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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, January 03, 1900, LAST EDITION, Image 4

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BURKE ON TRIAL.
Slayer of W. J. Coffey Before
the Court of Oyer and
Terminer Today.
JURY EASILY SECURED
Prosecutor Erwin Outlines the
Case—Witnesses Exam
ined.
Frank Burk* was placed on trial for hl«
life in tb* Oyer and Terminer Court this
morning. Burke shot William J. Coffey
in the stomach at No. 47 Van Winkle
Btreet on June 22, inflicting a mortal
wound. Burke was brought into court
shortly after ten o'clock by Constables j
Girsban and Connolly. (He is a tall, thin
man, with mutton chop side whiskers and
a moustache. His face was pallid, prob
ably the result of his long incarceration
in the Jail. His eyes are restless and shifty
and he has the appearance of a man of
weak mentality. It was 10:35 when Jus
tice Llpplncott and Judge Blair took their
seats on the bench and Justice Llppincott
asked if the Burke case was ready. Prose
cutor BrWin. for the State, aijd ex-Judge
(William T. Hoffman, for the defence, both
answered ready. Frank K. Runyon of
New Brunswick is associated with ex
Judge Hoffman for the defence.
A Jyry was selected with very little
difficulty, the State interposing no chal
lenges and the defence nineteen. The Jury
selected are:—James R. White, Charles
Snead, Patrick J. Clark, Edward E. Van
Buskirk, Walter Commerce, Arthur Mor
ris, John Murray, A. L. Crawford, Charles
Ermish, Richard Goss, William A. Thorpe,
Michael Gilhooley.
Prosecutor Erwin gave an outline of the
case in his opening. Burke and Coffey
lived in the same house, Coffey on the
first floor and Burke on the second.
Coffey was forty-three years old, a steve
dore, and Burke is a laborer, fifty, years
old, and was employed on the Erie Rail
road. Coffey got home about ten o'clock ,
on the night of the shooting and went..tn
the closet, which was in the back yard.
Burke went there a few minutes after
ward and found the door fastened. Some
words passed between the two men and
Immediately afterward the people in the
house heard thre§ pistol shots. The police
arrived soon a/ter and Burke was taken
into custody. Coffey was removed to the
City Hospital and remained there under
treatment until August 10, when he insist
ed on leaving. He was taken back to the
Institution again and died there on
AUgUSI II.
Lewie H . Broome was the first witness.
He explained a diagram tie had made of
the house at 'No. 47 Van Winkle street
and the closet in the yard.
Policeman John Maguire, of the Oakland
avenue station, testified that he was on
duty in West Newark avenue about 10:30
when a citizen told him that a man had
been shot in Van Winkle street. The
i officer ran around and found Coffey
^standing on the front stoop pressing his
ffcands on his stomach. He said he had
pleen shot. Maguire went up to the front
i|»>or and found it locked. He demanded
yplmittance and as no one opened the door
(fne__brdke it open and entered the house.
Mr. Heavey, with whom Burke* boarded,
asked the witness what he wanted. The
officer saw Burke on the stairs and placed
him under arrest. Coffey had been taken
into the store and Maguire took Burke
there. As soon as Coffey saw Burke he
said: “That’s the man that shot me, ar
rest him." Burke said: "I wish I had
given him one or two more and finished
him.”
Maguire took Burke to the signal box
and telephoned to the Third precinct for
an ambulance, the reserves and the patrol
wagon. On the way to the police station
Burke said that Coffey struck him wilh a
shovel. The officer asked him twice for the
revolver with which he shot Coffey, and
Burke denied that he had any revolver. On
being asked a thirdjtime, Burke said that
tLi pistol was an ofd one, not worth fifty
cents, and that hwfhad thrown it over
near the fence. * Maguire took Burke back
to the house afiij searched for the re
volver but could not find it. He then took
Burke to the station. Burke said there
that he was sorry the trouble had occurred
but refused to make any further state
ment. There was a scratch on Burke’s
head and it was bleeding.
Sergeant James O’Brien testified that
toe took Burke to the hospital on June 25
to be identified by Coffey. The wounded
man identified him and said he was the
man who shot him. Coffey made a state
ment of the occurrence, which was taken
down in writing by William E. Robinson,
Chief Murphy’s private secretary. Coffey
stated that he was in the closet when
Burke came to the door. When he came
out Burke was angry and found fault
with him for remaining in the closet so
long. Coffey saw a revolver in Burke’s
hand and tearing that he would shoot
ran away. As he ran Coffey saw a shovel
and picked it up to defend nimaelf. Burke
fired three shots at him and one of the
bullets struck him in the stomach.
William E. Robinson corroborated Ser
geant O’Brien’s testimony. The trial will
probably be finished tomorrow. Bufke will
put in a plea of self-defence.
GRAIN-9! GRAIN-0!
Remember that name when you want a de
licious. appetizing, nourishing food drink, to
take the place of coffee. Sold by all grocers
and liked by all who have used it. Graln-O
is made of pure grain, it aids digestion and
strengthen* the nerves. It is not a stimulant
but a health builder and the children as well
as the adpults can drink it with great benefit.
Costs about % as much as coffee. 15c. and 25c.
per package. Ask your grocer for Gr&In-O.
LAW WORK
RAPIDLY
ACCURATELY
THE
JERSEY CITY
feSNEWS
LAW WORK
"BIG ME" KRAMER.
Reminiscences of a Popular
Down Town Man Who
is Dead.
“Jake" Kramer- is dead. Almost every
body down town knew him. Big ot
stature and big of heart, years ago he
gained the friendship of everyone with
whom he came in contact and who gave
him the well known sobriquet of "Big
Jake.” He n-umbered among his friends
some of the. leading businessmen of the
city. For years he kept a cafe adjoining
Police Headquarters in Gregory street.
About four years ago his health began
to fail. He was soon unable to attend to
business. His big form shrunk away. He
was dying of consumption. He knew his
days had been numbered. Even this did
not destroy his equanimity and good will
toward everybody and beyond his in
ability to talk without great exertion and
the shrinkage of his "John U” form, he
appeared even up to the last the "same
old Jake.” He died at Chicamingo,
Duchess County, New York. His body
was brought to this city yesterday, and
today rests in a cloth covered casket at
Undertaker Hughes' establishment on
Montgomery street. Many of his friends
viewed the remains yesterday. This even
ing the body will be conveyed to the Elks’
Lodge rooms across the way from Under
taker Hughes’ establishment. The body is
to be cremated at Fresh Pond Crematory
and the ashes will be burled in an urn In
the New York Bay Cemetery.
