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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, November 15, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 3

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WE AEE EEALLY GLAD TO BE ABLE
to offer such superb values iu fiue custom
made clothing to the public as are comprised in this
excellent stock. This line of clothing embraces a
' gorgeous array of Men's and Boys' Fine Overcoats
and Suits. They were made to sell for $40 and $45,
but having bought them at an imperative sacrifice
figure, we can and do delight in allowing the public
to come and share in the advantageous figures which
put clothing within reach of everybody. Never be
fore during our business career have we offered such
wonderful inducements to our patrons.
MAIL ORDERS given prompt attention when ac
companied by CASH, MONEY OBDEE or DRAFT.
Besides the bargains offered in this three days'
sale, we have inducements in our special departments.
The shoe department gets a big boom through the
offer of a standard value $450 shoe for $1.50. The
chance still holds out for you to call and secure a
pair.
Overleaps all Precedents.
FRIDAY'S, SATURDAY'S and MONDAY'S.
EXTRAORDINARY OPPORTUNITY.
BOTS' AND CHILDREN'S
DEPARTMENT.
During this sale we offer the following especially
reduced prices in boys' and children's clothing. All
these are of our own manufacture.
CHILDREN'S OVERCOATS,
4 to 13 Years.
CAPE OVERCOATS reduced during these
three days from $5 and $6 to $3.5Ο
CAPE OVEECOATS reduced during these
three days from $7 and $9 to 4.75
CHILDREN'S SUITS,
4 to 13 Years.
CHILDREN'S TWO-PIECE SUITS re
duced during this sale from $3.50 and $6
to 2.50
CHILDREN'S THREE-PIECE SUITS re
duced during this sale from $10 and $12 to 4.50
BOY'S OVERCOATS,
13 to 18 Years.
FINE CASSIMERE OVERCOATS reduced
during this sale from $7 and $8 to.... 4.50
ELEGANT CHINCHILLA OVERCOATS
reduced during this sale from $10 and $12
BOYS SUITS,
IO to 18 Years.
HEAVY LONG PANTS SUITS reduced
during this sale from $9 and $10 to. 5.50
FANCY CASSIMERE SUITS reduced dur
ing this sale from $12 and $14 to 7.50
We also show an elegant line of superfine novel
ties in Boys' and Children's Suits and Overcoats
and Cape Coats. Every one of these has been
specially reduced 25 to 40 per cent.
to
6.75
THE
LEADING
AMERICAN
CLOTHIERS.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, AT PEREMPTORY AUCTION SALE OF FINE CLOTHING BY MESSRS.
Wihnerding, Morris & Mitchell, at 04 and G6 White street, the entire stock of Fall and Winter Clothing of the
well known firm of Messrs. Naumburg, Kraus, Lauer & Co., of 657 and G59 Broadway, we purchased nearly $40,000
worth of the finest goods.
We did not need these stocks, but they were so ridiculously cheap and of such fine quality and excellent make, we could
not refuse them.
We bought for NET SPOT CASH and only paid about ONE-QUARTER MANUFACTURING COST of the goods.
It was a forced sale. They had to go and we have those same goods here today for yoti to select from. They were
delivered last night. We actually have not the room for these goods ; go they must. So we arrange this Three Days' Sale
to reduce the stock by giving the public the be nofit of our fortunate purchase.
IMPOETED CHINCHILLA. OVEECOATS, silk
or satin lined, manufacturer's price, $22, $25 and
$28, during these three days at
ENGLISH KEESEY OVEECOATS, silk satin or
cassimere lined, manufacturer's price' $23, $25 and
$30, during these three days at
EOEEIGN PLAID CAPE COATS, long capes,
cassimere lining, manufacturer's price, $38 and
$45, during these three days at....
