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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, November 15, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 5

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FAIRMOUNT VS. CENTRAL
TTIT.Y ROLL THEIR FIRST G AMI
FOR LEAGUE HOXOKS.
Tlie Home Team Bowls In Poor Inci
and ie Easily Vanquished—ilabig Al
most Knocked Out—Football Kicker*,
Active Athletes—Sporting Notes.
The Fairmount Club oi tho Jersey City
Amateur Bowling League intends extract
ing all the fun possible out o£ the meet
ings of the League clubs. The ν jour
neyed to and from Fuller's alleys last
night in a stage and sang, cracked jokes
and had a merry time on the trip.
The stage was of course crowded and
several fond of iresh air clambered on the
top of the 'bus.
That is the way to do it, boys. Make
tho meetings as merry as possible and
bring out the club members.
The game, too, was noticeable for the
splendid spirit that prevailed. The Cen
trals opposed the Fairmonts and, although
the former bowled on their own alley,
they bowled in hard luck. Words of
commendation and sympathy Were offered
to the unlucky bowlers by their rivals,
even at a time when it was possible for
the home club to overcome the lead and
win.
The Fairmounts put up only tne aver
age fame, but the Centrals were nineteen
points under it, which tells the poor luck
in which they bowled. Only three of
them had scores above the average notch.
In fact seven of the team were below the
forty block, one just reached the century
mark and one put up a beginner's game,
as he had but 82 to his credit.
He put several good balls down the
alley but the pins stuck as if they had
been glued. Hoffman, of the Ceutrals,
was in great shape, and he had the big
score of the night. He put 190 in the
tenth column, which was twenty better
than Kernig's score, who led the score of
the Fairmount team.
X lits i U.UJ.lljH WJ. LUC V1S1LU1.1 VYÛ3 Y Ol J
even. A defect, and a glaring one, ob
served on these alleys is the insufficient
light at the end near the pins. The pins
could be barely seen, and it would require
an umpire who can see as well as au owl
in the dark to tell whether the pins were
on the spots. A powerful lamp with re
flectors should be hung over the pins.
A bowler not blessed with strong eyes
would have to trust to luck in delivering
the ball, as it would be impossible to see
the pins in the poor light supplied last
night.
After the game last night the victors
and vanquished gave cheers for each other
and both teams united in giving a rous
ing three and a tiger for the league.
Among the onlookers last night were
President Loud and Secretary Hulse, of
the League, and a delegation of the Cen
tury Club.
The Fairmounte won by 180 pins. The
score follows:—
CENTRAL B. C. I FAIRMOUST B. C.
C. Weimar.... i 6 i 164 | L. Murray i's S * 131
A. BoUke 1 3 Β 130 ( C. Kerniï 3 8 4 170
F.Jahr . 0 5 5 133 10. Hannah. . .S I i 149
E. Bouter 0 0 10 «21 J. WheeUlmri l 5 4 144
P. Hoffman...3 S 2 190 I J. B. HoUteln.4 3 3 168
G. Metzgor.,,.1 2 7 117 ; II. Grimm 3 2 S 152
C Zahn I 2 7 100 I D. Baes 1 4 5 130
■ft'. Renter 1 3 6 130 C. Herring 3 2 5 Its
W. Prosch 1 3 6 117 I M. Dohrman..0 3 2 164
G. Oberbeck.. .4 3 3 159 | J. C. Retners. .8 4 3 141
Totals. 14 32 54 13171 Totals 22 33 40 1497
SCORE BT FRAMES.
Central B. C..127 291 337 535 683 806 908 1047 1199 1317
Falrmo't a C. 159 306 471 60i 730 890 1071 1254 1381 1497
Averages—Fairraount B. C., 149 7-10; Central B. C.#
181 7-10. Umpire—Stanley Tresouthwlck. Scorers—
J. B. Casscles for the Falrmouat B. C, and C. Del
Orme to r the Central B, C.
Opening Football Game.
