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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, December 16, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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- THE —
Jjemyi (£itrj HUtos.
JAMES LUBY. Editor
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
BY
THE NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY
OFFICE, Ko. SO Moxtooukry Street
(W1LDON BUILDING. )
Thf. Jersey City News:— Single copies, iwr
cents; subscription, six dollars per year ; postage
free
The Sunday Morning News:—Published every
Sunday morning: single copies, three cents; sub
scription. ono dollar and fifty cents per year
postage free.
Entered in the post office ai Jersey City as
ικκοηά class mail matter
All business communication» should be ad
dresnea to The News Publishing Company; all
others to the Managing Editor.
BRANCH OFFICES:
Advertisement®. Subscriptions and NewsdeaJ
ers' Orders received: —
Hobokkn—First and Clinton Streets. .7. D. Sin
clair.
Union Hill·—H. Fischer. No 62 Palisade Avenue
Bergen Point—T. W. Dobson, opposite Railway
Depot.
Five Corners—G. W. Pfeiffer, No. 663 Newark
Avenue.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 16. 1889
I The Jersey Cm News,
AVERAGE
DAILY
CIRCULATION,
<4?
thy/
HICH WATER MARK,
44,600 COPIES
— IN SIX DAYS.
The Sunday Morning News
.-- ! HIGH
©β,.' I WATER
MARK,
LARGEST CIRCULATION
IK HUDSON COUNTY.
This paper is Democratic in principles
and is independent in its views on all
local Questions.
Lovkrs of children should not lose
the chance of doing something for the
little ones at the Children'# Home.
Mr. C. J. Peshall sets the best sort of
example with his subscription of $10
to buy them Christmas presents. Who
■will be tbe next to join the roll of
UUUU1 ι
Jacky Lynch.
"Jacky" Lynch has got so accus
tomed to violate the law that he
thinks he is merely exercising his
rights as a citizen in doing so. Thus
when the police raid his place, he
meets them with forcible resistance as
if he were repelling an unlawful ag
gression, and when he has to succumb
to superior strength he casts around
to find some explanation of his case
as one whose views and theories of life
were rudely shattered and destroyed
by the ruthless hand of injustice.
He cannot realize that his arrest is
the result of breaking the law. It is
true he keeps his bar open on the Sab
bath against the law; it is true that
he makes his dance hall a meeting
place for dissolute men and women—
or worse, for dissolute men and foolish
girls. But these things are of no con
séquence in his mind. He cannot re
alize that they cairy a penalty with
them. He must seek further for an
explanation of the evil that has over
taken him.
And a precious explanation he
evolves. Polit ics, he cries, politics
are the cause of my suffering. I am a
martyr to the cause of political treach
ery. How absurd is this. The fellow
has been outraging good order and
corrupting the morals of men and
■women all his life, and now that
retribution overtakes him he must
pose as a political martyr. No, no.
Jacky it won't do. You are in the
toils at last, and no vain pleas of this
sort will excite the public commiser
ation.
The dnly wonder is that Chief Mur
phy did not close this vile place long
ago. It was fully exposed in The
Subday MoitJUU .N'kws, and it was
notorious in the neighborhood it dis
graced. But we presume the Chiei
desired to havo a clear case and was
collecting evidence. Sometimes it
takes the police a long time to move,
but, we observe, they generally get
mere au iue saine.
Engine No. 42 on the Susquehanna
end Western Railroad killed three
men at Little Perry.
Train No. 42 on the P. R. R. killed
three men at Taconl.
Engine No. 42 on the P. W. & B.
killed three men near Baltimore.
Let us see, 3 into 42; ahem, 14, not
13 times—that is strange.
Thb work of the chopper now
makes the political woods resound.
Little Mr. Large has got to work.
The Race Problein in the South.
The New York Press, a petty Re
publican print of the warpish kind, is
in a fearful state of mind because
Henry W. Grady, at the Merchants'
Annual Dinner in Boston, declared
that the South would not consent to
be governed by negroes. It may be
that Mr. Grady's way of putting the
case ίε somewhat more rhetorical than
reasonable; but it may perhaps bring
the editor of the Press to his senses to
ask him whether he would like to see
the negro element obtain in a NorUi
ern State the same ascendancy with
which the Republican party desires
to endow it in the South.
In the Northern States it is easy foi
us all to take a philosophical view ol
: the race question. The negro element
: ie trifling in our population, and it can
1 by no possibility acquire any special
j influence in the government of us. In
i the South, at least in some States, the
, white population stands in daiiger of
ι being dominated by the black, by
I sheer force of numbers.
I Theoretically, of course, the major
j ity rules, without distinction of race.
! coior, or previous condition of servi
tude. but we do not seem to think
that it would be pleasant to us. or
advantageous to the country that the
colored element, say in New Jersey,
by sheer procréât)veness should as
sume control of us and our affairs,—
should rule us and represent us as its
ignorance might dictate.
We have not observed that Republi
cans themselves specially like this
! sort of thing. In fact the South ac
j euses them with great show 01' jus
j tice. of repressing the negro with cold
j disdain, wholly foreign to the patri
archal spirit of the sometime Con
federate States. The race problem is
one of exceeding difficulty. It is evi
dent on the one hand that the limita
tion of the constitutional rights of
the colored citizen is a hopeless
proposition, while on the other hand
it will appear an outrageous anomaly
to all sensible people that in liis
present condition of undeveloped
mentality he should become the rul
ing factor in a state possessing hun
dreds of thousands of white citizens,
among the most enlightened and high
spirited of the human race.
