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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, August 28, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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- THE -
Jersey <£iîy fleurs.
JAMES LUBY, - - · Editoe.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
BY THE
JERSEY CITY NEWS COMPANY.
OFFICE. No. 80 Montgomery Stud®
(WELDON BUILDING.)
The Jersey City News:—Single copie*, two
cents ; subscription, six dollars per year ; postage
free.
The 8tkday Morning News : — Published every
Sunday morning ; single copies, three cents ; sub
scription, one dollar and fifty cents per year;
postage free.
Entered in the poet office at Jersey City as
second class mai lmatter.
AJ1 business communications should be ad
dressed to The Jersey City News Company ; ail
ethers to the Managing Editor.
BRANCH OFFICES:
Advertisements, Subscriptions and Newsdealers1
Crders received : —
Eoboeen—First and Clinton Streets, J. D. Sin
clair.
Union Hill—H. Fischer, No. 62 Palisade Avenue.
Bergen Point—T. W. Dobson, opposite Railway
Depot.
Bayonne — J. H. Brower. No. 481 Avenue D.
Five Corners—G. W. Pheiffer, Να 668 Newark
▲venue.
WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 28, 1889.
NOVELETTE
No 13.
NEXT
SUNDAY'
jASlH ATONED ι
THE TOUCHING STORY OF A
YOUNG BUSINESS M.LN'S TER
RIBLE TEMPTATION.
By J. X. McKAY.
JIIIE .SUNβ.ι Y MORNING
XXW8 HAS THE LARGEST CIR
CULATION IN HUDSON COUNTY
AND IS THE BEST ADVERTIS
ING MEDIUM.
PRICE, 3 CENTS.
All Newsdealers Keep It.
φ - - <8>
This paper is Democratic In principles
and is independent in ua views on aU
local ijuestions.
, In order to give its employes a
chance to participate in the celebra
tion of Labor Day The Jersey City
In ETS will omit its Monday edition.
May the skies smile on the feast of
Labor, and much good come of this
new holiday.
Captain Smith's "Extreme Case."
While we agree with Mayor Cleve
land that his prerogative of removing
should only be exercised in extreme
cases, we seem, inferentially, to be of
somewhat different opinion from him
as to what constitutes an extreme
case. He does not, we gather,
regard the deliquency of Captain
Christopher P. Smith in that light,
and, perhaps, seeing that his first duty
is conservatism, he is right in giving
Captain Smith and the Commissioners
all possible latitude.
±sut we must insist that tnere is a
point at which this indulgence ceases
to be justifiable, and at whieh the
case becomes one of extreme delin
quency. Does not the Mayor agree
with us that if this accomplished
criminal, Annie Jones, continues
through the intervention of Captain
Christopher P. Smith, to evade the
penalty of her offences, the case be
comes an extreme one? In New York,
police officials are most properly for
bidden to become security for prison
ers, and the same rule should be
applied here. Certainly friendly re
lations with a professional criminal,
such as Captain Smith's action pre
supposes, constitute no small public
scandal, to take the most lenient
view of the ease. Assuredly,
if he were a scrupulous man, or had
a proper respect for his own good
name, he would spend the last cent
in his possession, and strain every
effort of his detective skill—assuming
lie really did not know where she was,
to find her and bring her back to the
bar of justice.
The point for the Mayor to consider
is whether a stage in the scandal will
not soon be reached when the Police
Commissioners will beeome tacit
accessories to this business of
criminal shielding by their fail
ure to take cognizance of Cap
tain Smith's conduct. They have
as yet given no order, placed no pres
sure upon Smith to arouse him to a
sense of duty. They bave not even
demanded any explanation of his con
duct. If they fail to do this, and if
the Mayor will not see the case as an
extreme one, it seems to us the city is
in a bad way.
uniei Murpny, wun cnaracteristie
amiability, tries to make out the best
case he can for his subordinate; but
really he only makes the matter worse.
He says Smith's delaration that he
knew where the woman was, was
mere bluff. He does not believe Smith
knows her whereabouts.
That is very bad indeed. Smith, if
he knew where she was, might plead
some motives of policy for delaying
her production. It would be thin, but
it might pass. But the admission that
after making himself responsible
for her appearance, he failed to take
any steps to make his guarantee
good, even to the point of losing
sight of her, is to stamp him as utterly
false to his trust and wholly unfit to
hold any position upon the police
force.
Thk cheap caps which our only
competitor gives its newsboys are ad
mirably designed to typify the donor.
They have The Evening Journal on
the front, and "The Best Paper" on
the back. This is to illustrate the
Journal's practise of splitting its
stories up between the front and back
pages to save the cost of casting a
plate. The symbolism is made still
more exact by the fact that after the
reader lias found the whole of the
story it isn't true.
Drills in the Hands of Tllleves.
The Buckratli ca>e develops into a
real sensation today, though the pro_
ceedings at the inquest were not par.
ticularly enlightening. The most im
portant part of the investigation is
that made by ThB Jkrsky Citt
Nkws reporter who got Carl Krieger's
story.
He says that he was drugged and
robbed at the Schuetzen Park in a
manner that suggests an easy explan
ation of Buckrath's death. Krieg"
er's story should be sifted to the bot_
torn. If a gang of thieves "worked''
the crowd at the Schuetzen Park by
means of their drugging plan they must
have made a rich haul, for it is well
known that a great deal of money
wrongfully changed hands during the
progress of the Volksfest. Their suc
cess on that occasion has undoubtedly
the rascals, and
νltD J-»UViH IV"»4 —
may have frightened them
a little it will not prevent them from
playing their dangerous trick» at
every largo picnic this season,
or those which follow, un.
less some one of the gang
is caught and made an example.
The full strength of the detective
force should be turned to the discov
ery of these villians if the inquest
shows that Buckrath met his death
through such foul measures.
