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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, October 31, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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-THE
<£itg IJcws.
Editor.
3HED EVERY AFTERNOON
BV
ÎWS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
Ko. 90 Μοητοομκ&ϊ STREET
(WïLDON BUTLDIIfO.J
-sky City News:—Single copies, two
«ription, six dollars per year; postage
J^aY Morntnq News:—Published every
Sunday morning; single copies, three cents; sub
scription, one dollar and fifty cents per year;
postage free.
Entered in the post office at Jersey City aa
eeeond class mail matter.
AH business communications should be ad
dressed to This N*ws Publishing Company; all
others to the Managing Editor.
BRANCH OFFICES:
Advertisements, Subscriptions and Newsdeal
ers* Order* received:—
f ΊΒοboken—First and Clinton Streets, J. D. Sin
clair.
Union Hill—H. Fischer. No. 62 Palisade Avenue
Bergen Point—T. W. Dobaon, opposite Railway
I>epot,
Five Corners—G. W. PbeifPer, No. 063 Newark
Avenue.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 3L 1889.
Τ hit paper Is Democratic in principles
jttnd is Independent in its views on aU
I questions., -
THE
set City Hews,
EAD1NG IN
OCRATIC HUDSON
APER COUNTY.
IRCULATION:
- - - Daily.
OOO - - A Week.
Over one Hundred and Eighty Tbonsand
1 Persons Read TMs Paper Every weeï.
The Sunday Moriing News
HAS THE
LARGEST
CIRCULATION
IN
HUDSON
COUNTY.
ι EEtiULAR DJiJUOOKATIC NOMINATIONS.
For Governor,
LEON ABBETT,
For State Senator,
Edward f. Mcdonald.
For County Clerk,
dennis Mclaughlin.
For Register,
GEORGE B. FIELDER
For Director-at-Laraje,
AUGUST M. BRUGGEMANN.
For Assemblymen:—
District.
I.—Michael Mullonk.
II.—Henry Bybneb.
III.—James Mukphy.
IV.—William C. Heppenheimeb.
i_: V.—John W. Aymak.
VI.—Andrew R. Donnell.
VII.—John F. Kelly.
VIII.—Andrew J. Boyle.
IX.—Lawrence Fag an.
X.—Thomas B. Usher.
For Freeholders:—
District.
I.—John D. Gorman.
II.—Michael Hennessy.
III.—Peter T. Donnelly.
IV.—Adam G. Smith.
V.—William Pairson.
VI.—Frank Kimmehly.
VII.—William H. Ellis.
VIII.—William J. Tierney,
IX.— John Bruning.
X.—Dennis M. Noonan.
The Assembly Fight in the Fourth.
Colonel Heppenheimer made a right
manly speech at Pohlman's last night.
He voted for the Charter, he said, be
cause he believed it to be his duty to
do so. He had enquired into the af
fairs of Jersey City and had made up
is mind that speedy and radical re
rxn was necessary to save the mu
cipality from bankruptcy. He had
regrets for what he had done, and
apologies to make. He believed
citizens by their vote had ratified
approved his action.
He did not propose to assail Mr.
era. He merely pointed out that
that gentleman was in the field sim
ply to elect the Republican candidate
without regard to the true interests
of the people which demand that
every possible Democrat should be
sent to the Assembly. He, Mr. Hep
penheimer, was marked for special
opposition because he had favored
the Charter and because he had op
posed Mr. Kern's selfish interests.
But, were the eases reversed, he
' would lievet set himself up against
the candidate of the party which had
made him what he was in public life.
This is the tiilk of a man,and a good
democrat. Mr. Heppenheimer looked
like a man, and his voice rang like
the voice of an honest man when he
8:iid it. There is not a wora or it tnat
we cannot endorse. The situation in
the Fourth diatriot is a peculiar one.
On the one hand Colonel Heppen
hoimer represents* charter reform fpr
Jersey City.
On tlie other "Bill" Kern stands for
the corrupt, extravagant regime of
the "Big Pour."
Which do the people of the Fourth
District approve? That is the ques
tion.
The election in that district should
not run upon party lines. Every
honest Republican who wishes well
to the city should vote for Colonel
Heppenheimer as a matter of prin
ciple.
The Amateur Bowling League, of
this city, evidently appreciates a reli
able newspaper. At last night's meet
ing the League passed a resolution
making Thk Jersey City Nkws its
kotIieia.l paper. This is the sort of an
ï" which we are willing to be;
■ remarks made a few days ago
to this case. This is not
„doctrine; it is a yues
tion of fact.
League we shs
to print the etrS
news of this city,
sufficient space to be fully"
telligible, and without a trace of
the prejudice. We return thanks to
League for its good opinion of us, and i
wish it ail success. It has certainly '
made an excellent beginning. Noth
ing could be more sgtisfactory to the
lovers of good sport than the sight of
such a meeting as was held last night, ι
when the code of proceedure was the
great unwritten law of good fellow
ship.
The Finance Bomtl's Wise Conserv
atism.
The action of the Board of Finance
Board in the matter of the new
police station establishes that Board
in the confidents of the public.
It may be a disappointment t-o the
police oflloj'als, who are naturally
anxious-for more comfortable quar
ter». The public, too, are anxious
that they should be suitably and
comfortably housed, not as in the
present rattletrap building, but in a
iine new structure more in keeping
with their deserts and with the pros
perity of the city.
But the public in the present con
juncture will approve the stand the
financiers have taken on the subject.
For the obstructions that have been
interposed the responsibility is not
with the Board of Finance, but with
the Street and Water Board.
The e-entlemen of this latter Board
have not conducted the negotiation in
such a manner as to commend it to
the lovers of square dealing and fair
play. If any one entertains a sus
picion that the Street Board has more
than a public interest in the contract,
its members have no one but them
selves to blame.
The Board of Finance is right in in
sisting upon interposing its veto, as
long as the awarding of the contracts
is manifestly irregular—if not worse.