Mr. Kramer was a Prussian. He served
in the Franco-tPrussian war and came to
this country shortly after peace was
declared.
Among the many incidents recalled
illustrating his qualities of friendship is
the part he took in “The Jersey City
News’ ” great police popularity contest
during the World’s Fair. The best men
in the department were In the race, the
prize being a J200 trip to Chicago. "Jake’s”
old friend, Alex Watson, then City Prison
keeper, said he wish he could win that
double honor. "Jake” said he'd win it for
him or he’d make a mighty desperate at
tempt. “Jake” knew that his old “Vet
eran” friend had many friends in this
city. He got out and set them to hustling
for votes. Some of the favorites were
backed by rich men, one of them by mil
lionaires. On the day the closed one of
the backers of a loading favorite Jostled
through the crowd and depositing a big
bundle containing 12,000 votes and said,
what In common parlance would now
be paraphrased:—“I guess that will hold
you Just awhile!”
His back was scarcely turneu wueu jjis
Jake’s" burly form loomed up over the
threshold bearing1 two big great "double
barreled” Gladstonian valises, and
depositing them just seven seconds before
the very minute for the closing of the
contest, exclaimed:—
“Check dese for Ghicago!” It’s hard
word to explain "Jake’s" German dialect,
but his veteran fried Alex enjoyed his
trip to the World's Fair.
That he had no national bias was also
demonstrated by the fact that for many
long years he was, as he often tersely
expressed it‘'A Dutch tenant of an
Irish landlord”—referring to "Bob"
Murphy.
Old business men discussed these traits
of "Jake's” character in the lower sec
tion of the city, last evening. Not alone
in cafes, but in restaurants.
They went back beyond a decade.
".Take” cast his fortunes with the Re
publican party. The Democrats swept in
to power. Jake was unyielding. His
friends pushed him forward for a Police
Commissionership. It was at a time when
the Democratic power at its zenith was
apparently rent in twain by what was
then known as the ”Jeffersonian” move
ment. "Jake” asked his old friend Jim
Roche, who built up the eilegant building
at Grove and 'Morgan streets, now oc
cupied by the Third National Bank, for
his support. Roche refused it. "Jake,”
who had locked up his saloon many a
night for years to go around and spend
saloon one night followed by
it. For three years he did not step a
foot Inside Mr. Roche’s saloon. One of
"Jake’s” fads was to hire itinerant bands
and make a little parade of his own. His
sudden appearance in Mr. Roche's big
saloon, one night thereafter followed by
a Dutch band playing “Wacht Am
Rhine” and figuratively holding forth
the olive branch of peace was more than
the good natured Irishman could stand
and there was a joyour reconciliation.
One o fthe most sincere mourners at
Mr. Roche’s funeral was "Big Jake.” No
one who knew the man doubts his sincer
ity. Th« Elks, the Masons, the Knights
of Pythias, who will hold services over his
dead body this evening, know better than
anyone else the finacial sacrifices he has
made through efforts to benefit his fellow
man.
He was a member of the Crescent
Club and mixed freely with the Ameri
cans of Americans. Yet while lying on a
cot in the City Hospital, in this city, in a
vain effort to restore his health, even
though he was known as a "Dutchman,”
when telephoned to as to when he would
"be out,” saidi to the attendant:—"Tell
’em I’ll be out in time to head the next
St. Patrick’s Day parade. I’ll hire a coupe
and a band!”
CABLE CLUB RECEIVES.
Many Young Ltdin Call Upon the
Popular Young Men.
The Cable Club last evening received
lady callers. The assembly room was
thronged. An excellent entertainment was
provided. It consisted of songs and reci
tations. A dancje was one of the features.
John O’Donnell, P. H. O'Neill, Walter
Cooney, John Cleary and Peter Flynn re
ceived the guests on behalf of the club.
Among those who called were:—Mrs.
Delaney, M}ss Delaney, Mrs. Morris, Mls3
Morris, the Misses Noonan, Mrs. Murray,
Miss 'McDonald, Miss A. Cavanagh, Miss
iM. Davidson, Miss M. Hannon, Miss S. A.
Hart, Mrs. Terence Ambley, Miss Sallle
Mclnerny, Miss .Shea, Miss Nolan, Miss
Tracey, Miss Hyslop, Misses May and
Annie 'Ford,’Misses May and Susie Meade,
Miss B. Brown, Miss May Smith, Miss
F. Clendenning, Miss Ada Foley, Mies
Dillie Leonard, Mrs. Finlon, Miss Mamie
McDonald, Miss F. Heinz, Miss Welte
miller, Miss 'Smith, Miss J. Van Order.
The members of the club were out in
force.
M’LAUGHtIN’S CELEBRATION.
The members of the Dennis McLaugh
lin Association held an1 informal celebra
tion of the new year at their handsomely
furnished rooms in the Park House last
evening. There were addresses by some of
the old members and these were inter
spersed with vocal and instrumental
solos. President P. Connolly, ex-Poliee
Commissioner John P. Feeney, Dennis
McLaughlin and other prominent mem
bers made addresses.
Til® trend -of their remarks was in the
Ion ofithe business daMtobft.dnid the
fl outlook for local and.- national
Democracy. All agreed that the pros
pects of both were exceedingly bright.
MR. BAKER TO BE MARRIED.
It has been announced that Mr. Mark
Baker of the Heights and Miss Elizabeth
Slack of Grand street will be married in
St. Peter’s R. C. Church, Tulesday after
noon. January 9. Rev. Owed S. Hill will
perform the ceremony. *
i
j SCORES LODGING HOUSES.
i Justice Ncvin Say They Are a Dis
grace to the City.
! The case of assault and battery against
! Robert Allen Craig, who was arrested on
| complaint of Edward Mack, day clerk, In
| the Salvation Army lodging house, at No.
| 93 Montgomery street, and was arraigned
i before Justice Nevln in the First Criminal
| Court, this morning, caused the court to
j denounce the class of lodging houses In
| this city. Craig, who Is a lodger at the
| resort, was found not guilty, and was
| released from custody,
i 'Mack testified that Craig went up to
| him and demanded a money order for 13,
j which was held by the former as security.
