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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, November 15, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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— THE —
%zvsz$ (iïity JXjcïus.
JAMES LUBY, . . . Editor.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
BY
THE NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OFFICE» ' No. 80 Montgomery Street
(WELDON BUILDING..)
Tira Jersey City News:—Single coptes, two
ceo te; subscript ion, six dollars per year; postage
free.
The Sunday Morning News:—Published every
Sunday morning; single copies, three cents; sub
scription, one dollar and fifty cents per year;
postage free.
Entered in the post office at Jersey City ai
second class mail matter.
All business communications should be ad
dressed to The News Publishing Company; all
others to the Managing Editor.
" BRANCH OFFICES:
Advertisements, Subscriptions ana Newsdeal
ers' Orders received:
Hoboejcn—First and Clinton Streets, J. D. Sin
clair.
Union Hill—H. Fischer, No. 62 Palisade Avenue
Bergen Point—T. W. Dobson, opposite Railway
Depot.
Five Corners—G. W. Pheiffer, No. 663 Newark
Avenue.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15. 1889.
The Jersey Ciiy Nee
AVERAGE
DAILY
CIRCULATION,
HIGH WATER MARK,
44,BOO COPIES
IN SIX DAYS.
The Sunday Morning News
HIGH
WATER
MARK,
LARCEST CIRCULATION
JN HUDSON COUNTY.
This paper Is Democratic In principle*
end it independent in U* views on all
local questions.
The Elevated Railroad Scheme.
Hardly any great scheme of public
improvement can be devised which
does not cause somebody some loss or
inconvenience. In crowded cities, in
particular, change necessarily upsets
somebody's arrangements and there
fore there is always a certain narrow
selfish opposition to it.
The story of New York's elevated
railways ie an old one. It took years
to overcome the blind opposition of a
few abutting property owners. They
fought the project by every means
that the law allowed. They put it off
from one term of court to another,
and they carried their suits from one
tribunal to another until the patience
and determination of the projectors
was nearly worn out. Meanwhile the
development of the city was at a
standstill, the public was enraged and
nobody was happy but the old time
horse car companies.
Presently ;the opposition was ex
hausted The roads were built and at
once they became an essential element
of the city's life. One cannot imagine
how New York could get along with
out them, and the very first people to
reap the benefits were the factious
property owners who opposed their
erection.
xnree-iouruis οι nie growui οι ne»
York in the last ten years is due to
them. They have built up the great
west side, and indeed the east side
too; they have created, one might
say, Harlem and Manliattanville.
They have added millions in rents to
the incomes of New Yorkers, millions
to the taxable values of the city
property, hundreds of thousands to
the annual tax levy. The health and
comfort that they have caused, the
relief to the poor and the moderately
circumstanced by trippling the habit
able area of the city, cannot be repre
sented in money, and indeed words
cannot easily be found to picture it.
The case of Brooklyn is that of
New York all over again. It took
years of fighting in the courts before
one single pillar or girder of the roads
could be erected. When the opposi
tion was overcome and the roads
built the -wealth and population of
the city began leaping ahead with
giant strides, and today the blindest
of the opponents would not dare to
think in the secresy of his own mind
of undoing the splendid work that
has been done
Now, somewhat tardily, a project
for the erection of a rapid transit road
in this city has been brought to the
point of practical promise. The old
opposition at once starts up in its
way, and, forsooth, it is of the old
purely selfish, blind, narrow sort that
kept New York a decade behind the
age. One man opposes the projected
road because it will take a corner off
his lot; another because the noise will
injure his stable as a boarding place
for fancy horses; another because it
will darken his windows, and still
another because he fears the noise
will keep him awake o' nights.
What arrant nonsense this is. Be
cause Mrs. Jones does not want her
parlor darkened, Jones will oppose
the convenience of fifty thousand per
sons. Because Smith is a light
sleeper, it is of no consequence
whether or not millions are added to
the city's wealth. All the kickers are
amusingly willing that the road should
be built along some other street—but
Ν along theirs,—Oh, No.
Sentimental, fanciful and eccentric
grounds of opposition, the law cannot
notice, nor can the community at
large. If people do not like the vicin
ity of the road they can go somewhere
else, and that is all there is about it.
ϋϋ
ι:-'
ί
The city is big enough to give them
room somewhere else. Material in
jury, the law dan and will take cog
nizance of, whether the backer&of tUe
road like it or not. If the new struct
ure impairs property values, the com
pany must pay. For their own pro
tection as well as for the public bene
fit, the projectors have laid down
their lines as far as possible through
unsettled localities. West of Sum
mit avenue it is not possible to do
this, and to anyone acquainted with
the Hill It will be evident that the
thoroughfares selected are at least as
little open to objection as any that
can be named. It is of course nec
cessary to the business of the road
that it should run approximately
where it has been planned, and it is
hard to see how it could be taken
one or two blocks north or south
without loss or inconvenience
greatly exceeding any involved in the
present route.
