The music was very
good.
tt Commander Η. T. Stoesser was present,
and so was Mrs. Stoesser; there, too, were
Vice Commander and Mrs. M. S. Lyons,
Orator and Mrs. William Westrum, Past
Commander and Mrs. A. Gempler, Secre
tary and Mrs. T. Frambach, Collector T.
Vredenburgh, Guide and Mrs. Huber,
Warden A. Limouz; Sentinel and Mrs. T.
German, Chaplain and Mrs. L. Stahl,
Floor Manager and Mrs. Philip Weil
bacher. Others present were Mr. and Mrs.
F. H. Korson, W. Meier. Miss Louise Weiss,
Mr. and Mrs. W. Franibach, J. F. Daum,
Miss Lena Vulca; F. W. Knoblouch, Leo j
Loeffel, Miss Julia Daum, Mr. and Mrs. j
H. J. Kearney, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Albers, j
Misses Katie, Itetta and Mamie Caliill, ι
Mr. and Mrs. Rhode, Mr. and ι
Mrs. John Rhinehart, Mr. and ,
Mrs. Jacob Weiss, Mr. and
Mrs. J. P. W. Liederman, George Spell- j
meyer, Miss Delia Spellmeyer, Albert j
Madru, Miss Mamie Lyons, Mr. and Mrs.
Gustaub Mueller, Mr. and Mrs. John
Claus. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meyer,
Fred Ohligmaclier, Miss Ohligmacher.
Henry Clay Council, of New York, was
represented by Edward Curreau, Ben
jamin K'lhn, Daniel Davis, Samuel Par
ker aud Theodore Oltman.
WAITER ZVVECKE ARRESTED.
His Connection with the Buckrath Case
Will Be Investigated.
The first step take» by the law in the
Buckrath case was the arrest of Rudolph
Zwecke, one of the waiters employed
at the booth of Freeholder Charles
Waas.
Zwecke was one of the men who raised
Buckrath to the bench. He has been
under police surveillance since the dis
covery of the body, aud yesterday after
noon Coroner Brackner deemed it ad
visable to put him under arrest.
When the Coroner started out to find
him he had disappeared, and it was only
after two hours sharp detective work that
he was tracked to King's Woods. He had
made a comfortable nest for himself be
full length on the ground when the Cor
oner tipped over him.
Zwecke was thoroughly frightened
when arrested and made no resistance.
He would give no reason for running
away. Coroner Urackner spent the rest
of the afternoon in serving subpoenas.
Captain James Earle and Policeman
Mike Uavitt, of the Schuetzen Park Police,
Denipf, the waiter, and a number of
others will appear at the inquest tonight.
Zwecke is now in the county jail, but
will give his testimony at the inquest.
The result of the County Physician's
analysis of the beer found in Buckrath's
stomach has not yet been made public.
THE LOLLAli WASN'T THERE.
But Paperhmiger nines Seems to Have
Got the Chiiitgr.
William Hines, a paperhanger, of No.
138 Sussex etreet, was arraigned before
Justice Stilsing this morning charged
with petty larceny.
Louis Hollman, α saloon keeper, of No.
138 Sussex street, the complainant, said
that he had been missing money for
some time from hehind his bar and he
had reason to suspect Hines. He accord
ingly marked four quarters, and when
they were gone he had Hines arrested.
The marked money was found on Hines.
Hines said that he went into the saloon
and asked for beer for himself and friend.
Mr. Hollman told him to draw the beer
for himself. He drew three glasses and
treated the proprietor to a drink.
He then laid down a dollar bill and took
up three quarters and a ten cent piece.
Hollman denied that there was any dol
lar bill by the change after Hines left,
ana me iiuier was commiuea ior trial.
Building Trades' Council.
The Building Trades' Council will meet
this evening, at eight o'clock p. m., in
the Council Hall, on Erie street, between
Ninth and Tenth. The assignments of
positions in the Labor Day parade will be
mude public, together with a full list of
the officers, organizations, merchants
and manufacturers who will take part.
Grand Marshal F. II. Vreeland savs that
the parade will eclipse, in point of num
bers and splendor of display, any previous
demonstration of labor in this city.
Many important trade questions will also
be considered at the meeting and the
question of the amalgamation of the
Council and the Central Trades and
Labor Assembly may be brought up, as
there is a growing sentiment in favor of
such action among the locals represented
in both bodies.
THE SEWS OF BAYONNE.
Death of Mrs. Matilda Seaman Goddard,
of llergen Point.
