OCR Interpretation


The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, January 05, 1900, LAST EDITION, Image 3

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068097/1900-01-05/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WOMAN’S WOBLD.
‘‘No, I am not making my fortune.”
said Dorothy Warren, In response to a
question. “But X am making enough to
pay for my college tuition the second
semester, and more, too. Christmas has
created a great demand for my things.”
Dorothy Warren is a junior In college
She was thrown on her own resources
at the end of her sophomore year. By
means of a scholarship and the money
She has earned tutoring in' German she
has succeeded in getting through the
first half of her jtfnior year. She has
been more fortunate than most girls, for
she has left from the time of her pros
perity two important things—first, this
knowledge of German which is standing
her in such good stead, and is the result
of a year abroad,and secondly, one of
the best cameras made, together with
ability to use it. At. first she did not
think of earning money with It, but the
business was almost forced on her by
constant requests for photographs of
college rooms. There was no profes
sional photographer within reach, and
she was emplored as a favor to do the
work. Everything grew from that.
She recently spread out her pictures to
a visitor. First there were single pho
tographs of rooms. The prices varied
from 10 to 75 cents, according to size,
finish and number ordered. She had sys
tematized everything as a professional
would have done. Then there were series
of photographs giving four views of the
same room, and sometimes even more
to bring out the detail. Nothing was im
possible, for what sunlight could not
accomplish flashlight could, so even the
| windows of the rooms, with their cur
tains and plants, were duly represented.
: To complete, a set she would photo
graph a room with its owner at work in
it. Sometimes the girl was on her couch,
sometimes at her desk, again at her tea
table, and again at ,her window water
ing her palms and ferns. There was no
end to the variety possible, especially
when the girl went a step further and
had her room photographed, not only
with herself in it, but with groups of
her friends around her. These series of
photographs were mounted and bound
together, in some cases, and in others a
few were selected, grouped together,
and framed in one frame.
‘‘I see to having them framed.' if the
girls wish,” said Dorothy. “I get special
prices in town and so make a profit
myself and save the girls all trouble
without having to charge them extra.
The amount of business that' I have on
my hands is positively astonishing. It
has come so suddenly, too. I do my own
developing and printing and everything.
I think nearly every girl in college has
given me at least one order for the holi
days, and I should say some of the girls
were going to get all their Christmas
presents from me.
“These pictures of the rooms, naturally,
are not taken outside the family, but you
can take your choice from photographs
of the college building, both inside and
out, summer And winter. Almost all of
them I took last year for my own pleas
ure, so now I have nothing to do but print
■from the old plates.' They give me a good
profit and the demand for them is large
especially when they are mounted to
make calendars. The few that I fixed
that way went off like hot cakes. I have
about made up my mind to take a partner
in the calendar business and let her rush
it. There would be a good sale among the
graduates of the college if I had time to
reach them. I sell a few of these pictures
of they college plays and processions and
basket ball games and, ip fact, at every
thing that gives an idea of college life.
“Here, however, is something original.
T charged a fancy price for this, partly
because it is new and' partly because I
have to spend a lot of time over it. See, |
it is a history of a girl’s day told in pic-, J
tures. You can have as many as you
wish, hut these seven, make a good repre
sentative set.”
. * .
Search an opera audience over and
you’ll discover no lovelier opera cloak
than the one here described. In short,
it is a poem in chiffon! "Very warm!”
do you comment? But you must know
that the chiffon is merely the soft, shim- ■
mery surface. We shall consider it in
detail, however. First of it is a sun-rav
accordion cloak o-f the new and heavy
white satin in a slightly crepey effect,
* warmly wadded and lined with heavy tur
quoise blue satin duchesse. which is in
turn daintly edged with three rose quil
lings of turquoise chiffon. And so,
enough of the inside.
Over the accordioned white satin cloak
proper are three shaped accordioned
flounces of white chiffon, each edged with
a rose quilling erf the chiffon, and further
ornamented with a zigzag design of this
same quilling. You can readily imagine
the foamy mass in Jabot effect, as all
these flounces curve up in the front to
the neck.
