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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, December 13, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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-ΤΗΚ -
;ersetj ÛTity ^exus.
JAMES LUBT, . · - Editor.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
BV
THE NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OFFICE, Ko. 80 ΜοΝτβΟΜΕκν Street
(WELDON BUILDING..)
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free.
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postuge free.
Entered in the post office at Jersey City as
second class mail matter.
All busihess communications éboula be ad
dressed to The News Publishing Company; ail
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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13. 18S9
I
The Jersey Cm News.
I AVERAGE
DAILY
ι CIRCULATION.
/ 'O® :
c-^Vj
/ ι
HICH WATER MARK. 1
44,BOO COPIES I
IN SIX DAYS.
The Sondaï Morning News
i «Ο
„ 0°
\'V
HIGH
WATER
MARK,
LARGEST CIRCULATION
Ui f/L'DSOX COUNTY.
This paper in Democratic in principle*
and is independent in it# views on all
local question*.
Six padres again today—no flies on
The J kuskï City Ν "ws.
The Thirteenth Street Perry.
Here is the old story of individual
Selfishness again. A large number of
persons have absolute daily need for
a ferry from this city to the foot of
West Thirteenth street, New York.
Hundreds of shippers belonging to
this State want to deliver their stuff
zens of New York would be facilitated
in their business by having the mar
ket produce of New Jersey concen
trated in that locality by a new ferry
line.
The Pennsylvania Railway, recog
nizing that business demands the new
line and would make it pay from the
outset, is read}' to establish it. Citi
zens of both States petition the New
York York Board of Aldermen, who
liave the franchise in their gift, that
they grant it forthwith.
But now Mr. Delainater pops up in
opposition. It will be in the way of
his business, if you please. There
will bo such a rush to the new ferry
that the street will be blocked, and
that would be vexatious to Mr. Dela
niater.
What a pity' V,>w if we remember
right. Mr. Oelamaler is one of those
gentlemen who use the public streets
of New York for their private pur
poses without the least regard to pub
lie rights. If \vç do not mistake he
has the sidewalk and a. good part of
the carriage way lumbered up with
rubbish ol all sorts iroui steamship
boilers down to scrap iron. Engines,
models, propellers — Heaven only
knows what besidos, obstruct traf
fic, and endanger the wheels of
vehicles and die limbs of pedestrians.
We would strongly advise the
friends of the ferry to 'carry the war
into Africa" by forcing the New York
Bureau of Kncumbr.luces to laKe cog
nuance of the way iu which Mr. Del
amater abases the thoroughfares from
which he is endeavoring to osclude
the oublie.
We do no' exactly :jee how the
Fourth District tax complainants
liuve aclyan<;ed their oase through the
answers obtained from Messrs. Collins
& Corbin. The answers are admir
ably clear and precise, and, we doubt
not, are very good law. but the ques
tions were something like this;— 'Do
two and two make four?" "11 you
take two from live and add three to
the remainder will the total be six''
What were the property owners try"
ing to get at, we wonder?
The Bank thai Halliard Wrecked.
It, has taken the depositors ot the
Mechanics and Laborers' Savings
Bank a good many years to bring the
reckless managers of the institution
to book; but they seem finally to
have got them there. The full text of
the Chancellor's opinion will be
needed, however, to enable the ex
pression of a trustworthy opinion as
to the value of the judgment
that has just been given against
them. The Chancellor finds almost
inconceivable recklessness in the man
agement of the bunk's affairs. The
Directors seem to have placed the
hundreds of thousands of the money
of the depositors at the unrestrained
and unrestricted proposal of John
Halliard. The result is just what
might have been expected. The great
vaults filled with gold tempted him,
and he yielded to the temptation.
This much \νω patent on the face of
the testimony.
It was when lie oame to fix the in
diviilirai responsibility of the Direc
tors and Managers that tho Chancel
lor's work began. The recklessness,
or worse, extended over so long
a series of v.ars, and the direc
tory underwent so man y changes in the
meanwhile that it was no easy task
for the Chancellor to say just who
was responsible and for what part of
the deficiency. The decision, so far
as it has been reported, shows that
the Chancellor has given this branch
of the enquiry such careful consider
ation that there is little doubt his
conclusions will stand the test of
appeal.
It remains to be seen, however,
whether the decision brings any sub
stantial gain to the depositors. The
interest for seventeen years on the
$32,000 judgment will amount to more
than the principal, and on face of it.
the judgment seems to bo for about
$70,000. This is $23,000 in excess of
the amount that the defendant man
agers offered to settle for some months
ago.
But right here arises the question
whether the judgment is to be appor
tioned among the defendants who are
found to be responsible, or whether
the whole of it. can be collected from
those who are good. If the liability of
the good is only for their proportion
ate share of the judgment, then much
must be lost to depositor because of
the inability of the poor among-thede
fendants to meet the amount assessed
against them.
Thk friends and relatives of Frank
Emmons have the general sympathy
of the public in the grief they must
feel at this time. Mr. Emmons was,
but a few days ago. one of the leading
figures in the business, church and
social life of the city. His sad afflic
tion is a loss to the whole community.
Thk verdict in the case of Miss Sul
livan and yonngLockwood is a whole
some lesson to young girls who are
inclined to be light in their conduct.
We do not attempt, for a moment
to palliate the guilt of men who in
dulge in immorality. But it is
not conducive to good morals that the
women who are the confederates in
their guilt should be made statutory
victims and rewarded with damages
for their misbehavior. Juries do well
to steadily discourage immoral men
and women alike.
When a woman of twenty-three be
comes the stepmother of a girl of nine
teen there is apt to be trouble. When
a woman who can earn a good living
for herself becomes the wife of a man
who cannot happiness is hardly likely
to be her portion. If young Mrs.
Hinckson, of Camden, had thought a
little before she married an ancient
widower these ideas might have come
to her, and she would never have
needed the aid of the police to secure
her freedom from the galling chain of
a loveless marriage.