Mrs. Matilda Seaman Goddard, the
widow of theRev.KingstonGoddard.D.D^
died Sunday morning, in the seventy_
sixth year of her age, at her late homej
AVest Eighth street, Bergen Point. She
had been ailing for several weeks previous
to her death, which was caused rather by
the touch of age than by any specific ail
ment.
Previous to a residence of a dozen years
in this city she lived for a number of
pears in Staten Island. Her husband, a
representative ecclesiastic, was rector of
St. Andrew's Protestant Episcopal
Church, at Richmond, S. I. He also filled
the same office in St. Paul's P. E. Church,
Philadelphia, Pa. The Church of Atone
ment in that city was erected specially
on his account. He was also rector of
Christ's Church, Cincinnati.
Mrs. Goddard was a sister of Henry J.
Seaman, once a member of Congress from
Queens and Richmond counties. New
York. He is credited with having
gained considerable distinction during
the administration of General Zacharv
Taylor, by securing the tirst appropria
tion made by Congress of a million dol
lars for the Staten Island defences of the
Narrows. Within a short time of his
death he was appointed Collector of the
Port of New York.
Three sons and four daughters all
frown up, mourn the loss of a mother,
'hose resident in Bergen Point are Presi
dent John W. Goddàrd, of the Bayonne
Board of Council; Major Henry Seaman
Goddard, of the Real Estate Record-, Mrs.
George P. Moore, than whom few ara
readier to aid the needy and distressed;
Mrs. Seabury, wife of Lieutenant Samuel
Seabury, of the United States Navy, and
Miss Harriet *Go'ddard; Mrs. Henry E.
Ficken, of New York city and a son," who
occupies a prominent place in the medical
profession of Philadelphia, Dr. Kingston
Goddard.
Mrs. Goddard could trace her ancestry
back to Britain's partisans in New York
city. The plot of ground upon which the
New York Herald building now stands is
said to have belonged to her family. Dur
ing the Revolution it was confiscated
wiien lier ancestor tied for safety to
Nova Scotia.
This afternoon at four o'clock imposing
funeral services will be held at Trinity
Protestant Episcopal Church, West Fifth
street. The interment will be made to
morrow in Woodlawn Cemetery, Phila
delphia.
NEWS OF NORTH HUDSON.
Hibernians Have a Glorious Time in
Scliuetzen Park.
Division No. 7 (the North ïludson
branch) of the Ancient Order of Hiber
nians had a glorious time at Schuetzen
Park yesterday.
The bold Irishmen were out in force
and their twenty-first annual picnic
eclipsed the efforts of previous years. The
branch is rapidly increasing its member
ship and lias become one of the most
prominent in the State.
The picnic was under the direction of
the following gentlemen:—Floor man
ager, John Murray; assistant floor man
ager, Patrick Roach; Floor Committee,
Martin Filon, Frank McGauley, Thomas
Gallery, Edward Clifford, Martin Dugan,
Martin Costello; Reception Committee,
Michael Furlong, John Harrington, Pat
rick Higgins, James W. Phelan, Michael
Wallace and Bernard McAleese.
The officers of the branch are:—Michael
Furlong, president; John F. Plunket,
vice president; M. Wallace, financial sec
retary; John Murray, recording secretary;
James W. Phelan, treasurer; Martin Cos
tellow, sergeant-at arms.
Mayor Simon Kelly, of Weehawken,
Froeliolder Noonan, and many other
prominent men were among the guests,
and footed it neatly to the witching
κΐ.ι*Ηΐτι<4 r»f t,h»> rvinnrK
Λ Ball Itoiul Forfeited.
The great Martin Filan, of Union Hill,
has been made a victim of misplaced con
fidence.
Charles Smith, a young friend of his
was arrested for assault and battery a>
few days ago, and Martin signed his bail
bond for the sum of Î900. Smith
felt the case going against him and stood
not on the order of his going, but went.
It means $800 less for Martin.
Alt Ice Cnke Crushed His Foot.
Louis Phoetos, a driver on one of the
ice wagons of Councilman Ross, at
tempted to take a cake of ice into the
saloon of Councilman Basse, in Weeliaw
ken, yesterday, when it slipped from
the ice prongs and fell on his foot, crush
ing four of his toes. Phoetos was re
moved to his home. His physician fears
that amputation will be necessary to save
his life.
North Hudson Notes.
Judge Charles Schnueriger, Union
Hill's merry little Solon, is home again
from the Catskills. He looks in excellent
health, and says he had no end of a good
time.
The Weehawken Town Council met
last evening, and transacted a quantity of
routine business.