The Board of Aldermen and the
courts, in considering the question,
will of course hold as of no account
individual desires and individual
pensation for damage. The only
arguments against the road that can
have any weight must be those
founded on considerations of public
advantage. No such arguments have
yet been advanced, and, we confess,
we do not see any basis for them.
The opposition thus far developed is
purely individual and selfish, and
such as the Board of Aldermen need
not even listen to at any length.
Indeed delay is the only thing we
fear. The final result is, we believe,
sure enough. We only trust factious
opposition may not cause injurious
delay.
The best way to decide that Dukes
Lenalian squabble is the easiest.
President Harrison and General
Se well are off on a hunting tour in
Maryland, and the poor overworked
office seekers have a few days' rest.
Our dear friend, the Freionian, has
a wholesome dislike of plain state
ments. It is very angry because we
jumped on its little effort to steal an
office for a Republican in Middlesex.
The shocking manner in which Hiilmnn was
choked and tortured to death on the gallows yes
terday is a telling argument for execution by
electricity.—New York Herald.
How do you know? You haven't
tried it yet. It is not a month since
your own columns were full of harrow
ing descriptions of the lingering
agony in which Lineman Feeks came
to his end.
Ijooking to 1803.
The New York Herald had an Al
bany dispatch yesterday in which its
very astute correspondent said:—
Governor David Bennett Hill is out gunning
for the Presiden^É there is no reasonable doubt.
Reports from otTO· States show that his agents
are beating the bushes early and late to drive
the game his way. The first horn since eleotion
is sounded tonight in New York State. The
Albany Times, always the Governor's staunch
supporter and the only Democratic organ which
does give hiin whole souled support, has a leader
which smells of the executive chamber. * * »
There is no mistaking the meaning of this ut
terance in the Hill organ at the capital. It means
business—Presidential business—and Is the cue
for such other organs as the Governor possesses
to take up the cry. Possibly, however, it would
have been just as well for the Governor's friends
not to have said, " view of the recent election."
The Herald's analysis of the semi-official State
ιeturns showed pretty clearly that It was the
distinctly Cleveland and not the distinclv Hill
CDUUUC8 l/IIHt cictinu un© 1/cuiVA.i owi> wiei t UV/IVCV.
Had the Hill counties stood alone in the fight,
Republican officers would soon sit in the seats
of authority in the Empire State. This is hardly
a showing on which to claim the right to a Presi
dential nomination, but perhaps, after all, the
only thing the Governor really relies on is the
supremacy of his friends in the State Committee,
as the Herald long ago asserted.
It is remarkable that on the same
day when this was published, an in
terview with ex Speaker Carlisle was
going the rounds of the press, in
which that able statesman and politi
cian expresses himself thus:—
"The election means nothing else than Cleve
land in 1892. Although Mr. Cleveland was not
the originator of the tariff reform, he emphas
ized it and intensified interest in it.
"I will say that had the Presidential election
of last year been repeated a month afterward
Cleveland would have been elected. It was im
mediately after the election that the people saw
the way they should have voted. Now it is em
phatically Cleveland.
"Cleveland is in the air.'"
We ventured to say yesterday that
the recent contests were won much
more on the strength of National issues
than even the politicians themselves
knew. We think this is becoming
more and more apparent, day by day.
But who, pray, made the national
issues. Who built the platform otx
which the Democracy fought and
won? Who is the man who stands
before the enlightened and patriotic
people of the country in contrast with
Mr. Harrison, the Republican cham
pion? Is it Θ rover Cleveland or David
Bennett Hill?
It is too soon yet to begin to talk
candidate for 1892. Before that year
comes around, New Jersey may have
a claim to put in. But as between
Cleveland and Hill just at present, we
believe the majority do not want
Hill.
It seems to us, in our poor finite
judgment, that certain gentlemen,
who think they have a ri^lit to dictate
to their fellow citizens on account of
the syllable "Rev." usually prefixed
to their names, have been passing the
limits of decency of late. The Rev.
H. C. Applegarth. of New Brunswick's
First Free Baptist Church, for in
stance, spoke of tlip defeat of the Re
publican party as1 something to be
ashamed of. Speaking of the defeat
of Frank L. Jane way for the Assembly,
he said, "I am ashamed of being a
Jerseyman and a Republican."
For our part, we are ashamed that
anyone who has so little comprehen
sion of the rights of citizenship and so
little respect for the will of the uia
:··' .& ι .■ f, ^MàûSê^Î
jority should be a Jerseyinau or the
citizen of a free nation.
How does the study of theology
jnake a man so much wiser in politics
than the great majority of his fellows?