"It would be but a sorry victory to
elect Leon Abbett, and then send a
Republican Legislature to Trenton to
hamper him," said Prosecutor Win
field last night at Pohlmann's.
Mr. Winfield is a most admirable
thinker and speaker. He hits the
nail on the head every time. Here is
the most important feature of the
campaign presented in the most
prominent and impressive way, just
in one sentence.
But, Mr. Winfield, that is not the
sort of victory we are going to win,
and above all things Hudson will not
desert her Governor in that way. We
will send McDonald, and Mullone, and
Aymar, and Heppenheimer and all the
other Democratic candidates to the
head of the polls. Just see if we
don't.
AMUSEMENTS.
Hoboken Theatre.
The successful romantic actor, Mr.
Edwin Ardeii, will appear at Jacobs'
Hoboken Theatre tonight in his
stirring and beautiful love story; en
titled "Barred Out." Among its num
erous realistic episodes and splendid
scenic effects are "The Actors Dress
ing room." "The fall from the
Tower." "The great Whipping
Sceue." "The Gambling Episode,"
in which the blackleg is pinned
through the hand; a wonderful bit of
realism presented only by Mr. Arden.
Without doubt this plav will prove
one of the most successful dramas
saen on the stage for years. Its mord
is good and its story is entertaining
PERSONALS.
Ex-State Senator James Scovel, of Camden
visited the Republican State Headquarters this
morning with visions of a large majority for
General Grubb in South Jersey.
Ex-Judge John Δ. Blair has returned from his
trip to Maine much improved in health. His
recent illness has been α great disappointment
to the managers of the Republican campaign, as
Judge Blair is one of the most forcible and
logical speakers in the State.
Henry S. White, who was at one time collector
of this port, but who is now living at Red Bank,
called upon some of his many friends in Jersey
City this morning.
Colonel John McAnerney has just returned
from a two weeks' inspection of the railroads of
the Richmond & Danville and the Terminal
systems.
Clarence Sackett. who used to be assistaut
editor of the The Sunday Morning News, ia the
Democratic candidate for Freeholder in the
Tenth district of Essex county.
The shooting season will open tomorrow for
quail, grouse, rabbits and squirrels throughout
New Jersey, and quite favorable reports have
been heard regarding the abundance of game in
nearly all localities where it is usually found.
Still, these reports are always heard just before
the shooting season opens, and they are not al
ways trustworthy. As a matter of fact, several
observing old sportsmen say that they doubt if
the extreme wet weather early in the year was
conducive to the breeding of either birds or rab
bits, and they do not see any reason to believe
that the ruffed grouse will be found in any great
quantity, or that the young rabbits survived the
flooding which the whole State got a dozen times
this year.
A young girl of Pittscown, Huuterdon county,
has become insane on religion to such an extent
that she persists in living among the limbs on
large trees so that she may be nearer heaven.
She is frequently removed from the trees which
she has climbed. She will be sent to the Morris
Plains Insane Asylum, n
The Government Inspector says the cattle
disease in Monmouth county is caused by the
Texan fly.
The directors of the Delaware & Haritan Canal
went on an inspection of the condition of the
canal Monday.
Lawrence S. Mott, formerly a Philadelphia
Times reporter and a Trenton editor, but now a
resident of Newark, has been made one of the
directors and chairman of the Finance Com
mittee of the Oneida, Oneonta & New York Rail
road Company. This road is being built through
the hop growing counties of New York State,
and when completed will form a connecting link
for the Delaware and Hudson and the Ulster &
Delà were roads from the center of the State to
New York City.
George A. Halsey, at the dinner of the New
Jersey Society of the Sons of the Revolution on
Tuesday night, told an interesting incident, rela
tive to the purchase of the old Washington head
quarters at Morristown. Mr. Halsey. in the sum
mer of 1873, determined to buy the old place for
a summer residence. The house and farm were
to be sold to the highost bidder that summer
As^r. Halsey approached the grounds, he met
V
il»? the property, and it vrka declared sold to I
Messrs. Halsey, Randolph and Halsted. Mr Hal
sey condoled with his competitor, when to his
surprise and consternation the latter said:—
"Yes, I didn't like to see it pass into private
hands. I wanted to make a public museum of
it." Explanations followed, the loss by the com
petition was floured up and the now quartette
felt just a little blue. The fourth person, William
Lidgerwood, joined the original trio in standing
the expense, and the Washington Association,
which now controls ^he headquarters, was
formed. Mr. Halsey is president of it today.
The greatest object of interest there it» the
original commission of Washington, signed by
John Hancock. It was presented to the associa
tion by Mr. Green, of Philadelphia.
Robert vom Cleft is a conspicuous figure
among the prominent citizens of the Heights.
Connected with the principal German societies
of the Hill; of fine figure and commanding pres
ence, he is notable in social and society circles.
He is the Worshipful Master of AJlemania
Lodge, F. and A. M., and an enthusiastic mem
ber of the craft. He is also largely interested in
the German-American School and various
benevolent associations. His beautiful Queen
Anne cottage, at the corner of Summit avenue
and Lincoln street, is one of the prettif st homes
of the Hill. Mr. vom Cleff is an importer of
hardware in New York. He does not dabble in
politics, but is an enthusiastic admirer of the
drama, especially the German.
Oscar Klahre, director of the Teutonia Manner
chor. the Hudson City Quartette Club and other
German musical societies, is perhaps the best
known musician of Hudson county. He is always
selected to conduct the full choruses of the
united singing societies' concerts, and is ever
ready to give his services in aid of benevolent
work. He is a brilliant pianist and thorough
musician, but as unassumiug as the humblest of
the numerous singers under his control.
THOMAS-CABLE.
Many Guests See a Pretty Wedding—
Other .Social Event*.