It is probable that the Weehawken
Council may combine with the West
Hoboken Council and build a safe flight
of steps from the brow of the hill at Loss
burg to the Boulevard.
The improvement is milch needed.
The Union Hill School Board met last
evening und completed arrangements for
opening the schools next week.
Jersey City Ladies Become Nuns.
Miss Mary Barron, of Boston, Maes.t
and Miss Bridget McGee, of Jersey City,
were admitted into the Order of Mercy
at St. Joseph's Convent Chapel on Sun
Ε. RIDLEY & SONS.
GRAND STREET,
COVERING ENTIRE BLOCK,
FROM ALLEN TO ORCHARD ST., Ν. Ï.
GRAND STREET,
£OVERING ENTIRE BLOCK,
FROM ALLEN TO ORCHARD ST., Ν. ϊ.
'MIT INDIICflTO OFFERED THIS WEEK.
BARGAINS.
ALL-WOOL
DRESS FLANNELS.
Double Width, all colore, 33c. yard
BLACKSATIN RHADAMAS
All Silk, extra heavy, at 49c.
Special lot all silk, colored gros grain silk, 79c.;
worth $1.25.
Silk Velvets, all colors, at 47c. yard; worth,
80c.
Corsets.
200 dozen White and Drab Corsets, 49c. pair;
regular price, 75c.
MEN'S FURNISHING.
50 dozen fine Fancy Stripe Half Hose, "Schop
per's" make, at 15c. pair.
50 dozen Superfine French Unbleached Half
Hose at 15c. pair.
Men's fine Silk Knot Scarfs and Four-in-Hand
Ties, new fall shapes, choice patterns and colors,
48c. each.
Blankets.
.Largest Stock, Lowest Prices, All New
Goods, This Season's Manufacture, Latest
Border.
Ν. B.—BLANKETS CAN BE SELECTED AND
STORED WITH US UNTIL NOVEMBER 1st
UPON THE PAYMENT OF A SMALL DEPOSIT'
FREE OF STORAGE CHARGES.
BARGAINS
Handkerchiefs.
350 dozen Ladies1 all linen Handkerchiefs* j
white and colored borders, at 7c. each.
150 dozen Ladies1 pure linen, hemstitched
Handkerchiefs, white borders, at 9c. each.
250 dozen Men's pure linen, hemmed Handker
chiefs, having slight imperfections, at 9c. each.
Jewelry.
Fine Rolled Gold Ear Screws and Drops, 25c. a'
pair.
White Stone Collar Buttons, cup setting, 3c.
each.
Frosted Silver Lace Pins, 6c each.
Initial Cuff Buttons, 15c. pair.
Stationery· Fans.'
Tinted Note Paper and Envelopes, 10c. per box
Extra quality Tinted Paper and Envelopes, 15c]
per box.
Fancy decorated Fans, 6c. each.
Painted Fans, Feather edge, 15c. each.
Leather Goods.
Leather Club Bags, 55c.
Canvas Belts, snake buckles, at 9c. i
Canvas Belts, leather strap, at 5c.
Calf Leather Parses at 21c. each.
Fancy Leather Purses at 17c. each»
Ν. Β.—All Elevated. R. R. TrainsStop at Grand Street,
Station of the 2nd, 3rd and 6th Avenue Ele
vated Road. Grand Street Croastown Cars
Pass Our Doors. Only Six Minutes' Ride
East from Broadway.
\wm mm s m,
t
309, 311, 311% to 321 Grand St.
56 to 68 Alleu, 59 to 65 Orchard St.
mm mm 4 suns,
309, 311, 311^ to 321 Grand St.
56 to 68 Allen, 50 to 65 Orchard St.
Ν. Β.—Our Stores can be Reached from all points on North I
or Hudson River by taking West Street Horsecars, running along
river front to Desbrosses Street; Grand Street Cars starting at this
point pass our doors. fc
day, at Bordentown. The Right Rev.
Bishop O'Farrell, of Trenton, officiated at
the ceremonies, assisted by Father Fran
cis, of Camden, N. J.; the Rev. William
Lvnch, of Allentown, JN. J.; the Rev. M.
O'Donnell. of Keyport; the Rev. Thomas
B. Healy, of Trenton; the Rev. P. F. Con
nelly arid the Rev. T. J. IJegnan, of Bor
dentown. In the afternoon the following
young ladies were received as novices:—
Miss Mary Ryan, Manchester, N. H.;Miss
Ellen Brophv, New York city; Miss Ellen
McNamara, Limerick, Ireland; Miss
Maggie Douglass. Jersey City, and Miss
Mary Connell, of Camden, N. J.