I,adics at "War.
The Women's Christian Temperance
Union is disrupted over the question
of political partizanship. As the
ladies do not vote, we do not know
that this is a matter of very great
consequence to the political parties,
and as the great and noble cause of
temperance has nothing to do with
politics except in the minds of cranks
and fanatics, we do not know that it
is likely to be seriously affected
either.
In our judgment universal total ab
stinence is an utter impossibility, and
absolutely as undesirable as it is im
possible; but there is nothing in which
the happiness and welfareof the coun
try are so much involved as in the
cultivation of rational temperance in
the use of strong drink—and of strong
speech, too, for that matter. This
great principle will advance by its own
living force until it reaches its legiti
mate limit, and all the politics in the
country will not push it beyond that
point.
As for the quarrel among the ladies,
we beg the Christian people of this
country not to be alarmed. It amuses
them them and does nobody else any
harm. Temperance will advance, just
as before, and politics,—well, we guess
the wicked men will manage to keep
them whooping.
Drunken Men 011 the Horsecars.
We are by no means singular in our
observation of the drunken rowdy
nuisance on the horsecars. Here is a
paragraph upon the subject from a
recent issue of our only competitor:—
The ink was not dry upon the editorial refer
ence in Saturday's Journal, to the nuisance of
allowing drunken men to board the horsecars,
when a scene occurred in a Greenville car that
should not be allowed to be repeated. Between
four and five o'clock, two men boarded a car of
this line near the ferry. One was so drunk that
he could not stand straight, and the other,
though he had not lost the use of his legs, had
his tongue loose at both ends apparently, so
lively did he wag it during the entire trip. The
drunken man spent all his time in treading upon
people's toes and apologizing in a maudlin
fashion for so doing. Several ladies were in
jured. At last the drunkest one of the pair got
into a seat, but was so overbalanced by his big
drunken head that he would pitch against a lady
on one side and then on the other. One little
miss was courageous enough to resent this treat
ment, and gave him a hard push, for which she
was rewarded by .foul language and expostula
tions that brought color to her cheeks. The con
ductor made little or no effort to enforce the
rules, if there are any.
This is exactly in the line of what
we have witnessed ourselves. Some
times the ruffians are well dressed.
That only enhances the offence.
Doubtless a few arrests would have
a wholesome effect, especially as the
police justices, it may be confidently
expected, would deal with tho ~ ilprits
with exemplary severity.
AMUSEMENTS.
"Kriiiinfe" Coming Hack to the Casino,
The Drum-Major will remain the at
traction at the Casino next Monday
and Tuesday evening, and on Wednes
day evening "Erminie," the most
successful of all comic operas, will
be brought forth in a manner
more sumptuous than ever. New cos
tumes and new scenes have been pro
vided for the revival, and everything j
has been done to make the produc- ,
tion a most perfect one. The demand ;
for seats for the opening night has '
been extremely large, and ttie ever :
wulnAtitu fnvnritfl will mvon u !
cordial greeting. Pauline Hall will
appear as' Ermine, Géorgie Dennin as
Javotte, James T. Powers as Cadeaux,
and Edwin Stevens as Ravennes. As
the opening performance will be the
1,200th representation of the opera in
this country, Mr. Rudolph Aronson
will distribute a very handsome
souvenir, specially imported from
Paris for the occasion; it is in the
form of a folder; the outer cover con
tains a water oolor sketch represent
ing different designs of Moorish archi
tecture, similar to the architecture of
the Casino; upon the inner side,
printed on crystallized paper, is the i
cast of characters; a most appro
priate "Casino" souvenir.
Mr. SotHern's Visit.
When Manager Daniel Frohman, of
the New York Lyceum Theatre, first
sent Mr. Ε. H, Sothern upon the road
in "The Highest Bidder," there were
many in the profession who asserted
that it was an attempt to trade upon
a well known name, whieh would fail
early in its career. Those same croak
ers may now look upon the enviable
position which Mr. Sothern has at
tained in the theatrical world with
envy and wish . they had possessed a
portion of Manager Frohman's shrewd
insight, which has placed him in abso
lute control of one of the best paying
comedy stars now upon the road.
When Mr. Sothern made his first ap
pearance in Jersey City two years
ago, both he and his play were warm
ly received, and the announcement
that he will offer this same play next
week at the Academy of Music is sure
to be a welcome one to our theatre
goers. Mr. Sothern's work last season
in "Lord Chumley" showed how much
his methods had improved since his
first visit here, and now the public
will have the opportunity to see the
application of those methods to his
first play. "The Highest Bidder" will
be given throughout the week includ
ing Wednesday and Saturday mati
nees.
PERSONALS.