BLACK KEESEY CAPE COATS, extra long capes,
manufacturer's price, $42 and $46, during this
sale at
" OBLÔWSKI" KËËSËYS AND " EOTINE "
BEAYEE OVEECOATS, plain or quilted, silk or
satin lining, manufacturer's price, $48 and $50,
during this sale at
S15
$20:
$20
ι
$25
MEN'S IMPORTE^ CASSIMERE AND CHEVIOT
SUITS, manufacturer's price, $20 and $25, during
these three days at
MEN'S IMPORTED CORKSCREW AND
WORSTED SUITS, manufacturer's price, $22, $25
and $28, during this sale at
MEN'S ELEGANT DRESS SUITS, cassimeres and
worsteds, manufacturer's price, $32, $35 and $38,
during this sale at
MEN'S SUPERB EVENING FULL DRESS
SUITS, silk or satin lined, manufacturer's price,
$37 and $40, for three days at
MEN'S FANCY FOREIGN WORSTED CUTA
WAY SUITS, elegant trimmings, manufacturer's
price, $45 and $50, during this sale at
$15
$15
$20
$20
$25
±or Qà-j? CeiXtS y°u can bny a -Mens
Fine Dress Shirt, worth $1.75. This is the way the
fnrnishing goods department is made popular.
All popular blocks of stylish hats are shown by
us, and the leader, a regular $3.50 hat, we are selling
for $1.65.
In making the Boys' Suits only the finest Globe
Mills and Kock Cassimeres were used. They are
superb value.
Ladies will be surprised at the great difference in
favor of our prices compared with those of uptown.
The quality of the goods is superior.
Send for one of our handsomely illustrated Fall
and Winter Catalogues.
627 and 629
9
Near Bleoolior St.,
Hew York.
The bargains offered above are selected from the choicest lines. Thejare fashionably made from first-class materials,
and will WEAR AS WELL and look as well as any Fifth ave. product. We pride ourselves on the UNEQUALLED FIT of these
garments. We have also in stylish suits "Stouts," "Extra Longs" and "Extra Shorts," to fit all unusually proportioned men.
OPEN EVENINGS DURING THIS SALE UNTIL· 9 O'CLOCK.
A. H. KING & CO.
} DEMOCRATS STILL ACTIVE.
THE CLUBS OF THE STATE TO ES.
1'AItLISH PERMANENT HE Alt·
QUARTERS.
I Xlie County Organization to be Perfected
and a Series of Educational Talks to
be Delivered — Other News of the
State.
The Democracy of New Jersey were
fortunate in their selection of men to
prosecute the work contemplated in the
organization of the State Democratic
society, for the smoke of the recent bat
tle had not cleared away when President
E. A. Stevens, Secretary W. S. McKean,
Treasurer Sol Reineman and Chairman of
Executive Committee W. R. Wilson, had
α conference to formulate plans for the
future, which is fraught with so much
promise not only to our own state, but to
the whole nation. Although the work of
the State Society was not so widespread
as was wished, owing to want of
time and the unavoidable delays In
perfectlug plans for the campaign, yet
I the results of Tuesday week prove Beyond
question what organization can accom
plish, and there is little doubt that
our young, energetic and promising
Democratic society had much to do with
bringing about the glorious victory.
It is now desired by the officers of the
State Society to establish permanent
headquarters, probably in Newark, which
will be a place of randezvous, not only
for its officers, but for all good Demo
crats. From this centre will be given
aid and encouragement for all good work
contemplated by the subordinate clubs
and societies; information of value will
be compiled and sent forth; political lit
erature prepared and circulated among
all the voters of the State, and many j
other plans loruiuiatea ana carrieu out.
Many party workers believe that such a
general ana permanent place is wanted,
and if properly maintained will do much
good.
i The first important work of the society
f will be that of perfecting the various
l county organizations, and the formation
' of permanent clubs in all townships
where none now exist. There is informa
tion now In possession of the
officers of the society to lead them aud
others to the belief that the party has
suffered in a measure in several counties
from the lack of proper organization. In
the future this will not be the case, for
there has been considerable enthusiasm
creeted iu several very Important locali
ties, particularly in South Jersey, in the
objects of the State Society.
Illu addition to the clubs or societies
scattered throughout the various coun
ties there will be created a central county
organization which will have the special
supervision of all county club affairs, and
to which central organization quarterly
reports will be made and then this central
body will make its report to the State
society, thereby keeping up a most per
fect and well disciplined organization.
A very important educational feature
proposed is the arrangement of frequent
••tariff talks" in the principal cities of
the State by such able speakers as Hon.