A fashionable wedding occurred last
night at the residence of the bride's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John N. Cable, at
No. OS Fail-view avenue, when their
daughter Lulu and Mr. Charles Thomas
were married. The large parlors were
profusely decorated with palms, ferns
and flowers. In the large bay windowi
where the bridal party stood, were hung
'wo great balls of chrysanthemums, one
white, the other pink. The window was
a solid mass of green most artistically
arranged. Leading from the door at
which the bridal party entered was an
aisle formed of pink ribbons.
At eight o'clock the bridal party en
tered the parlors. First walked the
clergyman, the Rev. Charles Herrj fol
lowing him came the bridegroom, at
tended by Mr. James Pope, and the
ushers, Mr. A1 Cable und Mr. Fred
Crary.
Then the bridesmaids, Misses Jennie
and Laura Cable, entered. Preceding
the bride, who walked with her father,
was the little maid of honor, Elsie Grit
more, a niece of the bridegroom. The
bride wore an elegant gown of white
faille, with elaborate decorations of
pearl. A long tulle veil was fastened by
a cluster of white hyacinths and a dia
mond crescent, and tell gracefully about
her. She also wore the gift of the bride
groom, a handsome diamond pendant.
After the Rev. Charles Herr performed
the ceremony a reception followed. The
bridesmaids were dressed alike in rich
gowns of pink china silk, made in Em
pire style. Mrs. John Cable wbre an
elaborate toilette of white faille and pur
ple velvet. The bride received many
handsome and costly presents. During
the evening Mr. and Mrs. Thomas started
for a trip to Canada, where they will
spend several weeks. Fine music was
provided by Prof. Craumer.
Some of the guests were Mr. and Mrs.
.Tnsenh iiilinore. Miss ThomaK. Miss
Mamie Thomas, Mr. ami Mrs. William
G rattan, Mr. and Mrs. William Bumsted,
Mr. and Mrs. Throckmorton, Miss Mag
gie Throckmorton, Mr. and Mrs. God
ley. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Purdy, Miss
Mamie Wilkinson, Mr. and Mrs. John
Herbert, Dr. and Miss Durrie, Dr. and
Mrs. Cropper, Miss Ada Illlngworth, Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Linn, Miss Kittie Un
derwood, Mr. William Post, Mr. Frank
Hehill, Mr. Percy Wilson, Mr.
Edward L. Young, Misses Annie and
Nellie Post, Miss Mamie Ab
bett, Colonel William F. Abbett,
Miss Lida Falkenburg, Mr. William
Vidal, Misses Alice and Jessie Lyon, Mr.
Charles Lyon, Dr. George Steele, Miss
Frankie Steele, Miss Mamie Condict, Mr.
and Mrs. Livingston Gifford, Mr. John
Wilson. Mr. Frank Robinson, Mr. Harry
Pope. Mr. and Mrs. Cheever, Mr. Fred
Carter, Mr. ami Mrs. Cilley, of Buffalo;
Mr. and Mrs. Day, Miss Leila Hines, Mr.
and Mrs. Spencer Wenrt, Misses Mamie
and Maria Frazer, Miss Natalie Bray, Mr.
George Young, Miss Emma Marzolf, Mr.
and Mrs. Vidal, Dr. Pype, Mr. and Mrs.
Vincent Schenck, Miss Nellie Jackson,
Mr. Bobert Carter, Miss Anna Hetherlug
ton, Mr. John Headden, Mr. James
Ogden.
Misa Coleman's Kuril re Party.
A euchre party was glveu last night by
Miss Edith Coleman at her residence on
Monticello avenue. Four tables were
arrauged for players and the games were
greatly enjoyed.
Pretty prizes were Riven the successful |
ones. After supper was served at eleven
o'clock there was some fine music and
dancing. Mr. Cieorge Fentou sang a solo ]
excellently, aud a violin and piano duet
was well played by the Misses Wood, of j
Brooklyn. Among the guests were Mr.
and Mrs. Stevens, Mr. and Mrs. Davis,
Misa Ella Davis, Miss May Edwards. Miss I
Belle Gifïord, Miss Aunie Mason, Miss |
Kittle Bennett, Miss Sadie Adams, Mr.
Henry King, Mr. George Burrows, Mr.
Frank Laue, Mr. William Little.
A nli'thclay Celebration.
Mrs. Delsteen, of Palisade avenue,
celebrated her forty-ninth birthday las t |
evening at the residence of Mr. aud Mrs.
D ecker. A splendid literary and musical
programme was provided, after which
an elegant supper was served. Eight of
lier children and fourteen grandchildren
were present. Among others present
were:—Mr. and Mrs. Jolin McKeuua, Mr.
and Mr*. T. McKetina, Mr. aud Mrs. P.
Gray, M iss H easier, Miss Kock and Mr.
Harry Moore.
Packer Institute Class *89.
Miss Perkins entertained the class of
'89 of Packer Institute, of which she ig |
a member, at her home at No. 353 Bergen
avenue, yesterday afternoon. The class
numbers thirty-seven, all of wnom were
present. The afternoon was spent in en
Joying some flue music and other aniuse
meuts. A collation was served by Mor
row and Day.
Poor Old Tub.
The United States steamer Galena is re
ported to be aground In Swash Chanuel
in the lower bay. She is said to lie in an
unfavorable position. A government tug
has been sent to her assistance. The tugs
succeeded in pulling her off a little before
noon. ^
Piucs, iTcaiîm, Bi.ekdino, Uloeb, etc., CrsKD |
without CritTlNHi I.lOATixa or Chloroform. Our
patients attend tb business while roceivinit treat
ment. HJustrateil paper* sent free. Address
Dre. Μ*Β·ι· anil Amison, No. 41 West U'weuty
uiitu jtrwc, New Sur·.,».»
FEMININITY.
Y GIRLS WHO ARK
'ON CRICKET.
Sister anil Her IVoii
1 Railway Work — Male ami
Female Vanity—Limerick Lace.
