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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, December 13, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 3

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WILKIE COLLINS.
ΙΓΙίΓ IIΕ MADE COVST JOSCO
JUL A XD A SO FA T.
A Queer View of Perfection in Women—
Wonderful Mechanical Toys-Uow to
]£at Onions. '
An English journalist describes an in
(lerview that tooK place between himself
mid Wilkie Collins at the letter's residence
ft year or two ago.
"1 remember" said Mr. Collins, "that I
ascd to receive scores ot letters from all
parts of the world complaining of the
abstruse nature of my plots. And why,
do you think? Because, forsooth, they
were too difficult to follow. 'You make
us read every line; we can't skip1' cried
the plaintiff 'We even have to go back
•to follow the clue. I need scarcely say
that I took these letters as so many com
I pliments."
"Then you were accustomed to receive
! criticisms after the publication of a
I novel:'"
"Certainly, and especially when X deal
with what it is the fashion to call risky
subjects, as I did when I wrote 'Fallen
Leaves' and 'The New Magdalen.' The
women objected to the first, and pars ο ns
i to the second."
He told me his favorite authors were
IS^ott, ByTon and Dickens. With latter
day novelists he had but slight acquain
tance. "Perhaps I am old-fahsioned," he
&said, with a modest smile of selfdeprecia
tion. I gathered ;nat, thcvpl be liked
to' have pleasant things said about him.
-fee held that a review, however favorable,
was of no real service. If the people did
! not like a book they would decline to read
1 it in spite of all the reviews in the world
aud it was the same about notices of
plays. "Whenever I have produced a
play," he said, "I have made a point of
t" .
came out. I listened to their talk, and
that was my gage of popular opinion."
I happened to ask the novelist how he
came to evolve the famous Fosco, and
whether he had any particular person in
his mind. "He was a combination,"
laughed Mr. Collins. "When I was writ
ing the storyjl was at a dinner party one
night, and the table talk rau on the
villains of Action. One lady said that no
fut man could be a villain. I argued the
point and determined to mak» F03C0
fleshy. I took the idea of the white mice
from a schoolfellow, who used to carry
the Httle things in his pocket. I thought
they would serve as a foil. I made him
Italian because I had spent many months
in Italy, and thought it would be Interest
ing to work up some of the local color."
For years Mr. Collins had been subject
to violent attacks of gout. In the preface
to "The Moonstone" he mentions that
the amusing chaptersin which Miss Clark
tells her portion of the story were written
between fits of agony. When his bratu
was highly wrought in the throes of
composition he suffered fearfully from
nerves, which meant ghosts. "I would
begin," he said "say at midnight, and work
on till three or four o'clock in the silence
of the night, as the lit took me, smoking
cigars and drinking black coffee, my
mind absorbed in my situations.
"Then the ghosts would begin to appear
and I used to make a rush to my bedroom.
There was one particular ghost which
would greet me when the situation had
been particularly horrible. It was a
fearful, shapeless monster, with the eyes
of fire and Dig green fangs. He came to
be quite a familiar in those days.
•'Would you tell me how you work, Mr.
Collins?" I asked. The veteran replied:
"Well, 1 am not one of those who'havu
the patience to write a scenario. I get the
main subject well into my head and leave
the details and complex elaborations to
come afterward. Some novelists find it
possible to ltfgin at the beginning. I
tried that method in ' The Woman in
White' and failed egregiously."
Of all his works I judged that Mr. Col
lins liked "The Woman in White" best.
I remember his saying that translations
are the best gauge of popularity, and if
anyone takes the trouble to consult ;the
catalogue of the British Museum he will
' "Tind that Mr. Collins' novels have been
I ' translated into many languages.
Female Perfection.
In the first part of the present century
there was published a clever little satire
called "The Miseries of Human Life; or.
The Groans of Timothy Testy aad Samuel
Sensitive." In it, under the heading
"Miseries of Fashionable Life," is a "Key
to Female Perfection," from which we
give some extracts:—
"If you Dlay at cards abstain as much
as may be from the game of whist, which,
without great care, may engender a man
ly solidity of understanding, not to men
tion the lines which the attention neces
sary to this game may impress on your
countenance; games of chance and such
as do not exclude casual sallies of elegant
mirth are alone admissible. Avoid chess
as you would a tiger or a serpent.
"There is a captivating method, more
easily conceived than described, of ap
pearing inattentive and uninterested
when literature, politics, antiquities, and
other such masculine subjects are can
vassed, and of gayly and suddenly inter
rupting them by starting lighter topics.
"Cowardice is absolutely indispensable.
To turn pale (perhaps leave the room) at
a bare allusion to a robbery committed
at any distance of time and place, to
scream at the report of a gun however
remote, or the sight of a pistol known to
be unloaded, are recommendations in
which the most unpracticed candidate
for female honors is seldom deficient.
"Be it never forgotten that your powers
of conquest are not to be more fatally
shaken than when you mix, however
slightly, in a political debate. It may be
doubted whether you can justifiably bo
acquainted with any passing; event of this
nature short of actual invasion.
Frailty of memory, if not natural, must
be acquired. Names of unusual length
or difficulty will naturally burden your
recollection; this genuine forgetfuluess
is to be artificially protracted, a dearee of
mental weaKness very nappiiy harmoniz
ing with that of the body which is to be
inculcated. I add that a treacherous
memory exhibits to no small advantage a
delicate hand hurried with agitation
across the forehead. ,
"Continual health, which is but too
often attended by strength and by bold
ness, is by no means eligible. Nerv
ous complaints in all their protean varie
ties and the more interesting classes of
heartache should be frequent.
"Never be chnrgable with laughter, but
spare not animated smiles.
Beauty Nap Gowns.
Those fortunate ones who can spare the
time for a "beauty nap" during the day
may make themselves as pretty as pic
tures in the new slumber robes which are
fashioned of soft white Hannel with
silken dots in any delicate shade one fan
cies, and a great deal of ribbon is used in
the finish. These articles are made of one
piece of material. How they are made is
« question only to be answered by the in
ventor thereof. But truly, they are
pretty, and no doubt very comfortable.