An Old KuHffi γοη Children.—Don't fail to I
procure MHS. WDJSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP '
for children teething. No mother who has ever
tried It will consent to let her child pass through
this critical period without the aid of this invalu
able preparation. Gives rest to the mother and
relief and health to the child. Cures wind colic
diarrhoea, and regulates the bowels. Twenty
live centsa bottle. ***
SEE THE ARTISTIC EFFECTS !
WE PRODUCE WITH OUR
LOW PRICED GOODS.
C.¥lSK,
WALL PAPERS,
138 YORK STREET. \
Morrow Day & Co.,
BAKERS & CATERERS,
Ice Cream and Fruit Ices In Variety.
Bricks to Carry Home.
RESTA VRANT, 7 A.M. TILL 11 P.M.
Morrow, Day & Co.'s Hotel* Ocean
Grove, N. J., Open» June 27.
CHARLES WOLF,
MANUFACTURER OP
Traveling Bags, Trunks, Steamer
Chairs and Leather Novelties.
Goods made to order. Repairing neatly done.
58 CORTLANDT STREET,
Comer Greenwich Street, NEW YORK
HENRY MA ASM,
Practical Boot and Shoe Maker.
▲ $6 SHOE, made to order, my speolalty.
93 Montgomery St., J. C.
Sly own make constantly on hand.
^Repairing promptly attended to.
Dan Electric Light Co.,
115 BROADWAY, Ν. Ï.
STATIONARY ELECTRIC MOTORS, ELECTRIC RAILWAYS
m POWER STATIONS. STORAGE BATTERIES.
BIJOU THEATRE. Broadway, near Thirtieth St
J. \V. ROSENQUE8T Sole Manager
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
HERMANN'S
TEANSATLANTIC
VAUDEVILLES.
Gallery, 25c. Reserved, 300., 75c., $1 and (1.50.
AMUSEMENTS. _
NEW ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
WILLIAM HENDERSON, Proprietor.
GRAND OPENING
SATURDAY EVENING, A UGUST 31,
And the entire following week. Three Matinees.
Matinees Three: Monday |Labor Day], Wednesday
and Saturday. The new spectacular
Uncle Tom's Cabin.
Replete with Novel and Entrancing effects. A
carload of special scenery, a magnificent cast, a
band of colored singers and dancers, a wealth of
surroundings. Calcium colored lights and lires,
transparencies and glorious Apotheosis. Box Office
open for sale of seats on Thursday at 9 a. m. Tele
phone Call. 142.
FOURTH AVENUE PAVILION,
1STH STREET AND 4TH AVENUE, NEW YORK
Week commencing Monday, August 19.
NEW FEATURES-NEW FACES.
20 STARS.
MISS VIOLA RIVERS, Principal Equestrienne.
GEORGE CARON, Grotesque Clown.
WM. ROLLINS, Principal Jester.
WM BURKE. Acrobatic Clown.
PROF. PARKER, with his troupe of Trained Doge
LE DESMA, Perch Performer.
DAN O'BRIEN, Champion Double Somersault
Leaper of the World.
T. S. LEANDER, One-Armed Musical Wonder.
J. C. MULLINS, Champion Backward Jumper; has
beaten all records.
VIOLA RIVERS, in a Beautiful Act of Equitation
upon 3 Horses.
WILLIE SIEGRIEST and GEO. CARON, In a Ro
mantic Brother's Act,
FRED MENDOZA, Our Popular Ring Master.
Marvelous Exhibition by MARRETTA MEYER
Queen of the High Wire.
The.whole to conclude with our New Departure
A POPULAR OPERATIC CONCERT.
HALF PRICE ADMISSION.
Performance Every Afternoon and Evening.
Take Broadway or Fourth avenue cars.
From Hoboken, Fourteenth and Christopher,
street lines direct to Fourth avenue.
C1ASINO, Broadway and Thirty-ninth st., Ν. Y.
l MATINEE
Saturday at 2. Evening performance at 8.15,
THE SPARKLING OPERETTA
THE BRIGANDS.
Continuous Roof Garden Concert, 7:80 to 12.
Admission, 80 cents, including both entertainments.
5TH AVENUE THEATRE, Broadway and Twenty
eighth street, Ν. Y,
EUGENE TOMPKINS Lessee and Manager.
MONDAY, AUGUST 26.
DUFF OPERA UO.,
"PAOLO."