Ethel, daughter of Sir Morell Macken
zie, in a letter from London to the Boston
Transcript, says:—
We have become as enthusiastic sports
men as our brothers and our cousins and
our uncles. We ride, hunt, swim, fish,
row, play lawn tennis and cricket with
the keenness of connoisseurs, and I have
even heard it whispered that at a large
school in the North the boarders,
equipped in suitable costumes, have fierce
contentions at football. Only this sea
son, at the marriage between Hon.
Thomas Brassey ami Lady Idina Neville,
the bridesmaids were arrayed in serge
gowns with loose shirts and the colors of
the cricket club which the bride had so
often captained with success; and mar
riage does not seem to have interfered
with Lady Idina's devotion to the na
tional game, for in spite of tne counter
attractions of the London season she ap
pears to be iu very good form this year, at
any rate she has been scoring well.
Onlv a week or two ago Sunridge Park,
near Bromley, Kent, was en fete for a
ladies' match, Miss Scott, daughter of
Lady Edward Scott, captaining the
"home team," and Lady Milner bringing
a strong eleven against lier. The field
looked very bright and pretty, for all the
players wore wliite gowns and straw hats,
displaying their club colors, those of Miss
Scott's eleven being pale blue, while the
visitors had a pretty combination of pink,
green and white. Miss Scott won the toss
and went in, but the inning of her eleven
was not a very successful one, chieiiy
owing to the bowling of Lady H. Neville,
while the visitors were more fortunate,
and 170 was scored before the la3t wicket
fell, tiie chief run getters bciug Lady
Idina Brassey and Miss Lawrence. Miss
Haukey, unlike most of the ladies (for
this is a quality in whicli our sex are, as a I
rule, rather deficient), proved herself a |
very smart "field" and made a fine catch
at- point.·!
At Calcot Park, near Reading, η game
was recently played which was dignified
by the name of a county match, Lady Ed
ward Somerset bringing an eleven of
Gloucestershire ladies to play against
Miss Hargreaves'.
Although some good play was shown by
the latter Berkshire eleven, Gloucester
shire kept up its reputation, and Ladv fid
ward's side was easily victorious, Lady
Cholmondeley, a very enthusiastic crick
eter, making twenty·thrjeand Miss Huut
fifty-three. The bowling average was
much better than is usually the case with
ladies, for .Miss Moore took four wickets
for twenty-four runs; Mrs. Wilson, three
for sixteen: Miss Beaucham, three for
seventeen, and Lady Muriel Howard,
three for thirty-four.
An interesting contest was talked of at
the Lyric Club, Barnes, earlier in the
year with the rival teams, captained re
spectively by Lady Oholinonrteley and
Imdy Kaincliffe, but the season proved too
busy to allow of Its coming off.
Iii the absence of α sufficient number of
ladies the opposing eleven is often com
posed of men with their right arms in
slings, who, under paiu of a very heavy
forfeiture of runs, are forbidden to re
move them, even for an instant. I am
afraid, however, that these matches are
not always conducted with absolute fair
ness, for the umpires, who are usually of
the masculine gender, find it difficult to
resist the beseeching glances of the field,
when "leg before" or a doubtful catch is
appealed for, and a young man can
scarcely be expected to do his utmost to
bowl or catch tiie maiden whose heart he
aspires to win. It may gratify her when
the ball slips through his clumsy fingers,
or when she hits his bowling to all ends
of the field, but the other girls look 011
askance—they did not have such chances
—and the men will indignantly grumble
"that it's not cricket," forgetting what a
stake the unfortunate player is trying for,
and with what joy he is bowling himself
into the affections of his lady love.
Mise Garrett's Business Head.
Robert Garrett's recovery of. mental
and physical health is the first [gleam of
sunshine that has come to the Garrett
family for more than five years. No
household with millions in its. possession
has ever been so afflicted as the Garretts.
Within half α decade Mrs. John W. Gar
rett has been thrown trom her carriage
and died from her injuries: her husband
soon afterward succumbed to a malady
that was aggravated by the death of his
wife; then their eldest son, Robert Gar
rett, lost his mind, and while iiis phy
sicians were taking him on a tour of tlie
world in the hope that this would restore
his mental powers, his brother, Harrison
Garrett, was drowned by the collision of
his yacht with a steamer in Chesapeake
Hay. But the friends of Robert Garrett
have never ceased to predict that he
would one day bê himself again and re
enter the railroad and finance field with
vigor and wisdom. The prophecy may
soon be realized. The increase of the
Garrett capilal during the illness of
Robert Garretj, is an accepted fact in
financial circles, notwithstanding that
the family holdings of Baltimore and
Ohio Railroad stock have drawn no
dividend for three years. This increase
is due altogether to the sound business
sense of Miss Mary Garrett, the only
daughter of John W. Garrett ana sister
of Robert.
"It seems incredible, but it is the
truth,-' said a Baltimore lawyer to a
Philadelphia friend recently, "that this
young lady has virtually handled the
Garrett railroad and banking interests
ever since one of her brothers was at
tacked with disease and the other lost
his lite. She is not yet thirty years of
age and is a handsome woman of the
blonde type. She obtained her business
training from her father, to whom she
was a constant companion in his later
years, and she turned it to good account
when the Garrett family was actually de
prived of a male head. No woman has
ever had such a responsibility of this kind
placed upon lier as that which Miss Gar
rett voluntarily shouldered, and if the
whole story of her work could be told it
would be » narrative of the most extraor
dinary business qualifications that any
woman has ever shown. The millions of
the family have been added to during her
stewardship. She possesses some three
millions in her own name and she has
made Robert Garrett a wealthier man
than he was when he inherited his
father's seat as president of the Baltimore
and Onio .Railroad.— Philadelphia En
(in !
Vanity.