Wonderful Toys. #
What cannot be accomplished in the
way of toy making is hardly to be thought
of in these days of science and mechan
ism. Fond'mothers who desire to as
tonish as well as please their little ones
will not find it difficult. While looking
at the mechanical toys for sale this sea
eon one could almost imagine oneself
with little Alice in Wonderland. Dogs
that bark and cats that mew, goats with
natural skin—although small they look
very much alive—cry, wag theirheads and
walk off in a decidedly threatening man
ner, as though eager for a combat; all
sorts of animals, with voices so natural
that one might well imagine oneself in a
menagerie when in their midst. Some
of these are three feet in height, and so
true to nature as to startle a few timid
ones. The small boy of fifty years ago
who was delighted with a blue monkey
climbing a yelffiw stick, may now, in his
old age, present his grandchildren with
gay little sailors and firemen, who, after
being wound up and fastened at the bot
tom o£ a door or window, begin climbing
with such rapidity as to make one's head
whirl. Another toy, dear to the hearts
of children of long ago, was "Jack In the
Box," but he is now superseded by a
beautiful little French doll, who, instead
of popping up in the undignified fashion
of her oredecessors, rises gracefully from
the unfolding petals of a rose and wafts
kisses with the tips of her fingers in the
nuost engaging manner.—Xeuiark Even
ing News.
The Onion.
Botauically, the onion belongs to the
lily family. Tho odor ot the vegetable,
which is what makes it so unpleasant, is
due to a volatile oil, which is the same as
that in garlic, though in the onion it is
milder, and, naturally, does not last long;
there are, besides, easy ways, if one only
knows them, of removing at once all un
pleasantness from the breath. A little
parsley, or a few grains of coffee, or even
a swallow or two of milk, if taken after
eating, proves an effective remedy.
Boiled onions are the least objectionable
in regard to odor, and are as easily
digested as any. The oil in the oniou
passes off in the water in which the vege
tables are boiled, and if the kettle is kept
closely covered and the water changed
after they have boiled five minutes, and
then again ten minutes later, there will
be no odor through the house, and the
onions will be white instead of gray, as
they so often are. Besides being rich in
flesh-forming elements, raw onions are
especially good for breaking up a heavy
cold; they are also stimulating to
fatigued persons, and are otherwise
beneficial.
Milking Stools.
Of course everybody has seen the pretty
little milking stools, gilded and painted,
which have ornamented the modern par
lors more or less for a year or so. Well,
now we have them really utilized at last,
stead of standing upon their legs as well
regulated stools are supposed to do, they
are reversed, and a piece of figured China
silk is fastened about the rim of the seat,
drawn up about the gilded or silver stan
dards and shirred, forming a very unique
catchall or work-basket.
GROWING OLD.
A Solemn Subject for Thought—Consola
tions.
There is much solemnity in the con
viction that one is growing old—but there
should be no sadness. The thought often
comes to such a one:—"There is
my life. That is what I am very
soon to answer for. I must ans
wer for very much more than if
I had died youug. What will God say to
me about it V' The aging person has am
ple notice of the close of his probation—to
those who die young there is next to no
notice. He has ample time to set his
house in order, aud he will have to an
swer for that privilege, too. What should
the effect of this situation be upon his
minil? Ought it not to make him inde
pendent and fearless? Is he not already
emancipated from the bondage of man,
and freed from the fear of man? As the
world narrows and shrinks, why should
not the freedom aud the moral heroism
of heaven expand us his already received
heritage? It would seem that this ought
to be so, and that it ought to bring a
sense of great happiness. A great many
old people do enter very largely upon the
higher life before they have done with
this. There is no pull upon them but
love and duty, and these pull both ways,
toward God aud toward man, and strongly
toward righteousness in its relation to
both worlds. Let the old man stand like
a marble pillar under the good and true.
He ought to realize that the breeze which
fans his cheek is the breeze of the mern
ing. The finest fire we have seen is the
sparkle of old eyes, lit up by the courage
and hope of the rising sun. Die? The
old man is uot going to die. He has no
thought of dying. He is only getting
ready to live. "I have not begun to tight
yet," said Paul Jones, as he stepped from
the decks of the scuttled and sinking Bon
Homme Richard.—Chicago Interior.
CONKLI.NG's" SACKIPICE.
A Good Story of the Dead Utica States
Puring the war, at a time of great de
pression, it is said, writes Charles Dudley
Warner in Harper's Magazine, that a
public meeting was called in Oneida
county, Ν. Y., for the purpose of stimu
lating the war spirit. It was a matter of
general notoriety at the time that there
was a decided political disagreement be
tween Roscoe Conkling and his nephew,
Morris Miller, and they warmly opposed
each other's views and measures. The
meeting was aroused for the more vigor
ous prosecution of the war. The speakers
vied with each other in their devotion
and Felf-sacriflce. One speaker offered to
contribute a large sum of money, an
other and another offered an in
creased amount. An aged man arose
and with a broken voice declared
that he had no money to give, but that j
he had a young son whom he would j
dedicate to the service of his country. I
Another father arose and with tears iu I
his eyes pledged the same sacrifice.
The enthusiasm whs at its height and |
the house was carried away by the !
spirit of self surrender, when Mr. Miller
arose and eloquently expressed his de
votion to the cause. "I have," he said in
thrilling tones, "no money to give, but I
offer to my country my uncle, Roscoe
Conkling!" There was dead silence for a
moment, and then suppressed laughter,
and theu a roar that shook the house.
Business was resumed, the speaking
went on, other pledges were made. But
every now aud then somebody would
break out in a titter. 'He offers his
uncle, Roscoe Conkling," and the fancy
would tickle somebody else, until the
whole house was convulsed again and
again with merriment.
A Crack In the Moon.
The new asteroid discovered by Dr.
Peters, of Hamilton College Observatory,
on the 25th of August, may prove to be
the most interesting of the whole group.
The first computation of the orbit indi
cated that part of the path was inside the
Dlauet orbit of the planet Mars. Dr. Peters
is making another computation from
later observations, and he thinks the path
may be outside that 01 Mars, but still near
enouch to distinguish the new asteroid
as the nearest of all to the sun. In view
of the discovery, astronomers may be in
clined to adopt the view that the moons
of Mars were picked up by that planet
from the asteroids near his orbit. It is
possible that the earth picked up its satel
lite in the same way. The moon has the
appearance of having received a heavy
blow which cracked the shell in every
direction from the crater' Tycho. The
moon might have struck the earth in a
way to cause the fracture of the moon's
shell, which was afterwards cemented
again by the outflow of melted matter.
The lines of apparent fracture are in
tensely white, like new matter pushed up
through the older portions of the moon's
surface. The central point, or ci*ter of
Tycho, is also intensely white, and is very
large and shallow.— Rochester Democrat
Divorces in France.
The divorce law passed in Prance iu
1SS4 seems to be operating with terrible
effect. In 1884 there were 8,657 divorces;
in 1885, 4,123; in 1886, 4,007; in 1887, 5,797.