The Republican Press may rave,
but at least sympathetic considéra,
tion of the situation will result from
Mr. Grady's outspoken definition
of it.
We hope those who were longing
for snow feel happy this morning.
The large number of real estate
transactions which we publish every
Monday, shows how steady is the
movement of population and business
in the direction of this city.
AMUSEMENTS.
"Faust up to Bate."
The receptiou accorded to the London
Gaiety Theatre Company on tile produc
tion of the burlesque entitled "Faust up
to Date," at the handsome Broadway
Theatre, New York, on lust Tuesday
evening, indicates a successful engage
ment. In ensemble this company is dis
tinctly handsomer than the one which
was in this country last season, and
"Faust up to Date" is a much better bur
lesque than either "Esmeralda" or
••Mor.te Cliristo, Jr." The piece is ad
mirably put on the stage, and the
choruses, dances and tableaux are all
well manged. The production, as a
whole, takes high rank. Costumes so
beautiful, colors so exquisitely blended
are seldom seen on tnis side of the At
Miss Grace Pedley, a remarkably pretty
woman, who pluvs the part of Margaret,
spoke the lilies of tier part iu a most fas
dilating aud delightful manner. She
possesses a sweet voice of considerable
range. Mr. E. J. Lonnen (Mephisto
pheles), is a well known aud popular
comedian on the other side, and, judging
from his performance of the other even
ing, is quite likely to make a lasting im
pression on Americans. He danced ex
ceedingly well and rendered his liues
with clearness, and his fun making was
greatly relished. Charles Danby, who
was here last year with the first company,
was very droll as Valentine; his efforts
were real clever comedy, and were appre
ciated by the immense audience preseut.
The dancers—a la Lettie Lind and Sylvia
Gray, the avant-courriers of their pecu
liar style—were four in number, Misses
Edith Raynor, Florence Levey, Lillian
Price, Maude Wiluiot, and fornimbieuess,
flexibility, high kicking, grace aud rapid
ity of motion they certainly deserve to
take high rank among "saltatorialists."
Marie Hubert From it η.
Marie Hjibert Frohman's engagement
at the Academy of Music opens tonight.
There is unusual curiosity to see this
young actress, because she is represented
as possessing a remarkable originality, as
well as a careful artistic training. Her
manager says that she is a geuius, and he
lias apparently good grounds for this
statement—which is not always the case
with managers' laudatory utterances.
Mrs. Frohman will be supported by an
exceptionally strong and well selected
company. An attractive double bill will
be presented. It includes the brilliant
comedy "False Charms" and the beauti
ful poetic idyll "King Rene's Daughter."
Appropriate scenery, handsome costumes
and good music will enhance the beauty
of the entertainment. The performance
is under the personal supervision of Mr.
Gustave Froliman.
PERSONAL AND NOTABLE·
The family of Lewis D. Cook, one of the man
agers of Barnum & Bailey's Ehovv, live iu New
ark, Mr. Cook being in London with tbe show.
Friday morning, for the second time in a month,
the house was robbed while the family was
asleep. The first visit was on November 15,
when a cloak worrb $350 was stolen. Friday the
thieves secured diamonds, jewelry aud wearing
apparel worth about $:i,5uQ.
The New Jersey Trotting Horse Breeders'
Association met at Trenton, Wednesday.
It was decided to hold the next trotting meet
ing at the Inter-Mate Fair Grounds, which
were ottered free of charge. The admission
will he free. A committee, consisting of
Jacob Kiotz. of Belle Meade; Ira Killbourne,
of Newark, and A. G. Sargeant, of Somer
ville, was appointed to preseut a request from
the association to the incoming Legislature
to appropriate φΐ,υυυ or ^,υυυ ιο oe added
! to the premium purse of the association.
I The following officers were elected;—President,
j J. W. Ballautine, of Somerville; vice president,
George Wilder, of New Egypt; secretary, Col
onel Edwards, of Newark; treasurer, Charles
Bassine, of Newark; executive committee, 'Γ. K.
Dunbar, George Wilder, R. B. Konover, Edward
Bergeu, Ira Sargeant and James Collies.
New iron works may be erected on the prop
erty ou Railroad avenue, Newark, recently pur
chased by Mayor Barnert, which was formerly
the Union Bolt Works, and the adjoining lots.
William W. Evans has the erection of such an
establishment in view.
The church organ fever seems to have visited
Morristown of late with great force. St. Peter's
j has one of the finest in the Slate, costing nearly
' $9.000 The Baptists have lately placed a good
j organ in their bouse of worship; the Church of
! the Redeemer expect to have a fine new instru
j ment within a few months to ecst nearly $5.000;
the Methodists propose to buy a $4,500 fnstru
! ment very soon, and the South Street Church
are ta-king of getting α new organ to cost six or
seven thousand dollars.
An adjourned meeting of the trustees of the
j Monument Association was held in the office of
j the Gas Light Company, New Brunswick, last
: Thursday. Mr. R. L. Hoagland occupied the
chair and Mr. Fred Weigel acted in the capacity
of secretary. Among the trustees present were
ι Coionei Newell. Robert Carson, J. N. Terrill and
John N. Carpendyr. Messrs. H. L. Janeway
and V. M. W. Suydam, who had been appointed
j to collect the money promised by various per
\
sons for the purchase of a lot ou which to build
: the proposed monument, rendered a report.