I Roger Q. Mills, Hon. John G. Carlisle,
Hon. J. I. C. Breckenridge, Hon. Ashel
B. Fitch, Senator John R. McPherson,
Governor Leon Abbett, Samuel J. Mac
1 Donald, Josenh A. Beecher, Judge T. S.
I Henry, Hon. William McAdoo and
others. These "talks" will be arranged
at stated dates and announcement made
in advance. Particular attention will be
paid to the farmers, so they may avail
themselves of the opportunity of becom
ing. thoroughly posted on the questions
that have bicorne both State and national
issues. As in November next there is a
Legislature to elect and also Οοηκωβί
inen for the term begin'ling in 1891^Siis
contemplated work of the Democratic
society cannot be commenced too soon.
Not So Bad Alter All.
A conference of the attorneys for the
boroughs whose charters were thought to
Ï .
be seriously affected by the recent decis"
ion of the Supreme Court in the Sorners
Point case was held yesterday at Trenton
and the difficulty found to be of a much
less serious character than was antici
pated. Before the meeting it was feared
that the charters of Sea Isle City, Ocean
City, Avalon, Anglesea, Holly Beach,
Wildwood, Cape May Point, South Atlan
tic City, Beach Haven, Barnegat City,
Lavalette, Point Pleasant, and of Atlan
tic Highlands had been rendered void,
but the attorneys now think this wording
of the decision affects Sorners' Point
alone and does not apply to the other bor
oughs at all, unless some specific attack
were to be made upon them one bv one.
This, they argue, coula only be done by
some Darties inside each borough and
under the Attorney General's name, both
of which conditions are extremely lm
probaDle, as the Attorney General will
not allow his name to be used for such a
purpose, and the greatest harmony pre
vails in all the boroughs except Somers'
Point, against which the decision has
been made.
International Law Pointe from Atlantic
City.
Mr. William Adams, a well-known citi
zen of Atlantic City, was summoned to
Baltimore yesterday afternoon, in the in
terest of the defence of the Nuvassa riot
ers now on trial in that city. The Su
preme Court of the District ot Baltimore
holds that these rioters are answerable in
the United States for the murder of the
live American citizens on the island, as
the United States Government has juris
diction overNavassa.
The documents and evidence which
Mr. Adams will furnish will be very im
portant and not improbably delay the
execution of any verdict that may be
brought against the colored prisoners.
Mr. Adams will show that the
Government has made three distinct
ucumxaiauua, uj ocuictaij x'xcuu^
huyseu and his successor in office,
the last opinion of as late a date as
August last, that this government has no
jurisdiction in the Areuus Key Islands.
The Arenus Keys adjoin the Navassa
group and are secured and leased by
Americans iu the same manner as the
Navassa Islands. Mr. Adams will main
tain that if the United States lias no
jurisdiction in the one case it can have
no jurisdiction in the other.
Mr. Adams will take the ground that
the government must either free the
Îirisoners or pav him the amount he has
ost from inability to work the guano
deposits on the Arenus Keys, amounting
to $500,000. Mr. Adams suffered serious
loss by the décision of Secretary Freling
husen in refusing to acknowledge juris
diction when he asked for the prosecution
of the murderers of his ageut there seven
years ago. He spent $10,000 in trying to
push the prosecution, without success.
Since his agent was murdered he has been
unable to get any person to superintend
the working the Arenus Keys.
Λ Hotel Thief Discovered.
Detective Isaac Covert discovered that
William Mounce, collector for the Borton
Company, was the thief who broke into
the money drawer of the Seaside House
at Atlantic City, on Monday night, and
npou a hearing before Justice Goudley
today he pleaded guilty. Altogether
about ties of the $280 stolen has been re
sovered. Mounce was bound over in $500
bail at the December term of court. He
Uas a wife and some little children and
claims that he was intoxicated when he
stole the money.
Λ Presbyterian Semi-Centeiinlal.
The semi-centennial of the Presbytery
of West Jersey was celebrated yesterday
[n the First Presbyterian Church of
Bridgeton. The Presbytery comprises
the counties of Camdeu, Gloucester,
Cumberland, Salem, Cape May and
Atlantic.
There was a large attendance of the
members of the Presbytery, and the
services were of peculiar interest. Among
those present were the Rev. Dr. Henry J.