But the most astounding statement made
is that in the department of the Seine,
i. e., Paris and its neighborhood, there
are no fewer than 62.8 divorces to every
thousand marriages, or that considerably
more than one in twenty marriages (say
one in sixteen) ends in a divorce. On the
other hand, In the Pinistereand the Cotes
du Nord not much more than in a thous
and marriages ends in a divorce—a curi
ous testimony this to the different morale
of Parisian and provincial life in Prance.
—The Spectator.
Bred in the Hone.
Her Matter-of-fact Old Pather—Daugh
ter, I do wish you would learn to talk
without rising so many exclamatories.
Everything you speak of is accompanied
!
with "oil!"' "the idea!" "great goodness!'
or something of the kind.
"Why, goodness gracions, pa! How car
I help It? The idea! We girls all talk
that way."— Kentucky State Journal.
Wooden tiouson' Advantages.
In those countries of Northern Europe
where wooden houses prevail, it is con
tended that, when Droperly built, wooden
dwellings are warmer, less damp and al
together healthier than houses of stoue
or brick. Dr. Seymour, at the meeting
of the Royal Asiatic Society of Japau, ex
plained that the remarkably small infant
mortality in that country was due iu a
great measure to the fact that the Japan
ese live In well built wooden houses.
It is also noticed that those foreigners
living in Japau, who reside in brick and
stone houses ore much more subject tc
disease and illnesss than those who live
in wooden houses; it remains a lonst ime
in the walls of a brick house. Of course,
if it were simply a question of health, it
might ne advisable to rebuild all our
towns, but then comes in the question oi
durability and dancer in case of Are.—
Sanitary News.
Corporation Notice.
Notice is hereby given tiîat on the
21&t day of October. lWja. application was made
to tbo Hoard of Street and Water Commissioners by
W. F. Rouse and others for the construction of a
24-inch oval Brick Sewer in
CB H ARLES STREET,
from
SUMMIT AVENUE
to a point 460 feet east thereof, ill the follow ins;
manner, viz.; Of suitable dimensions and in accord
ance with the established plan of sewerage, to
Êether with all the necessary manholes, receiving
asins and appurtenauce.i.
Notice is also given that on the 9th day of Decem
ber, H89, the Commissioners of Assessment tiled
with the Board of Street and Water Commissioners
their preliminary sketch showing what property
will probably be assessed and the probable amount
of benefit to each lot or parcel of land, also the
probable amount of assessment per foot of front
age for the said improvement, ana the same is now
open to public inspection iu the office of the Clerk
or the Board of Street and Water Commissioners.
And notice is also given that the following streets
or avenues or particular sections thereof are in
cluded in saiu assessment, namely:—
CHARLES STREET.
SUMMIT AVENUE
to a point about 475 feet east thereof.
And that on the 13th day of January. 1839. at
10 o'clock a. m., and the meeting room of the Board
of street and Water Commlesloners are hereby fixed
as the time and place when and where the Board
of Street and Water Commissioners will meet to
hear parties interested in said application and all
remonstrances against the said improvement that
may be presented in writing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners.
GEORGE T. BOUTON.
Clerk.
Datea Jersey City, December 13. 1839.
Corporation Notice.
VIOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT ON THE 7ΓΗ
day of October, 188.1. application was made
totheiward of Srreet and Water Commissioners
by John R. Halladay and others for the improve
ment of
WILLOW COURT,
betweee the paviug at
NEWARK AVENUE
and the crosswalk at the intersection of
WILLOW COURT
and
PAVONIA AVENUE,
in the following manner, including all intersec
tions:—
To have the street for the full width thereof,
graded to the established grade by excavating or
tilling the same to the established grade.
To have new twenty-Inch curb set on either side
thereof.
To have the present curb reset and new twenty
inch curb set where necessary.
To have new blue stone flagging four feet wide
laid on either sidewalk.
To have the present flagging relaid and new flag
ging laid where necessary.
Ίο have the carriage way paved with Belgian
block pavement.
To have the present bridge stone crosswalks re
laid and new bridge stone laid where necessary.
And all the work that may be necessary to *pro
vide for the flow of the surface water and to com
plete the improvement in a good and substantial
manner.
Notice Is also given that ou the 9th dav of De
cember. 1889, the Commissioners of Assessment filed
witn the Board of Street and Water Commissioners
their preliminary sketch, showing what property
will probably be assessed and the probable amount
of benefit to each lot or parcel of land, also the
probable amount of assessment per foot of front
age for the said improvement and the same is now
open to public Inspection in the ottioe of the clerk
of the Board of Street and Water Commissioners.
And notice is also given that the following streets
cr avenues or particular sections thereof are in
cluded in said assessment, viz.·—
WILLOW COURT.
from
NEWARK AVENUE
to
PAVONIA AVENUE;
NEWARK AVENUE,
on the south side, about 20 feet east and 22 feet wes1
of
WILLOW COURT;
PAVONIA AVENUE
on the north side, about 35 feet east and 19.47 feet
west of I
ι And that the 13th day of January. 1890,
at 10 o'clock a.m., and the meeting room of tne
Board of Street and Water Commissioners, are
hereby fixed as the time and place when and where
the board of Street and Water Commissioners will
meet to hear parties interested in said application,
and all remonstrances against the said improve
ment that may be presented in writing.
By oraer or the Boara of Stréet ana Water Com
missioners.
GEORGE T. BOUTON,
Dated Jersey City, December 13th, 1889.
Corporation Notice.
Notice is hereby given that on the 9th
day of December, 1889, the Commissioners of
Assessment filed in the office of the Clerk of the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners their
final assessment, map and report for tho improve
ment of
GRIFFITH STREET
from
CENTRAL· AVENUE
to the easterly line of
MILTON AVENUE,
bv paving, etc.. and the same is now open to public
inspection in the office of the Clerk of said Board.
And notice is also given that the following streets
or avenues or particular sections thereof are in
eluded in said assessment: —
GRIFFITH STREET
from
CENTRAL AVENUE
MILTON AVENUE.
SUMMIT AVENUE
from
GRIFFITH STREET,
to a point about 23 feet north and 23 feet south
thereof.
CENTRAL AVENUE
from
GRIFFITH STREET,
to a point about 2j feet north and 25 feet south
thereof.
And that tne 13th day of January, 1890, at ten
o'clock a. m.. and the meeting room of the Board of
Street and Water Commissioners, are hereby fixed
as the time and place when and where the Board of
Street and Water Commissioners will meet to hear,
consider and adjudicate upon all objections to said
assessment and report
AU objections thereto must be presented in writ
ing·
Byorde/of the Board of Street and Water Com·
mlfisicaers.