When the order was refused Craig became
boisterous and created a disturbance. He
is also alleged to have struck Mack.
Craig denied the charge that was made
against him, He swore that he was set
upon and beaten by the attachees of the
lodging house.
At this juncture, Capt. Henry Sheldon,
of the Salvatioff Army, who has charge
of the lodging house, stepped forward and
testified that he knew of the presence of
the money order, but said he knew noth
ing of the trouble, not being present at
the time.
In scoring these lodging houses Justice
Nevln said:—
‘‘I am getting sick and tired of having
these lodging houses cases brought before
me. They are a bad lot. The houses them
selves are a disgrace to the community.
They are nothing better than harboring
places for a set of criminals and loafers.
The lodgers are continually In trouble. I
am not speaking of the Salvation Army
lodging house In particular. All, how
ever, are run on the same principle. All
are money making Institutions. It would
be better for the city to have a public
lodging house where the worthy poor
could be cared for than to have to put
up with these places.”
Justice Navin, in discharging the
prisoner, ordered him to go and get his
clothing and seek a respectable boarding
house.
SOME ONE THINKS HE’S FUNNY.
TIu Greenville Idea of a Praeiieal
Joke.
| Court Interpreter Joseph Filmorano is a
resident of the Greenville section and of
ten spends a few hours evenings at Col
umbia Hall playing billiards, a game to
which he is partial. Coming from his
home he usually wears a large ulster with
a double row of buttons. The other even
ing he left the coat hanging in t'he cafe,
and went upstairs to Indulge in his usual
pastime. A few hours later he returned
and slipped into the ulster preparatory to
going home. He attempted to button the
coat, but the first button came off. He
tried the second button with the same re
sult. Thinking it strange, he investigated,
and discovered that some practical Joker
had cut the buttons leaving them hanging
by a thread only.
Someone suggested that he try the other
side, which he did, only to discover that
the joker thoroughly understood1 his busi
ness, and had partially severed every but
ton on the coat. ,
Joseph took the matter philosophically,
and said he wouldn’t care, only that he
would have a hard job to convince his
wife that he wasn't playing poker.
PACIFIC AVENUE BRIDGE
It Will Be Completed in About
Throe Weeks.
Judging from the progress made on the
erection of the Pacific avenue bridge with
in the past three weeks, the structure
should be completed in ten days. Every
piece of steel has been bolted and the
rails of the traction company have been
laid across the bridge on both sides. The
woodwork for the wagon paths has not
been touched as yet, but this part of
the job wilt be completed along With the
two footuaths.
These paths are six feet in width and
a vast improvement over the crowded lit
tle paths on the old bridge. These paths
were not more than three feet in width.
Pacific avenue, from Johnston avenffie to
Grand street, has been repaved according
to specifications and the grade raised sev
eral Inches. Trucks will have no diffi
culty in going up the grade to the
bridge on either side, as the slope is
gradual and not very steep as was the
case when the old bridge was in use.
MR. RICHTER RESIGNS.
Because Dioklnsou and Woolley Ran
the Parly.
Alexander Richter who represents the
Second Precinct of the Seventh Ward In
the Republican County Committee,
stated, last night, that he had sent In his
resignation. Richter Is a holdover mem
ber and had one year to serve. He Is a
member of the Greenville Republican
League Club ,and has been actlte In poli
ties for a number of years.
Mr. Richter resigning because he is
utterly disgusted with the manner in
which the Republican party is managed.
Dickinson and Woolley, he said, run
everything to suit themselves, while the
ordinary committeemen is nothing but a
figure head. It is simply a waste of time
he said, to attend committee meetings, as
everything is previously "cut and dried.
<Mr Richter will remain a Republican,
but in the future will refrain from any
active part in politics.
ST. PATRICK’S CATHOLIC CLUB.
A meeting of the Board of Directors of
St. Patrick’s Catholic Club, will be held
this evening. The Entertainment Com
mittee headed by Andrew Kerin has com
pleted its preparations for the annual
parish reception on January 17, and will
submit a report to that effect tonight.
The Jersey City Club will be the scene
of the merrymaking. The decorations will
be elaborate and other details that go to
make successful reception have been at
tended to.
GREENVILLE HORSE TROOP.
The Greenville Gardeners’ Horse Troop
is arranging for its thirtieth annual ball
to be held at Columbia Hall,! Tuesday
evening, January 23. Heretofore the
Gardeners’ social events have been ex
tremely popular, and the prospective ball
is expected to prove no exception to the
rule.
The arrangement committee Is composed
of Henry Gibbs, chairman, Charles Wilke.
S. M. Jensen, J. 'H. Borgstede, Jr., and
Charles Ahrend.
FOURTH REGIMENT BALL.
The ball committee of the 'Fourth Regi
ment meets, tonight to complete Its list of
patronesses and to award the music con
tracts. When the list Is completed about
3;000 Invitations will sent out.
Salem Davis will have charge of the
promenade music and Von Barr will look
after the dance music. Colonel Smith is
urging the committees to hurry that work
along, to insure a thorough success.
GREENVILLE REPUBLICAN LEAGUE.
The officers of the Greenville Republican
(League Club' elected at the last meeting
will be installed tonight. William Rose,
the outgoing president, will act as master
of ceremonies.
An informal entertainment and supper
j will follow the installation.
' MR. KAISER ENTERTAINS.
Proprietor of Colombia Hall’s Enjoy
able New Tear’s Reception.
Mr. Joseph Kaiser, proprietor of Colum
bia Hall, gave a pleasant party, to his
■many friends New Year’s night. Many
excellent selections, both vocal and In
strumental, were rendered by the guests.
Mr. Thomas Keely sang a comic song en
titled "I Want My Bow-Wow." As an
encore he sang a German song, which a
few of the guests are yet endeavoring to
translate. Mrs. Wheeler, a daughter Qf
Commissioner Edward Barr, sang several
soprano solos; Miss Nellie and Miss Grace
Barr played a piano duet, and Justice of
the Peace William C. Collins made a
humorous address. Songs were also ren
dered by Messrs. James Dodds, Albert
Mertens, Detective Robert Pearson and
William Charlock.
An excellent supper was tljen served,
which was followed by dancing.