AMUSEMENTS.
Scanlan is one of the biggest successes
at the Academy of Music this season.
Five hundred people were turned away
Inst night, and every night this week the
experience has been about the same.
"Myles Aroou," with its inimitable
sketches of Irish character and bright
songs, has taken the popular taste, and if
you want a seat you will have to go early
to get it.
Marie Hubert· Frohman.
Marie Hubert Frohman and her excep
tionally strong supporting company will
sooube seen here in a very attractive
double bill, "King i-iene's Daughter." a
lyric drama in one act, ami "False
Charms," a comedy in three acts. The
company is under the personal direc
tion and management of Mr. Gustave
Frohman, which is a guarantee of its
excellence. Of Miss Frohman, her man
ager says:—"She is not like any one that I
have ever seen ou the stage. She is her
self— nothing if not original—full of odd,
unexpected bits of work—she may play
the same part, differently every night iu
the week. That is why the same people
come over and over again to see her, to
see as they say 'what is she going to do
next.' Playing from her heart and soul,
governed of course always by her art:6t:c
training."
PERSONAL AND NOTABLE
At a meeting of the trustees of Rutgers Col
lege, litld at New Krunswick. Mr. Frederick
Frelinghuysen, of this city, was ejected ireas
urer.
The Kensington Spool &ec] Bcbbi^ Works, of
Philadelphia, will move to Mount Holly about
January 1.
Ex-Senator Johi W Griggs has declined U
serve as a member of the sub-committee oc> re
vision of the Patersoo charter.
Health Inspector Leal, of Petersen, ie waging a
vigorous war ou people who put up tenement
nouses so closely as to exclude light «no air
Bernard Eagan has been line·:! SCO and coete by
Recorder Ureavos for starting to bulla leveral
tenement houses too closo together.
John P. Jordan, of Upper Penn's Keck, Salem
county, has a very valuable collection of old
coins, ttao dates of which run from 170S to iS56.
31any of the life-saving crows along the coast
have received their new uniforms, comprising a
heavy pilot cloth overcoat, Unit Jersey Jacket
and yachting cap. Across the breast of the
Jersey and front of Hie cap is inscribed "Life
Saving Service 11 The uniforms cost each man
The Passaic County Fish and Game Protective
Association has received its first installment of
live Virginia quail. They will be stocked in the
woods throughout the county for breeding pur
poses so that α large brood will beat large next
spring. A number of Virginia quail are on exhi
bition iu the show window of Mr. George Newell
in the Washington Hall building They will also
be put out In.the country. After 15th instant,
the gunning season will close for partridge,
quail, rabbits and kindred game, Dealers will
have to get rid of their stock ia ten days after
Sunday.
President of the Pate:son Fcard of Aldermen
John Curtis. Jr., has been offered the position
of Consul to Panama and will in all probability
accept, the present incumbent being about to
be removed for neglecting the duties of his po
sition. The salary attached to the office Is$2,500
per year, with per quisitee amounting to a simi
lar sum.
A large crack has been discovered near the top
of the large chimney at the Barbour works on
Spruce street, Paterson, and the supposition is
Aiat it was caused by belntf struck by lightning
during the summer. The stack is I3t> feet and 6
inches high. ^ As the firm do not propose to run
the risk of having an> part of the stack tumble
! down, they have set workmeu at work building a
I scaffold about the chimney, so that the top can
be roacâed aad λ thorough investigation ο* it
made. It is thought probable that at least 35
feet will have to be pulled down and rebuilt.
Superintendent Havens, of the Life Saving
Service, bas arranged a code of day an ci night
signals. to be used in case of .shipwreck where a
vessel strands in reach of operation by life lines.
The siguals required are cheap and simple The
matter is to he brought to the notice of the
National Maritime Conference now in session at
Washington.
Bills of indictments were found Tuesday by
the Gloucester county Grand Jury against John
Long, a recent candidate for the Assembly, and
Thomas D. Cunningham for throwing stones at.
the homes of several non-union glass blowers in
Gias3boro. Both men are members of the Glass
Blowers' Union.
The twentieth annual report of President E.
H. Stokes, of the Ocean Grove Association,
shows that there has been an increase of fifty
one cottages this year; 16,000 square feet cf con
crete walk was laid by the Association, and 47,
C00 by property owners, making nearly seven
miles of new walk; thirteen artesian wells were
sunk; 341,000 people crossed over the two iron
bridges connecting the Grove and Asbury Park.
On Sundays and from October to June the
bridges arc free. The financial statement*shows
the total receipts to have fceen $l06.'Jt!3; total
payments, $100,798; resources, £li#Vt;97; liabili
ties, $10u,4gS; bonded indebtedness reduced,
$4.C00.
When the appointment of a successor to the
late United States District Judge Nixon was un
der advisement at Washington, Presi-.lent Har
risou stated that he would appoint no man over"
fifty-five, It is understood that members of the
Cabinet favored A. Q. Keasbey, of Newark, who
iu years exceeds the limit placed by the Presi
dent. The Newark Journal, Democratic, has
an editorial strongly favoring Judge Dixon as
Justice Bradley's successor on the United States
Supreme Bench, on the assumption that the
limit of age named will obtain in the selection of
a successor to Justice Bradley upon his retire
ment, which would shut out Cortlaudt Parker.
The Whig Hall Literary Society, of Primceton,
at its anuual sophomore oratorical contest,
awarded prizes which consisted of gold medals,
as follows: First prize, Edward G, Rawson, Jr.,
Albany, Ν. Y.; second prize, John Zimmerman,
of Wisconsin.