GEORGE 'Γ. BOUTON Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, December 13,13S9.
Corporation Notice.
"\TOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT ON THE 5TH
(lay of December. 1S89, the Commissioners of
Assessment and Chief Engineer hied in the office of
the Clerk of the Board of street and Water Com
missioners their flual assessment map ana schedule
lor the opening and extension of
WILLOW COURT,
from Its present southerly terminus to
PAVOMA AVENUE.
The land taken for said opening and extension
mav be described as follows:—beginning at a point
on the northerly side of Pavonia avenue, about
282.7 feet east of Summit avenue: thence easterly
along tho northerly side of Pavonia avenue, about
45 feet; thence north about 18B feet to the present
southerly terminal line of Willow Court; ther.ee
westerly alon« said present southerly terminal tine
about■ 133 feet to the point or place of beginning.
The land to be assessed for said improvement
mav be described as follows:—All the property
fronting on the following named streets or aveu
ues or particular section thereof, to wit:—
SUMMIT AVENUE.
from a point about 103.-Î feet north of
Ρ A VON IΛ AVENUE,
to a point about 185.1 feet south of
MAGNOLIA AVENUE.
WILLOW COURT.
PAVONIA AVENUE,
NEWARK AVENUS.
MAGNOLIA AVENUE
from a point about 87.85 feet east of
SUMMIT AVENUE.
to a point about 71.59 feet west of said avenue.
PAVONIA AVENUE
on the south side, about 4S2.2 feet east, and854 feet
west of
SUMMIT AVENUE.
PAVONIA AVENUE,
on the north side, from a point about 2G0 feet east
WILLOW COURT,
to a point about 400 feet west of
HOMESTEAD PLACE.
NEWARK AVENUE.
on the south side, about S43.3 feet east and 336.4 feet
west of
WILLOW COURT.
NEWARK AVENUE,
on the north side from
OAKLAND AVENUE,
to a point about feet west of
COOK STREET.
LOTT STREET,
from
WILLOW COURT,
to a point about 260 feet west thereof
And that the Mth day of January. 1890. at ten
o'clock a. ui., and the meeting room of the Board of
Street and Water Commissioners are hereby tlxed
as the time and place when and where the Board of
Street and Water Commissioners will meet to hear
aud consider objections to said ilnal a*sessmeut
map and schedule.
Al! objections to the same must be presented in
writing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners.
GEORGE T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, December 13,1SSV.
NOTICE.
HUDSON COUNTY
ARMORY BONDS.
By virtue of a resolution of the Board o;
Chosen Freeholders of the County of Hudson, ii
the Stat#» of New Jersey, parsed at a meeting
held MONDAY, DECEMBER Ί, 3689,
NOTICE IS HLREBI given
• THAT
SEALED BIDS, OR PROPOSALS,
will be received and opened at a meeting of said
Board, to be held in their meeting room, at tht
Hudson County Court House, in Jersey City on
Thursday, December 19,1389,
at three o'clcek in the afternoon of that day,
for the
Sale ef Eesistareil Bongs
of the said County of Hudson, to be issued by
the said Board for the
Loan of $&5,000
ordered to be made by said Board, by the reso
lution above referred to.
All bids and proposals must be sealed and en
dorsed, "Proposals for Hudson County Loan,'
and presented to the Board at their meeting at
8 o'clock in the day aforesaid, and before th€
opening of any bids.
The bonds are to be issued in denominations of
1,000 each, and to run for a term and redeema
le as follows:—
$5,000, redeemable January 1, IROl.
$5,000, redeemable January 1,
$5,000, redeemable January 1, 1H93.
$5,000, redeemable January 1, 1894.
$5,000, redeemable January 1. 1805.
To bear interest at the rate of not exceeding
three (3) per centum per annum, interest paya
ble semi-annually, and are issued under an act
of the Legislature of the,State of New Jersey,
entitled ,4An act to provide for the purchase 01
sites for and the erection and equipment of
armories in cities of the first and second class,
and making appropriations therefor, and tc
provide for the taking of real estate for sucli
sites by commission in case the same cannot
be purchased by agreement,'''' approved Marcb
23, 18KS.
Bids or proposals may be made for the whole
or any part or said loan.
This Board reserves the right to reject any or
all bids, if deemed for the best interests of the
connty. -
By order of the Board.
JOHN BOYD, Clerk.
MARTELS! MARTELS!
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The leading house for the
manufacture of all kinds
of SLATE MANTELS.
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EXCELLENT IN FINISH.
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AN IMMENSE STOCK.
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An<l warranted the best in the market.
Our traced line mautels are Gilt, with best Gold
Leaf, which lasts forever, aud not with Hronzti
powder or Metal leaf, which soon turns Black, and
the Beauty of the Mantel Destroyed.
Don't be deceived. See our mantels before pur
chasing elsewhere.
FACTORY AND SHOW ROOMS
Address 527 & 529 Grand St.,
2 & 4 Woodward St., Jersey City, N. J
USEFUL HOLIDAY PRESENTS
AT
CHARLES WOLF'S
58 Cortlandl Street, Ν. T.
He has a Jarjte stock of fine POCKE1
BOOKS, CHATELAINE BAGS
TOIliKT aud SHAVING CASES, auc
all kinds of fine LEATHER GOODS.
IN SEASON
AT
Post's Sea Food Market,
259 WARREN STREET,
Fresh Salmon, Blue Point Oysters,
Spanish Mackerel, Rockaway "
Frogs' Legs, Morris Cove "
Lake Bass, Shrewsbury "
White Fish. East River "
Smelts, Scollops.
And AlL.Other Kinds of Fresh Fish in
Season.
Pure Cod Liver Oil by the Bottle, Pint,
Quart or Gallon.
Telephone Call, 134 B.
irowEÎrrEÊGTBiGrH
A.N1) SUSPENSORY. PaienttJ Aua. 16, IS87.
Jmpr«*9<t Julv 80, 13ft·».
