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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, December 07, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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— THE -
^Jersey (£ity JJjeins.
JAMES LUBY. Γ Γ ! ÏDITOm.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTEHNOON
FT
THE NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OFFICE. Ko. SO Montgomery Street
CWELDON BUILDING.)
•Pite Jersey City News:— Single copies, two
eents; subscription. six dollars per year; postage
free.
The Sunday Morning News:—"Published every
Sunday morning; single copies, three cents: sub
scription. one dollar and fifty cents per year;
postage free.
Entered in the post office at Jersey City as
second class mail matter.
All business communications should be ad
dressed to The News Publishing Company; all
others to the Managing Editor.
BRANCH OFFICES:
Advertisements, Subscriptions and Newsdeal
ers' Orders received:—
Hoboken—First and Clinton Streets, J. 1). Sin
clair.
Union Hill—H. Fischer, No. 02 Palisade Avenue.
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Depot.
Five Corners—G. W. Pfeiffer, No. 663 Newark
Avenue.
SATURDAY DECEMBER 7, 1889.
The Jersey Cm News,
AVERAGK
DAIIjY
CIRCULATION,
HICH WATER MARK,
44,600 COPIES
—— IN SIX DAYS.
The Sunday Morning News
HIGH
WATER.
MARK,
i LARCEST CIRCULATION
;Λ_ HUDSON COUNTY.
This paper is Democratic in principles
and Is independent in its views on all
local questions.
Jefferson Davis.
At least one more generation must
pass before the full, fair truth can be
spoken or written about Jefferson
Davis. The glowing eulogiums of the
South are still animated by the spirit
of the "Lost Cause." A large section
of the North has in later years grown
generous, but even yet no one ven
tures to speak with absolute impar
tiality of him whose name was once
the synonym of hate throughout the
faithful states.
Jefferson Davis was nothing if not
an extremist anfthe uncompromising
utterance of his principles and the
undeviating persistence with which
he carried them to or beyond their
ultimate logical limits drew upon him a
bitterness of reprobation which the
more temperate genius of Robert E.
Lee, who shared with Davis the chief
taincy of the Confederacy never in
«urrea.
And yet there whs nothing in the
animating principles of Jefferson
Davis' life, considered in themselves,
which was calculated to arouse per
gonal hostility. He was a patriot
according to his lights. He was a
fanatic in the cause of liberty, as he
understood it. He was truthful,
bold, consistent, devoted. He loved
the soil of the ^outh and he
loved its people with a passion
such as is seldom lavished upon what
may be styled impersonal relations.
He revered the traditions of Ameri
can Independence, and it cannot be
doubted that as against any foreign
foe he would have given the same
energy, the same passionate devotion,
to the United States which made him
the soul of the Confederacy and the
idol of his people.
Let us pass over his faults today.
He is dead, and those who loved him
are mourning, not the great leader of
tumultuous times, but the gentle old
man who lived in sad retirement fos
tering brave traditions, and mourning
for the men and the days that were
gone forever.
Fourth District Taxes.
There may be some grievances to be
redressed—souie adjustments to be
made—in the matter of the -tax bill oi
tne fourth district residents; but we
have not the remotest notion that a
charge of unfair discrimination
against the people of that district will
lie against the City Tax Board, it is
so natural for a man to criticise his tai
bill—let it bo ever so lair and reason
able—that it is the easiest thing it
the world to get up a general tux
payers' revolt. If these gentlemei
who were so noit-y in their denuncia
tioiis of the city authorities at Thurs
day evening'* meeting will take th<
trouble to csiii at the tax board']
office, they will find their complaint
treated with ready consideration, au<
injustice, where it may have beei
incautiously or inadvisedly doue, wil
doubtless be speedily undone.
That is the proper and sensible an<
legal method of righting the wrong
they complain of. Other taxpayer
who think that their tax bills repre
sent more than their share of the pub
lie burden pursue this remedy,instead
of getting up " inuignation " meeting
and howling at everybody aud every
thing in the municipal line.
The plain fact is that the uieetin
of Thursday evening was not gotte
up with the view of redressing anj
body's grievances. The tumult ha
been stirred up. not for'the practici
good it will accomplish, but just t
aid its promoters to get their nam»
into the newspapers. They are a
ways sure of enough hot-headed hel
to enable them to make a noise, and
as that is about all these meetings ac
complish, it is safe to assume that it is
about all they are intended to accom
plish.
The disregard of reason and facts
which distinguishes the Fourth dis
trict tax kickers is illustrated in their
claim that one of the purposes of the
passpge of the new charter was to in
crease Mayor Cleveland's salary. The
truth is that the charter says nothing
whatever about the mayor's salary,
and Mr. Cleveland's salary was in
creased—very properly—by authority
of an act that had no relation what
ever to the charter.
When County Superintendent Gan
non said he didn't want that $3,000
for the Kearney road, one of the
Freeholders exclaimed "Great Cœsar."
He probably had in mind Marc
Anthony's words:—
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown, *
Which he did thrice refuse.
This was regarded as a somewhat
remarkable action on the part of the
late Mr. Cîesar, but Superintendent
Gannon's leaves it in the gloomy and
sepulchral shade.
AMUSEMENTS.
On next Monday evening Mr. \V. J.
Scanlan, the young and handsome
Irish commedian and vocalist, begins
a week's engagement at the Academy
of Music, his first appearance since
his successful tour of England, Ire
land and Scotland. Mr. Scanlan will
be seen in a special production of
Jessop and Townsentlx picturesque
Irish drama, entitled "Myles Aroon,"
tor which Manager Pitou promises
new and handsome scenery, cobtumes
anil iifi'essnries and a larire force Of
auxiliaries. At every performance
Mr. Scanlan will sing the following
songs written and composed by him
seli:—"You and I Love," "My Mag
gie, " "Live My Love, Oh, Live," and
his latest success, "See, There She
(ioes," which he sings while swinging
in his arms a pretty little girl. This
new song is likely to create as much
of a craze as his famous "Peek-a
Boo" did. Mr. Scanlan is now one of
the richest actors on the stage, as he
has been playing to large business for
several years, He has won his place
by honest attention to his profession,
and deserves all the success he has
achieved. Mr. Scanlan will have the
assistance of an excellent company,
including Charles Mason, Thaildeus
Krine, Robert McNair, Edward R.