The highest of the three bounces, Dy
the way, 4s set onto an ornate yoke, a
graceful drapery of Renaissance applique
concealing the meeting point. (This drap
ery suggests the new hood effect.) ' As
for the yoke and the high collar, there’s
t whole exquisite silvery applique, the
design picked out with turquoises. This
is the very climax for this dainty creation
The collar is faced with soft and becom
ing little tuck ruffles of turquoise chiffon.
And If you’ll believe it, Madame-without
an-opera-wrap, it’s to be had for $150.
If this sum scares the girl without a
sixth as much to invest, why, all she has
to do is to buy a few yards (from three
to eight, according to width) of anything
from cashmere to broadcloth, and, having
properly.lined it, to layout the rest of her
available cash for the embellishment
round the neck and shoulders. On the
delicate tints, cascades of white chiffon
are beautiful, or appliques of the heavier
laces, and a fur that blends well. On
the dark ones, not that as many of them
are worn, any of the handsome furs form
an attractive collar facing Beware of
dyed fur, however unless you are willing
to risk a stained neck. It is for this rea
son that ermine, white baby lamb, and
white Angora are most often chosen. In
selecting the shape for a comparatively
plain cloak the straight front circular is
better than the slope of the one shown in
the illustration. This shape must be ac
centuated by at least one flounce, and is
only at its best when swathed with them.
* . •
The supplying of oxygen is not the only
function, although it is the most direct
and vital one of proper breathing, says
Youth’s Companion. Thorough expansion
of the chest insure® the proper filling of
the lungs with air, dilates ail the minute
air cells, especially those at the summits
of the lungs, where motion, is at least and
where the seeds of consumption are usual
ly first planted, and Increases th| circula
tion of the blood throughout all parts of
these organs.
Still another effect of proper breathing
is a beautifying one. Teh chest is broad
en the shoulders are thrown back, the
figure is erect and the carriage graceful.
Perfect breathing is not natural in most
men and wbmen of sedentary occupation
and indbor life. Like all good things, it
must be worked for; and the work must
be persevered in until full and deep res
piration has become a habit.
The means of attaining this object are
various and can not be recounted' here;
but they are based upon the principle of
removing permanently every obstacle
to the free entrance of air into the lungs.
School children sitting at their desks,
clerks bending over their ledgers, seam
^ stresses at work with the needle or tiie
I sewing machine,’ typewriters and all who
I must stoop as they earn their daily bread,
| should learn to stop from time to time,
! sit back in their chairs, or rise, throw back
I the shoulders and draw in ten or twelve
i deep, slow inspirations, holding the breath
■ for three or four seconds each time the
lungs are tilled.
These exercises, like breathing in gen
eral. should always be done with the
mouth closed, for the nose is the only
proper channel for the passage to and fro
of air. A school teacher who will inter
i rupt the studies once every hour through
■ the session, and teach the class to do this
breathing exercises, will be contributing
to the future well-being of her youthful
charges.
• . •
Those men, says ‘'Cassier’s Magazine,”
who with fair abilities have received a
really good education, have been taught
: to use their minds, and who, by contact
; with other students, have acquired habits
j of application, amply make up for their
| late start by the power of mind and grip
! that they bring to their work. They are
fresh and keen when others who have been
hammering away at semi-technical work
i from early boyhood have become stale
S and are less vigorous; and reflection
; moves me to deprecate strongly any at
tempt to teach seriously practical . or
\ electrical engineering in preparatory or
| elementary schools.
As an excellent recreation, sucn sruaies
j are no doubt to be encouraged, but to
: make them a systematic part of eduea
1 tlon, to the exclusion of studies which
I have a more direct effect in developing tne
; understanding, seems to me to be entirely
• wrong. I would go furtheT and say that
! even in public schools, and their equiva
lents for older boys, what are termed en
gineering shops are generally a failure so
j far as any efficient knowledge to be gain
j ed in them is concerned. Except as a rea
i sonable diversion for ercreatiow hours,
; such “shops’ have, I fear, but little value,
i and in nine cases opt of ten the hours
: spent in them are subtracted from the
I time due to more valuable studies.