Not only does every womau who enters
an elevator containing a mirror turn
round, immediately, touch up her frizzes
aud remove flakes of soot from her face,
but men adjust their neckties, take a d e
liberate survey of themselves, and pose
and inflate their chests like Colonel Sel
lers, of lamented memory. A little sten
ographer, in her building over near the
City Hall, had been observing this pecu
liarity in the lords of creation. One day,
having surprised a man making a more
deliberate and careful scrutiny than
usual, she expressed her opiuiou to
"James," the elevator man:—"You
needn't talk to me about the vanity of
women after that," she exclaimed scorn
fully;" men look at themselves twice as
long and twice as intently us the vainest
woman that ever breathed." "You didn't
hear what ho said to me, did your" asked
James. "No." "He said 'I've been
drunk tour days, 'an I just wanted to see
how I looked.1 "—Chicago Inter-Ocean.
Limerick Lace.
Miss Forster, the adopted daughter of
the late Irish Chief · Secretary, has nearly
succeeded in reviving the manufacture
of Limerick lace, an important Irish In
dustry which has long been neglected.
Miss Forster, since her marriage with
Mr. Robert Vere O'Brion. has lived near
Limerick, aud she recently turned her at·
\
teutioii to reviving the luce industry,
which now bids fair to resume its wonted
activity. Assisted by a committee she has
opened a traiuing school lor girl», the pu
pils of which are making rapid progress
m the art. All the necessary material haw
been supplied to the girls, who, in addition
to their ordinary training, receivo lessons
at the local school of art in connection
with South Kensingtou.
Industrial Family Names.
Our Batters may be readily traced back
to their floury-handed ancestors, but the
Baxters must be followed for generations
before we find that they were of the same
family, being the descendants of the Bani
sters, who were the offspring ot the B"ge
sters, who acknowledged that they were
the children of the Bakesters, who were
feminine bakers. Of the bread-making
tribe were e!so the Breaders and the
Whitcbreads, the latter perhaps once
priding themselves on the color of their
stock in trade, '"hile nearly related to
them were the Mills, the Millers and the
Mealers. The large and respectable fam
ily of the Boulangers came from the
French bakers, who carried on their trade
in England during the ages when family
names were growing, while Mr. Lowe
suggests that the Bellingers and the Bul
liners are of the same origin. Few points
in Great Britain are more than a hundred
miles from the sea, and in all ages fish
has formed one of the staple articles of
British diet. Catching the fish was, there
fore, au important industry, and Fish,
Fisher and Fisherman doubtless had their
origin in the occupation of the men who
first assumed these names, of which fact
there is abundant record. It Is quite pos
sible also, as Max Muller suggests, that
met» may have made a specialty of taking
or of selling a particular kind of fish, and
thus Salmon fiom Kobert le Salmoner,
Bering from John le Heringer, aud 1
Trouter from Roger le Trowter. may have 1
arisen without violence to the laws of :
philology.—Pop illar Science Monthly.
Dr. Burroughs use» nitro glycerine as a
substitute for alcohol in cases of emer
gency. The preparation used is a one per
cent, solution, the dose being oue clrop.
It may be given in water, when it is al
most tasteless, or, in emergency, a drop
may be placed upon the tongue. Dr. Bur
roughs has fouud it relieved pain and
dyspnœa ill neuralgia of the heart (angina
pectoris). A drop on the tongue roused a
man who fainted during dressing of his
Wounds. Anaemic headache was quickly
relieved by it. One drop instantly re
lieved spasmodic asthmu, enabling the
patient to resume work at once. A patient
with typhoid fever became delirious and
extremely prostrated on the twenty
fourth day. His temperature fell; Dulse
became slow and remittent. He refused
brandy. One-fourth of a drop of nitro
glycerine (oue per cent, solution) was
given every fifteen minutes for twohours.
The pulse became full and regular, the
delirium subsided and in twenty-four
hours tlie mind was clear. In cases of
opium narcosis and of uremic corao, with
feeble pulse, great benefit followed its
use. It is-suggested, also, in any case of
apparent sudden death and from drown
ing. Ni'ro glycerine solution, dropped
upon the tongue, might start the heart
again and revive the patient.—London
Lancet.
RAILROAD NOTES.
The Lehigh Valley Railroad Company
has put its train hands in new uniforms.
The conductors and baggage masters
wear the regulation blue cutaway with
brass buttons and have on the lapels the
letters L. V. R. R. in gold. Two heavy
bauds of gold lace ruu around the cap, on
front of which is the word couductor. The
btakcsmeus uniforms differ from these
only iu the buttons and trimmings, which
are of silver.
The Erie Railroad Company has ar
ranged l'or a cheap autumn excursion to
and from Niagara Falls and Rochester, to
start from thé Erie Railroad depot, this
city, Saturday, November i!, at quarter
past six p. in. Ail tickets will be good
for return trip, by any regular train, up
to and including Tuesday November ϋ.
The round trip to and from the Falls will
cost only $».50.and to and from Roehester,
17.
The steamer Flushing, of the Thirty
fourth street ferry, has been chartered by
the Erie Railroad Company while its
boute are being overhauled and repaired.
The boy locomotive wipers at the Le
high Valley round house in South Easton
have a practice of initiating every new
boy that ioins their rauks, Henry, sou of
Jon η Mattes, became a wiper last Friday
night. Early yesterday morning they be
gan initiating him by tying a rope aronud
his legs and dragging him over the floor.
Mattes screamed with pain and the fun
stopped. It was then discovered that his
leg had been broken. The injury is worse
than the boys supposed. Mattes' leg is so
badly swollen that up to yesterday after
noon the doctor had been unable to prop
erly attend to it. Worst of all, it is feared
the injury may cause the boy to iose the
leg.
On Tuesday I. N. Smith, track super
visor on the New York division of the
Pennsylvania Railroad, between New
Brunswick and.ûeaus, was awarded $150
as lirst prize for best Section of track on
the Pennsylvania Raiiroad lines. The
second prize of $100 went to T. N. Wilson
for the best division on the main line be
tween Harrisburg and Columbia.