Thk information given on the first
page of today's issue, in relation to
the street improvements made since
the new charter went into operation,
shows that the new charter people are
redeeming their promises to
the people. The informa
tion might have been much
more interesting in detail however
if Street Superintendent Tumulty
had adopted another method of keep
ing his books. As often
as he orders a payment
made, he should be required to
specify on his order, to what particu
lar improvement it applies. It could
be seen then that the work had been
done, and the citizen could determine
at a glance whether the street is bene
fited to the extent of the outlay.
There is opportunity for a little re
form of methods here to which the
attention of the Street and Water
Board is called.
Doubtless Mr. Tumulty will catclj
the idea, and as we believe he is sin
cerely desirous of reform in all particu
lars, will very soon realize it in this
matter.
Now let's have a good-natured
laugh at the jjolice. The story of the
missing lumber that was found in a
policeman's backyard is too good to
lose. The quaking boys, the angry
father, the surprised police all make a
picture worthy of Dickens' pen.
PERSONALS.
James F. Moran can be seen every evening gal- j
loping along Erie street. lie is practicing for
his duties as chief aid on Labor Day.
James Δ. Stuart, the other chief aid, doesn't
need practice. lie rides like a centaur. He is j
one of General Joe Wheeler's old cavalrymen.
Ex-Commissioner John Brennan is fast becom- ;
lug an expert fisherman. The manner in which
he hauled in the weakfish the other day at Barno
gat was amazing.
Counsellors Midlege and Kellar are expected
home from Europe next week.
Colonel Erlenkoetter holds more offices than
any man in Hoboken, and he knows that cit^
like a book.
Tommy Cummings was full of his old-time
baseball enthusiasm yesterday. He had been on
the lield with the Enoch Smiths the day before.
Business will be resumed at the City Clerk's
office now. Mr. Wan die is at his desk again.
Judge Rankin, with a new white tile, was one
of the figures on the street yesterday. He has
just returned from Europe.
A BEAUTIFUL SAIL.
Glen Island la tlie Goal of Many a Picnic
Party Nowadays.
Iu the clear ail· of these late summer
days tlie sail along the East River and the
Sound to Glen Island is especially pleas
ant. The beautiful view stands out sham
and distinct, and the breeze come in from
the Sound with just enough coolness to
make the ail· delicious. At the Island
everything that one can desire is in readi
ness. Never before were there so many
picnic parties making this beautiful resort
their goal as at the present time.
Family parties tiud it the best of the
nearby resorts. Boats leave the pier be
side the Cortlandt Street Ferry slip at
fre- uent intervals, and the round trip
C0i,.s only forty cents'
llvoufflit Her Truant Husband Bach.
Henry Seymour, a native of Milwaukee
Wis., came East four years ago and mar
ried one of Hoboken's prettiest girls. He
deserted her several weeks ago, and she
located him in Tarrytowu, N. Y., day be
fore yesterday.
She got a warrant for his arrest, and
accompanied by Policeman Weeks, he
went there yesterday, and he
consented to come to Hoboken with
her. When the couple reached that city
Seymour was arraigned before the
Recorder and committed to the County
.Jail in default of bail on the charge of
abandonment.
A Hearty Handshake.
Maggie Lederliug, a pretty young girl
who lives at No. 204 First street, went iuto
Police Headquarters, Hoboken. lost night,
and said that a young man, whose name
she did not know, had a few minutes
before taken her by the hand and
given her such a wrench that she feared
her shoulder had been dislocated. Dr.
Ilelfer examined the girl's shoulder blade
and found to his surprise that that part of
her anatomy had been injured. He ap
plied the usual remedies.
A Disorderly Seaman.
Otto Otten, a powerfully built sailor
on board the steamer Moravia, which
lies at her dock in Hoboken
at present, got very drunk yesterday
and assaulted First Officer Kuelilewein
and several other people. He was « ar
rested and locked up in Police Headquar
ters, Hobokeu. While here he tried to
kick the bars out of his cell and raised a
terrible disturbance.
He will be kept in prison till the
Moravia's sailing,when he will be handed
over to the captain of that steamer.
IΛ SHE ELECTRIC BATTERY.
< —
' M.utrBT.zovs row tuts of a ve
T/Tji ar.oitaiA klokdiS.
She Downed John L·.—The Impulse to
•Suicide—How Fnst l>o insects ami
Fishes Morff ?—Fresh Air Benefie^iico
—An American Gift to the Princess
! Louise.
Georgia has produced another woman
who is as full of electricity, or something
very like it, aa the wonderful Lulu Hurst,
of the same State, who used to
throw big men around without
much trouble. This woman, who ijave
a private exhibition last night
"at Ford'3 to a few spectators, is Mrs. An
nie Abbott, of llilledgoville, a petite body
of only ninety-eight pounds. She is a
blonde of twenty-three years and of pleas
ing appearance. When seven years of
age she went up to her father's chair one
I day and astonished him by saying she
I could lift him up. He laughed at the
j childish remark, but she put her hands
! on the chair and it camo up from the
I floor. From that day it was apparent
that she nad more than muscular power.
Last night there were half a dozen cr so
[ pretty heavy and strong men on the stage,
but she was more than a match for any or
all. A man sat in an ordinary chair,
leaned back on its rear legs, and when
Mrs. Abbott simply put her "hands under
his ears the chair and man jumped up
UMVUU UllX LV lUVlllD.
Five men were then piled upon the chair
—the heaviest 216 pounds and all the
others over 160—and when she laid her
hands on the big man's ears the chair
jumped up again. She stood on one foot
and let a billiard cue rest in her hands
without grasping it, and one, two and
three men could not push her over. The
combined weight of the three men exert
ing all their muscular power was over
four hundred pounds. She pushed them
all about the stage. Heavy men sat in a
rocking-chair, and with her lingers just
touching the back tliey could not rock.