As Jesse West and Lewis Chasey, fishermen,
of Long Branch, were setting lobster pots from a
small fishing boat Thursday morning, they saw
a large, dark object rising from the water about
eight feet to the eastward. A few seconds later
a stream of water spouting in the air told them
that a whale had intruded on their fishing
grounds. The animal was abr.ut forty feet long,
and spouted and flounced away in a manner
that made the hair of the two fishermen stand
on end. They immediately pulled for shore with
all their strength. The whale turned and
headed in the direction of the boat, and at one
time came so near ic that the fishermen dropped
their oars, and were about to spring in so the
water and attempt to swim ashore, when the
whale slowly sank below the surface. The men
again grabbed their oars and pulled with might
aud main. In a few seconds the monster came
up again about fifteen fee' from the boat. After
sporting about a few minutes it headed south,
and then went down and was ttot seen again. It
is the first time a whale has been seen off the
coast in four years, and never was one seen so
near shore.
SEG.VRS AND LABORING MEN.
The Yellow Labfi I'rinmphs Over the
Blue in the Trades Assembly.
The session of the Central Trades As
sembly last night was not as harmonious
as it might have been. The old fight be
tween the Knights auii the Trades Union
ists, which, it was hoped, had been laid to
rest for good, broke out again with re
newed vigor. Cigars caused the wrang
ling, and there was a Knight of Labor
cigarmaker in the chair.
J. Knerr, of the I'ocahontas Assembly,
opened hostilities by moving that the
members of the Trades Assembly pledge
iiieinsHlves to Datrouize no merchant
dealing in cigars unless tne yellow
Kniglit of Labor label is attached.
The recording and putting of this reso
lution brought the printers' delegates to
their feet, and Edwin Dickson, o£ Typo
graphical Union No. 94, moved that the
delegates pledge themselves to patronize
only places where the blue label or K. of
L. yellow seal cigars are sold.
Joseph Hamilton preferred to smoke a
blue label cigar, because the Internation
al Cigarmakers had always helped the
printers, while the Kuights had never
rendered them any assistance.
James Dowling believed that this cigar
matter was simply a local light between
two rival organizations.
J. Kuerr said that the Κ of L. cigar
makers did not want light, but justice.
Since the institution o£ the Pocahontas
Assembly they had advanced prices ten
per cent, and they wanted to keep those
prices tip.
Adolph Zoller said that if the Assembly
did not want to stand by its friends the
sooner it disbanded the better. The pres
ent price lic.t of the K. of L. cigarmakers
in the city was the biggest, and if the
prises were anything to go by, the Inter
nationals were the "scabs."
John McMunus believed it was only
fair to give the K. of L. cigarmakers their
undivided support at the present time, as
Internationals would not lend their coun
sel oi support to the Assembly.
Kichard J. Allen charged the Interna
tionals with being mere disruptionists
than anything else, while tLc Knights of
Labor by their acts had proven thepi
seives the best unionists,
Henry C Gruber reviewed the connec
tion of the Internationals with the
Assembly and then went on to
s:.ow that the Knights bad belped the
printers. In Washington they had se
cured higher wages ioi the plate printers
and helpers in the Bureau of Printing
ar.a Engraving and ;n issuing Mutual
Aid The Jep.seν C:tt News had been
placed upon the customs Jut aa a union
orEce, and that, too, without any solicita
tion on the part of the printers.
in favor of k. of l.
Aftei a good deal more talk the ques
tion was put to the vote, anu resulted in
the deieat ol the substitute to the motion,
only four de-legates voting m favorot It,
while a numtei refrained from voting.
Thus the Assembly declared itself in
lavor of K. o: L. cigars only
Joseph Fuliem offered a motion which
was adopted, asking the Board of Street
and Water Commissioners to award their
rmrurt» to contractors who employed
union laborers, and paid them ut least
£ a day for ten hours svork, and that
union pavers be employed When needtd
at uuion rates.
John McCann moved to ask the Legis
lature to appropriate a sufficient sum of
money to establish a night school lu this
city for young men and women who labor
during the day.
This motion was seconded and carried,
and Messrs. McCann, Dowiing and Stuart
were appointed a committee to draw up
a resolution on the subject for presenta
tion to the State Legislature.
SOMK WITHDRAWALS.
Notices of withdrawal from the Assem
bly were read irom the Building Trades
Council and the Tin and Sheet Iron
Workers. Action on these was deferred
till the next meeting.
The report of the committee appointed
to draw up the friendly employers' cii'cu
lar was not. received with unalloyed sat
isfaction. it was embodied in the £ot;i:
of a .Jersey City edition o{ itus'Mutual
Aid Register, a paper issued uuderthe
the auspices ot the K. of L Co operative
Board, in Newark. Thk Jkhskt Crrv
News has a place on its united customs
lihtasauniou pr.ntery, and as such is
recommended to the patrons of organized
labor.
Mrs. Frances B. Norris, who is well
known as a temperance lecturer, will
give a lecture at Humbolt Hall, oil New
ark avenue, tomorrow night. The sub
ject is "'Contrasts." The admission fee
will be fifteen cents,
McGinty ot it again. Christie's Grand
Boyal uud Pointers Cigars bring him up and
give hiui lito. *·*
j FAIRS IN THE CHURCHES.
.4 KF.AUTIFVTj display at the
J· ARK REFORMED.
! One of tilt» Best Arranged Bnzaurs of the
i Season —In Westminster Church Rec
tory—The Free Reformed Church—
Other Fairs.
Beautiful indeed the basement of the
Park lieioimed Church appeared last
Light. Bright colored silks, flags and
bunting, laces, fans and Japanese um
brellas were there in profusion, but ar
ranged in a most artistic manner, each
hue being blended with sonic other so as
to give the best effect possible. It was
because the annual fair was in progress
that this delightful scene was presented
to the eye.
The tair was different in many respects
from the old-fashioned regulation church
fairs. Although there were pretty girls
there by the score, not one put on
her most charming smile when she
singled out some victim with a fat pocket
book and begged him to buy this or take
a chance in that. Yet the articles were
disposed of just as fast as if this had been
peeu permitted. Another feature that
is Dot usual at church fairs.
A band played at intervals during the
evening. It was the tabernacle band
and the music discoursed was very good.