Dr. OWEN'S ELEC
TRO.QALVAMO
BODY BELT A *1'$
PESSORV Cure* ΛI
ltheuiuatlc Cou?i.um
Lumbago, General au
Nervou* Debility, Cot
tlveniK», Kidney I> i κ
caof", .Ncrvou*ni-iif
Trembling* fc» c· χ « α
· »)>>!,«>■ Exhaustion, W a«t lnj
or bo«l ν, Diseases cnnaed bv I ndc*eretlo;i
in Youth, Ajte, Murrled or Slnifle Life. a
diseases per- ÏiÇvS to the τοιηΙ> nr ge&ita 1 organs ο
main or ffbiale. 8ent to responsible purtle* οι
SO du.v# trial. Try a pair ■·<{ l>r. (>nni> EleetrJe In
PHee *1 per pair, alun un ELECTRIC TliCS:
AND BELT COMBINED. Sen.1 sc. poalaae tor free tl!u<
1/aUd pamphlet of 2i!4 pages, which will he Reni yen Id pl.V.t «e.tiï
;-n\flope. Mention» OWEN ELECTRIC BKLT .VN1
lb la paper. AdilrÉ-.s. f APPLIANCE COMPANY,
Open· nt all time*, dnv*. niehtsaml ^ιιιιιΐϋτ»,
026 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CïTY·
3Q6 Ν. BROADWAY. ST· LOUIS. W
JAMES P. HALL·,
DEALER IN
PLASTER. HAIR, SAND. FIRE BRICK. OHIO
DRAIN PIPE, unit every descrlptiou of
MASONS' MATERIALS.
AGENT FOR CABOT'S MORTAR COLORS AND
CARTERET PRESSED BRICK.
PRICES QUOTED ON APPLICATION*.
office and ) Sofliii Cove, root of Hsilerstiii street,
YARDS, ) Foot Of St. Pauls AVEBU3.
Telephone Call
J Ν CHANCERY OF NEW JERSEY.
To James J. Thornley and Harriot Λ. Thornley.
By virtue of an order of tho Court of Chancery of
New Jersey, made on the day of the date hereof, in
a cause wherein Barney N. Ferdon is complainant
and you are defendants, you are required to appear
and plead, answer or demur, to the complainants
bill on or before the second day of January next, or
that in default thereof, such decree will be made
against you as the Chancellor shall think equitable
and just.
The said bill Is filed to foreclose a mortgage given
by Adelina De Mott and James S. De Mott to Barney
N. Ferdon, dated the sixth clay of December in the
year one thousand eight hundred and seventy, on
lands in the township of North Bergen, in the
County of Hudson and State of New Jersey, ana
, you James J. Thornley are made a defendant be
; cause you claim to own said lands or some part
thereof, and you Harriet A. T hornley are made a
defendant because you are the wife of James J.
Thornley, and because of such marital relation
claim some Interest in said mortgaged premises.
WM. BRINKEKHuFF.
Solicitor of Complainant.
No. 1 Exchange Place, Jersey City. New Jersey.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE OF HENRY
Kehr, deceased: Henry Ewald, executor ol
Henry Kehr, deceased, by order of the Deputy Sur
rogate of Hudson county, dated November 2"), lSSi),
hereby gives notice to the creditorsof said decedent
to bring in their debts, demands and claims again s !
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of said
order, or they willTbe forever barred of auy action
therefor against sala executor.
HENRY EWALD.
LA W Y FAIS.
fTHOÎAÎ %±&Ϋί£Γoffi&'rfi
JL Court House. Jersey City Heights.
A LARGE STOCK
—. ow —
Rugs, Lace Curtains,
Clocks,
Rogers' Silverware,
AKL> OTHSR IMIUL
HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES,
FOX
CASH OR OH T1ML
Call uU liMnlM Them.
GEORGE E. WATSON,
61 lloatgo merj St.
HIGHEST PKICB PAID
OLD EOGKS MIES AND iERHRIES
BOUGHTI
13. Scarboro,
94 Montgomery St., J. C.
Few boots supplied at a liberal discount from ρ or
chasers' prices. Call or senl for bargain eatAlogu·
I el 76 pages; free to all on application.
MALLIET BROS.
(Crescent Jewelry Store;,
MAKERS A^'D IMPORTERS Of
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry
and OPTICAL GOODS,
76 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J.
Personai attention given to all prescriptions.
MARCUS HIGG1NB0TJIAM, OCULIST.
BURR BREWING CO.
LAGER BEER
j 227 West 18th Street,
NEW YORK.
Public Notice.
REPORT NO. 47 OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF
ADJUSTMENT.
Notice is hereby given that the com
missloners of Adjustment, in and for the city
of Jersey City, appointed by the Circuit Court of the
County of Hudson, under and by virtue of tho pro
visions of Chapter CXIL of the laws of 1886. entitled
"An act concerning the settlement and collection
of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess
ments and water rates or water rents
in cities of this State, aud imposing and
levying a tax, assessment and lien in lieu, and In
stead of such arrearages, aud to e-i force tho pay
ment thereof and to provide for tne sale of lands
subjected ιο future taxation and assessment,"
passed March 80, 1S86, have made, certified and
illed a report of their proceed fogs relating to and
anodins delinquent laud, described as follows, to
Block 021. lots 51 and 52, Hoadley avenue
Block 524, lot 2, Pavonia avenue
Block 3-8. lot 25. Wayne street
Block Î46, lot 253, Webster avenue
Block 412, lot D, Bergen avenue.
Bloc tes 524 and 525, lot 15, Summit avenue
Block 447. lot M, Will ton street
Block 8(51, lot :i, triangle 9, Zabriskle street
Block 801, lot 4, triangle 9, Zabrlskie street
Block 706, lot 22, Jefferson aveuue
Block 847, lot A, Grand street
Block S47, lot B, Grand street
Blocks livc9 and 1330, lots 8, i>, 10,11,12, Dwight street
Blocks 1329 and 133U, lots 13, 14. 15, 16, 17 and 18,
Dwight avenue
Blocks 13» and 1330, lots 19, 20, 21,22 and 23. Dwight
avenue
Blocks 1829 and 1330, lots 24, 25. 25. 27, 28, 29 and 30,
Dwight avenue
HI - 1 -l-îû o«.-J icon Into Ot OO 0·> Ο Ι 1- οι· l ο-,
Dwight avenue
BtocETTSST una 1390, luls 89, 29, 10, 41, 42 and 43,
Dwight avenue
Blocks 1829 and 133U, lots 44, 43, 46 and 47, Dwight
avenue
Block 1324, lots 46, 47 and 4S, Dwight avenue
Block 1320, lot* SO and 91, Dwight avenue
Block 9Γί8, lots 4 and 6, Tonnele avenue
Block 12i2, lots 9. lu. li and 12, Cator avenue
Block 12"2. lots 13, 14. 15. 16.17 and 18. Cator avenue
Block 12Î2, lots 1!) and 20, Dan forth avenue
Block 12*2, lots 23, 24. 25 and 26. Danforth avenue
Block 1272, lots 27 and 28, Danlorth avenue
Block 127:?, lots 141 and lia, Terbuue avenue
Bloc* 1273, lots 143.md 144, Terhune avenue
Block 1274. lots 116 and 117, McAdoo avenue
Block 1274, lots 118, 119 aud 120, McAdoo avenue
Block 427, lot 7, Wayne street
Block 510K lot 15, Randolph avenue
Block Γ.24, lot A, Pavonia avenue
Block 13.il, lots 5. C and 7. Dwigbt avenue
Block 1831, lots 8, 9, 10 and 11, Dwlvht· avenue
Block 460, lots 28, 29 and 80, Lafavette street.