Van Dyke, of Brooklyn, and ex-President
Cattell, of Lafayette College. The latter
was licensed by this presbytery in 1833.
The Rev. A. H. Dashiell, the Rev. B. S.
Everett anil Elder Horace Churchman
were present as delegates from the Pres
bytery of Monmouth.
Eighth Regiment Veterans Reunite.
The thirteenth annual reunion and ban
quet of the veteran association, Eighth
Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, Hook
er's Old Guard, was held in Munzer's
Hall, on Broad street. Newark, last night.
There were about 150 veterans present,
besides a number of invited guests. In
the front of the banquet hall, in the cen
tre of beautifully draped flags, was the
coat of arms of the State.
The veterans and their guests assem
bled at headquarters and then marched
to the banquet, Governor-elect Abbett
and General William Ward in the front.
General Ward said grace, and then the
banquet was begun, Around the large
tables the following faces were seen:
Governor-elect Léon Abbett, General
William Ward, George A Halsey, De
Forest P. Lozier, Captain Howard, Police
Commissioner Currier, Captain Mason,
of Jersey Citv: Captain Ford, of Bridge
port; Thomas Fell, of New York: John Y.
Foster, George R. Gray, Major Enos Run
yon, Colonel Clark, A. J. Clark, John P.
Thompson, Robert S. Brown, Captain
Schenck, Colonel Ε A. Campbell, Dr. Al
lers, Amzi Joralemon, E. Gordon, Will
iam Hutman, Ferd Kishegel, John Hel
ler, ex-Alderman Irvin, Captain Masou,
Colonel Ford, Tax Receiver A. Judson
Clark, George K. Gray, John M. Burnett,
William F. Day, John Leonard, A. St.
John Chambre, Benjamin Sites, Robert
Smith, Captain W. H. Howard, Thomas
Schoner, Lieutenant Wake, Captain
William Daly, C. C. Gillin, Crans Run
yon, J. Barrett, Nigor Runyon, J. G. Ir
win, A. Judson Clark, Captain Force, J.
!.* rilvnipr \f. Ritynfiv. .1 P. Thomnson.
J. McLaughlin, William G. Huteman, :
William Hobbis, H. G. Baker, H. A. !
Howard, Thomas Laulor, Bennet Crane,
J. M. Barnett. W. H. Ford, Colonel 1
Campbell, E. Mockridge, Samuel Hiker,
W. Riker. Thomas Fell, Comrade Swain,
Charles Boweu, G. A. Thomas, John
Yearance, Comrades Bergfells, Mayhew.
Gordon, Captains Church, Penrose and
Tice.
The State Geological lioard.
The State Geological Board met in Tren
ton, yesterday. All the members were
present but two. Mr. George Richards,
of Dover, was chosen president pro tem
in the absence of Governor Green, who,
however, came in before the meeting was
over.
The Board did not elect a State Geolo
gist to succeed the late Prof. Cook. The
latter had left the work of the geological
survey in such shape at the time of his
death that the working force of the office
can go on with it with a very little assist
ance, and Prof. Smock, who was associ
ated with Prof. Cook from the beginning,
will reuder such assistance as may be re
quired, thus saviug the expense of the
State Geologist's salary.
It was decided that if the finances at
the oontrol of the Board will admit of it,
each State library In the Union will be
furnished with a copy of the State atlas.
It was also stated tnat those who desire
to secure single copies of the atlas can ob
tain them on payment of the actual cost,
which will probably be about §10.
Jail Women Have a Fight.
Warden Baker and Deputy Warden
Johnson were seated in the business room
of the Essex county jail yesterday morn
ing conversing upon business matters,
when suddenly they heard cries and
shrieks in the female prison, the entrance
to which is made from the business office.
Mr. Baker opeued the door in time to see
a tight of no mean quality. About a
dozen of the women were In the further
end of the! corridors, punching, biting,
kicking and pounding one another in
great style. Before he got to them two or
three others who had stood in the back
ground sprang into the rlug and got in
two or three good blows.
The presence at the warden and hia
deputy did not frighten the women in the j
least, and one after another they were ι
pulled from the ring and placed in their
cells. Finally something like order was
restored.
New Jersey News Notes.