! Their statements were of a satisfactory nature,
i as nearly all the money had been secured,
amounting to $8,000. and there now remains but
about $400 to collect. The sum of $5,800 re
! presents the actual cost of the site, and with the
j unprecedented amount of $3,000 collected in one
week, it uowjreinains for a little under $400 to be
; raised. This is the largest amount ever collected
i iu New Bruuswiek for ono object.
ι An event quite unusual in Asbury Park will be
j the opening of a winter hotel on Friday, Decem
i bertfO. On that day the new Ocean Hotel will
: be ready for guests, and we understand that
I most tit the rooms have been booked several
weeks in advance.
The Young Republican Club of Newark has
j elected James E. Howell president. The club
will soon take possession of its handsome new
1 house in Park Piace.
Mrs. George B. McCiellan, who has been visit
I ing in Orange for the past week, has consented
i :o allow a large number of buuting trophies,
j now iu storage with Colonel Ε. H. Snyder, to be
' used in decorating the Armory there. There are
i η number of deer heads and antlers in the col·
j iecrion.
.Marion Bright, age fourteen, and W. R. Wil
liamson, seventeen, who eloped Irom Wilming
ton. Del., were married In Camden Wednesday.
The bride was a schoolgirl. They returned
home, were forgiven, and are living with the
bride's parents
The New Jersey State Veterinary Association
held its quarterly meeting at Newark last week.
There was'some discussion of t.Uenew Veterinary
Surgeons' Registration bill. The president was
instructed to appoint a committee of five to
prosecute all veterinary surgeons who are prac.
tlcing without being registered.
Captain C. H. Miles, now a resident of Atlan
tic City, was the officer in charge of Jefferson
Davis when he was a prisouer at Fortress Mon
roe. Clement M. Clay, Vice President of the
Confederacy, and General Fitz Hugh Lee were
prisoners there at the same time. Davis was
given food on a tin plate with only a spoon to
efct it with through fear that he would commit
suicide if given a knife or fork. He dashed it to
the floor and exclaiming "I am not a dog,"
grabbed the gun of the sentinel and almost
wrested it from him. He was placed in irons.
U.> Ulo «Molttnn ΐΜ,ιηΙν ami K(t«- ni.
toward his captors.
The reference in The Jersey City News to the
wife of Anarchist Shevitch as a countess, stirs
up the Dispatch to tell the following: interesting
story about her: —
She is a Princess by right of her husband being
a Rnssian Prince. She is in her own right a
Polish Duchess of high renown. When she was
a mere girl her great beauty dazzled the eyes of
all who saw her. She was in love with a noble
man. but she had auother intense admirer. Goth
could not have her, so she agreed that, like
gallant knights, they should fight a duel for her
alabaster hand. They fought, and her heart's
love fell. She was in honor bound to wed the
slayer, so she married him out of pity. He was
sick'y, and soon died. Then she was short of
cash, and having a beautiful head of golden hair,
a winsome face, a willowy figure, and ecstatic
grace and fullness of limb, she went on the stage
as a dancer. She is now a clever newspaper cor
respondent, and lives in happiness with a
devoted husband, a monkey, a dog and a parrot
at the Park Hotel. Hoboken, where wealth is
tabooed as a vulgar tyranny and anarchism is
considered the coming millenium.
RAILROAD NOTES.
The Chambers street bridge, TOO fee
long, over the Pennsy lvania Railroad a
Trenton has been finished. It cost $64,000
of which the connty and the railroad
company each paid one-half.
The Morris and Essex Railroad Em
ployees' Mutual BenefitJAssociation, dur
ing the last three months has paid $3,
210.31 for benefits, and still has $7,221.41
in the treasury.
Ground has been offered to the Dela
ware. Lackawanna and Western Railroad
for the erection of a new depot on the
Bloomfield branch between Park and
.Springdale avenues. Superintendent
Reasoner is in conference with President
Slnnn nvor tli « nr>r>onfii nno nf tVit» nffoi·
Sixty feet more will be added to the
length of the Hoboken passenger train
sheds in the spring, and the old office
building will be torn down.
The Central Railroad's sidings at Junc
tion and at Clinton are filled with coal,
the company being unable to have it un
loaded at Elizabethport and Port John
son.
A railroad meeting was held at Mend
ham, .Morris county, last week, and the
mauy promises of the ϋ., Ij. & W. was
thrown overboard. The people decided
to cast their lot with ex-Congressman
Pidcock's branch of the Jersey Central—
the Rockaway Valley road.
It is stated that the new ferryboat Ber
gen, on the Hoboken line, while a distinct
success in economy as well as in comfort
to her passengers, has taught engineers a
lesson in the characteristics of triple-ex
pansion engines for which they were not
prepared. The third cylinder, it appears,
is of no use in so short a run as that from
Barclay street to Hoboken, for it does not
get warmed up to an efficient working
heat after leaving a slip until it has
reached the other slip, and must be cooled
off by the shutting off of the steam. Two
new ferryboats, having propellers atench
end, as the Bergen has, but with modified
engines, will be built next year by the
company.