The Rev. J. W. Hathaway, pastor of the West
minster Presbyterian Church, is a preacher with
a love for humor. He has arranged for a series
of six Sunday evening discourses by the most
prominent Presbyterian clergymen of New York
and Brooklyn. When asked the other day why
he secured such eminent talent, he replied: —
Because I want my people to hear as good ser
mons in the evening as I give them in the morn
ing."
Congressman Samuel Fowler, of Hunterdon
county, and Assemblyman Andrew J. Bale, ot
Sussex county, visited Newark on Wednesday,
They caiue in the interest of William E. Ross, of
Sussex county, who wants to be Sergeant-at
Arms of the next Assembly. They met with
little eucouragement in Essex, though they saw
all of the Democratic members there. The Essex
members say that that county, with its seven
Democrats, can take nothing less than the sei
aeant-ftt-arms if the Speakership go to Hudson
CHAS. S. FURST.
52 JVEWJÊJt* AlTBJrVE.
. m·' -
S&TURD&Y, il USUAL, B&RG&IR DIT.
We will begin TOMORROW'S SALE by offering
for TWO HOURS from
TEN TO TWELVE O'CLOCK.
Ladies'Fine Stockinet Jackets, heavy 84.00, I Glorie Silk Umbrella, Ion# fancy Silver ) 91.00,
weight, bound with silk Mohair Braid, Handle ("20 different styles), silk cord - were
Fancy Coat back, seams finished with w and tassel, Paragon Frame ) 2$3.uO.
satin in all sizes $7.00 I
Ladies' Seal Plush, striped satin ( ©8.40, All Silk Brocaded Ribbons, 4-iuéhes )_ 15c. a yard
lining, in all sizes ) were $12.00 I wide, in all color s. )" worth 4«c. ι
BARGAINS FOR THE ENTIRE DAY.
FOR C9c.
Boys' all wool Flannel Shirt Waists....worth 97c
FOB 99c.
Boys' all wool Flannel Shirt Waists,
all colors worth $1.25
FOB 53c.
Ladies' Flannel Skirts worth 75c
FOB 69c.
Ladies'Woven Skirts worth $1.00
FOB 19c.
Curtain Poles, with Brass Trimmings
complete ,. worth 30c
FOB 30c. DOZEN.
Tinsel for embroidering» all colors.... worth 50c
FOB 47c.
Ladies' all wool Cloth, 54-inch worth 69c
FOB Α Υ Λ BD.
All wool Serge, all shades, 40 inch worth 37}^c
FOB SI.69 A PAIB.
Ladies' Dongola P. L. Tips, Box-toe,
button Shoe worth $2.25
FOB #1.97.
Ladies' Dongola Box-toe C. S. Button
Shoe worth $2.75
FOR 23c.
All Linen Damask, GO-inch ..worth 35c.
FOH 15c. EACH.
Bleached Damask Towels...., worth 25c.
FOR 7%c. YARD.
All Linen Toweling, 20-inch wide... worth 12%ο.
FOU 85c. EACH.
10-4 Wool Blanket worth $1.25
FOR *1.15 EACH.
11-4 Wool Blanket worth $1.75
FOR 69c.
Large size Comfortable worth $1.00
FOR «2.25.
Sateen Lined Comfortable, fine white
filling worth $3.75
FOR 09c. A PAIR.
Ladies1 Fur Lined Kid Gloves worth $1.00
FOR 73c. A FAIR.
Gents1 Fur Lined Kid Gloves worth $1.2
FOR 20c. PAIR.
All Wool Shaker Hose worth 35c.
FOR 83c.
Ladies1 All "Wool—-non-shrinkage—
Long Sleeves, body form, knitted
Vests worth $1.85
ALL COLORS IN SATIN QUILTED
LININGS.
CHJLS- S. FURST.
and the Clerkship to Union. Patrick H. Corish,
Adolph Holzner and William Harrigan are the
local candidates. John Murray was an aspirant,
but he has retired from the fight ana will devote
his energies to securing the position of Warden
of the Essex County Penitentiary. Frederick
Nolan is also a prominent aspirant for the latter
position.
The work of removing the big United States
Hotel at Atlantic City to another location has
been begun.
The flrtit event of importance of the Newark
social season will be the "coming out" reception
given by Mrs. Joseph Williams Plume on Wed
nesday, November 20, from four until six o'clock,
in honor of her daughter, Miss Laura Plume.
Miss Plume will be assisted by all the prominent
debutantes. Among them will be Miss May
Abbett. Miss Abbett, who is pretty and has
very charming manners, is promised a brilliant
winter and will undoubtedly be a leading belle in
New Jersey.
A conscience contribut4on of sixty-five cents
has been received at the Treasury Department,
Washington, in an envelope postmarked Eliza
beth, New Jersey. Accompanying the amount
was a decidedly cranky letter covering Ave full
foolscap pages closely written. It was un
signed.