Block 460, lot 27, Lafayette street
Block» 190 and 192. west 2-3 of lot 50, Montgomery
street.
Block 122. lot 21, IGatto avenue
Block 122. lot 22, Idaho avenue
Block 122, lots 23 and 24, Idaho avenue
Biock 712, part of lot 1, near Hoboken avenua
Block 712, part of lot 1. Ilobokeu avenue
Block 401, nlot A, Hoboken avenue
Dock 4U2, plot B. Hoboken avenue
Bio k 61», lot 43, York street
Block «9, lots 44 ana 45, York street
Block 101. loteT and 58, Grand street
Biock (il. lots lfc and 17, Harrison avenue
Block 703, lots 3 aud 4, Palisade avenu·1
Block 7"1, lots 27, 28 and 29, Jefferson avenue
Block 701. part of lot 26, Jefferson avenue.
Block 1383, lots 1 to 21, Fifty-third streec.
Block i:-.83. lots22 to 29, Avenue C.
Block 138.·., lots ;so to 47. Fifty-second street.
Block 1390, lot 20, Ocean avenue.
Block 1390, lots 1, 2 and 3, Avenue D.
ι Block 1390, lots 4. f> and 6, Fifty second street.
Block I3H0, tots S and 9, Fifty-second street
Block Ϊ3Λ», lots 12, 14, 16 and 18, Fifty-second street
Block 1390, lots 7. 9,11 and Itf, Thompson avenue
Block 1300, lots 15 and 17, Fifty-third street
Block 1300, lot 1H. Ocean avenue
Block 34!». lot 37, state street
Blocks 1388 and 13^», plot A. Fifty-third street
Block 238, lot 20r>, Grand street
I Block MS, lots 511, 512, 518, Congress street
Block 813, part of lot 514, Congress street
1 Block 401, lot 26 and part of 27, Pine street
Block 33'i and «7, plot C, Van Horn street
Block S 7. lot X. Halladay street
; Block 3 6. plot D, Canal street
Block >;*». plot a, Pacific avenue
r Block 3.-ή, plot B. Oyster Creek
Î Block 333, j lot K. Pacific avenue
Ana tne said Court has nxett Saturday, the 14th
' dav of ecember. 188!», at the Court House, In the
cltv of Jersey City, at ten o'clock in the forenoon,
ι the time aud place for bearing any objections
thai may be made to the assessments, charges and
ι liens fixed and certified by the Commissioners of
ι Adjustment in said report, when end where all
parties Interested therein may be heard.
Dennis Mclaughlin,
Clerk of the Circuit Court of the County of Hudson.
Dated Jersey City. N. J.. November 30. 13S!>.
NOTICE
το
Dealers and Merchants
Proposals for Groceries. Butter, Dry Goods,Hosiery
Notions, Hardware, Lime and Cement, Moat, Milk.
Eggs, Shoes, Paints and Oils, Wooden ware. Teas,
Vegetables. Tobacco, Provisions, Coal, Lumber,
Flour.Feed and other supplies for the use of County
Institutions and County Jail will be received by
tho Board of Chosen Freeholders of the County of
Hudson at their regular meeting.
THURSDAY, DEC. 19, 1889.
at three o'clock p. m., at which time there will be
opened the proposals for furnishing and delivering
at the county Storeroom, Snake Hill and County
ail. Groceries, Dry Goods, Hosiery, Notions,.Hard
ware, Lime and Cement, Meat. Milk, £ggs. Shoes,
Paints and Oils, Woodenware, Teas, Vegetables
Tooacoo, Provisions, Coal, Lumber, Flour, Feed and
other supplies, the delivery of which shall be free
to the County.
Bidders can obtaiu Information of all supplies
required upon application to the Clerk of the Board
next to the Court House, on or after December 12.
who will have printed detailed lists of supplies.
Contracts for all supplies to date from award and
terminate November 80, 1891».
Proposals to he on forms obtained of the Clerk>
j with guarantee bonds attached and to be sealed
: and endorsed with tho name of the bidder and na
ture of supplies. Noueotner will be received.
1 Samples of goods required can also be seen at the
office of the Board.
The Board reserves the right to reject any or all
bids if deemed for the best interest of the Coanty.
By order of. the Board,
JOm BOYD,
CLERK.
Mullins & Go.
(21,123 à 125 NEWARK AVENUE, J. C.
EVERYTHING FOR HOUSEKEEPING.
TheLMo1fRe"abie Cash or Credit House %*Χι stat*..
For the next thirty clays we have made SWEEPING REDUCTIONS in
all our goods. Purchasers can rely on securing
Genuine Bargains,
and will here find an elegant assortment oi useful and ornamental Household
Goods, the very best articles lor
HOLIDAY PRESENTS.
It will pay anyone to ckll and examine our extensive stock.
^URNITTIRE.
PARLOR SUITS.
elegant patterns in Tapestry, Plush or Brocatelle, 03S to $300
RECEPTION CHAIRS,
of excellent design and finish,
EASY CHAIRS in variety,
FANCY ROOKEBS.
in Plush, Reed, Rattan or Leather,
FANCY TABLES, in Cherry, Oak or Walnut,
PILLAR EXTENSION TABLES,
Oak or Walnut,
besides a full line of
Bookcases, Desks, Music Racks, Easels, Mantel Cabinets, Mirrors
Wardrobes, Chamber Suits, Folding Beds, Bedding, Lounges,
Sideboards, Rocking Chairs, Baby Carriages,
Stoves, Clocks, Glassware, See.,
all marked down to prices lower than ever.