The Sltt-pounder and others put their
hands under her elbows and tried with
might and main to lift the ninety-eight
pounds, but in vain. In none of the
trials could the men do anything with
her.
Several years ago she was at the Hot
Springs in Arkansas, when she was
matched against John L. Sullivan, but the
brute slugger could do nothing with her.
When she has lier hands on the chair, or
on any wooden substance, she waits about
a minute and suddenly the power conies,
but the muscles do not become rigid. She
says the feats never tire her, but juet be
fore a trial she feels nervous and weary.
She sleeps well after throwing strong peo
ple about. She must stand on wood and
operate with wooden chaiis and sticks.
When in contact with carpets and iron
she can do nothing. Recently, when ex
hibiting in theSouth,somebody connected
a wire with her body and grounded it, and
immediately she was powerless. When
one pushes against her the impression is
that of the resistance of a wall. She looks
quite delicate. She is a quiet lady and
very modest.—Baltimore American.
Irresistible Impulse.
If the struggles that are going on daily,
made sometimes by nearest and dearest
friends, could be laid bare the expose
would be a frightful one. In a certain
building in this city which I frequently
visjt there is a large rotunda. Around
this rotunda runs a spiral staircase, the
banister of which is low, and is made to
continue on after leaving the stairs at the
sixth floor and acts as a guard rail for the
top floor. It is altogether too low, and
any six footer falling against it would
probably fall over into the pit of the ro
tunda. I have heard several of the men
engaged on the sixth floor of this build
ing tell in a matter of fact (but to me hor
rible) way of the desire that took posses
sion of them whenever they approached
this guard rail to throw themselves over,
and must confess that I have found my
self edging away from it with the indis
tinct, undefined, inexulainable fear that I
might throw myself over it if I got too
close to it; and have told others, who
spoke of having experienced the same
feelings, to let the world know that it
was not a premeditated suicide if I should
ever be picked up at the bottom of that
: ♦- „ Knnlrnn TV, «w,.
There is a young man in this city of
Chicago who has a dread of the bridges and
always takes to the wagon way when he
crosses the river, lie has been fished out
of the muddy, sticky water at Clark street
bridge once, having thrown himself over
the rail. When brought to terra flrma he
could not explain why he lxad jumped
over.
"The desire took possession of me and I
did it; that's all," said he, when ques
tioned about it. "I had jumped about a
foot when I wished from the bottom of
my heart that X hadn't," he continued,
"and now. to avoid a repetition of that act,
1 always take to the middle of the road
when crossing the bridges."
Suicides (so called) are increasing at an
alarming rate, and opposite the name of
many a man who is alive and well today,
with bright prospects, good health, happy
home, anil everything on earth to live for,
the word "suicide" will be written as the
cause of his death, when he was simply
the victim of oue of these irresistible im
pulses.— OMcago Times.
Inserts Fleeter Than Birds,
High speed is attained by iusects in
flight, many of them being able to out
strip swift birds. It has 'been computed
that the common house fly, in ordinary
flight, makes WW strokes per second and
advances twenty-tive feet, but that the
rate of speed, if the insect be alarmed,
may be increased six or seven fold, so that
under certain circumstances it can out
strip the fleetest racehorse. It is no un
common thing to see a bee or wasp en
deavoring to get in at the window of a
railway train at fnll speed, and it is cal
culated that if a small insect can fly
faster than a racehorse can run, an insect
as large as a horse would be able to travel
as fast as a cannon ball. Leunwenholk
relates an exciting clxase, which he be
held in a menagerie, about 100 feet long,
between a swallow and a dragon fly—
among the swiftest of insects. ~ The in
sect flew with incredible speed and
wheeled with such address that the swal
low, in spite of its utmost efforts, com
pletely failed to overtake and capture it.
A pigeon fancier of H am me, in West
phalia," recently made a wager that a
dozen bees liberated three miles from
their hive would reach it in better time
than a dozen pigeons would reach their
cote from the same distance. The com
petitors were given wing at Rhyhern, a
village nearly a league from Hamme, and
the first bee reached home a quarter of a
minute in advance of the first pigeon.
Three other bees reached the goal before
the second pigeon, the main body of both
detachments flnishing almost simultane
ously an instant or two later. The bees,
it may be mentioned, had been handi
capped in the race, having been rolled in
flour before starting for purposes of iden
tification. According to Chabrler, the
male of the silkworm moth travels up
ward of one hundred miles in one day,
and there are many British moths, as
entomologists well know, which can cover
long distances in an incredibly short space
of time.—Exdwnge.
xne »peen ox f isn.
The speed of flsnes is almost an un.
known quantity, being, as Professor G.
Brown Goode says, very difficult to meas
ure. '"If you could get a fish, and put
bim in a trough of water 1,000 feet loug,
and start him at one eud and make him
swim to the other without stopping, the
information could be easily obtained, but
fish are unintelligent, and they wont do
this. Estimates of the speed of fish con
sequently are only approximated, and
more or less founded on guessing You
can tell, however, at a glance whether a
fish is built for speed or not. A fast fish
looks trim and pointed, like a yacht. Its
head is conical-shaped, and its lins fit
down close to its bo<lv, like a knife blade
cluse to ite handle, iish with large heads,
I bigger than their bodies, and with short,
I stubby lins, are built for slow motion."
j "What are the fastest fishes?"
"The Dredatory fish, those which live on
' prey, are the fastest swimmers. The
ι food fishes are generally among the slow
! est, and are consequently easily captured,
j Their loss is recompensed, howover, by
the natural law which makes them very
! prolific in reproduction. Dolphins have
t>een known to swim around an ocean
steamer, aud ft is quite safe to say that
their speed Is twenty miles an hour. hut
it may he twice as much. The bonito is a
fast swimmer. Just what its speed is I
do not know. The head of the goose lish
is very large—twenty times as big as its
body. It moves about very little, and
swims at the bottom of the ocean. The
Spanish mackeral is one of the fastest of
the food fishes. Its body is cone shaped
and as smooth as burnished metal. Its
speed is as matchless as the dolphin, and
in motion it cuts the water like a
yacht."—Washington Pout.