Marsdell, J. O. LeBrasel, Mrs. Mattie
Ferguson, Helen Wealtersby, Nellie
Sackett and others. Matinees will be
given Wednesday and Saturday.
PERSONAL AND NOTABLE.
C. Asa Francis, of Long Branch, has been
elected to the position of Secretary of the Long
Branch Board of Education, made vacant by the
death of ex-Senator Thomas G. Chattle.
The following fourth-class New Jersey Post
masters have been appointed :—R. L. McDowell,
Cran bury; J. W. Newell. Eafcont own; Β S.
Pearce, Manasqan; H. E. Hathaway, Monmouth
Junction.
Congressman Bergen will have quarters in
Washington at the Richmond during the session
of Congress.
Robert Sewell, of Camden, has been appointed
a cadet in the United States Military Academy,to
represent the First New Jersey District.
Department Commander George C. S. Bogert
presided over the fourth annual encampment of
the department of New Jersey Sons of Veterans,
held at Hackensack Wednesday. After a supper
provided by the local post, the delegates assem
!<ed in Company C"s armory, where they held a
ball to raise money to buy a soldiers' plot in
Hackensack Cemetery. An intermission was
taken during the ball to publicly install the
newly elected officers.
Ex-Senator W. B. Miller, of Cape May, is re
covering from a slight attack of paralysis.
No caucus of the Essex delegation to the Legis
lature has been called yet, and it is hardly prob
able that one will take place until the night be
fore the organization just before the general
caucus. Then the battle royal will be over the
office of Sargeant-at-Arms, for which PatriGk H.
Corish, Adolph Holzner and William Harrigan
are candidates. The fight will be hot and hard
between Messrs. Corish and Holzner. William
IS. Ross, of Sussex county, would like to be Ser
geant-at-Arms also, but will be content with be
ing made assistant unless the Speakership
should go to Essex, something that seems to be
rather improbable.
Postmaster John Engel, of Hackensack, has
been notified by the department that free deliv
eries will be granted to that town as soon as
possible.
The following anecdote is told by the Newark
Evening News', it is probably less true than
amusing:—There is a boy in a Newark private
school who seems conversant with local history,
although young in years. Yesterday the teacher
was putting the youngsters of the class through
their lessons relative co the rulers of the United
States and cities. "Wlio is the Mayor of Newark
and wnat are his duties*" was the question.
"Mayor Haynes, commonly called 'Picnic Joe,1 "
came the ready answer; "and his duties is
sliootin' at targets and eatin' with soldiers."
The answer as to the duties, according to the
lesson, should have been 4,to enforce the laws of
the city as enacted by Councils and the laws of
the State," having a local bearing.
There ai e only two members in the light for
the presidency ol' the Senate. Senator Henry M.
Nevius, of Moumouth, and Seuator George T.
(,'ranmer, of Ocean. Senator A. F. R. Martin
will be content with the chairmanship of the
Municipal Corporation Committee, to which ha
is entitled by virture of the fact that he is the
the only Republican representing a largo eitv.
Senator Edward F. McDonald, of Hudson, alto
warns a place on this committee.
The Newark Free Library lias now been open
seven weeks and not a single book out of the
large number issued has been stolen or mutil
ated, and most of them have been returned in
; as good order as they were in when taken out.
j bixty-eight and one-half per cent, of the
^ volumes taken are fiction, and the remainder
principally scient itle works.
The residents of Lindenwold are complaining
' of the unhealthy condition oi' the place, occa
sioned by a large pool of water on the south side
[ of the raiiroad. The water is said to have devel
, oped malaria to an alarming extent. One family
η the past three months has expended over $300
i in doctors' bille. Superintendent Dayton, of the
" Camden ana Atlantic Railroad, offered to con
- struct a drain under the roadbed to the north
[ side of the track if the residents of the place
would lay a drain from the railroad's property
to a natural waterway ôtiO feet beyond, but while
- some are willing to accept the offer others are
indifferent to or oppoap the offer.
r The'Hudson River Tunnel Company has con
i tracted for an enormous cast iron pipe to hold
up the mud under the river while the workmen
are digging the tunnel. The pipe is known as a
s shield by tunnel builders. It will be forced intr
,! ; the mud by hydraulic pressure. Workmen will
j then dig out the mud inside of it until they
reach the eiîd, when it will be driven aheac
S again. Up to Tuesday 2.0S5 feet had been duf
■" on the Jertey side of the river, and on the New
t> i York *ide 200. Work on the New York end ii
-Ν· , .
TJ XJ LV V «
practically suspended at present. fcuperiuten·
dent Haskings says that be will bare a hole
through the mud in two years.
Assistant City Surveyor Osier, of Camden, bas
made plans of the farm of Chalk ley Lecooey for
use at the murder trial next month.
William T. Hopper, the recently appointed
Collector of the Port at Perth A m boy, has
appointed Abraham Coleman, of Eatontown,
coast inspector. The salary is $2,000.
Among the interesting and exciting; jtems pub
lished in the Bridgeton Evening Ne tes is the
story of a Fairton lady who walked backwards
into the rain barrel, which was sunk in the
ground in the rear porch of her house. She re
mained in a plight, which can be more easily
imagined than described, standing in the barrel
with the ice cold water up to ber waist until hea
"hired girl·1 came to her rescue and helped her
out.
WHO WILL PAY·FOR S1LC0TTS STEAL?
The House Will DtacuKs nu Kxtr* Appro
priation to Cover It.
Washington, 1). C., Dec. 7, 1SS9.—The
discussion among the members of the
House of the ruling of the committee,
that members were to be the losers by the
defalcation, was very animated yester
day. The ODinion was general that the
House would vote a special appropriation
to reimburse the members for their
losses.
Some opposition to this proposition
was manifested by several of the members
and it is certain "the appropriation will
not go through the House "on wheels."
Representative Evans, of Tennessee,
said this morning:—"If the members of
the House have allowed a system to stand
so irregular as the committee is quoted
as saying the existing system is, I think
they should be the sufferers.