The South Jersey green glass blowers who are
out of work are complaining of not receiving
proper aid and assistance from those in work.
The charge is made that only $1,000 has been
subscribed by the 600 blowers, and that only $100
has been paid in ten weeks.
A woman was convicted in Camden county on
Tuesday, of being a common scold.
The State Board of Assessors for Railroad
Taxation arrived at Cape May Monday evening
in the palace car "Nimrod," The party com
prised Governor Green, General Bird Spencer,
ex-Senator Cattell, General Sewell, Colonel
Wiseman, Colonel R. S. Green, Cojonel Van
Cleve and Sheriff Reynolds. The party has since
broken up.
The will of Clement B. Grubb, an uncle of
General Grubb, which was on Wednesday ad
mitted to probate in Philadelphia, disposes of an
estate valued at between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000.
Henrietta West, a young colored woman,
walked from Bound Brook to Hamilton, five
miles, but missed a train, and concluded to walk
to Philadelphia, which she did in a driving rain.
She walked 40 miles in all, and was found on the
street, foot-sore, and walking aimlessly about.
The appointment of William T. Hopper, as
Collector of the port of Perth Amboy, is not
generally approved by the Republicans of that
section, and President Harrison is severely
criticised for his action. *Λ
A literary society has been organized among
the Princeton Sophomores. The society is to be
a non-hall organization, having for its special
object the preparation of its members
for Dean Murray's English course in the
Junior year. Dr. Murray has consented to have
a general supervision of this course of supple
mental reading. Special attention will be given
to the works of Shakespeare. The society will
meet once a week, at which time the writings of
the author under consideration will be freely
discussed.
Governor Green has appointed the following
gentlemen to comprise the State Board of Can
vassers to canvass the vote of the State cast at
the last election:—George T. Weats, of Morris;
Robert Adrain, of Middlesex; Philip P. Baker,
of Cumberland; A. F. R. Martin, of Essex;
George T. Cranmer, of Ocean, and Joseph B.
Roe, of Gloucester. The Board will meet in the
Senate Chamber on November 36, at two o'clock.
The Methodists of Bloomsbury, Hunterdon
county, are up in arms because Mrs. Howard
Farley helps the church choir by blowing a
cornet.
Ex-Assemblyman John L. 'Armitage and ex
Alderman Henry S. Dunn were vigorously de
nounced at the meeting of the Joel Parker As
sociation, of Newark, on Wednesday night for
the part they had taken against the Second Dis
trict Democratic Assembly candidate, Reuben
Trier, at the election last week. Some members
said that it would only be fair to ask Messrs.
Armitage and Dunn to tender their resignations.
A black bear is scaring women and children
near Bennett's Station, Cape May County. It
has been seen by Arthur Lopper and George
McNeil, of Swanstown and several others.
She vit ch, the Anarchistic editor of the Volks
ZeifUng, is a resident of Hudson County. He
keeps the exact location of his residence a se
cret as he does not wish the privacy of his aris
tocratic wife, who is a Russian countess^ to be
invaded by his long-haired followers. He is a
daily passenger on the Barclay street ferry,
boats. _
Changes In Erie Time Tables.
Ou Sunday next, November 17, at 12
o'clock noon the winter schedule of pas
senger trains will go into effect on the
Erie Railway.
The through trains westward remain
unchanged. Eastward the principal
change in through service is in Chicago
aud tiraud Trunk Express, now leaving
Chicago at 2.-S5 p. in., which on uud after
above/date will leave Chicago at lip. m..
run solid to New York, and arrive early
secoud morning. Numerous local changes
will be made and the commutation ser
vice improved somewhat. New time
cards will be ready on Saturday.
Couldn't Fool Her.
Lover (ardently) — I love the very
ground you tread on.
Heiress—I thought it was the farm you
were alter.—Life.
Piles, "Pitching, Bleeding, Olcer, etc.. Cured
without Cutting, Ligating or Chloroform. Our
patients attend to business while receiving treat
ment. Illustrated papers sent free. Address
Drs. Miller and Jamison, No. 41 West Twenty
sixth street,'New York.***
William Pelaney, Furnishing Undertaker. car
rlagee and camp chairs to let, 345 Grove street jer
9©y City, N. J. Telephone caiL No. 138.*.·
Advertisements Under the Head of
MARRIAGES AND DEATHS
Will be inserted in the Jersey City News anl
the Sunday Morning News at the rate of ten
cents a line for the first insertion; jive cents aline
for each subseuuent insertion.
DIED
Ε A MES.—On November 14, 1889, Maud Webster, only
daughter of Arthur L. ana Nellie Eames, aged
eight months and twelve days.
Funeral from the residence or her parents. No. 333
Johnston avenue.
m. j. boylan,
Funeral Director,
198 Pavonia Ave.. Jersey City.
BOA IIDEIIS WANTBlt.