When I reached the church tlie base
ment \vas crowded with old and yoflng
and there was an abundance of genuine
heartv merriment.
THE BOOTHS.
I made a tour of the booths to see what
the charming ladies who li«d them iu
charge had to dispose of, aud the first
one that attracted my attention was the
rlnrrtl hnnt.1i.
It was in the center of the room, while
the other booths were arranged crescent
shaped about it with the band back of it.
The booth was built in a square, anil was
tastefully decorated with (lags, ribbons
and flounces. On each corner of the stand
was au iron vertical rod, from which a
wire was strung around the four posts.
This was covered with ribbons, and in
the place of rosettes were immense
roses. This booth was presided over by
Miss Elsie Spencer and her assistants,
Miss K. Lawsoc, Miss A. Lawaon, Miss
A. Lawsou; Miss C. L. Rousseau, Miss E.
Welch, Miss M. Heck, Miss Gussie Hit
ter, Mr. W. James Welch, Mr. J. R.
Spenser,Mr. W. Laugbrin, Mr. F Fraser.
These ladies and gentlemen disposed
of flowers, Japanese ware, cigars and
soda water. Tlie latter was furnished by
Druggist F. S. Hanf.
THE GROCERY STORE.
The next booth was the grocerv store.
AU sorts of groceries were there for any
who wished to purchase, and surrouudei
by the tasteful decorations this certainly
looked enticing, and especially so when
the purchaser knew he would be waited
ou by either Mrs. C. H. Raymond or her
assistants, Mr3. Steele, Mrs. Blizzard,
Mrs. Sherwood, Mrs. Archer and Mrs.
Hulshizer.
Adjoining this was the uut table, which
looked charming with its piuk and lace
decorations.
Miss T. Smith and her assistants, Miss
Westervelt, Edna Sweet, Fauuie Harri
son, Violet W ands, Mary Walker, Grace
Archer, Hattie Doremus, Julia Sehracier,
Miss Grace Villeplait, presided over this
table with much success.
Adjoining this table was the tin ware
stand, where all sorts of knick knacks in
tin weredisposedof bv Miss Irving Steele.
Next came the restaurant. It was com
plete in every detail.
A GREAT RESTAURANT.
A flue kitchen, snow white tables, sil
verware and china. A full course dinner
of an excellent kind was supplied for fifty
cents by the most charming waitresses,
who saw that not one single guest was
not given every attention possible. Ev
erything on a first-class bill of fare was
there, and as a matter of course ice cream
WHS lUCiUUBU. iuuio uuau ivvu uuuutcu ι
took dinner last night.
They were attended by Mrs. Virginia
Olinstend and her assistants, Mrs. Bliz
zard, Mrs. Pennal, Mrs. Krugler, Mrs.
Scott, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Smith, Mrs.
Benedict, Mrs. Loshen, Mrs. Smith, Mrs.
Hurlev, Mrs. Cook and Mrs. Fraser.
CANDY.
The candy booth was most tastefully
arranged. On the counter the sweets
were placed in a very attractive and
tempting manner. The booth was dec
orated Japanese style and had an enorm
ous sun flower canopy suspended over it.
The back of the booth was decorated with
numerous odd looking fans.
The sweets' were supplied by Miss
Sarah Verhoeff, Miss C. McCartcr, Miss
V. Peunell, Miss E. Jones, Miss E. Schra
der. Miss A. Terhoeff, Miss A. Hosbach,
Miss A. Curtis, Miss D. Hall, Miss B.
Blackwell, Miss May Graham.
THE KING'S DAUGHTERS.
The King's Daughters had charge of
the household table, which was orna
mented with a St. George'9 cross, on
wiiieh were the letters, "I. H. X. In
His Name. Here useful articles could be
purchased from Mrs. Creveling aud her
assistants, Miss Flora Baker, Miss Cora
Baker, Miss Nellie Buchanan, Miss Clara
Tildcn, Miss Melie Schrader, Miss Etta
Sliuliardt, Miss Eva Sloan, Miss Allie
Pennal, Miss Ollie Garrison.
The literary booth was in charge of
Mrs, G. M. Mitchell and Mis Emma Car
penter.
There were two fancy tables. One «-as
completely enveloped in late delightfully
arranged, and the other had heavy drap
ery for decoration. Beside there were
pictures, flags, fans. etc.
INTERESTING RELICS.
These two booths were joined by bands
of silk on which were pinned' three
pieces of continental money, of the de
nominations ol 44. eight shillings and
two shillings and sixpence.
This money was found behind the man
tel-ptece of the house in which Thomas
Jeilersou wrote the Declaration of Inde
pendence, when the building was toru
down. The money and the six canes
ihore, that were inade from a beam in
the house, belonged ίο the late William
Ludwig, father-in-law of the Rev. Mr.
Suydani.
The dates of the money are 1775, 1770
and 1777. The six canes will be presented
to the elders of the church. The two
tables were cared for by Mrs. F. C. Bar
low, whose assistants were:—Mrs. Day
ton, Mrs. Seymour, Airs. Wooley, Miss A.
Benjamin, Miss A. Couver, Miss G. Cane,
Miss G Horstnian, Miss M. Hovey, Miss
E. Jacobson. Miss E. Midlidge, .Miss M.
Smith, Miss E, Tamanay, Miss A. Tiima
nav Miss H. Verhoeff, Miss M. Winaus,
ι ,- τ Ι·' «ν 1' \( Wi,rvi Mm
F. t-prmg, Miss S. Beuedict, Miss Georgie
Van Kieek, Miss L:zzie Van Kleek, Airs.
Aug. Cleveling, Mrs. M. A. Walker, Miss
Jessie W. Perrv, Miss Rita W. Gray.
The apron table was under the charge
of Mrs. M. Smith, with Miss Elsie Spen
cer, Miss V Pennal, Miss Alice Veiholf,
Miss Etta Schrader, Mies C. L. Rousseau,
Miss Emma Midlidge, M:ss Edith Jones.