Among those present werei^-Police Cap
tain and Mrs. Nugent, Commissioner and
IMrs. Eld ward iBarr, Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Zeiger, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Carlook,
Mr. and Mrs. Norman, Mr. and Mrs.
Chavant, Mr. and Mrs. William C. Col
lins, Mr. and Mrs. Homan, Mr. and Mrs.
James Dodds, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Herlg, Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler, Mr. and
Mrs. Leifer, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kaiser,
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Keely, Miss Orthen,
Miss Nellie Barr, Miss Grace Barr, Miss
Lena Kaiser, Miss Carlock, Miss Lottie
Leifer, Miss Josephine Leifer, Miss Katie
Leifer, Mrs. Mary Kaiser, Miss Florence
Kaiser, Messrs. William Helber, Sell
Waters, George Kelss, Joseph Floramo,
M. Hart, Charles Herlg, William Leifer,
Albert Mertens, Mr. Loeffel, City Marshal
Edgar Vreeland, Detective Robert Pear
son, Michael Schultxe, Jr., Herman
Sehultae, Oscar Schultze, Robert Leifer,
William Charlock, W. Thompson, Wm.
Stewart, Sylvester Kaiser, Riohard Kaiser
and Joseph Kaiser, Jr.
ASSAULTED MRS. FELDNER.
Joseph McGregor's Bliutreni Cell
•l Hie Brother.
Joseph McGregor. thllty years old, of
No. 281 Grand street, was charged with
assault and battery in the First Criminal
Court this morning by- Mrs. Margaret
Feldner, of No. 238 Grand street. Mc
Gregor’s brother Thomas is married to
iMrs. Feldner’s daughter.
Saturday night Joseph called at the
Feldner home to see his brother. He said
he was refused admittance, when, It was
alleged that he kicked in the door and
struck Mrs. Feldner. McGregor claimed
he was assaulted by Mrs. Feldner and his
sister-in-law. McGregor admitted having
been drunk. Justice Nevln found the
prisoner guilty but suspended sentence
on payment of costs. Mrs. Feldner has
just been released from jail, where she
was committed for running a disorderly
house some months ago.
SERGEANT RICHARD’S FUNERAL
Buried in Norwalk With Military
Helen.
Sergeant E. Dudley Richards, of Com
pany A, Fourth Regiment, who died at
his home. No. 98 Astor place, last Sunday,
was burled to day at Norwalk, Conti.
Funeral services were held last night at
his home and this morning at ttye- hour
appointed for the funeral to leave the
grief stricken home a number of the
young man’s former soldier comrades took
positions on either side of the hearse and
marched to the ferry where the body Was
shipped to its last resting place.. The
hearse was proceeded by a firing squad.
Richards was a very popular young man
and his death comes as a heavy blow to
his many friends.
SORRY HE SPOKE,
Cannon’s Open Confession. Did. I Him
No Good.
Jqhn A. Cannon, SO years old, of No. 287
Railroad avenue, was arrested, yesterday
morning, on Exchange place, by Police
man Nugent, of the Gregory street sta
tion, charged with being drunk. Cannon
was too drunk to be brought into court.
He was arraigned before Justice Nevin,
this morning. In pleading Cannon said:—
"Judge this is my first offence in two
years. The last time I was here I was
fined $2.”
"Well I’ll fine you $S this time to see
whether you will keep out of court for
the next two years, remarked Justice
Nevin. __
DEMOCRATS WILL PLAY EUCHRE.
Committees from the Eighth and Ninth
Ward Democratic Clubs are to meet this
week to arrange for a euchre tourna
ment. It Is probable that the affair wl/11
be held the latter part of this month.
Several club prises are to be played for.
At the first tournament the Ninth War
ders carried off all the prises. An ef
fort will be made by their neighbors to
even up old scores.
U. S. GRANT ASSOCIATION.
A short meeting of the U. S. Grant As
sociation was held last night at which
only routine business was transacted.
New committees to serve during the com
ing year were to have been appointed, but
owing to the small number present the
matter was deferred until a future meet
ing. /_
SEVENTY FIVE EUCHRE PRIZES.
Seventy-five prises will be awarded to
night at St. Joseph’s Lyceum euchre, to
be held in Pa von la Hall, adjoining the
parish school and church. Preparations
have been made to accommodate a large
crowd. Dancing will follow the euchre.
TEACHERS INDIGNANT.
Many Talk of Resigning From the
State Aeeeeiaties.
[Speolal to “The Jersey City News.”]
TRENTON. Jan. 2, 1900.—There are in
dications of a material lessening of the
membership of the State Teachers’ As
sociation, which held its annual meeting
in Jersey City last week. . A number of
the teachers of this city who belong to
the association have decided to sever their
connections and the same is said to be
true of teachers in other parts of the
State. A prominent Trenton teacher, who
did; not wish to be quoted said last night
that there has been friction in the as
sociation for the past two or three years
because of the aggressiveness of those
Ignored and a minority report adopted.
Fund. The association, he said, had got
ten away from its original purposes along
educational lines and had .been made a
tail to the Retirement Fund kite.* ,>•>'
To cap the climax, he said, th*t,!**Ui&t
Jersey City meeting the majority nyfort
of the Nominating Committee?-1^'
ignored an da minority report adapted.
The Nominating ..^Com^Utee. hfe* g**&t
was made Up.^f rbpVesdWiaTiVes selected
by the teachers themselves by, Congres
sional distriots, and the minority report
give the control of the organisation to
the Hudson County teachers, who were
iri the majority in the convention by
reason of its being held in their own
city. This he said was unwise and has
been resented by the teachers from
other parts of the State, and he pre
dicted that before another annual meet
ing is held there would be a great many
resignations..
amusement*
Academy of Music
PRICES REDUCED.
A Good Reserred Soot for 80*
Thl« Week, Hatlneee Wedneadar and Saturday, ■
LOUIS MANN
CLARA LIPMAN
Til GtlL th\ B&ISiCKS
NEXT WEEK, CHARLES FROHMAN’8 CO. In
“Simu* Ike E#rod Mi* So.”
January 15—Chauncey Olcott.
Bon Ton Theatre
ALL THIS WEEK..
AMERICA’S GREATEST
VAUDEVILLE STARS.
PRICES.10 to 50 Cents
BIJOU THEATRE, *M
MAY IBWHT-&HH
I IN SISTER MARY.