A LARGESECOND-STORY FRONT ROOM TO LET,
with board. 89 Summit avenue.
"LMJRNISHED BOOM WITHTBOARD, FOR TWO
JL gentlemen; all conveniences. No. 337 Jersey
avenue.
Finely furnished room, with strictly
first-class board; opposite park. No. 8 West
Hamilton place.
T?UHNISHED ROOM WITH BOARD FOR GENTLE
A m eu; also table board; convenient to cars and
ferrie*. .No. I<8 Fourth street.
J7URNISHED RO'JMrS WITH OR WITHOUT
i board. 285 Grove street.
Γ ARGE ROOM; HEAT, GAS AND BATH; FIRST
LY class board. 233 First street.
PLEASANT ROOM, WITH GOOD BOARD, 43
Ocean avenue.
ÇELECT PARTIES CAN BE ACCOMMODATED
Ο at moderato rates for the winter. Furnace,
heat; superior board; 25 minutes from New York
3ity: 15«. commutation. Address Board. West ;
Fortieth street, above Avenue C, Bayonne, N. J.
SUPERIOR BOARD AND PLEASANT ROOMS
C? can be secured at No. 243 Montgomery street;
references exchanged. _
rAILOR BUTTONHOLES MADE TO ORDER, lc.
. each. No. 222 Park avenue, Hoboken.
TO LET-SECOND-8TORYFRONT ALCOVE ROOM,
with board. 232 Third street.
rpO LET—A SUNNY FRONT ROOM, WELL FURN
X ished and heated, witn board for two; moder- :
ate terms: references. No. 132 Wayne street.
1Ή) LET—WITH BOARD FINELY FURNISHED I
. - large room; furnace heat; hot and cold running ;
water; wardrobes; dressing room annexed; house,
neighborhood, board flrst class; table board. No. 87
Wayne street.
i)Jl GROVE STREET-TWO FINELY FUR
« X j. niched, heated front rooms, for two young !
souples or single gentlemen, with board; (M aud :
igl". '
1 no MERCER STREET- HANDSOMELY FURN
-L I/-* ished second lioor, with board; en suite or ι
single; reference.
7 MONTGOMERY STREET.—ROOM. WITH j
board, for one or two gentlemen; table
237
143
GRAND STREET.—A WELL HEATED
room, with or without board; other rooms.
HASBROUCK INSTITUTE, No. Ιϋϋ GRAND
street, Jersey City.
Thirty-fourth year begin· September 11.
A school of the highest grade, with the following
departments, each of which has its superintend
ent.—
The Boy β' Academic, the Girls' Academic, the
Boys' Preparatory, the Primary (both sexes), the
Musio Department, the Art Department.
Students prepared for college, professional
schools and business.
Catalogues and further information given at the
Institute.
X CHARLES C. STIMET3, Principal.
Directors, \ HORACE C. WAIT. Vice-Principal.
ESTABLISHED 1808.
"A Firm Foundation Laid for Be
ginners
"Style and Finish Given Advanced
Performers
V. A. MOJLLENHAUER'S SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND
ART.
No. 43 Montgomery street
Thorough courses of Instruction given In Inatru
mental aud Vocal Music, comprising Pianoforte
Violin, Singing. Organ, Flute, 'Cello, Cornet and
Guitar, also Modem Lauguages and Drawing and
Fainting. For terms, etc., apply personally or uy
letter to
F4 A. MOLLENHAUER.
Director.
"DON'T
OOMMENCK THE STUDY OF
STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING
until you call at Vermilye's College, 816 Broadway
Ν. Y. Pumphlets free.# Also lessons by malt
Cut this out.
-THOROUGH PREPARATION FOR CIVIL 8ER
I vice, business college, medical ana law school.
Hoffman Educational Rooms, No.4U Newark avenue.
α»ΟΠΠ A YEAR-BOARD AND TUITION; BOYS
<DiiUU and girls. Address Episcopal Schoool
Haddonfleld, N. J.
JJENRY ù 1ER VERS
Wishes to inform the public that he has again
taken possession of his old Confectionery Store at
No. 4t:i Bergen avenue, and will reopen it tomom w
with a complete stock of every variety of CHOICE
CONFECTIONERY of his otvn raanufaetur#
Ε. RIDLEY & SONS.
GRAND ST., Ν. Y.
COVERING ENTIRE BLOCK
ALLEN TO OKCHABO STREET.
GRAND ST., Ν. T.
, COVERING ENTIRE BLOCK,
I ALLEN TO ORCHARD STREET.
GOOD BAEGAIIS!
Winter Garments.
WraBS,Mets,Costii«,
Newmarkets and Peasant Cloaks,
Large Assortment, All the Novel
ties. Plain Fabrics at Ac
knowledged Low Prices.