Miss Emma Welch, Miss Clara McCarter,
Miss M. Winaus, Airs, Blizzard.
Tonight a concei t wlil be given in the
church and no extra charge will be de
manded for admission.
The fair organization is as follows·—
Thomas M. Ward, vice president; John R.
Van Kleek, treasurer: F. M. Hilton, secre
tary; Mrs. H. Wild, first directress; Mrs.
M A. Walker, second directress.
Committee ot Arrangements:—F. P·
Benedict, chairman: George Baker, M. IX
Baker. F. Bandholtz, H. Castens, G. K.
Colev, W. H. CooYer, J. R. Covert, J.
L. Covert, A. Creveling, A. Foster,
W. M. Frazer. C. K. Hart.
13. J. Hulshizer, J. B. Hurley, H, F. Mott,
G. H. Mitchell, N. Pennal, C. H. Bay
moud, Mr. Riley. F. W. Schmidt, C. F.
"■ - J J-* T1 c. .·
Welch ami H. 8. Wooley.
Door Committee-.Mr. Ltfhseu and
Everett Angler.
Hat and Coal Department—Fred Band
holtz, John L. Covert, B. R. Dixon and
F. M. Hilton.
Others who were there were;—Captain
and Mrs. Samuel Coles, Mr. and Airs.
Joseph Hurley, Mr. and Mrs. Warren,
Brooklyn; Mr. Raymond, Saratoga; Dr.
i aud Mrs. Garten, Brooklyn, Miss Mary
| and Sophia KUlott, Plai:;lieid: Mr. and
-Mrs. Morris, Monmouth; fro:'. Willis.
! New York; Mr. and Mrs. L. Hlckcrsoa,
I Brooklyn. Mrs. Mott, Hamilton, Mr. uuii
Mrs. Kimball, Hoboken; Judge Alfred
aud Mrs. Dayton, Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Buchanan, Dr. Durrie aud Mrs. Durne.
Mrs. A. Vac Home, Dr. aud Mrs. Hol
denby. Mr. and Mrs. ϋ. H, Perry, Mr. aud
Mrs. Hazzard Perry, Mr. C. L. Kiugler
Dr. F. C. Barlow, F. C. Benedict, Mr. and
Mrs. Blyih, Mr. F. K. Egbert.
IN WLSTMIXSTER KECTOEÎ.
I*aetor ITathavray Yields Hie "Flnt
Floor" to a Pretty Knlr.
All the young misses and masters, the
zealous little workers of the Westminster
Presbyterian Church on Summit avenue,
last evening inaugurated a bazaar for the
beneat of the church at the rectory iu
Van Keipen avenue. Pastor Hathaway
had generously turned over to them all
of the lower portion of his house, nnd
their nimble little lingers lieftly arranged
it into a veritable fairy bower, the splen
dors of which their b»»ming, active iaces
and juvenile enthusiasm greatly en
hanced. These young people are known
as the ''Christian Cadets," and are a
prominent auxiliary to the church's or
ganizations.
There is a "Little Girls' Table'' in
charge of Miss Ella Jones, who is assisted
by the Misses lietta Schneider, Lizzie
Ferris, Nettie Cummings, Lena Cassel
and Lulu Leroy.
At an annex booth are the Misses
Sophie Fuulriher, Flora Smith, Lizzie
Rubeard Edith Glover.
φι,λτ. - 4»r r*;πρ„ν,ιΛ>» i->,T
Miss Jennie Jones, Nellie Hauser, Gert
rude Black and Lulu Smith. The confec
tionery booth is presided over by Miss
Bessie Fuller, assisted by Elbert Fisher,
while little Lucy Lane has the old oaken
bucket full of lemonade.
The call for ice cream is so great that
Mrs. L S. Alberts, who has charge of it,
requires the assistance of Johnnie Fisher,
Chester Barkley, Hattte Newman and
Li)a MacCreary. There is a manngcrie
also, in which some time racoons, rabbits,
white rals and other small animals cat
capers for the audience. The "Daniels"
in this "lion's" den are Wiilard Beach
and Bertie Jewell.
The "Lone Fishermen" at the pond are
Bert Rogers and Da v. Alberts. Then
there is a pretty little "fairy," little
Bessie Webster, but Bessie got sleepy
early and the late comers missed seeing
her.
Tickets had been issued and it was gen
erally understood that there would be no
"dead heads." Before entering the hall
one had to pass Masters Bert Fuller,
Arthur Banks and Freddie Beach.
The fair promises to be a success. LiN
tla Miss Hathaway is entitled to much
credit for the good work, and to her ef
forts much;o£ the success will be due.
WAV NE ST. REFORMED CHURCH FAIR.
Tile Sunday School Needs More Koom
For Its Infant Class*
A fair was opened in the basement of
the Wayne Street Reformed Church last
evening, the proceeds of which are lo be
devoted to the enlarging and refurnishing
the Infant Class room of the Sunday
School.
Au octagon-shaped booth, prettily
adorned with flags and bunting, and
stocked with a collection of faucy goods,
occupies the centre of the room, h is in
charge of Mrs. Dr. Watson, Mrs. Trap
hagen, Miss M. Grunold, Miss Ella Lukius
and Miss May Dixon.
A dish of literary salad is an innova
tion. One selects a leaf of the dressing
containing a quotation, and if he names
the author he is rewarded with a prize.
The dish is in charge of Miss S. Traplia
gen, Miss Ella Van Cleef and Miss Alice
Firth.
A big lemonade bowl, handsomely
dressed is in charge of Miss Martha
Mabie, Miss R. Dechert and Miss
Thomas.
airs. ir, w, uavey ana airs. j>. u.
Wortendyke serve Japanese pudding in
big hunks, and the refreshment
table is under the supervision of
Mrs. Shepardson, Mrs. Eldridge, Mrs.
Alvah Scolield, Mrs. F. W. Westervelt
. and Mrs. H. H. Green.
An enjoyable stage entertainment was
provided for the patrons, in which Mr. D.