"In any event I shall not favor re
paying to members more than the amount
of one month's salary, which under the
custom of the House they might have
been warranted in thinking they were en
titled to entrust to the cashier."
"The story that Silcott had gone to
Xew York to collect some money of ex
Congressman Paige," said Chairman
Adams, of the Investigating Committee,
tonight, "was obviously invented for the
purpose of gaining time in his flight, as
was also the message to his wife that he
would return Monday night. There is no
evidence whatever that Mr. Paige owes
or has owed Silcott a cent."
DAVIS' DEATH ABROAD.
Vipws of the English Press on the Ex
President of the Confederacy.
London', Dec. 7, 1689.—The Times savs:
"Mr. Davie' policy wus a superb game of
brag. His later career was hardly worthy
of his forme* life, for while be was the
most conspicuous example of its clem
ency, he seldom had a good word for the
North."
The Standard says:—"While he must
occupy a prominent place ib history he
will not be accorded the affection that
friend and foe alike bestow upon Lincoln,
Lee, Jackson and Grant."
The Daily Telegraph says: "Now that
he is gone he will be followed to the grave,
we doubt not, by more affectionate "grati
tude in the South and more respectful
appreciation in the North, than was al
ways his position during his life."
The New Term Grand Jury.
The following is the list of Grand Jurors
drawn last Wednesday, and accepted by
Judge Knapp this morning:—Philip Ull
meyer, Henry Martinez, John Rich,
Charles T. Munn, Charles Turner,
Henry Pearlmutter, William H. Hunt,
James N. Davis, James Laverty, Rauion
M. Cook, Charles Klupful, Charles
Somers, Joseph Meinthul, James Vine.
Martin Lawlers, Edward Wrede, Adolpfi
Brehm, Charles W. Laws, John Hart,
Michael J. O'Donnell, James Byrnes,
Joseph Warren, Charles Eypper, John J.
Thompson.
Failures of the Week.
There were 281 failures in the United
States reported to Bradstreet's during
the week, against 26S in the preceding
week and 278, 238, 309 aj)d 214 in the cor
responding weeks of 1888, 1887, 1886 and
1885 respectively. The total number of
failures in the United States January 1st
to date is 10,633 against il,43!) in 1888.
RAILROAD NOTES,
The branch railroad running to High
land Beach is to be sold at auction. The
Central Railroad has been operating it of
iate and will makeas rong fight for its
purchase. It is reputed to be a paying
ii-vctit.ntirm
The Lehigh Valley Railroad has as
sumed work ou its long branch from
South Plainfield to Jersey City. Fifty
thousand dollars worth of track laying
machinery is already ou the ground in
Koselle and the work will be prosecuted
durincr the winter and spring in all
weathers. The distance to be covered is
twenty miles and the objective point in
Jersey City is north of the Central New
Jersey's ferry.
The Ijackawanna is fighting to keep the
New Jersey Central out of <i rich region
at the junction of Morris, Somerset and
Hunterdon counties. The Central already
has the High Bridge branch to near Lake
Hopatcong. Now it projects a line nearly
parallel to the High Bridge branch, from
White House, ten miles west of Somer
ville, to Morristown. From White House
to New Geruiautown the line has already
been laid. The Lackawanna's Passaic
and Delaware branch extends from Sum
mit to Bernardsvilie, and a large force of
men is at work near the latter place
pushing the line to Peapack, six miles
distant, with the intention of cutting off
the Central.
The Chicago limited train makes a run
to Philadelphia every day in one hour and
titty-nine minutes, or at an average rate
of a little more than forty-tlve miles an
hour. There are several "slow-ups" on
the route and at times the speed is a mile
h minute to make up for the deficiencies
in other places. The engineer and fireman
return to New York the same dfly and get
a day and a half pay for the round trip.
The Erie re-elected all its old officers
last week. The directors voted to pjiy six
per cent, iuterest on the income bends on
January 15. it will be the first interest
paid since 1888. The annual report of the
road for the year ending September 30
sets forth that the earnings of the entire
system for the year amounted to $27,004,
•iOti.Ol. out of which there was due to
leased lines worked upon a percentage of
earnings the sum of Si,409,182.74, leaving
$34,695,273.27 as the amount accruing to
U1B 1ΜΉ' rUHU [ilUjll'l, A III; WUiMUU f Λ -
penses were $17,854,434.95, leaving fti,74ll,
S4S..'!"2 as uet earnings Earnings from
other sources were ii,070,.504.04, giving
total net earnings of ïT,81T,35'i.!>(i. The
payments of interest ou the funded debt,
fixed rentals and various other charges
amounted to $7,042,570.51, leaving a sur
plus for the year of $774,706.45.
There is one feature of a ruilroad man's
life on some roads which is, to put il
mildly, annoying. It is the tardiness
with which they are paid their wages
every month. They are supposed tc
receive their wages ou the first of th<
month, but this never happens. Tht
paymaster is an autocratic individua
who takes hi3 time iu paying wages
Sometimes he is ready to pay wages ot
the fourth or fifth of the month It fre
quently happens that men are not paie
until near the middle of the month
This delay is a source of annoyance t(
the men and a profit to the railroaf
Shy locks, who loan money at ten ant
flîfeeu per cent, interest. It is said tha1
a law was recently enacted in Massacnu
setts compelling all employers to pa;
wages weekly. If such a thing is possi
ble in that State, there is no reason wh]
a law should not be adopted here régulât
iug the payment of wages. Of course, !
would be a matter of dfiRcn'ty to enforci
a weekly payment on big railroads, but i
would not be so difficult to par waee
fortnightly, or at least regularly on tin
first of the month. The Legislatun
might find a way of making tb:» j>racti
cable.
I PICKPOCKETS IN SKIRTS.
! some ι y tic λ κ s τι y ο facts most λ
pxxisiax moxchaxd.
Working tlie Omnibuses—Sceuery In
St ft ui—Snrftli'· Pretty Trinkets—Olove· j
In Oltlen Time.
G. Mace, formerly Cliief of Detectives '
in Paris, writes as follows: —
If the Italians are perfect in the art of j
pickiug pockets, the Italian women are
perfect also; they display great certainty
of execution in their exploits, anil the
arrest of one of them Is an exceedingly
rare thing.