The football season in this city will
open tomorrow afternoon at Oakland'
Park, corner of Hoboken and Oakland
avenues. The opposing teams will be
the Hasbroucks, ot this city, and the
crack Prospect Club, of Brooklyn.
The contest will be interesting and
those who want to see an exciting game
should be present.
There are few field sports that are as
j interesting as football. It is ft constant
! go from start to finish There are no
i breaks or delays to make the sport mon
otonous or weary the audience.
A large crowd ought to be present to
! cheer the home team and applaud tho
I good plays of the visitors. There is
ι nothing that has a greater tendency to
i spur the players on than the presence of
j a large number of spectators.
Empty benches have a depressing effect
! on them. The grand stand should be
j crowded.
The lovers of field sports who con
template witnessing the contest will
recollect that the game is to be played in
this city and not in Brooklyn as was
erroneously slated by a local paper.
The came will begin promptly at half ι
past three o'clock. Captain Negus has
selected a strong team and Captain
Patterson, of the Prospects, will produce
his best eleven. The rival teams named
are as follows:—
PROSPECTS HASBROI7CKS.
A. Bodine Loft End G. Rowland
G. Wyngate Left Tackle A. Cable
R. Lee Left Guard G. Bowly
F. Lee Centre R. Potter
T. Gill Right Tackle A. Ross
B.Jone s Ri«ht End. ...P. McAnerney
J. Shepard Right Guard J. Mansfield
W. Atkinson Quarter Back J. Powers
L. Patterson, Capt.Half Back D. Edwards
C. Rodman Half Back J. Farmer
J. Davis Full Back W. Negus, Capt
Sub Itosa's Strike,
The Sub Rosa Club bowled at Muller's
alleys last night and had a jolly meeting.
They whoop it up every time they come
together. The star bowlers were all on
hand last evening and the customary in
nocent wagers on scores were laid. The
result of the first game was as follows:—
o'mara's team. «abretson's team.
O'Mara 15β I Garretson 171
Doyle ITS I J. Daly 14'J
Dimond 157 I Walsh 187
O'Donald 139 | Martin lt:8
O'Neil 143 I McDonough 152
Gorman 131 I P. Daly 135
Total son! Total 912
Ill the Athletic Arena.
The Scots organized themselves into a
calathumpian band last night and seren.
aded one of the members who recently
took unto himself a helpmeet. The
serenaders had a heap of fun.
Cahill and a strong delegation of the
Scots went over to Hoboken late last
night to see Gabig and Elliuger have their
"go."
The cross-country runners of the Scots
will go out this evening with Captain
Rumpf in charge.
The Wayne Athletic Club will have a
practice run this evening. Dolan, Voge
lins and Flaherty will set the pace
The Lorillard runners will take a spin
this evening.
The cross country teams of the Hamil
ton and Cable clubs are practising almost
nightly.
The tickets for the fair of the Wayne
A. C. are going like hot cakes. The com
petition tor the banner will be open to all
olubs. A good entertainment will be
giveu each evening.
This is gymnasium night at the Loril
lard rooms. The tutor, Mr. Hotwell, will
be present to Rive the boys points.
The gloves are in constant use at the
rooms of the Cable A. C.
The Kensington A. C. has several good
runners and jumpers.
Field sports will have a lively boom in
this city next season.
A score of athletes practice in Caledon
ian Park.
Where, oh where are the tug-of-war
teams?
Athletic sports should be encouraged.
The people ought to aid the Wayne A. C.
in making their fair and bazaar a suc
cess, as the money realized is to be ap
plied to a good purpose—equipping the
gymnasium.
The club is composed of ambitious
youns: men who are uot millionaires' sous
and have to depend ou the people for en
couragement and aid.
They will in return, gather laurels for
the city in the field sports, as the club has ■
the material if a chance is offered to de
velop the talent, and it cannot be devel
oped if the club lacks the facilities. Buy
tickets and send contributions of fancy
articles, etc., and help the club in its
good work.
COLUMBIA DEFEATS STEVENS.