Evenings at 8. Saturday Matinee at 2
Seats now on sale.
"PALMER'S THEATRE. B'way ana Thirtieth St.
1 COOLED BY TONS OF ICE.
McCAULL OPERA. COMPANY
ra
CLOVER
112th to 118th Performance.
Evenings at 8. Saturday Matinee at 2.
"VriBLO'S. BROADWAY, N.Y.
-J* Mr. E. Gllmore Lessee and Manager
Reserved seats in Orchestra and Balcony, 50 cents
BOLOSSY KIRALFY*S
ANTIOPE.
GORGEOUS BALLET SPECTACLE.
MOST ELABORATE PRODUCTION IN YEARS.
Eveuiugs 8:15. Wednesday and Saturday Matinees, 2.
HC. MINER'S PEOPLE'S THEATRE, Ν. Y.
• MONDAY. Aug. 26, ONE WEEK ONLY.
MAYO,
SILVER AGE.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2 o'clock.
Popular prices, 25c., 35c„ 50c.. 75c, and $1.
BROADWAY THEATRE. Corner Forty-first St
Evenings at 8. Saturday Matinee at 2.
Manager Mr. FRANK W. SANGER
FRANCIS WILSON AND COMPANY,
THE 00LAH.
letb WEEK.
RAILROADS.
HAPPY DAY.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28,
via.
LEHIGH VALLEY RAILROAD
to
MAUCH CHUNK, PENN.,
GLEN ONOKO AND SWITCHBACK.
SPECIAL EXPRESS TRAIN.
EXCURSION TICKETS, $2.25. Switchback, 50 cent3
0 extra.
Train leaves Pennsylvania Depot at 830 a. m. For
full particulars and special accommodation for
parties apply to WE B. SMITH, General East
Passenger Agent, No. 285 Broadway, New York.
Erie Railroad Time Table.
rplCKET OFFICES—401. 817. 718. 957
A Broadway. 158^ Bowery, 1 Bat
tery place. Chambers street and
Twent.v third street ferries, New
•York; 381 Fulton street, Brooklyn;
107 Broadway, Williamsburg; cor
uer Newark and Hudson streets,
Hoboken. and neto station Jersey
City, where ticket» and parlor or
sleeping car reservations and orders for check
ing and transfer of baggage can be obtained.
Trains leave Jersey City station as follows
9:20 a. m.—Day Express. Pullman Buffet drawing
room coaches to Buffalo, connect at Hornellsville
for Jamestown and Chautauqua Lake.
8:18 p. m. daily—"Chicago and St. Louie Limited."
A solid Pullman train of day, dining and sleeping
coaches to Meadville, Youngstowu. Marlon ana
Clilcago without change. Pullman sleeping coaches
to Cleveland, Cincinnati and St. Louis. No extra
charge for fast time.
6:18 p. m. daily—Chicago and Grand Trunk Ex
ftress. Solid Pullman train of day and Buffet sleep
ug coaches to Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Hamilton.
Ι,οηάοη, Lansing, Battle Creek, South Bend and
Chicago without change. Buffet Bleeping coach to
Rochester, arrive 720 a. m.
8:50 p. m. dally—Chicago Express. Pullman Buffet
sleeping coaches to Elmlra, Hornellsville, James
town, Corry, Mead ville, Youugstown, Cincinnati
and Chicago.
Stations on Orange Branch, week days, 9:15 a. mH
12:58, 422, 6:27, 7D6, 9:12, 11:45 p. m. Sundays, 9:45,
a. m.. 1:42. 4:17, 6:27, 8:30, 10:12 p. m. Additional trains
to Prospect street, E. Orange, Washington street,
Orange, Llewellyn and Main streets. W. Orange,
Orange, week days, 6:15, 823, 1123 a. m„ 2:22.827,
452, 5:19, 550,8:12. 101)0 p. in.
Rutherford and Passaic, week days. 4:15, 5:00, 6:12,
7:12, 8:05, 9:45, 10:43 a. m., 12:12 noon, 1:12, 2M, 3:03,
850, 420, 450, 552, 6:01, 629. 6:42.7:15. 7:14.9:15,10:42,
p. m., 12:13 midnight. Sundays. 5:00, 8:80. 10:48, a. m.f
12:12 noon, 2:00, 820. 4:18, 5:20, 6:45, 7:44. 9.16, 10:42 p. m„
12:13 midnight. Additional trains to Passaic, week
days, 821. 5:12, 529, 620 p. m.