800 MISSES' GOOD CLOTH GRETCHEN COATS,
DOUBLE BREASTED CAFE AND BELT, AGES 4
TO 12 YEARS, $3.75; WORTH $6,
MISSES' SCOTCH PLAID AND STRIPE CLOTH
CLOAKS, WITH CAPES, ASTRAKHAN REVERS
AND BELT, VERY DESIRABLE, SIZES 4 TO 8
YEARS, AT $4.90; 10 TO 18 YEARS, AT $5.90.
MISSES' GOOD CLOTH NEWMARKETS. DARK
MIXED COLORS, DOUBLE-BREASTED, PLAITS IN
BACK, SIZES 12 TO 18 YEARS, AT $4.73.
MISSES* FINE TAILOR-MADE LONG TOP CoATS,
STRIPES. PLAIDS AND ALL NEW PLAIN COL
ORS, $7.50, $8.90 AND $12.
LADIES' ENGLISH SuJAL PLUSH COATS, 4®
INCHES LONG, SATIN LINED, SEAL ORNA
MENTS, $16; WORTH $24.
LADIES' SEAL PLUSH JACKET, GOOD QUAL
ITY, SATIN LINED, $10.
LADIES' PEASANT CLOAKS, ALL THE NEW
CLOAKING CLOTHS, AT $13.75; WORTH $2Ul
LADIES' CLOTH NEWMARKETS, WITH AND
WITHOUT CAPES, $5.50, $6.90 AND $8.50.
MEN'S FURiNiSHINGS.
NATURAL COLOR MERINO SHIRTS AND
DRAWERS. THE SHIRTS ARE DOUBLE BACK
AND FRONT, 49a EACH.
MEN'S FANCY STRIPE CASHMERE WOOL
SHIRTS AND DRAWERS, SEVERAL PATTERNS.
79c. EACH,
MEN'S HEAVY ALL WOOL DOUBLE BACK AND
FRONT SHIRTS. WITH DRAWERS TO MATCH,
SCARLET, LIGHT BROWN AND NATURAL COL
ORS, 93c. BACH.
Boys' Suits ai Overcoats,
Men's Suits and Overcoats.
250 ALL WOOL SUITS, AGES 4 TO
13
250 ALL WOOL DEEP CAPE OVER
COATS, EXTRA LENGTHS, AGES
4 TO 10 YEARS
250 OVERCOATS, AGES 2% TO 6
100 CHILDREN'S "REEFERS AGES 5
TO 11
150 BOYS* LONG PANT SUITS, ALL
WOOI., WARRANTED, AGES 12
TO 18
150 ALL WOOL ULSTERS, AGE8 18
TO 18
150 BLUE, BROWN AND GREEN
BEAYER OVERCOATS, HANDSOME
LY BRAIDED, AGES 4 TO 10;
WORTH $10
150 ALL WOOL CHEVIOT SUITS, [ ψ / ■
WORTH $10
100 BOYS' ALL WOOL CHINCHILLA
OVERCOATS, AGES 10 TO 13
100 BOYS' ALL WOOL CHINCHILLA
BEAVER OVERCOATS, AGES 13
TO 18
100 MEN'S ALL WOOL SUITS
100 MEN'S ALL WOOL CHINCHILLA
OVERCOATS
100 MEN'S FANCY MIXED CHEVIOT 1
ALL WOOL CASSIMERE LINED
C APE OVERCOATS, WORTH
«18
100 MEN'S ALL WOOL SILK MIXED
CASSIMERE SUITS
103 BROWN MIXED~~KERSEY OVER
COATS, ALSO CASSIMERE LINED
CHINCHILLA OVERCOATS.
100 MEN'S HEAVY BEAVER
ULSTERS, WORTH 820
$5.
$10.
$13.
Ν. Β.—Our Stores can be Reached from all points on North
or Hudson River by taking West Street Horsecars, running along
river front to Desbrosses Street; Grand Street Cars starting at this
point pass our doors.
EDWARD EIDLEY& SONS,
309» 311, 311^ to 321 Grand St.
56 to 63 Allen, 50 to 05 Orchard St., Ν. Y
EDWARD RIDLEY & SDNS,
309, 311, 311& to 331 Grand St.
56 to 08 Allen, 59 to05 Orchard St., N.Ï
REAL ESTATE.
TX)K HOUSES AND LOTS IN JERSEY CITV
X" BEUCfEN, GREENVILLE, BAYON.NE AND BEK
UKN POINT. CALL OK WHITE TO
JOHN N. BRUNS,
ΐίο. 137 Ocean Aram Jersey Cltr.
lo. 77 Daalonii Arenoe. GrBenrme.
end for list of city and country prop
ERTY.