N. B. KIRK
WHILE WE APPRECI
ATE THE VALUE OF
PRINTER’S INK,
we have always
relied more on the
QUALITY of
RYE
than exaggerated
advertisments.
We are satisfied
with the results.
Compare it with
all others.
I CO., N. Y
H. T. NUGENT,
AUCTIONEER,
Office: 263 Grove Street. Tel. 176, Jereey City,
N. 1.. will sell at PUBLIC AUCTION, on
THURSDAY, JANUARY V 1900
At 2 o’clock P. M., at Headquarters of the
Fire Department, No. 244 Bay street, Jersey
City, Tower and Bells, as follows:— *
(The purchasers of said property at a pre
vious auction sale having failed to comply with
,the conditions of said sale, it has been ordered
resold.)
One IronJ Tower, one Bell (estimated weight
1,200 pounds) and Electric Striking Apparatus,
located at House of Engine Company No. 14,
Webster avenue, near Franklin street, to be
sold together as they stand. The purchaser
to pay a deposit of, one hundred and fifty
dollars Immediately after the articles are
knocked down. ■' ?'
By order of the Board or Fire Commissioners.
; CHARGES ESTERBROOK, Clerk.
Jersey City, December 22, 1899.
HONEY IO LOAN
A.T SIX
PER CENT.
INTEREST.
on Furniture, Pianos and
all kinds of Household
Goods. You have the use
of the money and goods
and can pay It Pack in weekly or montnly
payments. Easy payment reduces the prin
cipal and Interest. C. J. IGOE. Room 1. 47
MToritaomery Street. Jersey City.
Hudson T«I. No. 114.
NEW FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY—NOTICE TO
Contractors.
Sealed proposals will be received by the
Trustees of -the Free Public Library of the
City of Jersey City, on Friday, January 5th,
1900, at eight o’clock P. M., at their office. In
the Free Public Library, 239 Washington street,
Jereey City, N. J., for the installation of the
tubes, outlet boxes and panel boxes complete,
reedy for the reception of the wires, panel
boards, cutouts, switches, telephone cables,
electric clocks, etc.; the same being a com
plete system of conduit. In accordance with the
plans and specifications for which bids were
received on December 13th, 1199, and required
In the New Library Building.
All bids for work and material must be In
accordance with the plans and specifications
for the same on file In the office of the said
Trustees, where blank forms of bid and agree
ment of sureties may be obtained, and copies
of plans and specifications consulted by the
bidders. . ' • '
For the better oohvdhleiice of Intending bid
ders, duplicate sets of plans and specifications
have also been placed on file as follows':—
At the office of the Architects, Messrs. Brite
and Bacon, 111 Fifth avenue, New York City,
and at the office of the Electrical Engineer,
Mr. C. O. Mailloux, 150 Nassau street, New
Yerk City.
Proposals must be inclosed in sealed en
velopes, endorsed “Proposals for Conduit
Work,” directed to the “Trustees of the Jersey
City Free Public Library,” and handed to the
Preeldent of said Trustees, In open meeting,
at the time and place aforesaid when called
for by the said President.
The bonds required to be furnished on the
proposals and on subsequent contract If award
ed are those of a responsible surety company
authorized by law to do business in the State
of New Jersey.
The- said Trustees reserve the right to reject
any and all bids if by so doing the best inter
est of the said Trustees and the New Free
Public Library building may be conserved.
By order of the Trustees of the Free Public
Library'" of Jersey City.
L. J. GORDON,
President.
IN CHANCERY OF NEW JERSEY.
To Mary A. Buck:—
By virtue of an order of the Court of
Chancery of New Jersey, made on the
day of the date hereof. In a cause where
in Simon E. Bernheimer and Josephine
Schmid, partners, trading as Bernheimer
& Schmlo, are complainants and you are
defendant, you are required to appear,
plead, answer or demur to the bill of
said complainant, on or before the twen
ty-fourth day of January next, or the said
bill will be taken as confessed against
you. The said bill Is filed to foreclose a
mortgage on land Jn Jersey City, Hud
son County, New Jersey, given by Will
iam Buck to Simon E. Bernheimer and
Josephine Schmid, partners, trading as
Bernheimer & Schmid, dated July ISth,
1896, and you are made a defendant be
cause you are one of the owners of the
said mortgaged premises.
Dated November 23d, 1391.
HUDSPETH A PUSTER,
Solicitors for Complainant,
260 Washington Street,
Jersey City. N. J.
IN CHANCERY OF NEW JERSEY.
To William George Goodwin:—
By virtue of an order of the Court of
Chancery of New Jersey, made on the
day of the date hereof, In a cause
wherein Fanny Goodwin is petitioner and
you are defendant, you are required to
appear, plead, answer or demur to the
petition of said petitioner on or before
nineteenth day of February, A. D. 1990,
or that in default thereof, such decree
will be inade against you as the Chan
cellor shall think equitable and just.
‘ The said petition is filed against you
Sr U divorce from the bonds of matrl
December 18th, 1899.
fUDSPETH fc BUSTER,
‘Solicitors for Petitioner,
259 Washington Street
ffH Jersey City,, N. J.
■au
IN CHANCER}" OF NEW JERSEY.
Between ’Eliza Giiklnson et al., complain
ants, and Jennie Steiner et al., defendants.
On bill for partition and decree for sale.
The sale of the lands and premises In the
above stated cause stands adjourned until
Thursday, the twenty-eighth day of Decem
ber instant.’ at. two o’clock in the afternoon,
on said psembujg, No. 194 Maple street, La
fayette, Mersey' City, N. J.
Dated December 16th, 1819.
WILLIAM B. GILLMORE,
Special Master In Chancery,
H. T. NUGENT
AUCTIONEER,
\ * *• ^
Office: 3S3 Grove Street, Tel. in, Jereey City,
N. J.. will eell at PUBLIC AUCTION, on
^ ' V
Thursday, Jan. 4,1900.
Alt J:JO o’clock P. U„ at Headquarters of the
Fire Department) No. tM Bay street, Jersey j
City, the following .property of the Depart
ment. the same having feecome unserviceable
for use:—
LOT OF ROBBER HOSE.
EOT OF COTTON HOSE.
TWO 4*WHEEL TENDERS.
ONE 8.WREBE TBNDER.