Paterson, week days, 4:15, 5:00, 6:12, 7:12, 8:05, 9:45,
10:48 a. m., 12:12 noon, 1:12, 21WL 3.03, 321, 8:45, 350,
4:12, 420, 4:45, .450, 5:12, 5:29, 5:42, 552. 6:01, 6:20, 029,
6:42, 7:15, 7:44, 8;50, 9:15, 10:43 p. m., 12:13 midnight.
Sundays, SIX», 8:30, 10:43. 12:12 noon, 2:00, 320, 4:13,
520, 6:45, 7:44, 850, 9:15, 10>42 p. m., 12:18 midnight.
Newark and Paterson via Newark, week days, 558,
654, 8.1)7, 10:20, 11:45 a. m., 1.14. 2:15, 3:47, 4:35, 5:07, 52Γ,
6:07, 6:37. 7:46, 10:15 υ. m.. 1220 midnight. Sundays,
9:15 a. m., 3:47,6:47. 8:15, 10:15 p. m.
Rldgewood and Suffern, week days, 4:15, 5KX), 805,
9:45, 1U:43 p. m.. 1:12 202, 821. 4:12. 5:12, 5:42. 6:20, 6:42,
7:15, 8:50,10:42 p. m.. 12:13 midnight Sundays, 5:00, 820,
10:43 a. m., 2:00, 4:13 and 6:45 p. m., 12:13 midnight,
Also to Rldgewood, week days, 8:45 a. m., 4:45, 525,
6:12,850 p. m.; Suffern. 3:45 p. m.
Newburg aud Cornwall, week days, 8:05, 920 a. m.,
8:47. 4:14, 5:42 p. m. Sundays, 9:20 a. m., 2 p. m.
Goshen, week days, 5:0Gt 81)5, 920,10:43 a. m., 1:12,
3:45,4:45.5:42, 7:15, 850 p. m. Sundays, 5:00, 820, 920,
a. m.. 6:45,850 p. m.
Mladletown, wee* days. 5.00, 8.08, 920,10:48 a. m.,
1:12, 3:18, 8:45, 6:18. 6:45, 850 p.m. Sundays, 51)0, 820,
920 a. m„ 3:18, 6:18, 6:45, 850 p. m.
Pt. Jervls, week days, 5D0, 80S, 920, 10:18 a. mn 1:12,
S:18, 3:45, 4:4a, 6:18, 7:15, 850 p. m. Sundays, 500, 830,
920 a. m., 3:18, 6:18, 6:45. 850 p. m.
Warwick, week days, 5Dft 920 a. m., 1:12, 4:45, p. m.
Sundays, 8:30 a. m.
Montgomery, week days, 920 a. m., 8:45, 4:45 p. m.
Sundays, 920 a. m.
Express trains arrive at Jersey City from the
West, 650, 7:40 a. m., 455, 955 p. m.
m-rr»TiTWïr&v BAît.Bnin nw www .tw.rsp.v
1Λ Traîne leave Jersey City station, Erie Railway
week days, for Englewood, Tenafly, Closter, Spar
kill and Nyack, 5:30, *7:15, 838» *1047 and 11:42 a. m.,
1:45. 3:12, 4:14. 5.Ό5, 5:44, 6:22, ♦657. 8:15, 10:44 p. m„
12.13 midnight. Sundaj'8, 8:33, *9.47 a. m., 1:45 4:14,
7:42 *8.27 p. m.
Additional trains to Creekill and way, 8:17, 7:45,
8:57. 957 a. m., and 12:33. 1:22. 3:12, 5:14, 5:59 D. m.
♦For Nanuet, Spring Valley, Monsey and Tallmana.
Nyack Express, *4:47.
NEW YORK AND GREENWOOD LAKE RAIL
way. Trolue leave Jersey City station, Erie
Railway, as follows:—
For Arlington. 6:15, 8:37, 930. 11:23 a. m., 12:16. 1258,
2AH, 327,352, 459, 5:27, 557, 6:35, 7:12, 857, 1U:12, 11:45,
12:16 Sundays, 9:12, a. m., 1:42, 4:17, 6:27, 8:17,
8 ^'loomifeld1 and Montclair, week days, 6:15, 837,
930, a. m., 12:16, 2.04, 352, 4:42, 459, 527. 5:57, 6:35, 7:12.
827,10:12. 12:16 p. m. Sundays, 9:12 a. m., 8:17, 8:45
P*Little Falls and intermediate stations, week days,
6:15, 8:37, 9:30 a. m., 12:16 noon, 8:52, 4:42. 4:59, 527,
557, 6:35, 7:12, 827. 12:16 p. m Sundays, 9:12 a. m,
8:17, 8:45 p. m. 2:04 p. m., Saturdays only.