W. Robertson and Miss Addie B. Hall, of
Brooklyn, were the main participants.
The phonograph was also brought into
requisition. The fair will remain open
this evening.
The Japanese booth is embellished with
decorations and stocked entirely with
Japanese wares. The exhibition is rare
and prettv. Misses Carrie and May
Bailey and Miss Carrie Van Cleef are in
charge.
Mrs. George Morrison and Mrs. T. Van
Wert preside at the apron booth, and Miss
Julia Lutkins, Miss Minnie Blauvelt, and
Miss Sarah Van Cleef at the candy table.
IN THE FREE REFORMED CUURCU.
A Fair Well Managed by the Christian
Endeavor Society.
The Young People's Society of Chris
tian Endeavor connected with the Free
Reformed Church ou Grand street, closed
a very successful fair last evening. The
fair was open but two nights, but a good
round sum was realized.
The room in which the fair was held,
was prettily decorated and various booths
were arranged with taste and skill.
Many regrets are expressed tnat the fail
was not continued longer.
Mr. J. I.indsay. Mrs. Howard Reynolds,
Mis3 Kittie Culbert, Miss Falkuer and
Miss Hattie Hutton presided at the maiD
fancy booth. A beautiful crazy oaby
blanket made by Miss Hutton and a milk
maid's stool trimmed by Miss Lizzie Halk
were admired by many patrons of thi
fair.
The refreshment table was temptingly
arrayed with toothsome delicacies and
sweetmeats served by Mrs. Johu Gray,
Mrs. A. A. Zabriskie, Miss Lizzio Cul
vert, Miss Lizzie Halk. Miss R. Davidson,
Miss Annie and Jenuie Kinney and -Miss
Lizzie Wallace.
The candy table was in charge of Misses
Jennie and May Anderson. Miss William
son and Miss May Reynolds.
Miss Gertie Ward and Miss Lillian
Lauge presided over u very attractive
flower booth.
"A kiss in the dark" wçis sought aftei
by many of the young men who knew
that Miss Alice Tweedie and Miss Fitz
henry were behind the scenes; but the
young men got fooled. They were given
only a caudy kiss.
"The house that Jack built" was in
chargo of Mr. John Lindsay ana Miss
Belle Reynolds, and Miss Belle Llndsa>
was the "Rebecca at the Well."
A pleasant stage entertainment was
given by .Miss Emma Filzheury, Mr. Syd
ney Jordan, Mr. Harry Brown, Mr. H. 1>
Reynolds, Misa Gertie Ward, Mr, Dun
com. Miss Alice Tweedie, Miss Lange anc
and Miss Ward.
AN OFFICIAL ARRESTED.
Council mull Sturm*, of Uulou Hillf Ac
cused of Receiving.
V nion Hill was startled yesterday after
noon by the announcement that ex-Coun
ciiman Daniel Sturius had been arrested
for receiving stolen iioods. Sturms li
one of tfce best known men on the Hill
and is the proprietor of Sturm's At lantii
Garden. He is said to be wurcU $50,000.
The complainant in the case is Morrii
Fiegel, of Kiegel Bros., oil dealers, of No
149 .Mercer street, New York, i'iege
stated that for some time the Arm hat
missed goods, aud had reason to suspeci
that one of their employees was the guilt;
party, and from information furnisliec
by him, Sturms place was visited aud th<
goods found. Sturms says that the good;
were stored in his place by a man whi
asked permission to place tliem there, a:
hi* wagon had broken down. Sturms wa
bailed for trial.
North Hudson Notes,
Burglars forced au entrance into tin
blacksmith shop of'Peter Tuskey, corue;
of High Point; and Summit avenues, las
CHAS. S. FUKST,
! 7
5-î ΛΈ1ΙΛΙΚΑΓ .1 ΓΕ.ΥΓΚ.
HEAOOHABTERS FOOOLIDAY PRESENTS,
WILL BE OPEN EVENINGS NEXT WEEK,
SPECIAL BARGAINS
IN
PRESENTS TOMORROW.
500
Silk Brocaded Flush Photograph Albums, in
all colors,
Sl.ifl; worth $2.50.
IT? Boxe·, Silk Plush Cases, containing fine
stationery,
G9c; worth $1.25.
100 Fine Silk Plush Autograph Albums,
25c.; worth 50c.
Fancy Boxes of Stationery,
7c. to 75c. a Box.
Fine Plush Frames,
33c. ; worth 50c.
Fine Silk Plush, Satin Lined, Toilet Cases, in
all colors,
Si. 10; worth $?.00.
Iuk Stands with Thermometer,
19c. ; worth 50c.
LEMONADE SET9.
Pitcher, y> dozen Glasses and Tray,
$8c. ; worth $1.50.
SLIPPERS.
We bnve a fine line of Slippers for Ladies,
Gents, Youths, Boys and Children.
UMBRELLAS.
500 Silk Glorie, Silver Handle,
$1.25; worth $1.75.
500 Silk Glorie, very fine. Silver Handle,
$1.»33; worth $2.25.
FULL LINE OF FINER GOODS.
GENTS' FURNISHINGS.
Elegant Neckwear, in Boxes,
50c. each ; wo rth 75c.
Fine Silk Embroidered Suspenders, in Boxes,
65c. each; worth 97c.
Gents'1 Kid Gloves, Embroidered Back,
$1.C0; worth $1.50.
DOLLS.
S&ilor Boy and Girls,
&*.c. ; worth 50c.
KID BODY, BISQUE HEAD,
25c. ; worth 50c.
Jfamma and Papa Doll,
25c. ; worth 50c.
Sleeping Dolls, Bisque Head, Kid Body.
49c.; worth $1.10
Jointed Body. Bisque Head, 20 inches long,
98c. ; worth $1.50.
Kid Body. Bisque Head, 24 inches long.
Si.39; worth $>.00.
HANDKERCHIEFS.