In my judgment, the age at which a boy
should seriously begin any special studies,
with a view to fit him technically for the
[ profession he may have decided to follow,
should not be earlier than seventeen, or
eighteen. And in any discussion as to the
age at which a boy should leave school,
the great incidental advantages that he
gains from a reasonable prolongation of
his school days must never be lost sight
of. A strict discipline, a wiser supervi
sion, a more authoritative yet systematic
advice as to conduct, are more possible at
school than can .ever be the case in after
life, and a more constant and generous as
sociation with his equals rubs off angular
ities and leads to amenity of disposition.
It is seldom, indeed, that one cannot trace
the difference "between a lad who has had
a full public school training and another,
who has been less fortunate.
Speaking as an employer of labor, I
3hould say that we And a pleasant speech
and manner, tact in dealing with others,
and some power of organization of the
utmost value, and it is precisely those
qualities which a boy requires or ought to
acquire in his later years at a good
school. So much for the necessity of
grounding technical studies on the basis
of a sound general education.
* . *
Any number of attractive house dresses
have been prepared for this season, which
to use a time-honored phrase, has opened
so auspieiously. As soft materials are the
vogue for everything it may readily be
imagined that these only have been em
ployed for the house dress for which they
are so eminently suitable. All of the
veiling and crepes are much in evidence,
silk crepe de Chine being the most ele
gant of course. Sad to relate, it is not
cheap.
You will surely be delighted to hear
of this example in wood brown cVepe de
Chine, that softly pinkish shade which
even those who are given to brash colors
must admire. Round the foot of this
exquisite skirt three tiny rose quillings of
Liberty silk a couple of shades darker out
line the undulating edge, which falls over
two accordion ruffles of taffeta. The
graceful bodice 1s shaped to correspond
with the foot of the skirt, is also trimmed
along the edge with the three rose quill
ings, which in this case lap over unto a
yoke of soft white satin. This yoke Is
enriched with appliques of deep cream
Arabian lace.
Any visitor must certainly admit that
one could be found in no more beautiful or
appropriate attire. Such a little dress
serves admirably, too, for visiting, theatre
and numerous occasions.
* * *
The pastel tones appear under new des
ignations, fob the most part, which have
been chosen with no reference to color,
says the “Millinery Trade Review.” Three
very pale shade of watyr greens head the
list, Aquarelle, Pastel and Frisque, and
these, as well as the four others further
on—Detaille, Trianon, Rambouillet and
Pierrefond (differing in tone, hut equally
pale)—may be classed as among the fash
ionable spring colors, equally with the
three pale, dull blues, Watteau, Murillo
and Rembrandt, and the very faint sky
blue Ingres. All the pastel pinks are
charming, the rose series—Miniature,
Gauache and' Chrome; the Solferino tones
—Van Dyck, Rubens and Raphael, and the
flesh tints—Ninon, Manon and Montespan.
The names of Dumas’s1 three heroes—
Athos, Porthos' and' Aramls—have been
given to a series of dull lilacs. All these
pinks and lilacs will be much used in
combination with the water greens. Beiges
of a light shade are also included among
the pastel tints, beginning with a ne.w
one, Blchetto, and a pale buff, Rayhet.
The browns on the card are of a golden
hue, and the grays metallic; a cloud-gray,
Corot, should be a success. With one ex
ception—Nenuphar—the yellows are pale,
but this has the brilliance of the gold cup
water Illy. Opinion is somewhat divided
on the subject of yellow, as to whether or
no it will rank high. I predict for It suc
cess as a summer eoldr.
* . *
Silk gimp of the same color as the ma
terial is used to simulate hemstitching on
some of the new woolen waists. Tucks,
braiding and cording are used extensively
on silk and woolen bodices, while waists
of shear materials show trimmings of lace
insertions entredeux, Tom Thumb fringe,
very narrow ruffles and satin babv rib
bons.
CRY NEPOTISM.
Senators Sore Because Reed's
and Francis' Relatives
Get the Plums.
COLORED BROTHERS TURNED DOWN
Mercer County Left Out in
the Cold and Threatens
Vengeance.
[Special to "The,Jersey City News.”!