Too of the Hoboken Team Injured In
the Game.
The cricket grounds at Hoboken was
the scene of a lively football contest yes
terday. The Stevens Institute team and
the Columbia College team met.
The Hoboken boys were in poor luck
When they had the victory almost won
two of their plungers were injured. This
weakened the team and demoralized the
players and victory went to the New
Yorkers.
Columbias won the toss and selected
the Held with the wind in their favor.
Despite this advantage as a stiff breeze
prevailed the Stevens boys kept the ball
in the territory of their rivals.
It was a desperate struggle and Stevens
four times lost the ball, but quickly re
covered it. McKenzie finally secured it
and by a splendid sprint secured a touch
down. McCord missed the goal in the kick.
Wreaks, of Stevens, was injured in one
of the scrambles and retired. Schafer
took his place.
When the second half began the wind
had abated and Stevens was deprived of
an advantage that Columbia had at the
start.
As soon as the game was resumed
Ilulett, of Columbia, got the ball and se
cured a touchdown. Tripp kicked goal.
McCord, of Stevens, received a kick in
the head in a scrimmage, and Stevens
lost the services of a valuable player, and
changes had to be made. Dilworth, of
Columbia, secured another touchdown
and Tripp kicked goal.
The Stevens boys made a grand rally
and compelled the Columbias to make a
touch down for safety. No more points
were made and Columbia won with a
score of 12 to 0. The players were:—
Stevkns. Position. Columbia.
Phelps Left end... Pierce.
Loud Leu tackle i.-Beekmans,
H. Wreaks Left guard .Tuttle.
Hall Ce η t γη Gllderslee ve.
C. McKenzie. Right guard KrsKine.
Wild man Risrht tackle Cairns.
Darby. Right end .. Metcalf.
De Hart Quarter hac.k Barnard,
liake Half back J. W. Hulett.
P. McKenzle Half back Dilworth.
MacCord Full back Tripp.
Referee—Harry Sheldon, Cornell.
Umpire—Albert Stevens, Columbia, '37.
Howling Buz/ins*.
Teuton ias tonight at Henn's.
Humors will bang pins at Freuùen
berger's tonight.
It is Volunteer's night at Becker's.
The Fullers will roll at Fuller's this
îvening.
The Wheelmen's League team will
bowl at Brown's alleys tonight.
The bowlers of the Pam rapo A. C. will
break pins at Metropolitan Hall this
ivening.
Adolph Walters, Jr., and OscarFackert
nrill roll a set of games in the match this
evening, Betting is even on the result.
The Wheelmen's League will meet to
morrow night in Brooklyn.
A pointer for our local wheelmen. The
Kings County Wheelmen's bowling team
«acte averages of 134.4-5 and 152.2-5in two
natch games rolled in Brooklyn on
Wednesday night.
Sporting Notes.
Brooklyn and Cincinnati have been ad
mitted to the big League. Now Von der
4.he and his combine can run the Asso
:iation.
Frank Class and Phil Daly, Jr., repre
lented New Jersey and Frank Kleintz
vnd Richard Irwin represented Pennsyl
vania in a pigeon shooting contest at
S'ewark. yesterday. The New Jersey
>air won with a total of 83 against 73.
Sweepstake shooting at the grounds of
lie Suburban Shooting Association at
31aremont tomorrow.
Mike Nolan, who is matched to flght
3al McCarthy, was regarded as the best
nan at his weight in England.
The next baseball seasou of the Ameri
can Athletic Union will be a big affair.
I'he clubs of the East and West are to
ne et.
The boxing tournament of the A. A.
U. will be held on December 16 at thi
Metropolitan Opera House.
A dozen members of the Iludsoi
County Wheelmen went to Plainfleld las
night to witness the contests of the Plain
Held Bicycle Club. I. D. Dowman, of th<
H. C. W., finished second in the half mil<
run.
THE GLUECKLICH INQUEST
A Jury Finds Mrs. Guttenberg Was
An Accessory to the Suicide.