The workshops of the old Camden and
Amboy Railroad at Bordentowu, N. J.,
which were abandoned when the Penn
sylvania Railroad absorbed the Camden
aud Amboy nearly twenty years ago, are
about to be reopened. The original plant
\vas built in 1831. There are nine brick
buildings. A. H. King, of New York,
has been using one ot the buildings for a
couple of years as a store house. He has
leased the whole property for twenty
years, and in the spring he will have the
necessary repairs made and machinery
put in for building locomotives aud cars.
It is said that he intends principally to
continue ou a big scale his particular
business of buying up. repairing and sell
ing second-hand rolling stock. There is
a good deal of profit in this business, and
.Mr. King has few competitors. The KiUR
Locomotive and Car Works is the name
of the new concern, and it has a capital
stock of $1,000,000. It will give employ
ment to 500 or 000 men. John Heddina,
who was recently superintendent at the
Rogers locomotive Works in Patereon,
» ml for a lomr t ime Master Mechanic of
the New Jersey Railroad and Transporta
tion Company, will have charge of the
works.
Knginecrs In the ernuloy of the Dela
ware, Lackawanna & Western have re
cently surveyed three routes for a rail
way between Caldwell and a point on the
Boonton branch.
The Central Railroad Company has
commenced to erect a new ferry slip at
Pier H on the New York side.
Contractor Kelly, of Jersey City, has
begun work on one of the new tunnels to
be built under the canal at Greenwood
avenue, Trenton. Two new tuunels are
to be built, one north and the other south
of the nresent tunnel. The north tuunel
is the one.on which work is to be begun.
Excavations will be made and the work
forwarded as rapidly as possible during
the next two weeks. Then navieation in
the canal will close, and it is intended to
have the work flnished By spring. When
the new tunnels are completeu the two
new tracks through the city will be
built, which will about finish the four
track system of the Pennsylvania Com
pany between Philadelphia and New
York.
It is rumored that the N. Y.. S. & W.
R. R. Co. intend to build a now line to
shorten the run of their coal trains The
new line, as the survey runs now, leaves
Butler and runs across the mountain, at
the point known as the Gap, and from
there in a direct line to Pat ergon, thus
saving the long run through Bergen
county.
Edwards' Men in the Union.
It is currently reported that Eilwarils"
the Sixth street livery man, has at last
Sermitted his men to join the Coach
irivers Association.
; Λ lUmrS COURTESY.
I HE LOUES HIS LIBERTY TO S.4.V1
A. 11'OM A X.
A Story Which Shows tliat Total De·
pravlty Is Not So Common as Οτιι
Miyht Think—Prettv Chinese Girl·.
How stVnngely the good and bad inter
' mingle in the breast of man is strikinglj
shown by the train of circumstances at
tending the recapture of Smith, the train
robber, who Is now awaiting trial in tho
county jail. In March last he, iu company
with three others, robbed the eastern
bound Atlantic and Pacific express a!
Canyon Diablo, and a month afterward,
after one of the longest chases on record,
the party was captured by Sheriff O'Neii
and posse in Utah. AVhile on the return
trip to Arizona Smith effected his escape
by jumping from a car window on the
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe while the
train was rapidly descending the Raton
Mountains in New Mexico.
He at once struck out for Texas, taking
horses wherever the opportunity present
ed and riding them as lone as they were
able to carry him. Ou the afternoon of
the ninth day, while in the Panhandle,
near Veruon. Smith discovered η wo(n«n
aimlessly wandering over the prairie, and
recognizing the fact that she must be lost
or iu trouole, he rode up and accosted
iter. She informed him that she had been
lost two days, during which time she had
gone without food. Knowim: that iu her
emaciated condition she could not possi
bly survive much longer without assist
ance, Smith, the escaped train robber,
fleeing though he was to escape trial fora
crime the penalty of which was death,
and still carrying on each lea his broken
shackles, bethought him of a windmill
he had passed some eight miles back, and
putting the woman on his horse, conduct
ed her to it.
Ile lett her, and riding along the wire
fence that enclosed the windmill for live
or six miles, until he discovered the camp
of the men employed to keep it in repair,
he informed them of the woman's condi
tion. They at once saddled, and, although
the night was nearly gone, started at once
for the windmill, and found the woman—
a young school teacher—weak, but still
alive, and at once brought her to a place
where she was cared for. At daybreak
the Sheiff and posse in pursuit of Smith
met the same men, and, Hulling from their
account and description iu wulch direc
tion the fugitive had gone, pursued him.
Before high noon they had overtaken
him. and Smith, the train robber, who,
less than twenty-four hours before, hau
turned from his way to succor an unfor
tunate woman, was shot from his saddle
while resisting au arrest which he might
have prevented by avoiding the delay and
observation so detailed. The story is
good enough to have a moral, but doubt
less Smith, who is now in the couutv jail
awaiting trial for his life on account of
it, fails to discover it.—Pregcott (Ark.)
Journal.
Pretty Chinese Girls.