Germany sends by far the greatest
number of female pickpockets to Paris,
but they are not by anv means the most
adroit. The English women have raised
this species of robbery almost to the level
of an art. Manoeuvring from preference
with the left hand, thev keep the right
gloved. The Spanish women are easily
recognized—small, frisky and dark, they
glide amid the crowds with great vivac
ity. If they see an agent, far from being
frightened by his presence, they waik up
to him and endeavor to get, him into a
conversation. One of them recently said
to au inspector on duty at the door of the
Bon Marche stores:—
"My friend, you are losing your time.
You'll neve* succeed in trapping me. I'll
gather the swag under your very nose,
and defy you to jug me."
The French women do not lack skill,
but are too much preoccupied with the
practical result of the thelts they com
mit. They hasten to verify the contents
of the stolen portemonnaies and thus get
caught.
Picking pockets has become second
nature with many French female male
factors. It is an evil without remedy,
the result of the gatherings in the big
cities, and the more alluring because the
thief has no need to have recourse to re
ceivers of stolen goods, and thus runs no
risk of being betrayed and arrested.
Numbers of women practice in the
markets, where housekeepers and
domestics are frequently dispossessed of
their portemonuaies. They are con
stantly inventing new methods of pro
cedure. Thus, recently at the Saint
Germain market, a female pickpocket
about forty years of ago and respectably
dressed, bore upon her left arm an infant
of eignteen or twenty months, whose legs
and feet she had arranged in such a man
•iû» «« whan mnvwl to nnvor thp. onenino·
of the pockets in women's dresses. At
the opportune moment she slightly
tickled the infant's legs with her left
hand, while lier right, masked by the
child, accomplished her ingeniously con
trived operation. If the woman robbed
felt a slight rubbing and turned, the
thief administered several taps to the in
fant, at the same time crying out:—"Be
careful with your feet; you are soiling
madame's dress!" These words sufficed
to prevent the birth of even the slightest
susuicion.
A' new and special species ot pocket
picting was brought to light only the
other «.lay. A little girl, scarcely ten years
of aae, was caught in the act of commit
ting depredations at an omnibus station.
This precocious and very intelligent little
wretch was attended by her sixteen-year
old brother. With lier hands in the
pocket of her coat she adroitly robbed her
victims, and if, by some unforseeu cir
cumstance, the suspicions of the latter
were aroused, on turniug about they were
reassured by the inoffensive attitude of
the child. The pockets in her coat were
only exterior openings, and by passing
her hands through the open front of the
coat the girl could easily rummage the
garments oi women pressed by the crowd.
The theft of a watch and chain was mere
play for this cbild. and she stole from
eight to ten portemonnaies daily, thus
bringing in quite α large revenue to her
parents..
HOW ARHESTS ARE EFFECTED.
The manner of following and arresting
female pickpockets differs radically from
that pursued in regard to men in the same
line of theft. The robberies committed,
the women separate and come together
again only in those places where the di
vision of the booty is to be made. As to
the arrests, which are always disagreeable
and dangerous, they are effected only
singly and upon the public thoroughfares,
every other method of capture, no matter
how much better it may be, being for
bidden to the agents.
A recent case, chosen among a thous
and, will post you as to the difficulty of
making these arrests. A woman freshly
released from the Saint Lazare Orison
was closely watched by two inspectors,
who arrested her on the Boulevard de
Sebastapool, about a hundred yards from
the Pygmalion stores, where, contrary to
the habits of pickpockets, she had stolen
an umbrella representing a value of
twelve francs.
At lirai. but· luuuu uu icsiaicuce, ttuuilL
ting the theft for which she was being
taken to the Commissariat of Police. But
on reaching the Hue des Lombards she
threw herself down, and, rolling upon the
sidewalk, began to shout, "Help! help!"
A crowd gathered, aDtl, without know
ing the cause of arrest, took the part of
the woman against the agents. She profit
ed by this interference to say in a loud
voice to the inspectors: "I am the honest
mother of a family. 1 have stolen noth
ing. I paid for that umbrella and you
have no rieht to arrest me." Then, ad
dressing herself to the constantly increas
ing throng, Blie added: "These two
scoundrels are notorious blackmailers.
They ought to be rammed into a mitrail
leuse and fired off!"
The hostile crowd wildly applauded this
sally, and shouted: " Let her go! Let her
go! Duck the blackmailers in the river!"
The situation was growing critical. A
guardian of the peace interfered, but in
stead of taking the woman and the in
spectors to the police station he exacted,
on the demand of several individuals and
despite the customary explanations be
tween agents of the municipal police, the
exhibition of their detectives' cards, say
ing to them: "After all, I don't know
you!"
Congratulated by the crowd and per
haps by her accomplices, the woman
finally disappeared, leaving the umbrella
in the hands of the agents. The latter, to
get out of their embarrassing position,
then conceived the idea of opening the
umbrella and, holding it over them,
marched away under the protection of
the guardian of the peace amid shouts of
laughter. They were saved. The ludi
crous turn of affairs had disar.ued the
hostile throng.— Newark Evening Sewn.
Gloves in Early Times.
Gloves date back to a very remote
period, the ancients not being strang
ers to their use, and by the eleventh cen
tury they were universally worn.
lu a tomb in Egypt a pair of striped
linen mittens were found that had been
worn by a lady. Xenophon alludes to the
Persians wearing gloves, and gives it as a
proof of their effeminacy; and Hornet' de
scribes Laertes at work in his garden
wearing gloves, to secure him from the
thorns. The Romans were severely up
braided by the philosoohers for wearing
gloves; but these reproaches had no effect
In diminishing their use—they were too
convenient and comfortable to be lashed
out of being by the tongue of philosophy.
They do not appear to have been worfi In
England until the beginning.of r.lie elev
enth century, and were of German m^nu;
facture, lu the course of time, a great
deal of ornamentation was used on the
gloves of England.