Passengers ou the Delaware, Lacka
wanna and Western Railroad complain
of the nuisance from the train boys, who
come through constantly with books,
candy packages, etc. They are unceri
moniously thrown into the laps of the
passengers, who ara expected to take
care of them until the boy returus to
gather them up or to sell them. An ex
change says;—"The monopolistic Morris
and Esiex newspaper boy is rarely mot
on those trains that travel during re
duced fare hours. One explanation given
is that there is not enough trade on the
trains to warrant placing the bovs on
them. Another explanation given is that
the workiugmen are not so meek as the
mid-day passengers. They think uothing
of sweeping all the papers and books olf
the seat usually occupied by the boy, and
on occasions they hâve been known to
yank the boy oft the seat when they
could procure no other."
No doubt a great many people who
iitvïD uuciuwo ii* «uv v/«uuiui iiamuau
Depot and some who don't, have noticed
the clock faces, with which the leaving
time of each train is marked. Now, it
does not seem that iu this enlightened
age a person would not know what these
were for, but, nevertheless, there are
people seen in there every day setting
their watch by the supposed time piece.
An attache of the depot, in conversation
with a reporter, said:—"I see people of in
telligent appearance every day or so set
ting their watches here, who, not seeing
the large clock iu the entrance, naturally
think that these dials contain correct
railroad time, and 1 have as many as five
or six people ask me every day if that is
the correct time."
And tli s is the nineteenth century.
Owing to the damage to the railroad
track from Seabright to Sandy Hook by
the late storm, tile Central Railroad
Company has decided to abandon that
part of the road and will build a spur
from Seabright to connect at Atlautic
Highlands. The latter place will be the
terminus of the New Jersey Southern
road i ustead of Sandy Hook,
The Pennsylvania Railroad Company is
making experiments with a fireproof rail
way car. The distinctive feature of the
car is that it is ail irou and steel. The
roof, sides and ends of the car are made
of boiler plate riveted together. The car
is somewhat in the shape of a horseshoe,
the round part being the top. In the bot
tom are several steel girdles placed in
cement, much the same as in Pullmau
care. Along the sides is an array of win
dows, «reciseJy similar to those of ordi
nary passenger coaches. The top . of the
car is destitute of heavy roof and venti
lating arrangements that are seen on
ordinary cars. It is said that ventilation
is secured by pumping air into the cars
through pipes. These pipes iu winter are
arranged so as to furnish warm uir. it. is
claimed that it will not burn, will last
forever and will not telescope or break up
in a collision. If, on testing it. the com
pany finds that it will run smoothly and
be comfortable for the occupants, Jt will
be adopted,
V M
William dk.akkt. Fnniahmz γτπλλγϊλλθγ. γα?
rlagi-s and e*m& chaire to 'et, ;)β Οτονβ «IKac . «r
aey City. K. J. Téléphona cail. MO. VU.*»0
ADVïRTWOniKjrre UîfDES THE H CAD O*
MARRIAGES ANL) DEATHS
WW he inserted in the Jiiisir? City News an1
the Sunday Mornito News at the rate of ten
ceii is a line for the first insertion; Ave omit a Une
f or each mbseuuent insertion.
DIED.
CKOWLEY -On Wednesday, (Jctober 80, 1«89, at hi
late residence. No. ir. Wayne street, William
Crowley, husband of Maria Crowley, in his fifty
fourth year. ·
Friends of the family, also members of the A. O.
F. and Amalgamated Society of Engineers, are in
vited to attend the funeral on Friday, November t,
at >st. Matthew's P. E. Church, Sussex street, at two
o'clock p. m.
DAtTMONT—On Tuesday, October 29,13R9. at her late
residence. No. D4 Forrest street, Hattie E. Wood,
wife of fctoorge W. Daumout.
Funeral Her vices will be held at the house on
Thursday, October 31, at half pu si one o,clock.
Interment private.
M. J. BOYLAN,
Funeral Director,
198 Pavonia ftve.. Jersey City.
MEAL ^ JB8 TATE.^ _
IX)R HOUSES AND LOTS IN JERSEY CITY
1 . BERGEN, ORKtNVILU:, ΠΑΥΟΝΝΚ AND BKIV
UEN POINT. CALL OR WRITE TO
JOHN N. BRUNS,
No. 137 Ocean Aveaae, Jersey Cirr.
so. 77 worn drew ermrnn
END FOR LIST OF CITY AND COUNTRY PROP
ERTY.
ROBERT M. FLOYD,
JERSEY CITY HEIGHTS,
36 OCEAN AVE. COR. UNION 6T,
Real Estate & insurance.
JAMES TUtSILTY,
Real Estate and Insurance GTroker,
ESQ. 21 I NEWARK AVE.
HOUSE LOTS, 25x130 FEET.
Given Away
AT
PASADENA,
ocean COUNTY, n. J.
Call at No. 35 Montgomery street, J. C.t for in
formation, or JOHN N. BRUMS, No. 187 Ocean ave
nue.
TO LET.
ELEGANT (VROOM FLATS, alt modern Improve
meute, at $19 to $23—210-14 Pavonia avenue.
4-rooin Flats at $15 to $18—fKW-12 Grove street.
6-room Flats at $15 to $18 — 151 and 153 Pavonia
avenue.
BEAUTIFUL STORES, plate glass windows, with
dining room, kitchen ana bedroom, at |»25—15J. and
153 Pavonia avenue.
DESIRABLE APARTMENTS, at 87 Up.
D. J. HULSHIZER, Gents' Furnishing Goods.
_ 19U Pavonia avenue.
07e WHITÔN STREET—TO LET, A 9-ItOOM
& é < > bouse; Improvements. Apply next door.
For Sale.