Chinese girls have, not infrequently,
pleasing faces; but this applies particu
larly says a writer in the Quiver, to those
of the middle aud upper classes. The
younger children wear their luxuriant
raven tresses twisted into a heavy pipit
hanging down behind, secured with
many yards of scarlet cord. Up to the
time of marriage, girls part their hair
smoothly at the forehead, as a sign of
their single estate; but when the wed
ding day arrives, the young bride's hair
is drawn back, and all the short hairs are
pulled out by tweezers, with the idea of
making her forehead appear broad and
high. With regard to dress, a Chinese
girl is little troubled by any considera
tion of fashion. There is a slight differ
ence. scarcely apparent to Western eyes,
in the cut of the costumes of the girls and
women of different provinces; but, speak
ing generally, the same attire is worn by
the aged grand-dame aud her year
old grand-daughter, by the man
darin's child aud the daughter of
a poor coolie. Their clothing dif
fers, not in shape, but in the material
of which the garments are composed aud
the manner in which they are ornament
ed. With reference to this question of
dress, a well-known American mission
ary iadv, who has lived and worked many
years in China, writes;—-'-In one thing
the Chinese woman is exceptionally
blessed—she has inherited from former
generations a style of dress at once mod
est, economical ana becoming. it takes
but eight yards of yard-wide cloth for a
complete suit of winter garments, and
there is no waste in cutting nor In un
necessary appendages. Its truest econ
omy, however, is in that saving of mental
worry which comes from always cuitiug
by the same pattern ana the obviation of
all need of fitting. It allows unrestricted
play to every muscle, is of the same thick
ness over the whole body, is not in the
way when at work, and it has little
weight, while it has all the needful
warmth." Probably some American girl
reader may hold different opiuions upon
this subject, and thiuk there are two
sides to this, as to most other matters.
AVhy Mrs. Wallace Shut the Door.
In patriotism Mrs. Lew Wallace and
her husband stand shoulder to shoulder,
differing only in his wearing the straps.
She had need of all her courage in some
of their hair grizzling experiences in New
Mexico, when her husban^ was Governor
there. They found border Vufflauism in
all its pristine glory, and General Wal
lace set about breaking uu the business.
One of a gang who boasted that he had
killed a man for every year he had lived
(ne was then twenty-one) pledged his
word and honor as a desperado that he
would track Wallace till he had shot him.
With so much at stake they played very
earnestly, and Ben Hur "wore bis beaver
up" and pistol cocked for him. Finally
he took lodging at the same hotel, and at
night General Wallace closed the door of
his room. His wife, speaking of the heat,
opened it and he quietly said, "It's best
not to have it open is in the
house watching his chance to shoot me."
We can fancy the alacrity with which
aha then shut the door and that t he prob
ably corked the keyhole, as Miss Peck
sniff did the wine bottle, with a curl
paper. With ritle at hand and pistol mi
ller his pillow, Governor Wallace lay
down and slept, better than his wife did,
you may besure.—Ladles' Hume Journal.
What Women Should Wear Greek Gowna.
Certain women should wear on all pos
sible occasions Greek gowns—women of
statuesque build and classical inuld; it is
themselves in tailor madewraps aud Ked
tera suits; but there are others who
would look like Titauia in lioadicea's
armor If they dared to depart from pre
vailing precepts, says a writer in Dress.
No woman should ask her dressmaker
what she ought to wear. From her she
may seek ideas, but they should be modi
lied by seif to individual needs. If one
does not know what her individual re
quirements are, let her hunt the art gal
leries, study there the nearest approach to
personal idiosyncrasies the portraits re
veal and evolve suggestions.
Λ Shrewd Maine Dressmaker.
One shrewd Maine dressmaker has hit
upon a lucky idea, and is thriving on it.
Wheu ladies coma to her with the goods
to make up an ordinary worsted dress,
she asks:—"Will you havo it made to feel
like silk or wool?" The owner of the
dress naturally inquires into the mean
ing of the question. "It is «11 in the
lining. 1 can give you a lining that will
rustle like silt aud that will make you
think whenever you touch it that it is
silk, aud it will only cost you thirty ceuts
a yard." The fancy of the patron is
caught by the alluring prospect of having
her woollen dress rustle Vike silk, and
she leaves an order for this cloud with a
silver liuiug.
Thought It tVas η Lady's House.
A few years ago a strange mistake was
made in New York society. Two ladies
of the same name gave an entertainment
I within a few doors of each other's houses.
I Many persons got into the wrong house.
\ .
5 2 NEWARK AVENUE.
HEADQUARTERS FOR HOLIDAY PRESENTS.
r '» · - ',t!i .
You can buy two presents from us for what yc.u will
pay for one elsewhere.
WE ARE SHOWING AN ELECANT LINE OF '
FANCY METAL AND PLUSH GOODS.
j PLUSH and LEATHER
PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS,
! In a great many styles, from
79c. to S7.30.
The one we offer for
#1.10 is worth $2.25.
It is made of Silk. Brocaded and Plain Plush,
ι with Fancy Metal Mountings.
TOILET CASES,
' Jewel Cases, Manicure Cases, Nut Cases. Salad
Cases, Sewing Cases, Smokers1 Cases, Shaving
Cases, Stationer)· Cases, Handkerchief and
Glove Cases, etc., in a great variety, ranging in
price from
COc. to S10.00.
STATIONERY
ί
» IN
FANCY ΡΛΓΕΙΪ and PLUSH BOXES,
! 'FROM
7c. to *«,00 a BOX.
Autograph Albums from 2Bc. to $5.00.
Vie have an excellent one' for 2#c. It is Silk
Flush, with Fancy Metal Mountings. ·
ι ii xjif affair, sifj
DOLLS. DOLLS. DOLLS.
In any Quantity or in any Style, in all Sizes and Ages.