A ITresli-Alr Fund Incident.
A lady who devotes a great deal of time
to charity was last week on one of the
New York fresu-air excursions for chil
dren. Just as the boat was about to pull
out there appeared a poor woman with a
babe in her arms.
"Why, your baby is dead," said the
physician who was on board.
The infant did indeed look dead, but
tho lady saw a spark of life. The physi
cian told the woman to take it home, as it
would die before the boat was out an
hour. The mother wept bitterly.
"Doctor," said the lady, "X want this
sick child to j£o on the excursion. I will
take the responsibility."
"Hut, my dear madam," added the
/Esculapius, "we have no death certificate
on nrwl fhah IVUIV nmktf» some
trouble."
Hut the lady prevailed, took the ice
cold child in her arms, washed it with
brandy and water, put ou a flannel band
age, gave it brandy and lime-water in
wardly, wrapped it in a shawl, took it on
deck in the fresh air, and prayed to God
to spare its life. It slept a few hours, be
came warmed up,aud opened its blue eyes.
To make a long story short, when the
boat got back to the city the child was
feeling much better, aud the doctor said
with good care it might live.
"Had the child been turned away from
the boat." said the happy lady, "it would
have died."—The Epoch.
Fife's American Cousin.
Princess Louise, the bride of the Duke
of Fife, will soon receive a valuable box
of family jewels from a relative in this
city. They will probably be an unex
cxpected treasure, since it is doubtful
whether the duke himself is aware that
Dr. David Bartlett Gould, of No. 139 Hes
ter street, New York, is a distant cousin.
However, such is the case, for Dr.
Gould's great-grandmother, Helen Tay
lor Bartlett, of Forrester Hall, was the
niece of Lady Bruce and the first cousin
of the first Earl of Fife, The
family jewels, which have been
handed down from generation to genera
tion, consist of a beautiful diamond ring
and brooch which were the property of
Lady Bruce, who died in 1718. They are
179 years old, of exquisite workmanship,
aud are now being cleaned and burnished
by a jeweler. Dr. Gould will send them
over as a complimentary testimonial from
Princess Louisa's American cousin. The
doctor is an old practitioner in New York
and has been connected as visiting physi
cian with the Charity Hospital on the
Island for many years. — New York
World.
One of Those Thins* Olio Would Kather>
Ac.
Mrs. Mary A. Livermore has a sense of
humor which is strong enough to make
her relish a joke, even when it is at her
own expense, and to relate it afterwards
with gusto. There Is nothing that she
enjoys better than to get a group of co
workers about her and amuse tlieiu with
stories for a few moments—and then oil
to work again. One of these stories
which Mrs. Livermore tells about herself
is this:—She went to a town in Maine to
deliver a lecture. A young minister, who
felt greatly his importance in having to
iutroduce so large a light, announced he r
in these words:—
"Ladies and Gentlemen—You have all
heard of the illustrious man across the
water, so beloved by his people, and who
is known by the sobriquet of the 'grand
old man.' I have now the pleasure of
introducing to you a lady beloved in Bos
ton and known there as the 'grand old
woman!' "—Bouton Traveller.
A ÎUKfiSIJiKS JiKMlYAJj.
Court Hoboken'e Members and Their
Friends Dance at I'olilmauii's.
Court Hoboken's third annual summer
night's festival at Pohlmann's last even
ing crowded that elegant pavilion with
merry Foresters and Hoboken's fairest.
Aivin Jaeger,s Second Regiment Baud
made the music, and the dancers were
many.
Past Chief Ranger and Floor Manager
F. A. La Pointe was presented with a
gold-headed cane. The presentation
speech was made by ΐ. T. Cullen, secre
tary to the New Jersey delegates at the
recent Minneapolis convention.
Prominent in last night's gathering
were Captain Harper W. Sagendorf,
Deputy High Chief Ranger; Chief Ranger
and Mrs. P. J. Murphy, Sub-Chief Ranger
Frank L. Bahr, Miss Mitchell,
Treasurer .Thomas Hatlleld, Miss Bertlia
Peterson, Recording Secretary Joseph
Kattell, Miss St. Pol, Financial Secretary
Ernest Gregorovius, Senior Woodward
John W. Toomey, Junior Woodward
Frank Gibbous, Senior Beadle Chris En
trip, Junior Beadle Joseph Scott, Past
Chief Ranger N. W. Goldrani, Mayor
and Mrs. Simon Kelly, of Weehawken,
and Miss Maggie Conley; Past Chief
Ranger J. F. O'Mealia, Past
Chief Ranger F. A. La Pointe,
who as floor manager, led the march with
Miss Boulanger. Among those who fol
lowed were Doctor Taylor, Miss Sheldon,
Wilber Wilklns, Miss Mary Bower, Ser
geant Edward Clifford, Miss Fiuk, Justice
William Seymour, Mr. and Mrs. Alphens
Burley, Assistant Postmaster John J.
C'avanaugh, George Swenck, Miss
Swenck, Mr. and Mrs. William
Miller, Mr. and Mrs. John Quinu,
Mr. and Mrs. John Toomey, P. P. Cud
dihy, Miss Gussie Siebers, John Henry,
Miss Isabella Law, Mr. and Mrs. Mattiiew
llalpin, Street Commissioner Cornelius
lvelly, Walter McOniber, Miss Libby
Furey, John F. Ryan, Miss Mamie
Heftrou, Jerry McCornuvck, Miss
Mamie Murphy, Lewis Farrel,
Miss Mamie 'fully, Charlie Munzing,
Miss May Boulanger, William Jaeger,
Miss Minnie Jaeger, John Johnson, Miss
Marie Riguey, Mr. and Mrs. C. White,
William Ryan, Miss O'Rourke, Mr. Louis
Boulanger, Misses Daisy, Mina and May
Boulanger, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mul
vey, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Martin, James C.