Ladies' Hemstitched, cold border, % dozen In
Box,
33c. ; worth 49c.
Ladies' All-Linen, Hemstitched, Initial,
dozen in a box.
90c.; worth $1.49.
Gents' All-Linen, Hemstitched, Initial, H
dozen in a box,
$1.50; worth $2.00.
-Japanese Silk, Hemstitched, Initialed,
55c. each; worth 75c.
All-.Silk Mufflers in elegant designs,
75c.; selling.everywhere for Si.00.
DKESS PATTERNS.
In Plain, Stripe, Check, All-Wool Cloths; also
Cashmeres, Henrietta in black and colors.
Remnants in all these cloths at less than half
price.
.JEWELRY,
Scarf Ping 6c. worth 15c.
·· 10c. ,l 25c.
" 44 in Sterling Silver. .25c. " 35c.
Kings in Gold and Silver 25c. " 50c.
Bracelets in Gold aud Silver. .25c. " 50c.
CHAS. S- FURST.
I -^••rr-r.T.Tirr.TT ÏIIrv 1Ι~Λ JTKΤ»ΛΓ€Τί
night and secured about $100 worth of
tools.
Union Hill will be lighted w ith elec
tricity. Provisions were made at the
Council meeting on Wednesday night.
•John Archibald, a mason, was severely
injured by tailing from a scaffold on the
Boulevard yesterday afternoon. He was
attended by Dr. huck.
West Hoboken Council, No. 1185, R. Α.,
have elected the following officers:—F. A.
Schwartz, regent; Robert Stocker, vice
regent; Thomas Hopkins, P. K.; John
\\ eber, secretary; Albert K-st, treasurer;
Charles Weber, guide; A. Grimm, chap
lain: T. Davidson, Jr., orator; George
Deniss, I. S.; W. A. Humphrey, sentinel;
Julius Klumpp, trustee.
Court Bergen's Dance.
Court Bergen, No. 0,982, A. O. F., last
evening held their seventh annual enter
tainment and ball at Bergen Hall. The
first part of the programme was fur"
nished by the Madrigal Boys, of New
York, in musical selections. There were
duets by Messrs. Beebe and Post, and
solos by Charles Goodman, E. J. Post and
Adolph iianer. The affair was a very
pleasant one.
The hop that followed was an enjoy
able affair and in It nearly two hundred
couples took part
Drunk ou His Post.
Chanceman John Fallahee, of the Sec
ond precinct, was found intoxicated on
his post last night by Roundsman Flan
nelly. At the station house Captain
Christie Smith demanded Fallahee's
badge, which Fallahee refused to hand
over. The Captain had a big tussle with
the intoxicated chanceman, but finally
succeeded in getting it away from him.
Fallahee was suspended.
Files, Itching, Bleeding, Ulcer, etc.. Cubed
without Cutting, Lkjatino or Chlorotorh. Our
patients attend to busiuess while receiving treat
ment. Illustrated papers sent free. Address
Drs. Miller and Jamison, No. 41 West Twenty
sixth street, New York.***
A/"k IT TTUDSON CO. — A GENERAL
. \J, ΧΑ., -ΓΧ meeting of officers and
members will be held iu St. John's Hall, Gregory
Ftreet, on Suudav, December 15. at three o'clock p.
m.. A full attendance is requested as business of
importance is to be transacted. _ _
DOMINI OK REYNOLDS. C. D.
JAMES W. BURKE. F, S.
FRANCIS McA AMEE, R. S.
THOMAS LINAHAN, C. T.
William dklamey. Furnlettïnc CTodertaiter, car
rlafcee and camp chairs to let. 345 Grove streat ».or
sey City. N. J. Telephone call. No. 183.%*·
ADVERT1BEMENT3 UNDEft THE HEAD Otf
MARRIAGES AND DEATHS
Wffl be iusertod in the Jersey Cr?Y News nn 1
the Sunday Moiwino News at the rato of ten
cents α line for the first insertion; five cents a Une
for each subseouent Insertion.
D1KI>.
IlOFFMaN.-On Wednesday, December 11. 1899. at
the residence of his son-in-law, John Niece, No.
549 William street, this city, Jacob Roltman,
aged sixty-three years, eleven months and six
teen days.
Brief eervicesat the bouse, Friday, at 6.45 p. m.
leternient at Emilie, Fa.. Saturday.
m. J. ËOYLAN,
Funeral Director,
198 Pavenia Ave., Jersey City.
fiOÂlïJJERS WANTE1h
^ oardkrî- fu h ni she fi?*HOOM S, \VΙΤΪΓ ^ Ο R
_Γ> without boiu'd. L. G. Wyatt, No. 340 \orlc
street, corner Varlck.
Ï7RONT HALL ROOM TO LET, WITH BOARD, AT
JT No. Third street.
fvURNISlIEO ROOM TO LET WITH BOARD; NO.
219 Pavonia avenue.
1 BURNISHED ROOMS, WITH OR WITHOUT
board; No. 236 Grove street.
I BURNISHED ROOM. WITH OR WITHOUT BOARD;
nil improvements: Να 233 Grand street,
Furnished room with board for gkn
Monica, also table board; con veulent to rare
and ferries, No. 173 Fourth street.
τ a RGB room sickly furnished: all con
Λ j vealences, with Ûrst-elass board. No. 233 First
street. (___
1>LKAS.\NT ROOMS WITH BOARD IN PRIVATE
. family; terms moderate. No. Third street
P""lEASANT FURNISHED ROOM, WITH OR
without board, for two respectable men;
termg moderate. No. ;/]% Seventh wtreet.
PLEASANT ROOM, WITH GOOD BOARD, 43
Ocean avenue.
Oi) 7 WARREN STREET.-LARGE ROOM, SEC
4 ond floor; also hall rooms; with board.
Ol)7 WARREN STREET, LARGE PLEASANT
w — i front room; also other rooms; with board.
IlfSTR VCTIONS.