Sleeping Dolls, Bisque Head, Kid Body,
25c.: worth T5c.
HANDKERCHIEFS.
ΛΙΙ-Linen, Hemstitched, Initial, 90c., H
dozen in a box.
You can select your Β and kerchiefs and
placed in Fancy Boxes as low as 33c, a
dozen.
MUFFLERS AT 75c. TO 83.00.
JEWELRY.
Scarf Pins in Gold and Silver.
Lace Pins in Gold and Stiver.
Kings in Gold aud Silver.
Earrings in Gold and Silver,
Bracelets in Gold and Silver.
Christmas Tree Ornaments.
j Lar<te Size, Bisque Head, Kid tlociy Lion,
98c.; worth «11.50.
UMBRELLAS.
,· You must see our line of Umbrellas. Ali the
j latest styles of bandies. You can find α grand
selection of them both for Ladies and Gents
From #1.G3 to 87.00.
LEATHER 60QDS.
The assortment is complete.
Chatelaine and Hand Bags,
I Pocket Books, Purses,
Music Rolls
Made of all kinds of Leather.
I CHRISTMAS CARDS.
I Candles, lôc. a box (72).
ineu y uu wujib tu nop v»v ^777·
worth &J.50.
JUVENILE BOOKS.
In all the New Publications, ' "
jfrom 19c. to S 1.2 5
Full Illustrated Stiff Cover Book for
ii'-ic. : Worth 4Pc. ·
BUSS WARL /
Colored Glasses, Qç. each.
Wine Sets, ?5c. and upward.
Lemonade Sats,. 88c. and upward.
Decanters, 15c, and upward
BISQUE FIGURES /
In pretty styles from l^c., 18c., 25çJf, S8o.t 57c
and upward.

Elegant Line of Slippers for Everyone.
GOODS DELIVERED FREE TO ALL PARTS OF HUDSON COUNTY.
CH AS~ i: FUR ST.
The hostess who gained that day the ad
miring comments of all New York wa
the one who received perfect strangers as
if they were her best friends and made
them her friends by that gracious recep
tion. She know how awkwardly they
would teel when they found out their
mistake: she did all she could to prevent
their feeling awkward while with her.
The other lady, less well bred, said to a
person who had come into her house
under a mistake. '"I think you have got
into the wrong house."
"Yes, madame, I have," said he, "I
thought before I entered it that this was
a lady's house."
It was a terrible revenge, but, under the
circumstances an entirely justifiable one.
Almost Equal to Pantaloon».
Firat X get a pattern of the ordinary
trouser, goring it to the top to fit. the
form. Then I have two skirts, one reach
ing from the knee to the ankle, the other
from about six inches above the knee to
the ankle, and over these I wear a short,
light overskirt, also ankle length. They
are all trimmed with lace. So I have, in
fact, three light skirts, all independent of
one another, and meeting at the ankle. I
find that for my purpose they are both
modest and comfortable. I use silk or
light muslin 01· American cheese cloth,
and in private I flud black surah a good
material.—Kosina Vokes in San Fran
fiuon T>nst
CHRISTIAN WOKRNKB CAMP.
l iivst Annual Keoeption Held In the As
sembly Room*, Hoboken.
The first annual reception of Christian
Woerner Camp No. 1, Sons of Veterans
was held at the Assembly Rooms in
Hoboken Saturday night. It wasasuccess.
The grank march was Darticipated in by
about seveuty-flve couples, and was
led by Charles F. Koster and Miss
Roeie Foster. Among the many
present were Fred. Hulbig and
Miss May Martin, W, T. Baruey and
Miss Tillie Conk, W. Shaefer ana wife,
George J. Weaver and lady, h. Λ'οη
Schreudorf and lady, George Payne and
lady, Charle» P. Ahreus and wife,
Thomas Martie and lady, L. J. Hucfle
and wife, L. Detmering and lady, Wil
liam Schneider and Miss Frida Schla
mig, Charles Brufjgemau and lady,
George Hall and Miss Stumpf, William
Acker and wife, William Harrison aud
lady, William Howe and Miss Louisa
Drewes, also delegations from Elizabeth
Camp No. 3 Sous of Veterans, Putereoa
Camp No. 8 and Woerner Post G. A. R.
iN(i. 81.
The floor was under the able manage
ment of Charles F. Koster, assisted oy
William T. Baruey. George \V. Payne, F.
Schneider, William Headberg, Fred. Hul
big, R. Clausen and T. J. Martie. ljiviug
stou Conkllug was chairman of the follow
ing Reception Committee:—G. P. Alliens,
George J Weaver, Wilhelm Sehaefer, E.
Eindetueyer, E. Von Shoendorf, L. J.
Halle, C. F. Dougherty. W. F. Keich
melter, W. E. Parport- and Ν. B. Kueline.
mm CUKISÏ'AIAS Uins.
A Flue Display at Furst's Great Store on
Newark Avcnne.
The all important question just at pres
ent is what one shall give for Christinas
presents, and an even more important
question is where to buy such articles as
one desires. A visit made to the large
handsome store of Charles S. Furst ou
Newark avenue can not fail to satisfac
torily settle the. questions. Everything
one may possibly desire in the line of
Christmas articles are displayed here in
great profusion.