CARPETS,
Our Carpets consist of the largest and most select assortment in the State
Note the prices:—
#4 to βΓ.Ο
to «45
&i5 to »4<)
to #30
ί£β to 873
Ingrains, Good Quality, - 35c. to si.oo Body Brussels,
Tapestries, Genuine, - 50c. to 81.10 Best Makers, 81.00 to 81.3Λ
Velvets, Handsome, -- 81.00 to 81.50 Moquettes, Fine ratterns, 81.25 to βΐ.βο
Rugs, Mats, &C. Wiltons, Choice, - - 81.35 to 81.7S
All these arc FIRST-CLASS GOODS from the Best Makers, a^fl GUARAN
TEED in every respect. The prices are better value for the same quality of
goods than those offered by any other honse in the trade.
OUR SPECIAL· HOLIDAY STOCK
will be found suitable for Christmas and New Year's Presents for Children °f
all ages, and at prices within the reach of all. The stock consists of
Velocipedes, Dolls, Carriages, Cradles, Sleighs,
Hobby Horses, Drums, Tool Chests, Shooflys,
Desks, Tables, Chairs, Pianos, &e., &e.
CREDIT.
We make the very best terms to those desiring credit, and purchasers
cannot fail to find everything satisfactory.
All Goods are Guaranteed as Represented.
MULLINS & CO.
Horse Cars from Hoboken, Erie and Pennsylvania Railroad Depots reach
our store.
RAILROADS,
Elle Railroad Time Table.
'PICKET OFFICES—101. 317. 713.937
1 Broadway, 153^g Bowery, 1 Bat
tery plftoo. Chambers street and
Twenty-third street ferries. Now
York: 331 Fulton street, Brooklyn;
107 Broadway, Williamsburg; cor
ner Newark and Hudson streets,
Hoboken. and new station Jersey
City, where tickets and parlor or
■ImdIsc ear reservations and orders for check
ing ana transfer of baggage can be obtained.
Trains leave Jersey City station as follows
l>i» a m.—Day Express, Pullman Buffet drawing
room coaches to Buffalo, connect at Hornellsviile
for Jamestown and Chautauqua Lake.
3-18 ρ m. daily—"Chicago and St. Louis Limited."
A solid Pullman train or day, dining and sleeping
coaches to Meadville, Youngstown, Marion and
Chicago without change. Pullman sleeping coaches
to Cleveland, Cincinnati and St. Louis. No extra
change for fast time.
h:18 p. m. dallv—Chicago and Grand Trunk Ex
firess. Solid Pullman train of day and Buffet sleep
ug coaches to Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Hamilton.
London, Lansing, Battle Creek, South Bend and
Chicago without change. Buffet sleeping coach to
Rochester, arrive 7::i» a. m.
ÉrftO p. m. daily—Chicago Express. Pullman Buffet
Sleeping coaches to Elmlra, Hornellsviile. James
town, Corry, Meadville, Youngstown. Cincinnati
and Chicago.
rotations on Orange Branch, week days, 9:15 a. m,
1253, 422, 6:27, 7.·ί'·Γ», 9:12, 11:45 p. m. Sundays, 9:45,
a m.. 142, 4 ,7, 627. 8:30, 10:12 p. m. Additional trains
to Prospect street, E. Orange, Washington street,
Orange, Llewellyn and Main streets, W. Orauge,
Orange. week days, 6:15, b23, 1123 a. m., 222.327,
4:52, 51'.). 550, 8:12. 1000 D. m.
Rutherford and Passaic, week days- 4:13. 5:00, 6:12,
7:12, 805, 9 4». 10:43 a. in.. 12:12 noon. 1:12, 2.02, :«W,
S 50. 4:30, 450, 5:52, 601, 629, 6:42. 7:15, 7:44, 9:15, 10.42,
p. in., 12:13 midnight. Sundays. 5i0, 8:90. 10:43, a. mu,
12:12 noon, 2:00, 320, 4:13, 5:20, 6:45, 7:44, 9,15, 1U:42 p. in„
12:13mldniaht. Additional trains to Passaic, week
daye, 8:21. 5:12. 529, G2u p. m.
Peterson, week days, 4:15, 500, 6:12, 7:12, 8Λ5, 9:43,
10:43 a m.. 12:12 noon, 1:12, 202, 8DS, 3:21, 3:45, 8SO,
4:12, 4.2U, 4:45, 4 50, 5:12, 5:29. 5:42, 552. 6.01, 6:20, 628,
6:42, 7:15, 7:44, S50, 9:15. 10:43 p. πι., 12:13 midnight.
Sundays. 500. 8:30, 10:48, 12:12 noon. 2.00, 820, 4.13,
5tfJ, 6:45, 7:44, 8:53, 9:15, 10>W p. m., 12:13 midnight.
Newark and Paterson via Newark, week days, 558,
654, 8.07, 10:20, 11:45 a m., 1.14, 2:15, 3:47. 4:35, 507, 5ΛΙ,
607, 6-37. 7:46. 10:15 υ. m.. 1'2:20 midnight. Sundays,
8:1:) a. m.. 3:47,6:47. 8:15. 10:15 p. m.
6:4
ïd5. 850,10:42 p. m. w__. .
10:43 a. m., 200, 4:13 and 6:45 p. m.. 12:13 midnight.
Also to Bidgewood, week days. 8:45 a. m.. 4:45, 5:3*
6:12,850 p. ra.; Suffern. 2:45 i>. m.
New burg ana Cornwall, week days, 8.Ό5, 9:30 a m.,
ξ:47, 4:14. 5:42 p. m. Srndays, iï30 a m., 2 p. m.
3:45, ·1:45, 5:42. 7:15. 83υρ. m. Sundays, 5.U0, 8:30. 9:2Ut
Λ. id., (5:45, 8:5U p. m.
Miadleto wn, weet day?. 5:00, 8:05, 9:20. 10:4S a.
1112. 8:13, 3:45, 6:18. 6:45, 8.50 p.m. Sundays, SsUOl 8d0k
li&ia. in., 3:18, 6:Id, 6.45, 850 p. ra.
Pt. Jervls, week days, 500, «a». 9:20, 10:13 a. m., 1:12,
3:18, 3:45, 4:4.), 6:16, 7:15, 830 p. ra. Sundays, 5:00. 8ΛΧ
«ίυ a. m., 3:13, 6:13, 6.45. 830 p. m.
Warwick, week days, 5:00, 9.20 a. m., 1:12, 4:45, p. ra.
Sundays. 8 30 a. m.
Montgomery, week days, 9:20 a. m., 3:45. 4.-45 p. ra.
Sundays. 9-20 a. in.