LOT OF OLD IRON.
SIX <•> HORSES.
Terms: Cash. ’
By order of the Board of. Fire Commissioners.
CHARLES ESTERBROOK. Clerk.
Jersey City,' December at. ll*».
TO CHARLES E. CARPENTER. ANNA CAR
penter, bio wit*; Nettle Carpenter, Harr E.
Bartholomew, Rob«rt M. Bartholomew, her
husband, and Samuel Aller:—
Teu art hereby notified that at a public sal*
made by the City Cdlleotor of Jersey City,
on the J5th day of October, Ui<. The Mayor
and Aldermen of Jersey City purchased for the
sum of two hundred and sixty-ninw dollars and
twenty-nine cents ALL the land and real es
tate situate In Jersey- City, In the County of
Hudson and State of'New Jersey, fronting on
Rock street, which Is laid down and designat
ed as lots 25 and 28, la block number 127, upon
an assessment map annexed to a report num
ber 88, made by the “Commissioners of Ad
.—lilted In add for said City by
Justment" appoln — .
the Circuit Court of She County of Hudson, a
certified copy of which report and map was
filed In ths offics of the City Collector of
Jersey City, on-the 8th day of January, 1183,
eald report aqd map and sald sale being made
pursuant to the provisions of an ant of ths
Legislature of New Jersey, passed March 80th,
1888, entitled^- '
"An Act concerning the settlement and
collection of arrearages of unpaid taxes,
assessments and1 water rates or water
rents In cities of this State, and Im
posing and levying a tax, assessment
and lien In lieu and Instead of such
arrearages, and to enforce the payment
thereof, and to provide for the sale of
lands subjected to future taxation and
assessment.”
And the several suppletnents thereto.
And you are further notified that you
appear to have ah estate or Interest in
■aid land and real efrtate, and unless the
■aid land and real estate shall be re
deemed, as provided In said acts, befers
the expiration of s|x months from and
after the service hereof, a deed for the
same will be given conveying to The
Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City, the
fee simple of • said land and real estate
according to the provisions of the said
act.
Dated Jersey City. N. J„ October 14tb. 1198.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JER
SEY CITY. • ___
; E. HOOS,
(Seal.) Mayor.
^ 'Attest- O'DONNELL.
City Clerk.
tael* No. .4881.)
TO GERHART RjClfifcHER, MRS. GER
hardt Reiscber, his wife; Carl Struver:—
You are hereby notified- that at a public sale
made by the City Collector of Jersey City,
on the 18th day of April, 1W5, I purchased for
the turn of three hundred and ninety-three
dollars and ten cents the land and real
estate situate In Jersey City, In the County
of Hudson end State,of New Jersey, fronting
on South street, which la laid down and desig
nated as lot 70, in, block number 874, upon
an assessment map annexed to a report number
U, made by the ‘'Commissioners of Adjust
ment” appointed in and for said City by the
Circuit Courtj of the County of Hudson, a cer
tified copy of which report and map was filed
in the office of the City Colleotor of Jersey
City, on the ‘12th day of April, 1898, said re
port and map and said sale being made pur
suant to the provisions df an Act of the Legis
lature of New Jersey, passed March 80th, 1X86,
entitled*—
"An Act concerning1 the fettlement and collec
tion of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess
ments and water rates or water rents in
cities of this State* *hd imposing and levy
ing a tax, assessment and lien in lieu and
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce
the payment thereof,' and to provide for the
sale of. lands subjected to future taxation
and assessment.” -
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are furtn^r .notified that you appear
to have an estate or ffitereht m said land and
real estate, and unless the said land and real
estate shall be redeemed, as provided in said
acts, before the explratloh of six months from
and after the service hereof, a deed for the
same will be given conveying to the purchaser
the fee simple ,of said land and real estate
according to th« provisions of the said acta
Dated Jersey City, N. J., September 27,
1899. t
PETER W, BECKMANN,
Purchaser.
RANDOLPH PERKIN'S,
Attorney, for Purchaser.
(Sale Nb. $831.)
HUDSON COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT.
Beniamin Altman, trading as B. Altman ft
Company, plaintiffs, va. Ada E. Atkins, de
fendant.
In attachment—On contract.
Notice la hereby siren that a writ of at
tachment, Issued out of the Hudson County
Circuit Court-, against the rights and credlta,
moneys and effects, roods and chattels, lands
and tenements of Ada R. Atkina, an absent
debtor, at the suit of Benjamin Altman, trad
ins as B. Altman dr Company, for the sum
of eisbty-nlne dollars and forty-elsbt cents, re
turnable on the lyentg-seventh day of Novem
ber, eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, has
been served and duly executed, and was re
turned on the llth day of November, A. D.
ISM, by the Sheriff of the County of Hudson.
Dated December JWh, IMS.
JOHN G. FISHER,
- Clerk.
frank f. McDermott,
Attorney,
359 Washington St., Jersey City.
STATE OF NEW JERSEY—HUDSON COUN
TY CIRCUIT COURT. „
Jullds Palm, pi iff.. 9. J. Fred Beerbower,
deft. "
In attachment—On contract—Notice.
Notice le hereby given that a writ of at
tachment was issued out of the Hudsoni Coun
ty Circuit Court, State of New Jersey, against
the rights and credits, moneys and effects,
goods and chattels, lands. and tenements of
J. Fred Beerbower, am absent debtor, at the
suit of Julius Palm, for the sum of one hun
dred and seventy-nine dollars and seven cents,
returnable on October 21th. H99, has been
served and duly executed, and wks returned
October 14th, 1899, by She Sheriff of said County
of Hudson. '
JOHN G. FISHER.
Clerk.
JOHN S. McMASTER^^ n
Dated . December 11, 1899.
IN CHANCERY OF, NEW JERSEY.
To Joseph Shields^
By virtue of an order of the Court of
Chancery ot New Jersey, made on the
day of the date hereof, wherein Margaret
Shields Is petitioner and you are defend
ant, you arp required to appear and an
swer the petitioner's petitioi
swer the petitioner’s petition on or be
fore the seventeenth day of January next,
or In default such decree will be taken
against you as the Chancellor shall think
equitable and lust. The said petition Is
filed against you fer a divorce from the
bonds of matrimony;
Dated November IS, 18S».