Prentiss, Miss Katie Murray, John Hil
derman, Miss Maggie liagan, Mr. and
Mrs. George Ludwich, Mr. and Mrs. Will
iam J. McGlade, Mr. aud Mrs. Michael
Griffin, Michael Wallace, Miss Maggie
Murphy, William Miller, Miss Mamie
Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. G. France,
Charles Keller, Miss Keller, Mr. and Mrs.
XkUWVIt V I ' llk/U*, VUUU
Mamie Cullora, Mr. aud Mrs. Lawrence
Feeney, William Smith, Miss Fosburg.
Jobu Fitzpatrick, Mrs. Miller, Mr. aud
Mrs. Gus Piarriege, Mr. aud Mrs. Collins;
Court Astley was represented by George
Hofmanu with Miss Nellie McCarty,
Charlie Hofmann, William Kaddigan with
Mrs. Itaddigan, Johu McAndrew, Walter
Manning, James Clark, William Murphy,
Miss Tillie Hofmann, John Fox aud James
Lyons. J. Golden represented Court Pride
of (be Hill, and William Newly, George
E. fflierman, and James Trumbull were
present from Court l^afayette.
To Pay Hoboken 1'olice and Teachers.
Tlie police requisition amounting to
#4,»li).0f and the School Board requisition
tor $10,000 were passed by the Hoboken
Council lust night.
To Iteopen River Street·
The Commissioners of Assessments will
meet in the City Hall tonight for the pur
pose of assessing damages for the opening
of Hiver street.
SUMMER INGS.
The Rev. G. W. Nicholson has returned
from Saratoga.
Mr. and Airs. George T. Seward, of
i Summit aveuue, will spend September In
Vermont. ✓
Miss Annie Miller has gone to Cincin
nati to remain several weeks.
Mrs. Henry Eougwell. of Grand street,
has gone to Utica to remain until Octo
ber.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomae Fallon, of the
! Heights, bave gone to Pompton to spend
I several weeks.
; Mr. Helmer and Miss Minnie Heliner,
of Erie street, are summering in Penn
sylvania.
Miss Agues Vincent, of Mouticello
avenue, is summering at Boston, Pa.
Miss Cora Brown, of Jersey avenue, has
returned from Honowack, N. J.
Mr. Henry Ives has returned from a de
lightful cruise on I.ong Island Souud.
Mrs. Tunisou and daugh ters, Allie and
IJllie, of York street, are summering at
Laxawaxen, Pa.
Miss May Martin, of Eighth street, is
spending the summer at As bury Park.
Mr. and Mrs. John Weed, of Montgom
ery street, have gone to Chicago to spend
the month of September.
Mr. John Menagh, of York street, Is
to visit his home in Hacketetown, N. J.,
next week.
Miss Jessie Elliott, of Duncan avenue,
is spending the summer at Norwftlk,
Conn
Mr>j Tnnnnnt i« enenrtinir several weeks
at Anbury Park.
Mr. and Mr». William Jackson, of Sum
mit avenue, have gone to Niagara l'aile.
The Rev. and Mrs. Zabriskie, of Grand
street, are sojourning for a short time in
the country.
Miss Crissie McDonald is summering at
Cornwullon-the-Hudson.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Gates, of Cottage
street, have gone to Boston to remain un
til October.
Mrs. Hodson, of Fourth street, is spend
ing the summer at Asbury Park.
The wife of Lieutenant Harry Phelps,
of Aunapolis, is the guest of Mrs. Phelps,
Lieutenant Phelps' mother, of Grand
street.
Τϋ TUNG'S ONE TONGUE.
It "Was Chinese ami It Bothered Police
mail Kane.
Michael Burns, with no home, was
arraigned before Justice Stilslng by Po
liceman Kane this morning for breaking
a window in Tu Tung's laundry on Wayne
street. Tu Tung was unable to identify
the prisoner, and in spite of his name
seemed to have none other than hie Chi
ne e tongue.
Policeman Kane attempted to act as an
interpreter, but was unsuccessful. Burns
was committed on general principles.
John Kearney was arraigned with
Burns, charged with breaking into Mr.
Tu Tung's back yard. Policeman Κ ne
caught him in the yard and the Celestial
identified him readily. He was commit
ted for trial.
The Doctor» Disagree.
Doctor Samuel A. Heifer's communica
tion to the Common Council of Hoboken
last evening has created widespread
alarm. The doctor says that diphtheria
is raging in the sister city.
Dr. Irving Simon says that Dr. Heifer
is a gross prevaricator of the truth, and
that the city of Hoboken is now in as
healthy a condition as ever it was.
Doctors differ and patieuts die.
Typos to March.
Though some misunderstanding the
Printers' Union decided not to parade on
Labor Day. A spécial meeting has been
called for Friday evening, to reconsider
this action, and it is more than probable
that the typos will march with their
brethren on Labor Day.
BURR BREWING CO.
MER BEER.
227 West 18th Street,
NEW VORK.
DO NOT FORGET THAT FOR THE NEXT TWO
MONTHS
Any one presenting this ad. will be entitled, by
paying $3, to one dozen finely executed and finished
Photographs of himself, and will receive a ticket,
which will entitle any person, except himself
again, to one dozen Imperial Photos. Free of
charge. First class work Is strictly guaranteed. I
do this to induce as many new customers as possl
ble to try my new quarter*· GUSTAVE THOMMEN
successos to Quantrell, Studio. No. 219 Sixth ave '
nue, New Yore.
Public Notice.
REPORT NO. 41 OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF
ADJUSTMENT.
XTOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
χ ι Commissioners of Adjustment, in and for
the city of Jersey City, appointed by the Cir
cuit Court of the Count ν of Hudson, under
and by virtue of the provisions of chap
ter CXit of the Laws of IsSi, entitled "An Act
concerning the settlement and collection of arrear
ages of unpaid taxes, assessments and water rates
or water rents in cities of this State and imposing
and levying a tax .assessment and lieu in lieu ana
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce the
payment thereof, and to provide for the sale
of lands subjected to future taxation and
assessment," passed March 30, 18S6, have made, certi
fied and filed a report of their proceedings relating
to and affecting delinquent land, described as fol
lows, to wit:—
Bloclc 569, lot 02, Beacon avenue
Block S47, lots 17,18, Carlton avenue
Biock 437, lots 19, 20, Ash street
Block 201. lot 32, Church street
Block 140, loc 2tfu. Webster avenua
Block 1303, lot S&Jkfyrtle avenue
Block 413, lot 24, Wescott place
Bloc k 733, lots 41 and 73. Palisade and New York
avenues
Block 52'», lot 20, NewarK avenue
Block "<91. lots 98, 99, Webster avenue
Biock 794, lot 100. Sherman avenue
Biock 37<>, loc ι», Cold on street
Block 810, iol 13, Poplar street
Block 203, lots 3l, 32, 33, Church street
Block 203. lots 14,15, l«,.Montgomery street
Block 203, lots 17, 18, 19, Montgomery street
Biock 2U3, lot 5, Baldwin avenue
Block «.99, lots 88, 89, Summit avenue
Biock 1471, lot 7">, D wight street
BiocK 1471, lots 75, 80, Dwight street
Block 1471, lots 83, 84, Dwight street
Block 1471, lots 8.), 86, Dwight street
Block 1471, lot 91, Dwight street
Block 1471, lot 9i, Dwight street
Block 123, lot 13, Rutherford avenue
Block 542, lots2S. 27, Newark avenue
Block 41o, lot A, Harrison avenue
Block 12», lot 5, Summit avenue
Block 350, lot C, Grand street
Block .'>75, lots 190, 101. Hopkins avenue
Block 575, lot 102, Hopkins avenue
Block 328, lot Κ Bright street
Block 841, lots 21, 22, Nelson avenue
Block 339, lot. 2, Centre street.
Block 224';., lot 13, Howard place
Bloclc 2l8k:> 2:9. lotE, Baldwiu avenue
Block Γ>23κ, lot P, Bergen avenue
Block 517, lot C. Clinton avenue
Block 203, lot 38, Church street
Block 5, lots 5, 6, Hudson street
Block 347. lot C, Grind street
Block 347, lot D, Grand street
HIOCK ·>-Η, lui- ·«, wrtiuu svrce»
Block 34'Γ. lot Κ Grand street
Block 317, lot 88, Oswego street
Block 847, lots 41 to 52, Oswego street
Bu oie 34Î, lots54,5>, Oswego street
Block *47, lot Si, uswego street
Block 847. lot (17, Fair mount avenue
Block 817, lots 18 to its, Falrmount avenue
Block 847, lots 44, to 29, Falrmount avenue
Block 847, lots 3 ), 31, Fair mount avenue
Block 84», lot 2, Falrmount avenue
Block 849, lot.'; Grand stree
Block 345), lots 4, 5, Grand street
Block 84s1, lots 6, 7, 8, Grand street
Block 849, lots 12, ^3, Bishop street
Block 841), lot Ht;, Bishop and state street*
Block m lot 26, Fourteenth street
Block 410, lots 1 and Brunswick street
Block NU), lot 409, Central avenue
Blook 171, lot. P, Bay street
Block 1$·, lot 9G, Steuben street
Block 1 lot 4i, Steuben street
Block U-S, lot 68, Steuben street
Block 172,1 ts E, F, G, First street
Block 762, lots 1 and 2, Central avenue
Block 870, part ot lots 41,42, Beacon avenue.
And the said Court has fixed Tuesday, the tenth
day of September, one thousand eight hundred and
eighty-nine, at the Court House, in the city of Jer
sey City, at ten o'clock In th«- forenoon, as the
time and place for hearlug any objections that may
be made to the assessments, charges and liens fixed
and certified bv the "Commissioners of Adjust
ment" in said report, when and where all parties
interested therein may bo heard.
D ated, Jersey City, X J.. August 21, 1889,
dlnnis Mclaughlin,
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Uic County of Hudson
William Dklaxey. Furnishing Oeflertaker, car
riage? and camp chairs to let, :ïi.~ Grove street, Jer
sey City, N. «I. Telophoue calL No. 138.V
▲nvsRTfiitkfrarrs Under τιγκ H κ ad of
MARRIAGES AND DEATHS
Will be inserted to the Jersey City News and
the Sunday Morning News at the rate of ten
cent* a line for the first insertion; Jive cents aline
lor each eubeeouent insertion.
1)1£D.
COtTLDREY—In this city, August 27,1SS9, Joseph α
CouJdrey, age«l fifty nine years.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
COURTNIY.—In this city, on August 2Γ, 1889, Mag
gie Α., wife of (Jeorge Courtney.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to
attend the funeral on Thursday at three o'clock p.
in., from her late residence, No. 82» Warren street,
HILLIER.—On Saturday. August 24. 1339, at Ocean
Urove, N. J., Carrie wheeler Hlllier, daughter of
Isaac V. 8. and E. Carrie Millier, aged ten months
and twenty-eight days.
MeKEON—At No. 48 Sussex street, on Tuesday»
AUKUSt 2Î, 18S!>, Ann McKeon, widow of the late
Henry McKeon.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
McDONOUGU—At Jersey City, August 26, 1839. Mar
tin Mcdonough. native of BalTygar, Ireland, in
the 45th year of his age.
Funeral from St. Patrick's Church, on Thursday,
August 29, at 9.80 a. m.