The effigies of Henry, II. aad Richard I.
hnci gloves aaorned with previous stores,;
and reai gloves Ornamented with
jewels were found upon' the "tftiidii
of King John and Edward 1., when
their tombs wen? opened <itt»iug
the last century. Gloves were even orna
mented with crests and ahiional bear
ings. The ecclesiastical were always
richly adorued. They were made of silk
or linen, embroidered and jeweled. A
pair preserved at New College, Oxford,
art of red silk, with the sacred monogram
surrounded by a glorv, and embroidered
i in gold on the 1>neks. Pope lkuufs.ee
ι VIII. had g!o\es of white silk embroid
i ered very beautifuilv njut studded with
• pearls
About the year 1600 leather gloves »p
i
X
peared. They were embroidered, adorned
With pearls and yews awl trimmed with
late. Perfumed gloves, too, made their
appearance and were very popular with
tue ladies. We are told that Queen Mary
Tudor had a pair of "swete gloves" sent
to her by a Mrs. Whellors. The college
tenauts of Oxford had perfumed «loves
presented to them, as well as distin
guished guests. The custom went out
ioou after the reign of Charles 1.—Mon
treal Star.
What Cured Htm.
It was a sad scene. The old man lay
on his bed, and by him sat the faithful
wife, holding his worn hand in hers and
forcing back the tears to greet his wan
dering look with a smile. She spoke
words of comfort and of hope. But he
felt the cold hand falling on him, and he
turned his weary eyes up to her pale, wan
face.
"Jennie, dear wife, I am going."
"Oh, no. John—not yet—not yet."
"Yes. dear wife," and he closed his
eyes; "the end is near. The world grows
dark about me. There is a mist uround
me gathering thicker and thicker, and
there, as through a cloud, 1 hear the
music of the angels—«sweet and sad."
"Oh, no, Joliu, dear; that isn't angels;
that's the brass band on the corner."
"What!" Aid the dying man. "Have
those scoundrels dared to come around
here when they know I'm dying:' Give
me my bootjack. I'll let, 'em see."
And in a towering rage the old man
jumped from his bed, and before his wife
could thin κ he had opened the window
and shied the boot jack at the band.
"I've hit that fat leader anyway!"
And he went back to bed and got well.
Hardly a Miracle,
An extraordinary affair has occurred at
Maryport. A few days ago the wife of a
laborer in the town gave birth to a son.
When the child was born it was found
that its head was covered with a veil or
caul. The veil was placed on one side
and no notice was taken of it until some
hours after the child's birth. When ex
amined, however, it was found that the
words "British and Foreign Bible Socie
ty" were deeply impressed on the veil.
When this discovery was made the great
est excitement prevailed in the neighbor
hood, some of the women declaring that
nothing short of a miracle had been en
acted. The doctor, who inquired into the
matter, however, soon explained the
affair. The veil, while in a pliable condi
tion, had been placed upon a Bible, on
the cover of which the words "British
and Foreign Bible Society" were deeply
indented. The word* were in this way
transferred to the veil, but some of the
inhabitants still ascribe the affair to
supernatural influence, and declare that
the child is a "missionary born.Leeds
Mercu/ru.
Johnny's Slate.
A boy's composition—The following is
an extract from a real composition
written by a small boy in New Jersey.
The subject given by the teacher was the
extensive one of "Man." Here's what
the small boy wrote:—"Man is a wonder
ful animal. He has eyes, ears, mouth.
His ears are mostly for catching cold iu
and having the earache. The nose is to
get sniffles with. À man's body is split
half way up and he walks on the split
eada."—LippliicoU'g Magazine.
Bernhardt'» Jewels.
Sarah Bernhardt's latest catastrophe
with her jewels Is too good to miss gett
ing into print. It seems that Dona Sol
left her jewels in a cab, and on discover
ing her loss flew off to Scotland Yard,
and there found them safe and sound.
When asked, however, to oay the usual
percentage on recovered property, and
finding that this commission would, in
the present instance, amount to £165, she
was furious, and called it an imposition
and asked to see the X'refet de Police.
The guardian of the peace who was at
tending to her assured her, in the most
plausible manner, that she could not see
the chief without an appointment, where
upon Sarah exclaimed:—
"Why not? I can see the Prince or
Wales without an appointment. Why
not the Chief of Police?"
Finding argument, however apposite,
of no avail, la grande tragedienne betook
herself to Essex street to her solicitor,
who told her that the police in this case
had the law on their side, but advised her
to return to Scotland Yard and ask what
was the lowest they would take. Sarah,
therefore, returned and meekly asked
whether they could not remit part of the
commission." Whereupon, she was in
formed that, considering the circum
stances of the case, they would "knock
off" £100 and let her off with £05, which
was promptly handed to the fortunate
cabman.—Lohden Star.
On a Siamese River.
Rain fell heavily during the night,
washing the race of nature, burnishing
the trees, clearing the airand thus bright
ening the whole landscape. Tlie cool
fresh morning air that bathed our hands
and faces as we started soon after day
break, was scented with the fragrance 01
flowering shrubs and trees, and the pano
rama we passed throusrh was delightful.
Temples decorated with bright red ana
gold and picturesque monasteries set like
gems in the beautiful fringes of foliage
that skirted the banks. Women and girls,
gayly attired in a striped petticoat, or one
of a small tartdn, and a silk scarf thrown
ovtr the left shoulder, tripped along bare
footed on their way to the market with
baskets of flowers and garden produce.
Here a group of men and women
sat squatting on the sands, hav
ing a chat before crossing the ford. Three
men, women and children, with tlicirgar
ments tucked up above their Knees,
laughed and joked as they waded the
stream. Groups of children playing in
the water dashed it about and splashed
each other. Cattle were lowing on the
banks ou theirway to pasture. Thosuu
was lighting up the balct pates and yellow
garments at the monks and acolytes, who
were passing In prooession carrying their
begging bowls through the streets. Wo
men and children were reverently await
ing the approach of the monks, arid heap
ing little cups of rioe and saucers of fish,
and ondiments into their bowls, while
the monks—at least the young ones, whc
have the reputatiou of being a jovial
crew—peeped over their fane, which were
Intended to vail fair women from their
sight.—Blackwood's Magazine.
, Donnelly Has a High Old Time»
Charles Donnelly, a sixteen-yeur-old
teugh skipped the town on Thauksgivina
Day upon learning that the police Were
niter him for assaulting aged Patrick
Callomey, of Xo. 451 Graud street.