The large windows are artistically ar
ranged and in them the goods are most
attractively displayed. The interior of
the store has assumed a holiday appear
aace and many gay and pretty decora
tions are seen in all parts of the building.
In the direct line of Christmas goods
there is a great variety. Pretty Christmas
cards from a cent and a half up, and bet
ter still little booklets with fine engrav
ings and appropriate verses, all sorts of
Christmas tree ornaments, miraculous
talking dolls, novel designs in perfumery
bottles and cases, many unique styles of
braes ornaments and Japanese ware, und
cups and saucers of every kind and de
cription are all prettily displayed and
selling at moat reasonable prices. Kid
: cloves and many styles and qualities of
: handkerchiefs always a welcome gift to a
lady, and fine silk mufflers for gentlemfen
are being made a specialty of. This firm
is also selling Hue stationary, shaving,
smokine, toilette, sewing and manière
ι sets in plush boxes, handsome albums in
ι man}' new styles, wine and lemonade sets
: excellent wa.e. umbrellas, canes, liaijd
| Dnintod placques, bisques and many nov
i
elties carefully selected us appropriate
gifts for this, the best of holidays. The
regular tlrygoods and millinery depart
ments are not neglected and both are
carrying a line assortment. It will well
repay one to give this store a call and see
the many preity things it contains
NEW PUBLICATION.
The Arena for January.
Tn the Arena for January, Colonel In
eersoll, otherwise widely known as
"Pagan Rob," has an article on "God in
the Constitution," which is said to be oue
i of his greatest efforts. It will of course
j be interesting and amusing if not edify
ι iug. A poem of the Sierras by Joaquin
j Miller is another great attraction of this
number. It is pronounced by competent
critics to be one of his best poetical pro
I ductions.
Taken to Stat© Prison.
This morning Constable Ryno took
Ferdenand de Paul to State prison to
serve a term of two years. He was con
victed recently of atrocious assault and
battery.
PlLÏS, IlCHINa, Bi.ecdino, Oudsh, stc., Oorid
without Cutting. Ligatiko or Chloroform. Our
patiente attend to business while receiving treat
ment. Illustrated papers sent free. Address
Prs. Miller and Jamisou, No. 41 West Twenty
sixth street. Mew York.*»*
William Delaxkt. Furntetunit Undertaker, car
rlRRM and camp chairs to let, 345 Grove street -er
tey City. N. J. Téléphoné call. No. 13H.*."
ftt. J. BOYLAN,
Jt
Funeral Director,
(96 Pavonia Ave.. Jersey City.
MODEMANN
DENTIST,
No*. 503 and 504 THIRD AVENUE,
Southweti Corner 34th Street.
No. 255 SIXTH AVE., near 16th St., Ν. Y.
AJ..11 Gum Elagrant
•4, S7 and «10.
Perfectly adapted to the anatomy of the mouth,
and guaranteed to stand the test of time.
Old Time Prices, $10, $2U and &*).
ArtHicial Teeth on <k»ld. Artificial Teeth on Silver
NO CHARGE NOCHARCF
for extracting teeth without pain wheu artificial
teeth are to b«; inserted. (In this department a lady
in attendance,) Teeth filled with oold, Silver. Ac..
&c. Teeth repaired in fifty minutes. Sets ma id
while waiting.
Se« rhat the name 310D15MANN is painted in full
and plain letters, on the doors, stairs and win
dows. Wo have positively no connection
with any dental office that does not display the
name
MODEM ANN,
Nos. 502 and 504 THIRI> AVENUE»
Southwest Corner S4th Street.
No. 255 SIXTH AVE., near XGtU St.. X. Y.
SITUATIONS AND WORK
_ WANTED.
Respectable girl wishes situation to
do general housework. Call at No. 183 Bay
street. ,
SITUATION WANTED BY A GKKMAN GIRL TO
do,gen«4ral housework or in u restauraut. No.
248^ York street.
Situation wanted to cook, wash and
O iron or do general liousewoit. No. 150 Seventh
street.
WONTED-SITUATION AS PLAIN ΟΟΟΚ IN A
private family. Call at No. 16 Erie street, sec
ond floor.
YOUNG GIRL WISHES A SITUATION TO DO
housework or chumOerwork. Apply at No. 23.3
Bay street,
—1...U1UB··—ρ·Β
HELP WAX TED.
wiTH'soWTix:
H perieuce in the retail notion and fancy Koods
business; must bave ftr.st class references. Address
Box^..'ersey Cityl^'.
~ REAL ' ESTATE.
For houses and "lots in jehsey city
BIRQEN, GREENVILLE, BAYONNH AND BKH
UE>' POINT, CALL OK WRITE To
JOHN N. BRUNS.
Ne. 137 Ocean mm, ftrsty CUT.
So. 77 Dasfortii Ατβιιηβ. Greesriils.
END FOR LIST OFCTTT^ND COUNTRY PROP
ROBERT M. FLOYD,
JERSEY CITY HEIGHTS,
3S OCEAN AVE. COR. UNION ST,
real Estate &, insurance.
Boarders-furnished rooms, with or
without board. L. U. Wyatt, JS'o. atO York
Btreet. eornor Variok.
ÎJ1RONT HALL ROOM TO LET. WITH BOARD, AT
No. 232 Third street. _____
1 BURNISHED ROOM TO LET WITH BOARD; NO.
219 Pavonia avenue.
; T7URNISHED ROOMS, WITH OR WITHOUT
J J board ; No. 235 Grove street.