TAYLOR—On Tuesday. August 27,1889, George Ells
worth, son of William and Esther Anu Taylor,
aged twenty-four years.
Relatives and friend.·; arc invited to attend his
funeral on Thursday, August at two p. m., from
ί No. 1416 Mercer street.
M. J. BOYLAN,
Funeral Director,
198 Pavonia Ave., Jersey Gity.
liEAL ESTATE.
For houses and lots in jersey city
BERGEN, OBEENVILLE. BAYONNE ADD BKH
UEN POINT, CALL OK WRITE TO
JOHN N. BRUNS,
Ko, 137 Ocean AYeane, Jersey City.
So. 77 Danara Arem GreeMlt
SEND FOR LIST OF CITY AND COUNTRY PROP
BRTY.
TO LET.
EurnisM House To Let
On Heights, 2-story and basement; improvements
to a family who will board owner.
C. C. JEWELL & CO.,
SUCCESSORS TO
G. P. HOWELL ά CO.,
Opposite Court House and Bergen Square.
το letT —
2-story and base, bricfc, impte.. Bergen ave—$30 00
2-ety and bare. bricic, impts., Van lioipen ave. 25 00
2 sty and base, frame, impte., Jones st 27 .10
2-sty and base, frame, Newark ave 28 00
2-sty and base, frame, Oakland ave 2v U)
2-sty and base, frame, Oakland ave 80 00
2*ty and ex. frame, Impte., Bersren ave .16 (0
Flats, 5 rooms, tube und water closet, New York
ave., *10.50 aud «11. Hats, 5 rooms, very nice tube
and water closet, Newark ave.. $17.
Suits of desirable rooms at various prices, differ
ent parts of the Hill.
IlC. C. JEWELL & CO., successors to G. P. Howell
& Co.. opp. Court House and Bergen square.
ELEGANT SIX-ROOM FLATS, all modern im
provements, at $91 to 423—Nos. 210-14 Pavonia
avenue.
Kour-room Flats at $15 to $18—Nos. 506-12 Grove
street.
Six-room Flats at $15 to $18—Nos. 151 and 153
Pavonia avenue.
Beautiful Stores, plate j?lass windows, with din
ing room, kitchen and bedroom, at $25—Nos. 151 and
153 Pavonia avenue. !
Desirable Apartments, ai $7 up.
D. J. IIULSHIZER, Uents ' Furnishing Goods.
No. 190 Pavonia avenue
TO LET-FOUR ROOMS IN PRIVATE HOUSE:
bath and improvements. Coles street, near
Hamilton Park. Call at No. 301 Seventh street.
For Sale.
FOR SALE—$2,800, TWO-STORY EXTENSION
house, cellar, ten rooms, water, gas. suitable for
two families. John G. Gaffney, No. 291 Tonnele
avenue, near Marion station.
SITUATIONS AND WORK
WANTED.
Three Lines FREE
under this heading
until September 1st.
QERMAN PIONEER VEREIN,
LABOR DEPARTMENT.
Employers needing help and employees needing
work may apply to or address
LOUIS L. FINKE, Secretary.
No. 564 Jersey Ave., corner 2nd St.
WANTED—POSITION IN RESTAURANT AS
order cook or work by the day. Call at
No. 218 Railroad avenue
A
Female.
YOUNG WOMAN WISHES WORK OF ANY
kind; washing, ironing or office cleaning or |
day's wo»*k. Call at No. 24Î Thirteenth street. second
floor.
A POOR WOMAN. WITH ONE CHILD, WOULD
like a place to work; good washer, lroner, etc.; ι
wages no object; home desired. Enquire No. 'Δη
Fifth street. 1
C^IRL, AGE SEVENTEEN. WOULD LIKE SITU- !
J ation iu small family or three or four. Address
L. Α., News off tee.
p OOD SEWER WILL BE GLAD TO HAVE RE
VIT pairing and children's clothes. Address Com
panion, Jersey City News Office.
When you call at the above addresses
mention' this paper.
HELP wanted.
Female.
HOUSEWORK.-WANTED, a STRONG ACTIVE
girl who is a good washer and ironer at No. 101
Sip avenue* · *
When you call at the above addressee
mention'this paper.
LOST AND FOI y I).
DOG LOST—$"> REWARD FOR SMALL DOG
with yellow hair on nock and head, rest of
bod r shaved. Had on light leather collar with sil
ver trimmings and lock. Strayed from rear of No.
444 Monmouth street, Saturday, August 24. Answers
to name of Muggins. Reward paid if returned to
No. X.'2ô Warren street, Jersey City.
ΐΜ··ιι*ι·ηΜ·ΜΒ··—·κ»
FOB SALE.
A'^^FÎMT'ÔLaSs"ΐοΚΝΕΗ UQTOR^STORlS "oSf
Newark ave; live years lease; doing a good
Li usinées; has been a liquor store for forty years.
Bad health the reason for selling. Apply at Να
110 Newark ave.
Î" TOK SALE—A FANCY ÔÔODS STORE; will
sell cheap for cash. Address No. 417 Monmouth
street, Jersey.City. ^
BEECHAM'S PIUS
ACT T.rimil UAGtIC
ON 1 ΙΟΙ ST8M18I.
gigots, a Box
OF ALL DRUCOIST8.
ft
MODEMANN
DENTIST,
Nos. 503 and 504 THIRD AVENUE,
Southwest Corner 84th Street.
No. 255 SIXTH AVE., near 10th St., Ν. Y.
Full Gum Elegant Seta,
$4, 87 and $10.
Perfectly adapted to the anatomy of the mouth,
and guaranteed to stand the test of time.
Old Time Prices, $!0. $20 and #30.