Coroner John O'Hara held an inquest
i last evening in Crane's Hall. Hoboken,
on the death of Jacob Gluecklich, who
committed suicide by taking poison last
month. The circumstances that sur
rounded Gluecklich and compelled him
to commit self murder, would form the
basis of a first-class novel of the kind
Wilkie Collins delighted to write.
The suicide was a young Bohemian.
He failed in business a few months ago,
but by skillful management extricated
himself from the ruins of his fortune and
came to New York with 20,000 florins,
about $0,000. The story of how he lost it
and subsequently poisoned himself lias
been told already in The Jersey City
News. In a letter to a German newspa
Ser in New York he charged his aunt,
1rs. Jennie Guttenberg, with having
taken his money, advised his suicide and
furnished him with the poison. He ac
cused her husband, Karl Guttenberg, of
complicity in the robbery.
Mrs. Koehler was the first witness ex
amined at the inquest. She testified that
she kept a boarding houso at No. 11
Second street, Hoboken. During the last
week in October Gluecklich called at her
house ana begged her to shelter him for
a l'ew days. He told her enough of his
sad story to enlist her sympathies and
she gave him a room.
A few days later a gentleman called
and showed her a letter addressed to the
Stoats Zeitumj, signed by Gluecklich,
nuitu iviu uio ovyjxj in ucuau auu ounucu
that he was going to poison himself.
Mrs. Koehler said that she at once sum
moned her son-in-law, Roundsman Fenn
ing, and that he broke in the door of
Gluecklich's room. His body was lying
on the bed. He had evidently been dead
some time.
Policeman Fenuing testified to break
ing in the door and finding the body.
County Physician Converse said that at
the autopsy he had found tho organs of
Gluecklich's body in a healthy condition.
Upon examining the stomach he had dis
covered about thirty grains of cyanide of
potassium, a dose of poison enough to kill
five men.
Mr. W. E. Cohen, a reporter of the
Staats Zeitung, was expected to appear at
the inquest and give his testimony, but
business prevented his attendance.
Mrs. Gutteuburg, who was wrested
from the Hoboken police by a writ of
habeas corpus, has made good her escape,
and was likewise missed at the inquest.
It did not take the jury long to make
up their minds. Their verdict was that
Jacob Gluecklich came to his death by
poison, self-administerAl, and that Mrs.
Jennie G'uttenberg was an accessory to
the crime. They urged that she should
be brought to justice at once.
Karl Guttenberg, the husband, is sup
posed to be on Long Island. It is said
that the Austrian counsel will take the
case in hand and do all in his power to
sift, the evidence against the Gutten
bergs before a proper tribunal.
Tlielr Silver Wedding.
The twenty-fifth anniversary of the
wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Kir
scher was celebrated by a silver wedding
at their residence, No. 809 Bergen avenue,
Jast night. Quite a large company was
present and a sociable time had by all
present.
THE PËTBY BOND SUIT.
Vice-Chancellor Van Fleet Hears Evi
dence in an Old Controversy.
Testimony was heard by Vice-Chancel
cellor Van Fleet yesterday between John
Petry, of Hohokus, Bergen County, com
Ëlainant and the estate of the late James
laker, a former New York broker, resid
ing at Jersey City, defendant. Tne suit
was to recover two $500 bonds of the city
of Paterson. Nos. 525 and 542. The bonds
were issued April 1, 18G5, add the com
plainant alleged were lost or stolen soon
after he pnrchased them.
The testimony of the complainant was
to the effect that he had learned from the
City Treasurer of Paterson in 1875 that
thecoupons of the missing bonds were
being paid to Broker Baker, and that the
payment had been going on since I860,
When he called upon Mr. Baker aud told
him his story, Mr. Baker said that he
would hold the bonds and assist him in
catching the thief. In the meantime the
Paterson authorities paid him the value
of the ponds; he giving the city a bond of
indemnity to secure it from being com
pelled to redeem them a second time. He
said that the bonds with thirty-eight
others had been purchased by him from
the late John Morrisey, of New York,who
was acting as his agent at tiiat time.