ROBERT M. FLOYD,
JERSEY CITY HEIGHTS,
36 OCEAN AVE. COR. UNION 8T,
real Estate & insurance.

Q*> '—HANDSOME FRENCH ROOF HOUSE, ALL
improvements, 14 rooms, two lota, barn,
garden, fruit, etc., near Morion depot. J. J. Galïney,
No. ÏU1 Touiiele avenue.
<) 7 /r CHITON STREET—TO LET, A P-KOOM
Zi It) house; improvements. Apply next door.
WANTED.
WANTED-YOUNG LADIES AND GENTLEMEN,
to correspond in reference to organizing a
dramatic club. A. R. Wilson, Box «38, Jersey City.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
Λ NICELY FURNISHED FRONT SQUARE ROOM,
with e,a,°. Are, bath, etc.; home comforts. No.
2$[Grand street, near Grove.
FURNISHED ROOM TO LET, WITH USE OF GAS
and bath. No. l(R$ Pac flic avenue.
JARGE, FURNISHED ROOM ON THIRD FJX>OR
à to let, without board, in urivaie family. No. 53
Madison avenue.
N icely furnished front roow to let;
heated; also ball room. Apply No. 88 Atlantic
street. Heights.
Nicely furnished front room to let
Heated; also hall room. Apply at No. 191 Bay
street,
YJLEASANT FRONT ROOM TO LET. ENQUIRE
JL No. 81 Sussex street.
IV) LET—A FURNISHED FRONT ROOM. HEATED;
suitablo for one or two gentlemen; use of bath.
No. 188 Seventh street.
SITUATIONS AND WORK
WANTED.
A YOUNG WOMAN WOULD LIKE A WASHING
to do at her own house. Ε. M., No. 314 Second
street, Jersey City. __
A GOOD GIRL WOULÎ) LIKE UPSTAIRS WORK
in private family. Enquire No. 155 Wuynç
8 treet. . ,
â ΫυΟΝϋ GIRL WISHES A SITUATION FOR
A. upstairs work and mlndlug children. Lately
landed. Apply No. 7T2 Ocean avenue
FOR SALE.
Mohro'\v « day, the bakers and cater
ers, have three delivery horses for sale at thoir
stable, No. 5S Gregory street.
TO PURCHASE.
Wanted—A^HOflBEj price, about «sado
Laundry. No. lil Montgomery efc
MODEMANN
DENTIST,
Nos. 5 02 and 504 THIRD AVENUE,
Southwest Corner 84th Street.
No. 235 SIXTH AVE., near 10th St.. Ν. Y.
KuU Qum Elegant
«4, 87 and «10.
Perfectly adapted to the anatomy of the moutb,
and guaranteed to stand the test of time.
Old Time Prices, $10, frA) and $80.
Artificial Teeth on Gold. Artificial Toeth on Silver
NO CHARGE, NO CHARGE,
for extracting teeth without pain when artificial
teeth arc to be inserted. (In this department a lady
in attendance.) Teeth filled with Gold, Silver. Ac.,
Ac. Teeth repaired in fifty minutes. Sets made
while waiting.
See that the name MODEMANN is painted in full
and plain letters, on the doors, stairs and win
dows. We have positively no connection
with any dental office that does not display the
name
MODE MAN Ny
Nos. 508 and 504 THIRD AVENUE,
Southwest Corner 31th Street.
No. «55 SIXTH AVE., near l«th St.. Ν. Y.
THE BLIND SEE,
The Deaf Hear, the Lame Walk,
THE SICK MADE WELL WITHOUT MED1CINJS
Marvelous cures are performed dally at Um
rooms of
DR. FANYOU,
No. 258 Sixth avenue, Ν. Y.t
of Dyspepsia Insomnia, Catarrh, Paralysis and all
Nervous and Chronic Diseases.
Ottlce Hours:—9ÛU a. m. to 4Λ0 p. m.
The poor healed free from 9:30 to ÎO-'SU a. m.
•wAwittouaii rnv as
'8^n»o gg ao|
PIOS ana-., ΧΟΗ * w>B|»9 η quoAl.,
*sispios|Q snouaN pue snomg joj
sil!d
■A03W3» Η8ΙΊ0Ν3 J.V2U0 3HX
jjj
IN SEASON
AT ' ■'
Post's Seafood Market,
288 WARREN STREET,
Fresh Salmon, Blue Point Oysters,
Spanish Mackerel, Kockawav "
Frogs' Legs, Morris Cove "
Lake Bass, Shrewsbury "
White Fish, East River "
Smelts, Scollops,
And All Other Kinds ot Fresh Fish In
Season.
Pure Cod Liver Oil by the Bottle, Plat,
Quart or Gallon.
Telephone Call, 184 B.
^'^VfeiÉïSÎiàÈfc.

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