The marksmen of May's Landing are
trying to form a gun club.
Sylvan Lakes, near Burlington, have
been found to be full of big black bass,
ranging from two to four pouuds.
The Rev. R. C. Hallcock, Ph. D., of Old
Tennent Presbyterian Church, Freehold,
hns resigned and will preach his farewell
sermon next Sunday.
Ground has been broken at. Williams
town for a co-operative glass factory. A
number of the Gloucester county opera
tives form the company.
The Paterson Board of Trade has pas
sed a resolution to have a committee ap
pointed to take into consideration the
erection of a home for vagrant children.
James Latimer, of Atlantic City, bet on
Leon Abbett and won. The various
articles he secured in payment of the bet
enabled him to give a party to the ninety
three children living ou the blocs
bounded by Tennessee. Arctic and Baltic
avenues. After the party the children
were driven in big wagons all over the
island.
American Legion of Honor.
At the annual session of the New Jer
sey Grand Council of the American
Legion of Honor, held in Passaic, the
following officers were elected for the en
suing year:—George A. Grey, com
mander; J. Gordon Emmons, Jersey
City, G. V. C.; Dr. Church, Passaic,
orator; J. B. Clinton, Passaic, secretary;
C. H. Drummer, Jersey City, treasurer;
M. E. Downey, Hoboken, chaplain; J. F.
Vittalley, Newark, guide; F. M. Potter,
Newark, warden; Frauk L. rfhiDman,
Vftll'nrL·· oantrir· fnnotaue t-T Uimfnn
Newton; Charles lierger, Hoboken;
Kobert Rahlf, Hoboken. At η banquet
given by the local council in the evening
Judge J. Frank Fort, of Newark,
Supreme Treasurer Grinnwell and others
made speeches.
Triennial S. S. Convention.
The third triennial Convention of the
New Jersey Sunday Association ad
journed its Trenton meeting after the
election of the following officers:—Presi
dent, Charles A. Williams, of Camden,
vice presidents, F. S. Janeway, of Mid
dlesex; F. S. Gardner, of Cumberland,
and William M. Clark, of Newton; cor
responding secretary, the Rev. S. W.
Clark, of Paterson; recording secretary;
Louis Pomeroy, of Chatham; assistant
recording secretary, E. F. Westcott, of
Passaic, and treasurer, Walter M. Patton,
of Camden.,
BATHING IS SALT LAKE.
It 1· Four Times no Salt as the Ocean
Queer Experiences.
You get a bathing suit of heavy knit
wool, just like that issued to the China
man who stood in the line ahead of you.
It is very thick, and it has a startling
tendency to sag down that Is increased
with wetting. When you have tied your
self up in it and joined the throng that
wades out through the coarse sand to
deep water, you notice that the waves do
not come In with the high, proud arch of
those at Long Branch. Nor do they
break with the roar of the ocean waves.
They come in with a long low sweep and
curl over in foam with a strong hiss.
One could hardly expect anything else.
This pond is one of salt pretty thoroughly
saturated, and that is about all. It is
four times as salt as the ocean. The
Dead Sea is not much salter. You And it
out to your discomfort if you neglect to
read and follow the instructions posted
noon the platform and lu the bathing
houses to avoid swollowing or getting
the water in your eyes. You wet vour
head in the dressing room and then you
J
make an effort to keep your head out of
the water.
The lake is low now. This is accounted
for, as is the scarcity oi water every
where about the mountains, by the fact
t hat the snows of last winter were very
light. It is necessary to go out 200 feet to
get beyond your depth. Then you are be
yond the low breakers, and have only to
look out that the wnite caps do not dash
In your eyes. There is no undertow. As
soon as you have reached a point where
you can hold on the bottom with your
feet, your feet will come up and you will
iiud yourself involuntarily in the attitude
observing your toes as they stick out of
the water. Try to turn over, and you
have only lifted your arm to make an ef
fort when you pop over like a lop-sided
cork. If you keep one arm aown and
lift the other, over you go ; and you find
that by repeating the process you can get
up a speed of about forty revolutions a
minute.