J. HERBERT POTTS,
Solicitor of Petitioner,
1 Montgomery Street,
Jersey City, N. J.
Stresgth, Titalltj, MaiM
College,
rmj* dru Exhausted Vitality,
i Physical Debility, Premature Da
ce la, Atrophy (waiting) tal all
aafl Weaknesses ef men
hatSTsr cease arising,
as, halddle-aged or old. Cnasulie
B sr by Uttar float I to ». Sunday*
• Diagnostician, or Know Thyself
2* taeeumof medloal science, with
indorse meet*'end testimonials, price
. free, sealed. So every male reader
**
THE PEABODY,
MEDICAL HKTIT|TE
rOpp. Beyers Hobbs. established 1M0.
■ Chief Conanlihat Physidlan (during the past
its sf Harvard Medical
■V-STO If
MULLINS J SONS.
The Grreat . . : f
Furniture Store.
GASH IF YOU LIKE IT.
CREDIT IF DESIRED.
SIDEBOAHrS.
We are especially well supplied
with Sideboards, finished in
golden oak, making a swell ap
pearance. Some as low as.
DINING ROOM CHAIR.
Cane Seat,
Spindle Back.
89c
CARPETS AND LINOLEUMS.
Velvet Carpets, good assort
ment of patterns, in designs for
rooms, halls or stairs, worth at
least $1.15 per yard, at.
Good Tapestry Brussels Car
pets, nice bright patterns, wear
guaranteed, regularly sold at 75c.
per; yard.
Full yard wide Ingrains, new
fall designs, light and dark
grounds, regular price 49c. per
yard...,.
85c
55c
33c
DINING ROOM FURNITURE.
High Back Dining Room Chair*, brae#
arm, golden oak finish, value $1.50, Q|.
»t..v.,. 9IC
Dining Tables, lull. 6-foot, good solid
legs, well made, worth $5.00, « If
each.Of 19
Oak Rockers, also mahogany finished
rockers, in variety of styles, all highly
polished and strongly made, wood or
cobbler seats. The price on these rockers
at exclusive dealers Is from $2.50 I Afl
to $3.25 each. IsVV
Good couches, covered with handsome
materials, full size, well and 4 A0
strongly made..... 0i90
CANE-SEAT ROCKER, large
and comfortable, made to last,
at the price of.
COBBLER-SEAT
ROCKER.
CHILDREN'S
ROCKERS...
1.69
69c
WOMEN’S WRITING DEHf*
2.91
in Oak ani Mahogany finish,
the |5 kind,...,...
CNIN1 CLOSETS.
and sides; the correct shape; I §
the twenty-five dollar kind... ■ I»W*
MULLINS & SONS
Newark Avenue and Grove Street,
JERSEY CITY.
T
B
BAIJLEQADS._
Pennsylvania
RAILROAD.
THE STANDARD RA1UAY0FAMERICA1
i
IN EFFECT NOVEMBEB 19, 1899.
Trains leave Jersey City as foliowst
FOR THE WEST.
*1« A. M., Fast Mall, limited to two Buffet
Parlor Cara, dally to Pittsburg. connecting
tbare lor Chicago. (No coaches to Pittsburg.)
» M A. M., Fast line, with Veatlbul. Parlol
it: rsnCrated P.nn»lvanla
i.imiud. the pioneer of thU claw •* “if***"
vte* composed exclusively of Pullman VMtb*
iull' CeSJaruasnt. Blseplag. DlnUg, Obwxva
fi.a sndBmettln* Cara, lighted by «*tl*nagr
Suif: st. *-^““‘1 3?TsSW-*
t^atlbule Sleeping and Dining Corn, daily
w rinia and Chicago. Through bleeping
^atior ^uivi1l. (vU Cinoinnatl) and In
Western Express, with Vestibule
••W, daily to Pittsburg and Chicago.
StnlP£*wr» ^PblUelSla, *n‘d Pittsburg to
Celnf*p K, Southwestern Express. Sleeping
Cars dally to Cinoinnatl, Nashville,
•Sf Cincinnati, Akron and St. Louis.
Paclflo Express, Pullman Sleep,
i i'Vtae to’Plttsburg. Connects lor Chleayo
to#, Car ^°r,i*veland except Saturday. Dally
Nr“rinoxvlU.. Te^ . '^Shenandoah Valle,
SKy-p u , Util and Express, Pullman Buffet
Car to Altoona, East Liberty, Pitts
Sleeping car west week days. No coaches.
g&rmc&ft wAggugrw and the
_ iMmnra Washington and the 8outh at
A-S2 (Dinmg Car), 11.14 (Dining
I.1S. «.44, J14 J J2 (3.44 Congressional
car) A. Nl-» CM.rM and Pennsylvania Rall
Llmlted, Parloj F 4 45 (Dining Car),5.14
road Dining t.»n^ 9 44 p M and 12.30 night.
R^11aSSday 8.44, 9.14, 11.14 (Dining Car) A. M.,
Yh ix 44 Congressional Limited Parlor Cars
L14 «■«naVlvinla Railroad Dining Car), ».4o,
and XSSS* car), 9.14 (Dining Car), and 9.44
p'M^’nd 12.39 n'ght. For Baltimore only. 1.15
Pi M. ’,'**por'PHILADELPHIA.
_ .... for Philadelphia, €.33. 7.44, 7.45, 8.1a,
ExpreM (10.14 Pennsylvania Limited),
»-3 n H (Dining Car) A. M.; 12.15. 1.14,
19.J2 *n.d iJ, ,.45. 4.14, 4.44. 4.43, 5.14, 6.14
1,19' ,*•**• car), 8.14, 8.16, 9.14, 9.44 P.
4P1 1 and 12 30 night. Sunday, 6.84,
a,iu14 9,44 10.14 Pennsylvania
r’fmi ted) ’10.16, 11-14 (Dining Car) A.