He returned last night lighting drunk
and encountered 1'olicemuu Jones or
Grand street. His challenge to Joueo u
come ou was accepted, and Donuellj
found himself in the Fourth preclnc
lockup. Detective Holtic this moruins
; arraigned him on two chargée, the old as
sault on Callomey and his attemptei
assault on Policeman Jones. Justici
Wanner held Him for further examina
tion.
His 'Estate Wouldn't Pay Hla.JDefcte·
The Orp trip's pourt was eotifieid thi,
morning lO&t t'.io usiarc'o? thp lat^Dau
:«·! Karle, nÎjXoi'thgIud®6, had befli s«$j
to'pi y hie ppn&iMhe esta» wsé jftiluw
at Î1.500, au.<\ the Oeflbiçnpy left after it
snip was tow; which tlte crédit oa wi)
: probably loose. His widbw, .Mrs.- (Lilff
lsàrlç, was the administratrix. -V
..· ■) - «
lUT Λ lluistid Water Main, 15
Tho niaia wat»r\oipeithat supplies al
the Kuake j'Jfll in&titutîéns, bursÊ iestei
day morning at tft» meadows and !br llv
hours nil the water had was piimpei
from the Hackensack Hiver.
County Superintendent Gannon as son
as possible h«d a gang of meu at wor
and the repairs were made by afternoon.
Opening of a llayonoe Street.
Counsellor Mann applied to Judg
Knapp (or α writ of certiorari la the ma
I ter of opening Bast Twenty-second street,
, Beyonne.
This was opposed by Counsellor Fuller
on behalf of the Central Railroad of New
Jersey. He claimed he had not had legal
notice of the motion.
A SPECIMEN KICKER.
Mr Héritage Should Find No Fault witli
Hie Tux Hill.
One of the hardest kickers against his
tax bill in the Fourth District Citizens'
Association is George Heritage. The
especial object of his protest is that his
property at Nos. 157 and 150 Cambridge
avenue has been assessed at Î4.200.
The Tax Board has investigated his
complaint, and it is found that ho paid
*7(>u for the lot on which the house at No.
159 stands, and ÎWOO for that on which No.
157 stands. The contract for the building
on which No. 157 stands calls for an ex
penditure of fci,900; and for the builning
on which No. 1M» stands calls for an ex
penditure of #1,050. So that the house
and lot at No. 157 cost him $3,MX). It is
assessed for #2,200 The house and lot at
No. 159 cost him il,740. It is assessed for
*2,000.
There may bo a slight over valuation of
No. 159, but t>he two houses taken to
gether represents $5,241* of investment,
while their assessed valuation is ouiy
$4,200.
The Cruising Fleet Salle.
Boston", Dec. 7,1889.—The United States
(Juisers Chicago, Atlanta, Yorktown ami
Boston, sailed hence at ten o'clock this
morning. _
Files, IrcaiNO, Bleedixo, CJlcer, etc., Cored
without CXTTixo, Lioatinq οι· Chloroforu. Our
patients attend to business while receiving treat
ment. Illustrated papers sent free. Address
Drs. Miller and Jamison, No. 41 West Twenty
sixth street, New York.***
William Delaney. Furnishing Undertaker, car
rliùffê and camp chairs to let, 3t5 Grove street </0r
sev City, N. J. Telephone eali. No. 188.***
advertisements Under the Head ο»
MARRIAGES AND DEATHS
Will he inserted in the Jersey City News ant
the Sunday Mornino News at the rate of ten
centa α line for the first Insertion; Jive cent» aline
tor each subseouent insertion.
DIED.
COLSTON.—At Carthage, Jefferson county, N. Y.(
December 7, 18S9, John K. Colston, of No. 322 Bar
row street, Jersey City, atçed twenty-four years.
Notice of Funeral hereafter.
O'CONNOR.—Sarah, mother of John Michael and
the late Patrick H. O'Connor.
Funeral from the residence of her daughter, Mrs.
Mary Dillon, 131 Essex street, on Sunday at 2 p. m.
m. J. DUTLAI1,
Funeral Director,
198 Pavonia Ave.. Jersey City.
REAL ESTATE.
UOR HOUSES AND LOTS IN JERSEY CITT
-Γ BERGEN, GREENVILLE, RAYONNE AND BER
UEN POINT. CALL OR WIUTE TO
JOHN N. BRUNS,
Ho. 137 tea Avenue, Jersey City.
so. 77 DaMortï Aram Greenrflis.
END FOR LIST OF CITYAND COUNTRY PROP
ROBERT M. FLOYD,
JERSEY CITY HEIQHTS,
35 OCEAN AVE. COR. UNION 8T,
REAL ESTATE 6. INSURANCE.
Γ Ο LET-HOUSE; SIX ROOMS; HALLA&AÏ
street; $18.00. Flat; five rooms; Grand street
813.00. Flat; five rooms; Woodward street;
Stable and single stalls; corner Grand and Varlcfc
streets. Van Keuren Sc. Son, No. 530 Grand street
Jersey City.
MADISON
Building and Loan Association,
NEW SIERIES.
SUBSCRIPTION1 BOOKS NOW OPEN.
FEATURES:—
1. Premium not deducted from loan
but paid in monthly instalments.
2. Interest reduced quarterly.
Association meets Second Monday nîghl ii
each month. Meeting room at No. 8 Ocean ave
nue, near Bramhall. Information furnished au(
subscription list may be signed at any time at thi
meeting room, or on application to Secretary L
E. Herman, No. 03 Orient street.
Next meeting of Association December, 9, a
8 p. πι. *
ν Corporation Notice.
Notice is hereby given that on thi
30tla day of September. 1889. application was
made by Reuben Simpson ana others for the Im
provement of
NEPTUNE AVENUE,
between
OCEaN avenue
and the west curb of
GARFIELD AVENUE.
in the following manner, including all intersections
To have new2u inch curb set on both sides thereof
To have new blue stene flagging 4 feet wide lait
on each sidewalk.
To have the gutter paved 3 feet wide with Belgiai
blocks.
And ail other work done that may oe neceesarj
to provide for the flow of the surface water and t<
complete the improvement in a gooa and sub
stantial manner.