TO LET-ONE APARTMENT, IN FIRST-CLASS
apartment house. "GRANVILLE," Main and
Grove streets. East Orange. Nine large, lUrht rooms
and large piazza; decorated and papered; all im
provements; g;is, pu 11K WATKit, steam heat; janitor
on premises; floor space, 25x&> feet; on Orange and
NewarK street railroad, and three minutes from
Grove street station, Morris and Easex Railroad;
moderate rent; includes water, steam heat and Jan
itor's services. Inquire of Janitor or Druggist at
corner or A. D. Palmer, No. 115 Broadway, New
W,»L
POLITICAL.
T0II6HT
HUI
HUDSON COUNTY
Ballot Reform Association.
Ν OX-PARTISAN
RATIFICATION MEETING
AT THE TABERNACLE;
Cor. Henderson and York Streets.
ORDER OP EXERCISE8:
0 vert ure Tabernacle Band
Address Rev, J. L. Scudder, Chairman of the ι
Meeting
Report of the Executive Committee J. R. A bar :
banell, Chairman
Musical Selection Tabernacle Band j
Address John D· Witt Warner, of New York
Musical Selection ...Tabernacle Band i
Reading of Letters and Resolutions.. J. T. Altemus, 1
Secretary
Address Hon. E. F. McDonald
Address Hon. William S. Stuhr !
Musical Selection Tabernacle Band
Address Richard J. Allen
Musical Selection Ta bom acle Baud j
Address Louis F. Post, of New York
Address James M. Br ana
Cera et Solo
Address William M. Ivins, of New York
Musical Selection Tabernacle Band
SHORT ADDRESSES BY THE CANDIDATES FOR
ASSEMBLY ENDORSED.
Third Assembly District.
The People's Choiee,
FOR MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY,
Charles D. J. JVoelke.
WM. GEO. NELSON
FOR FREEHOLDER
5th Assembly District
jFOB SALE.
FOR sale — PROMINENT CORNER SALOON
finely fitted; paving business? owner haa other
business. Apply before nine o'clock. Oscar Kraig,
No. 247, First street.
THE CREAT ENCLISH REMEDY.
Beecham's PilSs
For Bilious and Nervous Disorders.
"Worth a Guinea a Box "—tout sold j
for 25 cents,
BY u.l; DHlCiCIMTS.
li
iorthe blood isÎlis iife"
IOUGEST Λ CO.'S WORLD FAMED BLOOD MIX
j tore is warranted to cleanse the blood from all
Impurities, from whatever cause arising. For
Scrofula, Scurvy, Skin and Blood Diseases and
Sores of all kinds, lis eiteecs are marvelous. Sold in
bottles at $1, or ti bottles for $5. To be had at No. 223
Second street, Jersey City, and No. 42 Pembroke
places Liverpool, England.
LougesiaCo's Special Remedy
"yy ARRANTED TO CURB ALL DISCHARGES OF
ί^νΐ °K'e »1 wr'Mi?· d'»vel and
New jersey jockey club races.
ELIZABETH. N. J.
RACE DAYS— Oct. oil and 8t, Nov. 1, 2, 4 and 5.
SIX RACES BACH DAY,
Commencing at Two P. M,
SPECIAL RACE IRA INS, direct to Qraud Stand,
▼la Central R. R. of N. J„ from foot oC Liberty
street. New York.'at 12:>Xl l and l:20.
Round trip tickets, including admission to grand
stand, £1.50,
M. F. DWYER, President.
H, D. McINTYRE, Secretary.
mm■ .IL U IJ IlLJLl·—L-I-I L.
JFVM^SMBO J^Ol
L.tftftg fhONT ROOM. PURNWHEO; PR|
1 ho··©; h'-afc, eta Nfe $1* Fifth street.
pURNISHKD ROOMS ΚΟΚ LIGHT HOUSE*
£ ing; home comforts. No. 833 YdrtB treet.|
Furnished fkont room to let;
provements. No. 064 Jersey avrtmo.
JARGE FURNISHED ROOM ONT TOP PL
J let to two gentleman. Mo. 44 Novrarkjj
'IX) LET.—A PDHiisHKD ROOM,
1 floor, front; prlvaio family. No.
street.
TO LF.T—SECOND AND TIHBD FLOORS OFl
BB 284 Four» h street. inquire In basémeut.
TO LET. - A NEATLY FURNISHED FRONT
room; heat, gas fvnct bath. No. 558J4 Jersey
avenue.
Ί^Ο LET.-THREE NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS
for eentlemer.; private house: >11 Improve
ments; reference exchanged. H6. 9* Eighth street.
SUSSEX PLACJ^.SINGLE AND DOUBLE
furnished rooms to let; terms moderate.
18
HELP WANTED.
ΓΛ AN VA 8SER WaN TED FOR ΤΗ Ε PERFECTION
Tuftin* and Embroidery Machine, Good can
Tassera make good wages. No. 381 Summit avenue
Jersey City Heights. -'
WANTED-BOY, 1? OR 18 YEARS OLD, TO MAKE
himself useful. Answer by self-written letter
to Employer, News Office.
Female.
WANTED-AN EXPERIENCED COOK AND
laundress; reference required. Apply at Να
845 Communlpaw avenue.
XE7 ANTED—GENERAL HOUSE WORKER WHO 19
τ" good cook am! laundress In family of three
where there Is another girl Apply to Να 162 First
street, Jersey City,
WANTED—A GIRL TO DO GENERAL
housework In a boarding house. No. 87 Hud*
■on street.
7 ο SUSSEX BTSfcrt'-HUlS' COOKi WASHING
Ι Ο and irouing; reference required.
BOARD^ÂNTM^
A GENTLEMAN DESIKËS BOARD FOR HIMLELF
and wife, With a room for storing furniture
m ar Jersey avenue. Add re se Board, J. C. News.