1~^HOROUQH PREPARATION FOR CiVIL"^SER
VI ce, business college, medieal aaa law school.
Hoffman Educational Rooms, No. 4ti Newark avenue.
flgOAA A YEAR-BOARD AND TUITION: BOYS
Φ-uUU and girls. Address Episcopal Schoooi
Haddon field, N. J.
A YOUNG GENTLEMAN WOULD LIKE IN
struct ion in French. Address DON. Jersey
' City News Office.
FAIR
Of the YFayiie Street Reformed Church
Musical and Literary Entertainment Thursday
Evening and Friday Afternoon and Evening,
December Wand 13, 1S83, beginning at 8οΊΊθί·Ιε,
Admission* wcents; Children, lu cents. Kxhibi
tlou of the Phonograph. Special attractions for
Children Friday Afternoon.
Χ.' υ JLX'JM JL&JLJLJ^JL·^ JLV ν/ \yarxA_>»
IARGE FRONT ROOM. SUITABLE FOR TWO
J gentlemen or ladies; also hall room. No. 254
Grove street.
Κ" OOMs TO LET, FURNISHED.—TWO VERY NICK
front rooms, S3 and $l.5U. No. 246 York street;
ring three times.
T<0 LET—NICE FRONT ROOM FURNISHED, FOR
one or two; bath, pas and heat. Enquire No. 49β
Grove street.
v ρ WO NICELY FURNISHED ROOMB. HEATED
J gas aad bath; family private. No. 175 Fourth
street.
rWO VERY"NICE FÛÔî^ltÔOMSTNEWLY FUR'
! nished: ten minuter from ferry; §3 and $1.50.
No. M6 Yorksireet; ring three times.
rrO LET—FOUR OR"FIVE ROOMS. IN STRICTLY
Χ private house; rent moderate to right party.
Address M., Jersey City Sews.
1 WO NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS, HEATED^
i gas and bath; family private. No. ΙΤδ Fourth
street.
rpcTLET—THREE UNFURNISHED ROOMS IN NEW
.1 private house, occupied by owner; pleasant
neighborhood; one block from cars. Enquire No.
Si Wiley street.
ΓΟΟ SUSSEX ST Η KEY-FUHNÏSHED LARGE
L· tL· room and small room, connecting; ail con
veniences.
SITUATIONS ΑΝΌ WORK
WANTED.
KBîpectableT"όίκΐΓίν'ïsîîés atkîn'To
do general housework. Call at No. 138 Bay
street.
SITUATION WANTED BY A GERMAN GIRL TO
Ο do general housework or in a restaurant. No.
243% York street.
SITUATION WANTED TO COOK, WASH AND
iron or do general housework. No. 150 Seventh
street.
W'ANTED—SITUATION AS PLAIN COOK IN A
private family. Call at No. 10 Erie street, sec
ond floor.
\ OÛNO GIRL WISHES A SITUATION ΊΟ DÔ
X housework or chaftiberwork. Apply at No. 285
Bay street.
REAL ' ESTATE. _
T?OH HOUSES AVI) LOTS IN JERSEY CITY
-Γ BERGEN, OREJSNV1LLE, HA YONNE AND BEtt
UEN POINT. CALL OR WRITE TO
JOHN N. BRUNS,
No. 137 (tea Ayenue. Jersey city.
So. 77 Dasiortli kmn Greenrllls.
END FOR LIST OF CITY AND COUNTRY PROP
ERTY·
ROBERT M. FLOYD,
JERSEY CITY HEIGHTS,
36 OCEAN AVE. COR. UNION ST,
REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE.
ι ÔO ' AA HANDSOME TWO-STORY BRICK
basement and cellar house; eight
rooms; all Improvements; near Marion oepot; tine
order. J. J. liurtney, No. 2ϋ1 Tonueie avenue, near
Marion Station.
HELP WAITED.
' VV tï5ÎfB2X't^îB^-'iiÎA5?"^îfâ'"giaDÊT6îe
ί V V perieuce in the retail notion aud fancy goods
business; must bave liret class references. Address
, Iîqx Oersgy City Κ O.
THE BLIND SEE,
Ttie Deaf Hear, the Lnm» Walk,
I THE SICK MADE WELL WITHOUT MEDICI N'B
Maivolous cures are performed daily at Lad
rooms ot
DR. FANYOU,
Ko. Î55H Sixth avenue, Ν. Y„
ci Dyspepsia Insomnia. Catarrh, Paralysis and all
Nervous aud Chronic Diseases.
Oitlce ΰυ»Γ6:—a. m. to 4:80 p. ra.
The poor healed free from 9:20 to 10:30 a. m.
MODEMANN
DENTIST,
Νοβ. 502 aud 604 THIRD AVKNUE.
Southwest Corner S4th Street
No. 355 81XTH AVE., near 16fcfc St., Ν. Y.
à'VAli Gum Elegant
94, »? and «10.
Perfectly adapted to tlie anatomy of the mouth,
and guaranteed to stand the test of time.
Old Time Prices, $·&> and $90.
Artificial Teeth ou Gold. Artificial Teeth on Silver
NO CHARGE NO CHARCF
for extracting teeth without pain when artificial
teeth are to he inserted. (In this department a lady
in attendance.) Teeth filled with Gold, Silver, &c.,
Ac. Toeth repaired in fifty minutes. Sets made
while waiting.
see that the name MODEMANN is painted in full
and plain letters, on the doors» stairs and win
dows. We have positively no connection
with any dental office that does not display th«i
name
MODEMANN,
Nob. 603 and 504 THIRD AVENUE.
Southwest Corner 84th Street.
No. 255 SIXTH AVE., near 10th St.. N.Y.
First National Bank.
Jkhsky City, Dec. 11,18S3.
Notice Is hereby given that an election
for eleven Directors of this Bank will
be held at the Baufcing House on Tuesday, the 14th
day of January next. The poll* will be opeu from
U m. to 1 p. m. G. W. CONKLIN, Cashier.
A

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