Notice is aibO given that on the 19th day of Novem
ber, ls89, the Commissioners of Assessment flle<
with the Board of Street and Water Commissioner:
their preliminary sketch showing what propertj
will probably be assessed and the probable amoua'
of benefit to each lot or parcel of land, also thi
probable amount of assessment per foot of front
age for the said improvement, ana the sam6 is nov
open to public inspection in the olfice of the Clerl
or the Board of Street and Water Commissioners.
And notice is also given that the following street
or avenues or particular sections thereof are in
oluded in saia assessment, namelv:—
NEPTUNE AVENUE,
from
OCEAN AVENUE
to
GARFIELD AVENUE.
And that on the !K)th day of December. 1839, a
10 o'clock a. m., and the meeting room of the Boar<
of Street and Water Commissioners are hereby flxet
as the time and place when and where the Boar:
of Street and Water Commissioners will meet to
hear parties interested in sakl application and al
remonstrances agaiuet the said improvement thai
may be presented in writing.
By order of the Buara or Street and Water Com
mlbsioners.
GEORGE T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dateu Jersey City, November 39. 1889.
corporation JNotice.
-\T OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT ON THE 9Tf
1^1 dav of feeptemb*!1, 1S89. application was mad
to the Board of street atii water Commissioner
by Johu R. Halladay and others for the improve
meut υ Γ
VAN HORN STREET.
between Johnston avenue and .Maple street. In th
following manner, iucludliig all lutersectlous:—
To have the straei for the full width tnereof
Sraded to the established grade by excavating ο
lllng the same to the established grade.
To have new twenty inch curb set on each aid
thereof.
To have the carriage way paved with Belglai
block pavement.
To have new bridge atone crosswalk* lai !.
Tohavelû'· present bridge stone crosswalks rc
laid and new bridge stone laid where necessary.
And all the work that may be necessary to pro
ytoe tot· the flow of the surfoco water and to eonr
plate thy Improvement in a good and substantia
mat-ner. ,. v , _
Notice is also given that on the 19th d^.v of N(
veiriber. l£S9, the Ccimmissloners of Assessment tile
with the Board of Street and Water Commissioner
thélr preliminary sketch, showing what J&nopert,
wiilwrobarjly uo assessed and the probable amouu
of benefit to each rot or jpareel of land, also th
probable amount of assessment per foot of front
age for the »aid improvement and the same 1/5 no^
open to publie inspection in the office of the clef!
•oi the Board Of Street and Water Commie*!oners.
And notice is alsd given that the following streel
or avenues or particular sectloua thereof are U
eluded in «aid assessment, via.:—
VAN .HORN STREET.
. from .Tohnston avenue to .Mapffr street,
MAPLE STREET,
from Van Horn street, about 25 feet north and
feet south. ^
And that the 80th day of December, 1S8
at lu o'clock a.m., and the meeting room of th
Board of Street and Water Commissioners, ai
hereby flxed as the time and place when and whei
the Board of Street and Water Commissioners wil
meet to hear parties Interested In said applicatio
and all remonstrances against the said lutprov
meat that may be pnej-ented in writing.
By orcier of the tioaru of Street ant; Water Cor
miHloaer*.
GEOEOK T. BOUTON.
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City. 3». J„ November 2M8Mi
KOARJJERS WASTEV.
Ï^URNISHED ROOM WITH BOARD FOR ORN
tlemen. also te bio board; convenient to raff
and fer rte*. No. ITS Fourth street.
ÎFINELY FURNISHED ROOMS, WITH STRICTLY
firet class board; opposite park. No. 8 Wert
Hamilton place.
iJUJRNiSHËD ROOMS WITH ΟΪΓ WITHOUT
board; No. 94 Jewett avenue. Heights. Mrs. St.
John.
IARGE ROOM NICF.I-Y rUKMSHBU: ALL CON
J venleuces, with first-class board. No. 288 First
street.
I A RUE FRONT ROOM TO LET; BOARD IF DE
J aired. _ No. JM1 fiercer street.
VTICF.LY FURNISHED ROOM TO LET WITH
λ.* board, for one or two gentlemen: private fam
lly: central location. Address J., New» office.
ONE LARGE AND ONE SMALL ROOM TO LET,
with board; everything first-class. No. :î9 sum
mit avenue.
PLEASANT ROOMS WITH BOARD IN PRIVATE
family; terms moderate. No. 223Va Third streefc
PLEASANT ROOM, WITH GOOD BOARD, 43
Ocean avenue.
TO LET-SECOND STORY FRONT ALCOVE ROOM
with board. 232 Third street. _
Oil VIRGINIA AVENUE, HEIGHTS — NICELY
mi L· furnished alcove room; flret-class board;
ample closet room, two minutes from Jackson Ave
nue Station, Central It. R. of N. J.; suitable for two
Ο<>7 WARREN STREET.—LARGE ROOM, SEC
I ond floor; also hall rooms, with board.
£ΪΛ 1 JERSEY AVENUE—SECOND FLOOR FRONT
DUi alcove, and third front, with board.
FURNISHED BOOMS.
T?URNISHED ROOMS. WITH FOLDING Bed"
J for light housekeeping. No. 611 Jersey avenue
PLEASANT Ε Κ ONT ROOM TO ÛJCTV ENQUIRE
No. 84 Sussex street.
T>LEASANT "ROOMS WITH BOARD; NO. ~229W
JL Third street.
Rooms to let, furnished.-two very nice
front rooms, $3 and f 1.5U. No. 246 York street;
ring three times. .
rIHVO NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS, HE AT ED
J gas and bath; family private. No. 1T5 Fourth
street.
T*WO VERY NICE FRONT ROOMS, NEWLY FUR
I nishcd: ten minutes from ferry; $3 and $1.60.
No. 246 Yorks<reet; ring three times.
TO LET—THR&E UNFURNISHEÏ) ROOMS IN NEW
private houae, occupied by owner; pleasant
neighborhood; one block from cars. Enquire No.
34 Wiley street. »
TWO VERY NICE FRONT ROOMS, NEWLY FUR
nished; ten minutes from ferry; $3 and $1.80.