An injunction was granted in Decem
ber, 1883, to restrain Baker from dispos
ing of the bonds, which he claims to have
purchased in a regular way, and Petry
now asks that the bonds be returned to
him in order that they may be cancelled
by the city and relieve him from the in
| demnity bond.
Mr. Petry's counsel was ex-Senator
Griggs, and S. C. Mount appeared for the
Baker estate. No decision was reached.
DAMON COUNCIL K. A.
Greenville Men Who Were Instrumenta
In Forming tlie New Body.
Greenville's new council of the Royal
Arcanum was ^formally instituted last
, evening. Twenty-six of the district's
leading citizens assembled at the Belvi
dere House, on Danforth avenue, and did
the business. Supreme Representative
Charlock presided and instituted the
council.
These officials were present:—Grand
Regent Douglass, Past Grand Regent
McDowell, Deputy Grand Regent Frank
S. Petter—to whom credit is due for the
new order—Grand Guide Drummond,
Grand Trustee Coleman, George White,
of No. 09; Past Regent Nickson, of No.
22; Deputy Grand Regeut Nichols, of
Orange, and Past Grand Regeut Griffith.
The session lasted nearly two hours. The
name "Damon Council, No. 1,198," was
decided upon.
These officers were installed:—Regent,
Nicholas G. Vreeland, the well known
I UBS.
ESTABLISHED 40 YEARS.
HENRY SIEDE,
furrierT
The riglit goods at the right prices.
Fifth Aïenue & 45th St,,
AND
No. 14 West 14th Street.
NEW YORK.
LADIES OF JERSEY CITY.
Now Is the time to have your Seal Sacques and
Garments Repaired and Altered to the Latest
Fashions. Best Workmanship Guaranteed. I also
have on hand a large stock or Seal Sacques, Wraps,
etc., in the 1 Atest Styles. It will pay you to call on
me and see my prices.
F. G. HOFFMANN, Furrier.
No. 95}4 Montgomery Street. Jersey City.
local journalist; Vice Regent, Alexander
Smith; Past Kegent, S. C. Leonard;
Orator, D. P. Cross; Secretary, Charles E.
Nugent; Charles H. Wood; Collector,
Frederick Oberhausen; Chaplain. Thomas
P. Sawyer; Gtxide, Theodore H. Knnis;
Warden, W. L. Pitcher; Sentry, James
Sutcliff; Trustees, Dr. 'J. Stapmeyer, one
year; John H. Jansen, two years; Legal,
W. Leman, three years.
— ·
An unique advertisement adorns a
bulletin board on Henderson street. On
one side of the board is printed in large
letters "Divers Wanted.' "See other
side,"—"To find McGinty," is the mirth
provoking sign which ereets the inquisi
tive passerby who happens to turn to
look iit the other side.
T. C. Brown
& Van Anglen.
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS
for
SATURDAY.
WE WILL PLACE ON SALE TO
MORROW (November 16).
1 LOT LADIES KID GLOVES. GOOD
QUALITY. 4 BUTTONS, COLORS AND
BLACK, PULL LINE OF SIZES
49c. per pair, usually sold at 75c
1 LOT LADIES, EXTRA QUALITY
KIDG LOVES, 4 BUTTONS,STYLE NEW
NARROW STITCHING ON BACK.
COLORS AND BLACK.
79c. per pair; Real Value IL 13.
1 LOT LADIES' FULL REGULAR
MADE STRIPED HOSE,
ISc. per pair; usual price, 35c·
SPECIAL LOT OP LADIES HAND
KERCHIEFS, HEMSTICHED AND
EMBROIDERED IN WHITE AND
COLORS. LARGE VARIETY OF
PATTERNS.
13)£c. each worth fully 30.
POPULAR ; DRESS FRAMES FOR
DRAPING, INDISPENSABLE TO
EVERY HOUSEHOLD.