Exprès·* trains arrive at Jersey City from tde
West, 630, Τ.4υ a. m., 4:55, 035 p. m
KGRTHERN RAILROAD OF NEW JERSEY
Trains leave Jersey City station, Erie Railway
week days, for Englewood, Tenafly. Cloeter, Spar·
kill aud Nyack, 5:30, *7:15, 8:33, '10:27 and 11:42 a. ra.,
1345. S:12, 4:14. 51)5. 5:44, 6:22. *637, 8:15, 10:44 p. ni..
12.13 midnight. Sundays, 8:33, *>.47 a. m.. 1:45 4.14,
7:42 *8.27 p. m.
Additional trains to Creakill and way. 6:17, 7:4*
S:57, 9:57 a. TO., and 12:33, 1:22. 3:12, 5:14, 5:59 D. ra.
•For Νanno t. Spring Valley, Monsey andTallmans.
Nyack Express, ♦4.47.
NEW YORK AND GREENWOOD LA Κ Ë~R ATLr·
way. Trains leave Jersey City station, Erie
Railway, as follows:—
For Arlington, 6:15, 8:87, 9:30. 11:23 a. in., 12:18. 12:53,
2:04, 327. 3-52, 439, 5:27, 5:57, 6:35, 7:12, 837. 1U.12, 11:45,
12:16 p. m. Sundays, 9:12, a. ra., 1.42, 4:17, 6:27, 8:17;
6:45, 10:12 p. m.
Bloomfleld and Monte loir, week dare, 6:15, 8:37,
9:30, a. m.. 12:16, 2.04, S;52. 4:42, 4:59. 5:27, 537, 6:35, 7:12.
8ii7,10:12. 12:16 p. in. Sundays, 9:12 a. in., 8:17, 8:45
p. m.
Little Falls and intermediate stations, weekdays,
6:15, 8:87, 9:30 a. m., 12:16 noou, 332, 4:42, 439, 5:27,
537, 6:35, 7:12, 8:27. 12:16 p. m Sundays, 9:12 a. in,
8:17, 8:45 p. m. 2."04 p. ni.. Saturdays only.
Pompton, week days, 8:37, 9;30a. in., 4:42, 439,5:27,
635, p. m. Sundays, 9:12,10:15 a. m., S;17 p. m.
Greenwood Lake and intermediate stations, week
days, 8:87. 9:80 a. m., 4:42, p. m. Sundays, 9:18, 10:15,
a'W.* J. MURPHY, L. P. FARMER,
Gen'l Supt. tten'l Pose. Agi.
W EST SHORE RAILROAD.
sr. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. CO., Lessee.
Trains leave West Forty second street station. New
York, as follows, and twenty minutes earlier from
foot of Jay street, N. R.:
Chicago, Detroit, London, Hamilton. *9.55 a. m. and
*5 16, *S.15 j>. m. £>r. Louis, "5.15, 8.15 p. m.
Toronto. +9.55 a. m. aud +9.15, *8.15 p. ni.
Mom real, « anada East, *5.15 p. m.
Niagara Falls, Syracuse, Utica aud princlDal inter
mediate statious, 3.15. *9.55 a. m. au.i *5.55, *8.15 p.
m. (ana all.30 a. m. for Utica only).
Kluuston, Saugerties, Catakill, Albany, S.15, *7.15,
*9.2;-), all,80 a. TO,, sl.'JO. *5.15, Ή.15 p. m.
Newburg, *10.15 a. ni., 1.15, 4.15,5.35, ♦6.25, *11.45 p. m.
Haverstraw. S.25 a. in.. 2.45, 8.45 p. m.
Elegant sleeping cars for Buffalo, Niagara Falls,
Toronto, lietrolt, Chicago and St. Louis.
♦Daily. +Dally except .Saturda\s. Other trains
daily except Suuday. a. s. Leave Jersey Citv. P.
R. K. Station at all.30 a. m., «3.40 p. m.; Hoboken,
West Shore station, all.2ti a. ni., sS.46 p. in.
For tickets, time tables or information, apply at
offices:—Brooklyn, No. 333 Washington street, No.
72»» Fulton .street, Annex office, foot of Fulton st.;
New York City. Nos. 271,363, 785 and 942Broadway.
15SJ# Bowery, 12 Park place. (·8 West One Hundred
and Twenty fifth street aud West Shore stations,
foot of West Forty-second street aiyl foot oc Jay
street, N R.
Westcott's Express calls for aud checks baggage
from hotels and residences.
C. E. LAMBERT.
General Pa&senger Agent, No. 5 Vanderbilt avenue,
New York.
J
OB PRINTING.
CHEAPEST!
QUICKEST!
NEATEST!
ALL KINDS OF WORK DONE IN
THE MOST FINISHED MAN
NER AND AT THE MOST REA
SONABLE RATES IN THE
JOB DEPARTMENT
OF THE
Jersey
City
News
Eetabliahm»»·,
BILLHEADS.
LETTE RHEADS,
NOTEHEADS,
BUSINESS CARDS,
VISITING CARDS,
TICKETS,
INVITATIONS,
CIRCULARS,
HANDBILLS,
POSTERS and
LctiAL rnlNllNti
! OF EVERY DESCRIPTION TURN·
; ED OUT IN THE BESTSTYLS
AND AT SHORT NOTICE.
BRIEFS, CASES ON APPEAL A.ND
REPORTS OF TESTIMONY A
SPECIALTY.
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS Al' THJS
OFFICE OF THE
Jersey City News,
Ko.80 MOTOOMRY ST RT LWeidoc Building^
JERSEY CITY.
Daft Electric Light Co.,
115 BBOADVAY, Ν. V.
TATIOMRY ELECTRIC MOTORS. ELECTRIC RAILWAYS
, AND POWER STATIONS. STORAGE BAKERIES.
CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH
PENNYROYAL PILLS.
lied Croas Diamond Brand.
The only reliable pill r Mje. 8sfe
surf Laillea* ask DrugrUt foC4i.e Ola·
mond Brand· in red meiallio boxet, scaLf*
wiih blœrlbboâ. Takenoother. 8*nd4e«
(stamp·) for particular* and 44 Relief for
Ladle»" te Utter, by raaiL >'<***« Pavtr.
Chlcheater Chemical Co., Madlaou Su.. Fhilada* rfc
S'lEA31 BOATS.
, A LI. FARKS iiËmîCÉD VU'stSnÎSS
ι TON LINE—The inside route; Hoston, S3i Pror
| ldenedfr $2.Λ; Worcester, $:.'.Λ0. Su-auuern Rhode
ι Island and ilassaehuaetts leave Hew FVm-36, Ν. H.,
I one bIoc& above Canal street. al OJ y. m., buildup*
I excepted.

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