Artificial Teeth on Cold. Artificial Teeth on Silver
NO CHARGE, NO CHARGE,
for extracting t«»eth without nain when artificial
teeth, are to be inserted. (In this department a lady
in attendance.) Teeth illicit wit* Gold, Silver, Ac.,
&c. Teeth repaired in fifty minutes. Sets made
while waiting. .
see that the name MODEMANN Is painted in full
and plain, unostentatious letters on the doors, stairs
and windows. We have positively uo connection
with any dental office that does not display the
name
MODEMANN,
Noe. 502 and 504 THIRD AVENUE,
Southwest Corner 34th Street
No. 255 SIXTH AVE., near 10th St.. Ν. Y.
C. M. CLERIHEW,
ERIE GOAL YARD
Cor. Twelfth and Henderson Sts.
TKUtPHOSB m.
[ WANTS 1
>ΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦΦ ♦♦ <3>φ ♦♦♦
lie Jersey City News
AND
The Sinday Morning News
Are at present making a special
ty of Short Advertisements,
and are therefore taking then)
for the summer season, at ex
ceedingly low rates, as fol
lows :—
TER I.1NE.
Marriages, - 10 Cents
Deaths, . . 10 "
Lost and Found, - 10 "
For the second and subsequen
insertions, half rates.
Special contracts for lonçr
FOR
THREE LINES
Help Wanted Male, 10 Cants
Help Wanted Female, 10 "
Boarders Wanted, - 10 "
Furnished Rooms, - 10 "
Rooms Wanted, . 10 M
Board Wanted, - 10 "
For the benefit of the unem
ployed, three lines will be in
serted
FREE
under the head of Situation»
and Work Wanted, until further
notice.
THE SUNDAY MORNING
NEWS has the largest circula
tion in Hudson County.
THE JERSEY CITY NEWS
is the leading Democratic Daily
in Hudson County.
These papers offer unequalled
facilities for advertising. Simi
lar value has never before been
given at so moderate a rate in
the State of New Jersey.
BOARDERS WANTED.
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
Furnished room with board for two
gentlemen; also table board. No. 687 Jersey
avenue. *
I7RONT ALCOVE AND SQUARE ROOMS TO LET*
J excellent board. No. 604 Jersey avenge.
IAROÈ AND SMALL ROOMS TO LET, WITH
j board, In Van Vorst Park. Call or address,
Hancock. Room No. 47, Weld on Building.
<IQ7 MONTGOMERY STREET - ROOM AND
ώυ I board for gentleman or lady; table board.
When you call at ttoe above addresses,
mention_thls paper,
FURNISHED ROOMS.
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
Furnished front room to let·, all im
provements. No. 584 Jersey avenue.
Nicely furnished room to let. ko. et
Sussex street.
rpo LET—NEATLY FURNISHED FRONT ROOM,
1. for one or two gentlemen. No. 558^ Jersey
avenue.
r LET-FURNISHED ALCOVE FLOOR F0 9»
light housekeeping. No. 213 Grand 8tree.,
fro LET—AN ELEGANT FURNISHED PARLOR
X suitable for a physician. No. 552 Jersey avenue
INSTRUCTIONS. ; J
NEW JERSEY
STATE NORMAL and MODEL SCHOOLS
TRENTON.
Fall term will eommence Monday, September 16.
The Normal School prepares for teaching: the
Model for business, the drawing room or college.
Total cost at the Normal, including board, wash
ing, books, etc., $150 to fcl(K) t»er year. At tho
Model $3UV per year. Buildings lighted by gas and
heated by steam. Dormitories elegantly furnished,
provided with baths, etc.
For circular containing full particulars, address
J. M. GREEN, Principal,
t Trenton, N. J.
PACKARD'S BUSINESS COLLEGE
ASD
SCHOOL· OF STENOGRAPHY #
Will open for the fall term on Tuesday, September
3. Places can be secured by letter or personal appli
cation. Send for circular.
S. S. PACKARD, President.
No. 101 East. 2'.Ul Street, New York,
jjtQAA A YEAR- BOARD ASD TUITION; BOVs
«ÎjZiUU and girls. Address Epiacopal Schools,
LAWYERS.
Φη<5μΑ3ρΓ NOOÎÎAN', ~jfC 'LATÎfËfjfKjsSïif
X Court Houee. JersoyJJity Heights.
manteIFmanîels! ..
John C. Fox & Sons,
The leading house for the
manufacture of all kinds
of SLATE MANTELS.
BEAUTIFUL IN" COLOR.
EXCELLENT IN FINISH.
MADE IN ANY STYLE.
AN IMMENSE STOCK.
AT LOWEST PRICES.
And warranted thè lifet in the market. -31
Our traced line mttkels are Gilt, with best Gold
Leaf, which lasts foit'ver, and not with Brousse
powder or Metal leaf, which soon turns Black, and
the Beauty of the Mantel Destroyed.
Don't be deceived. See our mantels before pur
chasiug elsewhere.
FACTORY AND SHOW ROOMS.
Address 527 & 529 Gran-' St.,
2 A 4 Woodwatd St., Jersey City, N. J
SPECIAL.
WE HAVE ON HAND THE LARGEST
AND FINEST STOCK OF
DRY 090HS, 1ATODBÏ, ΒΟΤΤΙ,ΙΝβ.
BAKERS', MUTCHKKS·, CABPE»·
TERS' AND MILK WAGONS IN
THE UNITED STATES.
BEST MATERIAL AND FINEST WORK. SPECIAL
WAOONS BVILT TO ORDER. ALL WORK WAR
RANTED. CALL AND EXAMINÉ.
RACINE WAGQH AND CARRIAGE COMPANY,
163 and 16S SPRING ST.. NEW YORK
WILFRED G. LAWRENCE,
MANUFACTURING AMD WHOLESAL*
Confectioner,
No. 291 First Street,
JUNCmON iraWARK AVENUS.
intaiblitw *ii 8eoond-H»ad Steow Cue» QlM*
Jan.8Mlae.Ma

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