Limited), m n Car)i ,45, 413, 4,45 (Dln
hit'-: 514 (Dining Car). 6.14 (Dining Car),
in* cart ».i t p M d 13.|« night. Accom
1115 A M., 4.12 and 7.15 P. M.
Sundays. 5.15 and 7.15 P. M.
week a Mantle City. 12.30 and 11.14 A. M., 1.14,
, F,orPAtM (215 P. M., through Vestibuled
ranffset ’parlor Cars, rassenger Coacn,
Sd^omblned Coach) week days, and 12.10 and
iCay*lLIO A. M.. 1.19 P. M. week
dV£r Lodi: Branohf Ansbuyry Park. Ocean Grove,
P*5 Pleasant and 'ntermedU^statmn. via
O^slmday’w^i A." M., '9.28 P. M (Stop at
Interlaken for Aahpry Park or Ocean Grove on
®'iP^Tv.w York Transfer Company will call
foT^d check bTggaiS from and to hotels and
5“w'nHT?TCHTNSON. J- R WOOD,
J- omMWsmCrer. Oen’l Passenger Agent.
parnmnu*
i 1b It KB ibJ 4r«14 nstaUls boxes. ae*l*d
I with bins ribbon. Take ne ether. Bcftu
I Sueemna Snbetltntfene and Imlta
" goal, guy of yonr Druggist. nr Mad 4o. in
stamp* for Particular*, Teetlmeolale
and ‘‘Belief fir Ladle*,*in Utter. by re
tarn Mall. 10,000 Testimonials. Sold by
all Druggists. Chichester Chemical Co.,
Mention this papsr. Madison f»«nare, PM1LA., PA.
XL,
Relieves Kidney
& Bladder
troubles at once.
Cu/m In
■>fe
beats (fce name—
Bewjab of useless '*■'
counterfeits,
railroads.
r
WEST-^SMORI
“RAILROAD= .
PICTURESQUE LINE OP TRAVEL TO Tt;
NORTH AND WEST.
THE NIAGARA FALLS ROUTE.
Trains leave Franklin street (North River)
station. New York, as follows, and fifteen min
utes later from foot W. 42d street, N. R. Ter
minal station at Weehawken, N. J„ can t>e
reached via trains of N. J. J. Rd.. lduviug
Penn. R. R. Depot at Jersey City;—
A. Id. dally for Havorstraw, West -Point,
Cornwall, Newburgb, Kingston and Albany.
A, M. dally. Albany and Montreal,
li. 11 :1s A. M. daily, except Sunday) fcr
Cranston's, West Point, Kingston, New Pales,
Lakes Mohonk and Mlnnewaska, Caukill
Mountains, Albany, Saratoga and Lake
George. Parlor Car to Albany.
U:M P. M„ CONTINENTAL LIMITED, dalty,
fsr Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, BuffaTlo,
Niagara Falls, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicalo.
and St. Louia Arrives Chicago and St. LuLj
next afternoon. Dining Car attached. ' -
C. 8:45 P. M. dally, except Sunday, for C'flb
fers, Cranston’s, West Point, Cornwall, Ne
urgh and intermediate stations to Albany ;
®:is,,p' ¥•> ph'cago and St. Louis Limlte
daily, for Montreal. Utica Syracuse, Ro.
ester, Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Toronto, D i
trolt, Cleveland, Chicago and St. Louis. ■ »
»:0« P. M. dally, except Sunday, for Utic****
Syracuse, Roohestar, Buffalo, Niasam*).
Falls, Hamilton and Toronto.
da-lly, for Albany, SyracusS?*
Rochester, Buffalo, Niagara Fulls.
ronto, Detroit, Cleveland and Chicago.
B. C.—Leaves Brooklyn Annex:—B, 10:45
A. M.; C, 2:46 P. M. Jersey city. P. R.
R. Station:-B, U:2« A. M.; C, S:35 P. M.
Haverstraw Locals:—1-6:45 A. M. (W. 4id
street 7:15 A. M.): -|-2:30, -|-4:15, -1-505.
-1-5:45. -1-7:30, ||»:4d aiid ni:& P. M.
Newburgh Locals: -|-S:3o, *10:05 A. M.;
-1-5:00, 'SOS, Kingston Local, -|-1:*0 P. M.
•Dally. ||Sundays only. -|-Except Sunday.
Wagner Sleeping Care for Albany. Utica.
Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo. Niagara Falla,
Detroit, Cleveland and Chicago *u through
trains.
Westcott’s Express check baggage through to
destination. For Cab or Carriage, ’phone 4950
Cortlandt.
For tickets, time-tables, parlor and sleeping
car accommodations or Information apply
offices:—Brooklyn, Nos. 538, 333, 72« Fulton
street; Annex Office, foot of Fulton street.
New York City: Nos, 113, 415, 671 and 121«
Broadway: No. 61 West One Hundred and
Twenty-flfth street, and at Stations.
C. E. LAMBERT, Gen'I Passenger Agent,
Grand Central Station. New York
LEHIGH VALLEY.
leave Pennsylvania Railroad Static ii'
except Sunday. Other trains dally. c
7.14 A.M. Local tor EASTON.
8.* 3 A.M. For BUFFALO. NIAGARA
FALLS and West, and principal local
points. Parlor and Dining Cars. Connects tor
Coal Branches. +
+12.14P.M "BLACK DIAMOND EX
PRESS. Handsomest tram In the world
Limited to seating capacity. Due Buffalo
9.S5 P. M.: connecting with through
Sleepers to Detroit and Chicago. Dining cat
sendee a la carte.
f For WILKES-BARRK
1.18P.M. (SCRANTON, Coal
t4.22 P.M. 1 Branches and intermo
Ldiate points.
5.83 P.M.
6.23 P.M.
Local for MAUCH CHUNK.
CHICAGO Vestibule Limited.
ThroughSleeping Cars to Chicago and Toronto
8.1 o P. M. Exposition Express tor BUFFALO
and TORONTO.
8.1 T P. M.
BUFFALO and
Chicago.
For ITHACA, ROCHESTER
West Sleeping Cars to
SOUTH PLAINFIELD and BOUND BROOK loos s
9.53 *%wZ «.« *ttd 6.38'
daily except
and 9.45 P. M.
Sunday.
Tickets and Pullman
___aft P«a*
sylvanla Railroad station.
N. Y. Transfer Co. will call for and check haggag*
ftom hotels Or residence through to destination.
LADIES
»K. KlHO>l
(t»r Onn ln>4
PENNYROYAL PILLS. ^
soooials. A trial Vtli MBtises yea *ftbeir intrinsic valu«
in cam of sayproMloa. #«ni tea ««u for «ample and
book. All Prunista or by mail $1 JO box.
KINS MEDICINE CO., Sox 1930, E83T0N, MASS.

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