Pompton, week days, 8:37, 9;30 a. m., 4:42, 459,527,
635, p. m. Sundays, 9:12,10:15 a. m., 8;17p. m.
Greenwood Lake and Intermediate stations, week
days, 837. 930 a. m., 4:42, p. m. Sundays, 9:13, 10:15,
a'w" J, MURPHY, L. P. FARMER,
Gen'l Supt Gen'l Pass. Agt.
SHERIFF'S SALE—IN CHANCERY OF NEW JER
SEY.
Between Theresa Johns and Hiram C. Johns,
complainants, and John D. Nome et aL, defend
ants.
FL fa., for costs.
Returnable October Term, 1889.
J. B. Vreedenburgh, solicitor.
By virtue of the above stated writ to me directed
and delivered, I have levied upon and shall sell by
public vendue at F. G. Wolbert's Real Estate and
Auction Rooms, No. 47 Montgomery Street, Jersey
City, on
THURSDAY, the Twenty-sixth day of September
next,
at two o'clock in the afternoon, all the right, title
and estate of the above-named defendants, iu and
to all the following described land >nd premises,
with the aDpurtenances, that is to say:—
All that certain tract, piece or parcel of laud and
Ï,remises hereinafter particularly decribed, situate,
ving and beiug in the City of Jersey city, In the
county of Hudson and State of New Jersey,
bounded and abutted as follows:—Beginning at a
point in the westerly line of lot No. twenty-two (22)
in block No. seven (T), as the same is laid down on a
certain map entitled, "A Map of Part of the Town
of Jersey (commonly called Bowles Hook), made by
Joseph F. Mangin, April 15th, 1804." which point is
eighty (80) feet northerly from the northerly Hide of
York street, and twenty-five feet easterly from the
easterly side of Greene, and running thence il) east
erly across lot No. twenty-two (22) parallel with the
northerly line of York street twenty-five feet to a
point in the easterly line of said lot No. twenty-two,
eighty (80) feet northerly from the northerly line of
York street: thence (2) northerly alone the easterly
line of lot No.twenty-two parallel with Greene street
twenty (20) feet to the northeast corner of lot No.
twenty-two (22) the middle of the block thence (3)
westerly along the middle of the block parallel with
the northerly line of York street twenty-five (25) feet
to tine northwesterly corner of lot No. twenty-two
(22); thence (4) southerly along the westerly line of
lot No. twenty-two (22) parallel with Greene street
twenty feet (20) feet to the point or place of begin
ning, being twenty fest of the rear of lot No.
twenty-two as laid down on said map.
Dated August IT, 1839.
ROBERT DAVIS,
A LARGE STOCK
_ Of
Rugs, Lace Curtains,
Clocks,
Rogers' Silverware,
AND OTHER USEFUL·
HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES,
FOB
CASH OR ON TIME.
Call wad Examine Them.
CEORCE E. WATSON,
51 Montgomery St.
HenryAlbçrs,
jebsey cirir
WINE
-ROOM
Imported fUitte», JLiquor»
and Segars.
70 MONTGOMERY ST.,
(Velio! Bailing) JERSEY CITY.
EUAN If I Il A II I V
FURNITURE
Carpet, Bedding,
Oil Cloth and Stove
♦ WAREHOUSE, ♦
203 Newark Ave.
I Tbree Door· above Jersey Avenue, J. 0.
BOATS LEAVE FOOT WHITEHALL STREET. Ν
Y., terminus of the Elevated, Broadway and Belt
Line Railroads, at 7:10, 8:10, 0.10 a. m., and half
hourly (Sundays every.20 minutes) until 9.40, and at
10:20 p. m.
Returning, leave Sea Beach Palace, Coney Island,
at 722, 822, 922,10:22 a. m., and half-hourly (Sunday
every 20 minutes) until 952, and at 10:32and 11:12 p.m
Excursion Tickets, / Π Gents.
To the Sea in tU Minutes.
STEAMBOATS.
ROCKAWAY BEACH.
THKEE TRIPS DAILÏ.
GRAND REPUBLIC and CHYSTAL WAVE.
ι Jewell's
West 22d st.
8.40 A. M.
10.00 A. M.
1.80 P. M.
west ιιπηsi.
8.5D a. M.
10.15 Α. M.
1.40 P. M.
ner ο, λ. ι
9.15 Α. Μ.
10.35 Α. Μ.
1.55 Ρ. Μ.