Make the usual motions to swim, and
your feet will kick in the air. Your best
efforts will be wasted in attempting to
keep them in the water, whether you are
back down or up. If you set a little of
the water in your mouth, you do not need
to be told why there are patches of glist
eniuc white alone the shore, where the
suu has been. It is not a good place for
swimming. The best use you can make
of the opportunity is to try the capacity
of the densely-salt water of flotation.
When you have spent half au hour in the
warm waves, and have taken the fresh
water shower provided in each dressing
room, and a brisk rub, you are ready to
admit that there are worse things to take
in this world than a bath in the Great
Salt Lake.
MACEDONIAN BRIGANDS.
Cruelty With Them le a Pure Matter of
Business.
The causes and character of Macedon
ian brigandage are complicated by a pos
sible political element: but it is no easy
matter to learn the true state of the ques
tion. Turks and philo-Turks assert posi
tively that it is supported by secret socie
ties in Bulgaria and Greece, with the
view of discrediting the Ottoman govern
ment in the eyes of the powers; but in
spite of the preponderance of Greeks in
the Drigand bands one is loath to believe
in the complicity of the Greek nation,
even through a secret society. In any
case the authorities are absolutely inno
cent of,such foul play, and do what they
can in the absence of an extradition
treaty. It woulil be well, nevertheless,
to be more careful, and not to allow notor
ious ruffians to harbor in Tliessaly, as was
asserted to be the case not long ago, for
no diplomotic jealousies ought to give
security to a blood-stained monster like
the infamous Nicko, who was said to have
lived for some time at Larissa.
The taking of Colonel Synge was the
least of this brute's misdeeds, the atro
cious character of which shocked even
his own villainous profession. Here is
one which can be absolutely certified.
Some years ago he took two little chil
dren, for whom he demanded four and
three hundred liras respectively. The
larger sum was paid, and, like a strict
man of business, he gave up the child; in
the second case he had to do with poor
parents, to whom the sum demanded
was an impossibility. Fifty liras were
sent up, and sent back again. The
wretched parents sold all they had,
raised a subscription, and got together
another hundred. JS'icko sent this back
as before, with the brief message that if
he was not satisfied in three days the
child would not be living. He kept his
word; the parents received tne body in
four quarters, and Nicko told his own
horrified ruffians that business was busi
ness in this as in everything else—Mac
mlllan's Magazine.
Hew Fast Can a Locomotive Kan?
The question "How fast can a loco
motive run ?" has been a good deal dis
:ussed recently in the engineering papers.
j The conclusion appears to be that there Is
no authentic record of any speed above
eighty miles an hour. That speed was
obtained many years ago by a Bristol and
Exeter tank engine with nine foot driv
ing wheels—a lone extinct species—down
α steep bank. But it has, apparently,
never been beaten. It is, indeed, not a
little strange how sharply the line ap
pears to have been drawn at eighty miles
an hour. Records of seventy-nve miles
an hour are as plenty as blackberries.
Records of eighty are exceedingly rare.
Records of any greater speed have a way
of crumbling beneath the lightest touch.
—The Railway» of England.
Diplomacy.
Fond mother (with ugly child)—Well,
Dr. Baxter, what do you think of that for
a baby?
The Rev. Baxter (who has his own ideas
of beauty but, is conscientious)—Well,
that is baby.—Life.
JOB PRINTING,
o*—.
CHEAPEST!
QUICKEST!
NEATEST!
ALL KINDS OF WORK DONE IN
THE MOST FINISHED MAN
NER AND AT THE MOST REA
SONABLE RATES IN THE
JOB DEPARTMENT
OF THE
Jersey
City
News
Establishment,
BILLHEADS,
LETTERHEADS,
NOTE Η Ε ADS,
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VISITING CARDS,
TICKETS,
INVITATIONS.
CIRCULARS,
HANDBILLS,
POSTERS and
LEGAL PRINTING
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION TURN- \
ED OUT IN THE BEST STYLE \
AND A Τ SHORT NOTICE.
BRIEFS, CASES ON APPEAL AND \
REPORTS OF TESTIMONY A
SPECIALTY.
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS AT THE j
OFFICE OF THE
Jersey City News,
Ko. 80 MONTGOMERY STREET [Weldon Building],
JEKSBY CITY.
RAILROADS.
Erlt Ballroad Tim· Table.