F' URNISHÊD ROOM, WITH OR WITHOUT BOARD;
. all improvements: No. 238 Grand street, :
Furnished room with board for gen
tlemen, also table board; convenient to care
and ferrie a. No. KS'Fourth street.
LARGE ROOM NICELY FURBISHED; ALL CON- r
venieuces, with fireglass board. JSa. 233 F J rat
•treet.
PLEASANT R0031S WITH BOARD IN PRIVATE*
family; terms moderate. No. '-328^ Third street
PLEASANT FURNlhHKD ROOM, WITH OR
without board, for two respectable men;
terms moderate. No. ?W Seventh street.
PLEASANT ROOM, WITH GOOD BOARD, 48
X Oceau avenue,
997 WAKBKN STREET.—LARGE BOOH, SïiO
«m mi I ond floor; also hall rooms; with board.
k>6> 7 WARREN STREET, LARGE PLEASANT
% front room; also other rooms; with board.
FURNISHED BOOMS.
Τ AUGE FRONT ROOM. SUITABLE FOR TWO
I i gentlemen or ladies; also hall room. No. 254
Grove street.
Rooms το lct, furkishisd.-two very nice
front rooms, $3 and $1.50. No. 246 York street;
ring three times.
T"iO I.RT MCK FRONT ROOM FDRÎIISFÏÉD, FOR
. one or two; bath, gas and heat. Enquire No. 49β
Grove street.
TWO MCEt.Y FÛRNISHKD ROOMS, HEATED
J gas and bath; family private. Να 1Î3 Fourth
street.
Γ WO VERY Niefc'-MtONT ROOMS, NEWLY. FXfS ■
ni shed: ten minutes from ferry; $:« and $1.50.
No. 246 Yorks.reet; ring three times.
ηηο let-four or ην#·ROOMS, IN«triotCS*
A private house; rent moderate to right j)»rtvy.
Address ST., Jersey City News.
1 WO NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS, HEATED. .
gas and bath; family private. Nc. Π5 Fourth
street.
T^ÔLEf—THKKK UNFURNISHED ROOMS IN Nfllfr
I private bouse, occupied by owner; pleasant
neighborhood; one block from cars. Enquire No.
34 Wiley street.
TOO SUSSEX STREET-FURNISHED LARGE, „
1 .L· jmi room and smaH room, connecting; sill con
veniences.
INSTRUCTIONS.
THOROUGH"PREPARATION FOR CTVifj 8EPI·
1 vice, business college, medical ana law school. a
Hoffman Educational Rooms, No. 46 Newark avenue.
ΟίΟΠΠ A. YEAR-BOARD AND TUITION; BOYS
Raddonfi ldD\ Address Episcopal Schopoi
A YOUNG GENTLEMAN WOULD LIKE IN
struction in French. Address DON. Jersey
City News Ofl'ice. ' ;
■1' — 11-L-, ±.JL
THE BLIND SEE,
The Deaf Hear,1 the Lame Walk,
THE SICK MADE WELL WITHOUT MED1CINR
Jiarvelous cures are pea-formed daily ac the
rooms of
OR. FANYOU,
No. 258 Sixth avenue, Ν. Y.,
ci Dyspepsia Insomnia, Catarrh, Paralysis and all
Nervous and Chronic Diseases.
Office hours:—9:30 a. m. to 4:30 p. ra.
The poor healed free from 8:30 to }03ϋ a. m.
First National Bank.
Jbrsey City, Dec. 11,1889.
Notice is hereby .given that en election
for eleven Directors of this Bank will
beheld at the Banking Mouse op Tuesday, the )4tû
day of January next. The polls Will be open from
12 m. to 1 u. m. O. W.'ÇONKLIN, Cashier.
For a DISORDERED LIVER
Try BEEGMM't PILLS.
25cts. a Box.
OJP AIiXj DnXJGrG/ISTe.
MASTER'S sale.- in chancery of new
Jersey. ■
Jnmea Muckln, complainant, and> Mary Maclcln,
Bernard' Mackin and others, defendants.
On bill for partition, etc.
By virtue of a decree made in the above cause on
the thirteenth day o£ November, 1889. I shall expose
to sale, at public vendue, to the highest bidder, on
Thursday, the sixteenth day of January next, at
two o'clock In the afternoon, at F. Q. Wolbert's
real estate and auction rooms, No. 4? .Montgomery
street, in Jersey City:—
All that certain tract or parcel of land $nd prem
ises situate. in Jersey City, in the County of Hud
ton and State of New Jersey, bounded and de
scribed us fdllows·-, ,
Beginning at a point In the south line of Seventh
(formerly South Second) street, distant one hun
dred and fifty feetijfid ft,) westerly from; the South
west cerner of Henderson (formerly, Prospect)
street .and said Seventh street: thèneô runutng
weçterl.v along sniu Seventh street twenty-five feet
(25 ft.); thence southerly, parallel with said Hender
son street one hundred feet 1100 it.); thence easterly
parallel with said Seventh street twenty five feet
(25 ft.); thence northerly parallel with suid^Hender
son stieet one hundred feet (100 ft.) to tbe xplaceof
beginning, with the buildings and appurtenance·
thereof. ·.
Date* December V3, 1839.
WASHINGTON B. WILLIAMS,
Master in Chancery.

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