9.33 Α. M.
11.00 ▲. M.
2.15 P. IL
ItetUrUlUK innu
Brooklyn Annex from Jersey City 8.53 a. m., 10.35
A. m. and 1.55 p. m.
Tickets for sale on all Elevated Ronds.
Fare for Rouned Trip, 50 Gents.
PROVIDENCE LIN?! FOR BOSTON
PROVIDENCE. WORCESTER, and al
points East. Most direct route £»r WHITE MOTJN
TAIN POINT8. Limited White itountain Express,
with parlor cars, leaving direct from steamers'
wharf for Fabyans and intermediate pointa.
Steamers CONNECTICUT and MASSACHUSETTS
leave Pier 29 Ν. K., foot of Warren street, at 5:80
p. m. daily, except Sunday, connecting at wharf
with express train for Boston. Tickets and state
rooms secured at principal ticket offices in New
York and Brooklyn; at all offices New York Trans
fer Company, who will call for and check baggage
from hotels or residences, Send to P. Ο Box 3,011
for Excursion Book, whlcn will be mailed free.
STONINGTON LINE FOR BOSTON
PROVIDENCE, Nttrragansett Pier, and
Watch Hil 1 .—Steamers RHODE ISLAND and NAR
RAGANSETT leave new Pier 36 N.R.,one block above
Canal str*et, at 5.Ό0 p. m. dally, except Sunday.
Tickets and staterooms secured at principal ticket
offices in New York and Brooklyn, and at all offices
ofNew York Transfer Company, who will call for
and check baggage from hotels and residences
Send to P. O. Box 3,011 for Excursion Book.
SHOHOLA
GLEN
AND
GREENWOOD
LAKE
EXCURSIONS.
EVERY
Wednesday
AND
Sunday.
ÏUUit (JUUItJl ÎUJtt
$1.00.
Sl^obola train leaves Erlfc
depot, Jersey City,
WEDNESDAY, 950 a. m.
SUNDAY, 9:45 a. m.
Returning, leaves Shohol%
5 p. m.; arrives Jersey City,
8:30 p. m.
Greenwood Lake train leave·
Jersey City, Erie depot,
WEDNESDAY, 9:30 a. m.
SUNDAY, 10:15 a. m.t 2:15 p. m.
Returning train leaves Wed
nesdays, 5:40 p. m.; Sundays,
4:55 and 7 p. m.
♦ 2P03R. ♦
Pure Wines
and Liquors
CALL· AT
LEWIS FISCHER'S,
109 Newark Ave.,
Wholesale LiquorDealer
Monogram
W HISKEY,
Full Quarts, One Dollar per Bottle.
SUMMER FOOD
Posts Sea Food Market
255 WARREN ST.
SOFT SHELL CR4-BS, STRIPED BASS.
LITTLE NECK CLAMS, PORGIFS,
BLUE POINT OYSTERS, HALIBUT.
SEA BASS, PICKLED LITTLE NECJf CLAMS*
SHAD ROES, PICKLED OYSTERS,
KING FISH, PICKLED MUSSEIA
And all other Summer Fish.
We have a regular Deep Water Summer Ovster
Order· by Telephone Call promptly attended to
Telephone Call. 134 B.
M. 3P. MOÏtikïT
Plumber and Ο as fïtter,
663 Grove Street, J. C.
Estimates for all work cheerfully given and orders
promptly attended to.
Repairs lor stoves and ranges furnished. Alee
roo£s, leaders, etc. made and repaired.
3?. 3E. ΜΑΪίΤΊΙΪ,
Practical Sanitary Plumber
and steam fitted;
mm AP RANGES A SPECJALTT.
189 Montgomery St., Jersey City
PETER T. DONNELLY,'
PRACTICAL PLUMBER AND GAS FITTEiL
Sanitary Plumbing a Specialty.
2BB Washington Street, J. G
1 ^EnTimTS* t~PBSUiHiu> all Work Ucmnm
M. A. SHANÂHAN,
PRACTICAL PujBpiER,
Sanitary Work a Specialty.
515 Grove Street, Jersey City.
All orders promptly attended to.
Try SI*50 and Φ8.00 Ladies* and Gents
Shoes, in all stylos, as good as sold
elsewhere for 88.00 and 83.00.
ALL GOODS WARRANTED.
Γ). β\ι11ΪΛτο.χι,
MONTGOMERY STREET, near cor. WublsgtO*
» NEWARK AVENUE, and
S28 NEWARK AVENUE, cor. Cole* Street.

xml | txt