ΓΓΊΟΚΚΤ OFFICES—401. 317. 718.957
X Broadway, 153Hi Bowery, 1 Bat
tery place. Chambers street and
Twenty third street ferries. New
•York: 331 Fulton street. Brooklyn;
107 Broadway, Williamsburg; cor
ner Newark and Hudson streets,
Hoboken. and new station Jersey
v City, where tickets and pariur Or
sleeping ear réservations and orders for check
ing and transfer of baggage can be obtained.
Trains leave Jersey City station as follows
8:20 a. m.—Day Express. Pullman Buffet drawing
room coaches to Buffalo, connect at HornellsvlUe
for Jamestown and Chautauqua Lake.
3:18 p. m. daily—"Chicago and St. Louis Limited."
A solid Pullman train or day, dining and sleeping
coaches to Meadville, Youugetown, Marion ana
Chicago without change. Pullman sleepingcoaches
to Cleveland, Cincinnati and St. Louis. No extra
charge for fast time.
t>;18 p. m. daily—Chicago and Qrand Trunk Ex
press. Solid Pullman train of day and Buffet sleep
ing coaches to Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Hamilton.
London, Lansing, Battle Creek, South Bend and
Chicago without change. Buffet sleeping coach to
Rochester, arrive 7:30 a. m. _
8:50 p. m. dally—Chicago Express. Pullman Buffet
sleeping coaches to Elmira, Horneilsville, James
town, Corry, Mead villes Youngs town, Cincinnati
and Chicago.
Stations on Orange Branch, week days, 9:15 a. m.,
12:58, 422, 627, 7:05, 9:12, 11 .-45 p. m. Sundays, 9:45,
а. m.. 1:42, 4:17, 6:27, 8:30, 10:12 p. m. Additional traîna
to Prospect street, E. Orange, Washington street,
Orange, Llewellyn and Main streets, w. Orange*
Orange, week days. 6:15, 8:23, 1123 a. m., 2:22.3^7,
452, 5:19, 550, 8:12. 10<0U p. m.
Rutherford and Passaic, week days. 4:15. 5:00, 6:12,
7:12, 8A)5, 9:45, 10:43 a. m., 12:12 noon, 1:12. 2&, 3:03,
350, 420, 450, 552, 601. Ii29. 6:42. 7:15. 7:44. 9:15, 10:42,
p. m., 12:13 midnight. Sundays. 5:00, 850, 10:43, a. m„
12:12 noon, 2.Ό0, 320, 4:13, 520, 6:45, 7^4, 9.15, 10:42 p. nu,
12:1 H mldnfcrht. Additional trains to Passaic, week
days, 3:21. 5:12, 52», 6:20 p. in.
Patereon, week day»; 4:15, 5:00,6:12. 7:13, 8:05, 9:45,
10.43 a. m., 12:12 noon, 1:12, 2JÛ2, 3:03, 3:21, 3:45, 850,
4:12, 4:20, 4:45, 450, 5:12, 529. 5:42, 552. 6:01, 620, G29,
6:42, 7:15, 7:44, 850, 9:15. 10:43 p. m., 12:13 midnight.
Sundays, 5:00, 8au, 10:43. 12:12 noon, 2:00. 330, 4.14
5:20, 6:45, 7:44, 8:50, 9:15, 10:42 p. m., 12:13 midnight.
Newark and Paterson via Newark, week days. 558,
654, 8«7. 10:20, 11:45 a. m.. 1.14. 2:15, 3:47. 4:35. 5ώ7. 5:31,
б.-07, 627. 7:46. 10:15 p. ru.. 1220 midnight. Sundays,
»:lo a. ni., 3:47, 6:47. 8:15, 10:15 p. m.
Ridgewood and Suffern, week days. 4:15, 5:00, 8:05,
9*5, 10:43 p. nu 1:12 2:02, 321. 4:12. 5:12. 5:42. 620, 6:42,
705, 850,10:42 p. m.. 12:13 midnight Sunaays, 5Λ0, 8:30,
10:43 a. m., 2.Ό0, 4:13 and 6:45 p. m., 12:13 midnight,
Also to Ridgewood. week days, S:45 a. m., 4:45, 5:3a,
6:12,850 p. m.; Suffern. 3:45 p. m.