No. 246 York street; ring three times.
TO LET—FURNISHED ROOM; PRIVATE FAM
lly.' No. KX3 Fourth street.
'ΓΟ LET—rURNISHED ROOMS FOR LIGHT
1 housekeeping; first floor. No. 224 York street.
TO LET—A HANDSOME BACK PARLOR,PARTLY
furnished; suitable for doctor or dentist. No.
182 Wayne street.
1 Q Q SUSSEX STREElUFURNISHED ROOM TO
Α Ο V let, without boartt.
Furnished Rooms Wanted.
WASTED-A YOUNG MAN WANTS A FUR
nlshed room In the lower part of Jersey City;
Barlor and bedroom in a flat preferred. Address,
. P., Jersey City News.
SITUATIONS ΑΝΏ WORK
W ANTED
Τ» EXPECTABLE GIRL WISHES SITUATION, TO
IX do general housework. Call at No. 183 Bay
street.
SITUATION WANTED BY A GERMAN GIRL TO
Ο do general housework or in a restaurant. No.
248J/é York street,
SITUATION WANTED TO COOK, WASH AND
iron or do general housework. No. 150 Seventh
street.
WANTED—SITUATION AS PLAIN COOK IN A
private family. Call at No. 16 Erie street, sec
ond floor.
%ipUNG GIRL WISHES A SITUATION TO DO
15» housework or chamber work. Apply at No. 285
Bay street.
LOST AND FO'UNV. ^
LOST OR STOLEN, BANK BOOK No. 285,?«8 OF
the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank. Pay
ment stopped, Blease return book to bank. No. 51
Chambers street, New Yorlc.
DRESSMAKING.
DRESSMAKING.-STYLI9H «XTITS MADF. TOR «5
and upwards: S. T. Taylor's system; fit guaran
teed. Miss M. Flannery, No. 129 Forrest street,
Height».
^ _ FOR SALE.
FOR SALE-CONTRACTOR'S CARTS, SENDER
llng's patent: light and easily operated; to. be
seen at Contractor Henry Byrne's Wayne street;
built to order by Ernst Schantz, No. 183 First, stteet.
■" " ' •'■.'III LL!!L'. ''ι hi ι ||ΐ|||ΐ||·
I2ÏSTR UCTIONS.
HASBROUCK INSTITUTE. No. lUi GRAND
street, Jersey City.
Thirty-fourth year begins September 11.
A school of the highest «rade, with the following
departments, each of which lias its superin^nd
ent:—
The Boys' Academic, the Girls' Academic, the
Boys' preparatory, the Primary (both sexesl the
Music Department, the Art Department.
Students prepared for college professional
schools and business.
Catalogues and further information given at the
Institute.
Î CHARLES C. STIMBT9. PrIno!p»l.
Directors. HORACE C. WAIT. Vice-Principal.
DON'T
COMMENCE THE STUDY OP
STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING
until you call at Vermllye's College. «10 Broadway
Ν. Y. Pamphlets free. Alio les&one by mall
Cut tale out.
IniOROUGH PREPARATION FOR CIVIL SER
vice. business college. medical ana lave school.
Hoffman Educational Rooms, No. 46 Newark avonne.
aanAA A YEAR-BOARD AND TUITION: BOYS
9P^L/U and girls. Address Episcopal Schoool
Haddonfield. X. J.
A YOUNG GENTLEMAN WOULD LIKE IN
;-truutlon in French. Address DON. Jersey
City News Office.
A UCTIONSALJiS. _
FRANK STEVENS, Auctioneer.
Notice is hereby given that the subscriber will, by
virtue of a decree of the Court of Chancery dated
December 2,1889, sell at public auction to the highest
bidder, on
TUESDAY, the 10th day of December instant,
at two o'clock in the afternoon, at the office of
Frank Stevens, No. 55 Montgomery street, Jersey
City, two hundred shares of the capital stock of
THE JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY,
the par value of each share being one hundred
dollarn. EDWARD F. C. YOUNG.
Dated December 3,1889.
Receiver of the Joseph Dixon Crucible Company.
■ R. VAN SYCKLE, AUCTIONEER, WILL SELL
«J « on December 11,1889, at 10 a. m., at No. 58 Mont
gomery street. All goods pledged previous to
Dooember 9, 1889. By order E. McDonnell, No. 818V<
Grove street.
JL.J-J'Ji LBJL.1 f'■."".'Bil!1! «g
THE BLIND SEE,
The Deaf Hear, the Lnme Walk,
THE SICK MADE WELL WITHOUT MEDlCINlE
Marvelous cures are performed dally at til·
rooms of
DR. FANYOU,
No. 258 Sixth avenue, N. YM
of Dyspepsia Insomnia, Catarrh, Paralysis and all
Nervous and Chronic Dieeases.
Office nours:—9:80 a. m. to 4:80 p. m.
The poor healed free from 9:o0 to luaiû a. m.
For a DISORDERED LIVER
Try KEOIUrS PILLS.
26cts· a Box.
OF αΧμΤλ 13IlIJCiO χ»τβ.
MODEMANN
DENTIST,
No·. 603 and 504 THIRD AVENUS,
southwest Corner 84th Street.
No. 255 SIXTH AVE., near 16th Sfc.. Ν. Y.
Gum H^legant Siet·,
«4, «7 and «10»
Perfectly adapted to the anatomy of the moutfc.
and guaranteed to stand the teat of time. v. ·«
Old Time Prices, $10, $*20 and $80.
Artificial Teeth on Gold, Artificial Teeth on Sliver
HO CHARGE v NO CHARGF
for extracting teeth without ualn when artificial·
teeth are to be inserted. (Ια this department a lad/
in attenrifcdce.) Teeth filled with Gold, Silver. Ac.,
ii·. Teeth repaired tn fifty minutes. Sets mania
while waiting. * -
Set? that the name MODEMANN Is painted in full
and plain letters, on the doors, stairs and win
dow*. We uave positively no connection
with any dental office that does not display the
name
MODEMANN,
Ko·. 508 and 504 THIRD AVENUS.
Southwest Corner 31th street.
No. «ββ SIXTH AVIS., near 16th St., Ν. Y.

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