46c. each.
MAIL OR TELEPHONE ORDERS
WILL RECEIVE PROMPT ATTEN
TION. FREE DELIVERY TO ALL
PARTS OF NEW JERSEY.
21 Newark Ave.
AND
128 Montgomery St.
Simpson,Cmimd
! ■ . · .:,·ί
ί Simpson, f
6th Ave. & 19th St,
I .V/; If VORK.
Misses' Newmarkets.
Misses' Goats.
Misses' Jackets.
We pay great attention to the
styles, cloths, sewing and trim.
mings of all garments for Misses'
wear sold by us.
Those intended for school or
rcugn wear are maae ?rom ex
clusive designs of Bannockburn
Cheviots, fine all-wool Beavers
and Scotch Worsted Diagonals of
the best makes known. We rec
comend them with the positive
knowledge that In all cases thev
will give entire satisfaction. The
prices are the lowest ever made
for these high class materia1?.
MISSES' SUITS.
tln Misses' Suits for dress,
school and street wear, we
offer an unusually large as
sortment. They are princi
pally copies of the latest and
best Paris styles of this season,
and are marked at very low
Prices.
Adhering to our fixed rule,
We make no charge for alter
ing either Ladies' or Misses'
Suits or Cloaks.
!
6TH AVE. AND 19TH ST., T|
NEW YORK.
THE BOSTON.
DROPPED.
Dropped to $10.00.
Dropped to $10 00.
Dropped to $2.95.
Dropped to $6.00
pTcox"SHOES, Half Price,"
Tomorrow we shall sell a quantity of JflEJY^S OwERCOATS, now marked $12
and $13, and good value at that,
JLfc $ 1 O.
BLUE PILOT BEAVERS, BROWJT KERSEYS, IRISH CHEVIOTS and
ΓΙΛ*Ε CHINCHILLA S.
Jill Wool JflEJVS SUITS, Black and Blue Cheviots and Jflixetl Cassimeres; good
value at $12 and $13; will be sold tomorrow
At $10.
OVERCOATS,with Cape, in Blue Chinchilla, ages 4 to 10. For just such a coat as
you pay $3.00 in any other house, tomorrow we sell
At $2.95.
Fine All IIM CASSIJUERE SUITS for boys wearing long pants, ages 12 to 18;
ex cellent value at the market price, $8. Tomorrow you get them
For $6.00.
P. Cox retires f rom the New York Market. We have bough t a large quantity of
his finest goods which we give our patrons a chance on. $3 FINE FRENCH
^^£^2^'™ Ζ"αίβ8' 8i*eg> <*ll widths, at $2.30. $2 MISSES' PEBBLE
GOAT SPRING HEEL at $1.
These Geods ere Going with Bells on Them. So Come Quick if You Went Any ot Them.
LADIES' FURNISHINGS.
Natural Wool.
Λ eC.f U TV—ΕΛΒΙΕ S' «fLI,-WOOL· RIBBED VESTS JIT 4» CEJVTS·
A regular hummer at that price.
We are tioiv selling NATURAL WOOL SHIRTS and DRAWERS at 9Sc. each.
Better look at our FRENCH MERINO HEAVYNIGHT UNDERSHIRTS
at $1. You pay $2 elesivhere for the same thing.
ft
CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR, at 15c. for 16 Inch Rise, 2c, J
A WORgBOUT JEWELRY
As we are nearing the Holidays our Jewelry Department assumes larger proper
tions. We have added this week, SILVER, GARNET TOROUOISE a Li
X%DA»™TrclîN£ï«S ^ACELExi, GOLVatà
BEADED NECKLACES, LACE PINS, EAR DROPS and liHOAVniSi
KNOT RINGS and WHAT NOT. ana CUES,
While promenading through our stores, stop and see wnat our juiwûi-Uttχ unijtAitxiviiiiiN ι oners. |
THE BOSTON. [CLOTHIERS AND OUTFITTERS.] [42-48 NEWARK AVE. J. C.I J

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