Newburg ana Cornwall, week days, S55. 930 a. m^
3:47, 4:14, 5:42 p. m. Sundays, 920 a. m., 2 p. m.
Goshen, week days, 5:00, 8:05, 920, 10:43 a. m., 1:12,
3*5, 4:45, 5:^. 7:15, 850 p. m. Sundays, 54*), 8201 920,
Hlddletown, weeJc deys. 5.Ό0. 8:05, 950,10:43 a. m.t
1:12, 3:18. 3:45, 6:1(1, *.-45, 8:50 p.m. Sundays, BjUU, 8:90.
950 a. m., 3:18, 6:18, 6:49, 8:50 p. m.
Pt. Jervle, week days, 5:00, 8:05, 950, 10:18 a. 1:12,
3:18, 3:45, 4:45, 6:18, 7:15, 850 p. m. Sundays, 5:00, 830,
*30 a. in., 8:18, 6:18, (5:45. 850 p. m.
Warwick, week days, 53& 950 a. m., 1:12, 4:45, p. m.
Sundays, 8:30 a. m.
Montgomery, week days, 920 a. 3:45, 4:45 p. m.
Sundays, 950 a. m.
Express traîna arrive at Jersey City from the
West, 65<λ 7:40 a. m.. 435. 955 p. m.
Northern railroad of new jersey
Trains leave Jersey City station, Erie Railway
week days, for Englewood. Tenaliy, Closter, Spar
kill and Nyaek, 530, *7:15, 83Ô, *1057 and 11.-42 a. m.,
1:45. 3:12, 4:14. 5:05, 5:44. 6Hi. *657, 805, 10*4 p. m.,
12.18 midnight. Sundays, 833, *9.4? a. m., 1:45 404,
7:42 *8.27 p. in.
Additional trains to Creakili and way, 6:17, 7:45*
857, 957 a. m., and 12:©. 152, 3:12, 5:14, 559 p. m.
•For Nanuet, Spring valley, Monsey and Tall man».
Nyack Express, *4:47.
XfEW YORK AND GREENWOOD LAKE RAIL·^
J. ν way. Trains leave Jersey City station, Erie
Railway, as follows:—
For Arlington, 6:15, 8:37,950, 1158 a. xaH 12:16. 1253,
2Λ4, 857, 3-52, 459, 557, 557, 635, 7:12, 857, 10:12, Uî45,
12:16 p. m. Sundays, 9:12, a. m., 1:42, 407, 657, 807,
8:45, 10:12 n. m.
Bloomfleld and Montolalr, weak days, 6:1£ 837,
S:8U, a. m., 12:16, 2:04, 3^2. 4:42, 459, 557.J57, 63& 702.
857, 10:12. 12:16 p. in. Sunday», W:12 a. m.. 807, 845
p. m.
Little Falls and Intermediate stations, weekdays,
6:15, 8:37, 9:30 a. m.. 12:16 noon, 352, 4:42, 4M, 557,
557, 6:35, 7:12, 857, 1206 p. m Sundays, 902 a. m*
8:17, 8:45 p. m. 2Λ>4 p. m., Saturdays only.
Pomp ton, week da/s. 837, 9;ifc a. m., 4.48, 4:59,557,
655. p. m. Sundaye. 9:12,1005 a. m., 807fe m.
Greenwood Lake and intermediate stations, weak
days, 8:37, 940 a. m., 4:4% p. m. Sundays. 9:18, 10:15,
a. m.
W. J. Ml'RPHY, L. F. FARMER,
tu'l Supt ta'l Put. Act.
STEAMBOATS.
A IL FARES REDUCED VIA STONING
Λ TON LINE—The Inside roule; Bottom, «3: Fτον
ldence, «.Β; Woreeater. tUO. Steamer, WjoUe
Island and Ma»aacniu*cta leave New Pier J6, N. R.,
oue block aoove Canal «treet, at 4.80 p. m., bond·»
excepted.
Daft Electric Light Co.,
IIS BROADWAY, M. T.
TATIOÏARY ELECTRIC MOTORS. ELECTRIC RAILIAÏS
AH) POWER STiTlOIS, STORAGE BATTERIES.

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