Board wanted by gentleman and wife
two connecting rooms; private family pre
ferred. Address J. S., care of J. C. News.
οι ι Washington street, five minutes»
λ.11 walk from ferries -One extra large front
room on second floor, and a large front parlor, with
walk from forrie«-One extra lai-ge front
■M- Jucond floor, and a lar— * t —
bay windows, to let, with boan
1 ο Ο NEWARlT^I^fÛÊ-NICELY FURNISHED
lOw hall room, with or without board, for one
or two gentlemen; moaerate price.
i)7<i montoomeb? stkbbï; opposite van
. Ι ώ Vorst Park—Pleasant large room, with
board, for two persons.
JERSEY AVENUE-TWO FURMSHKQ
\ ι UO roomy, witn board; also table boarders *
commodaced.
BOARDERS^WANTM
Boarders wanted, heïgiîts.-a lj
heated room with board; terms $5;
family; convenient to steam and horse ea
dress Bergen, Jersey City Newa. _
PLEASANT ROOMS WITH FIRST-CLASS
lu private family ; reference. 102
street.
1 I ·> GRAND STREET — PARLOR,
HO heated, with or without board;
SITUATIONS AND
AOTED.
Female.
A STRONG, WILLING GIRL OF FIFTE
help with housework or care fo
McDonald, No. 2S6 Wayne street, Jersey Ci
T> ESPEOTABLE GIRL WISHES A SITUj
XV do general housework, '"'•all at Noi
street
YOUNG GIRL WISHES A SITUA
nurse; speaks German and French β
sist children In music. No. 21 Germania ε
LOST AND FOULAI
LOST.-A BUNCH OF KEYS; FINDER
liberally rewarded by returning to .
Potts, Fuller Buildiug, Jersey City.
WANTED.
\~\fANTBD—SMALL HAY FARM, NE|
ν V York. Address, with price, sine anq
George R. Mclntyre, No. 808 Henry street, I
Ν. Y. 1
WANTED IN JERSEY CITY, PLEAS™
or floor of five rooms, furnished·
nished, for man, wife and two small]
Address Promptly, News office.
mSTRWTIONb
Hasbrouck INSTITUTE^ Να
street, Jersey City.
Thirty-fourth year begins Sep te |
A school of %e highest grade, with rs
departments, each of which has its
ent:— ι
The Boys' Academio, the Girls' Acl
Boys' Preparatory, the Primary (both\
Music Department, the Art Department. *
Students prepared for college, profession
schools and Business.
Catalogues and further information given at t
Institute.
τή^αλ^λμ ( CHARLES C. STIMETS, Prindpa
Directors, j HORACE C. WAIT. Viee-princfp^
ESTABLISHED 1808.
"J. Firm Foundation Laid for Bè^
ginners. "
"Style and Finish Given Advanced
Performers
V. A. MOLLEHHAUER'S SCHOOL OP MUSIC A.N'D
ΑΓνΤ,
No. 48 Montgomery street.
Thorough courses of Instruction given in laser u
mental and Vocal Music, con ipri king Plan of or ta
Violin, Singing, Organ, Flute, 'Cello, Cornet and
Guitar, also Modern Languages and Drawing and
Painting. For terms, etc., auply personally or by
letter to
F, A. MOLLENHAUEIU
Director.
DON'T
COMMENCE THE STUDY OP
STENOGRAPHY AND TYFK VHMTINO
until you call at Vermilye's College, 810 Broad way
Ν. Y. Pamphlets tree. Also lessons by mtUL
Cut this out.
f»Qnn A YEAR—BOARD AND TUITION; BOY
and girls. Address Episcopal Sciio »
addoaileld, N. J.
OBBSSMAKBMS.
MISS BELLE VAN HISE,
FASHIONABLE DRESSMAKER.,
131 Pacific Avenue, Jersey Oity.
Suits, $3 up.
RESS MAKING—REASON ALLS PRICES; CUT
tinsr and iltting by New York system. Corner
Eighth and Cole streets.
MEETINGS.
The Annual Meeting of the Stockholder
of the
NEW JERSEY STEAMBOAT Go.
Will be held at TAYLOR'S HOTEL, In Jersey City,
on TUESDAY the 12TH NOVEMBER NEXT, at 12 m.,
for the Election of Seven Directors for ensuing
year.
GEORGE S. RIQGS, Secretary.
Jersey City, October 19,1889.
MODEMANN
DENT88T,
Not. 002 and 504 THIRD AVKNUB,
Southwest Corner 34th Street.
No. 255 SIXTH AVE,, near lGth St.. N. *.
Full Gum Elegant Set»,
S4, $7 and »IO.
Perfectly adapted to the anatomy of the mouth,
and guaranieed to stand the teer. of time.
Old Time Prices, flU, $20 and aWO.
Artificial Teeth on Gold. Artificial Teeth on Silver
fo.-£?ra,.0 fiUlofi ?al,f
teeth are to bo inserted. (In this depart meut a lady
ta attendance.) Teeth flUed with Gold, Silver, Ac.,
kc. Teeth repaired in fifty minutes. Sets made
while waiting.
S<* thai the name MODEMANN Is painted in full
and plain letters, on the doors, stairs and win
dows. We have positively no connection
with any dental office that does not display the
name
MODEMANN,
Nos. 502 and 504 THIIU) AVENUE,
Southwest Corner iHth Street.
No. 255 SIXTH AVIS., near lGtb St.. Ν. Y.
THE BUND SEE,
The Deaf Hear, the Lame Wall
THE SICK MADE WELL WITHOUT MEDiq
Marvelous cures sure performed daily
rooms of
DR. FANYOU,
No. 258 Sixth avenue, Ν· T.»
of Dyspepsia Insomnia. Caftarrh, Paralysis aul
Nervous and Chroulo Diseases. j
Office nours:—d-jjo u. m. to 4:30 p. m.
The poor healed free from 9Λ0 td io&) a.

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