TRENTON, Jan. , 5, 1900—Subsequent
developments yesterday afternoon show
ed that notwithstanding the adoption of
the prepared slate of the Republican
Senatorial caucus, it whs not accomplish
ed without a struggle. 'Much soreness is
felt in Mercer because Elijah Hutchinson,
their Senator, failed to-secure any of the
desirable fruit that fell from the plum
tree in yesterday’s-caucus of the Republi
can Senators. There' were other Senators,
too, that left the caucus in'a very Unholy
frame of mind, Tho'ire of these states
men had not been aroused solely by the
fact that, they had t>Uen frozen out in the
distribution of the more important
berths. It was partly due to the spirit
of nepotism that overhung the caucus.
Senator Charles A. iReed, the tall syca
more from Somerset,' who has done so
much towards rending ;bis party asunder
in his home county, insisted on having his
brother, Dr. Douis T, Reed, named as
Bill Clerk, and-Senator C.-Asa Francis,
the Monmouth county manikin, was just
as obdurate in insisting that his brother
in-law, George R." Hoyt, be named as
Journal Clerk. This, took two of the
choicest places for family, instead of po
litical purposes and ‘ made some of the
lawmakers very warm under the collar.
But the nepotists hgd tile votes and in
sisted that their kin be -cared for, no mat
ter” what the effect might be’ on the
party.
Reed and Franciswere last fall elected
in counties that were regarded as some
what doubtful until- the votes had been
counted off, and now ‘each feels that he
is the particular Moses that led New
Jersey into the Republican fold. Some of
their fellow Republican; Senators are will
ing to concede that Reed and Francis
did have rough hills to climb in the last
campaign, but fail to understand just
why they should want to bring their
families with them, instead of rewarding
some faithful workers in their respective
counties. These dissatisfied statesmen
evidently forget that blood, is thicker than
water. There certainly can be nothing
wrong in throwing a- few hundred dollars
into a kinsman's pbcket.
Somerset is becoming rather pronounced
in its spirit of brotheriy love. Only last
week. Assemblyman Cooper, the lone rep
resentative from that county in the lower
House of the Legislature, succeeded in
having one of his brothers named as as
sistant sergeant-at-arms of. the Assembly.
Possibly it is fortunate that Somerset
only gets one office in ■ each -House, other
wise the representatives from that coun
ty might exhaust their supply of brothers.
Just what Mercer county will get in the
final shuffle is not determined. It cer
tainly will get none of the important
places, as they were assigned at yester
day's caucus. The Mercer politicians are
beginning to sorely miss the deft hand
of ejX-Senator Skirm.in political manipu
lations at the State House. When
Skirm's political star was in the ascend
ency, Mercer came pretty near getting
everything in sight at the Capitol and
always captured a liberal share of the
legislative offices. Now the Republican
Senators seem to be inclined to give Mer
cer the marble . heart,. Last year the
county had the Senate sergeant-at-arms—
a relic from Skirm’s days in the upper
House. This year the local leaders had
promised to get the assistant sergeantcy
for R. Henri Herbert;’ who’ has done such
valiant work for tlie party among the
colored brethren. But when the Senators
met yesterday they quietly advised Sen
ator Hutchinson that he must not expect
the place and he was placated with a
promise that Herbert should have one of
the minor berths.. He may be named
as clerk to one of the committees.
There is some talk of giving Herbert the
assistant bill Supervisorship in the House
and making William Joynes a doorkeeper
in the Senate. Senator Hutchinson is
anxious to have william Rogers, of Ham
ilton, named.as a-doorkeeper. Rogers was
an important factor in the memorable
Hamilton primary contest last fall, when
Charles !P. 'McDermott was defeated for
the shrievalty nomination. Senator
Hutchinson will also name one of the
pages.
A special committee, consisting of Sen
ators Stokes, Reed and 'Hutchinson, were
named to apportion' the doorkeepers, pages
and committee clerks. These attaches
will be-'named at a caucus to be held on
Tuesday morning next at eleven o’clock.
rFho n nnmintmontc Ttr u1 err, lo T-ppol V frt +hf»
counties not represented in the more im
portant offices. Two of them will go to
Atlantic, which was. forced to give up the
Journal Clerkship to make way Cor Sena
tor Francis’ brother-in-law; two will go
to Cumberland; three to Mercer; two to
Camden, and one each to Salem, Essex,
Cape May, Bergen’ and Gloucester.
HOLY INNOCENTS' RECEPTION.
Celebration Concluded Last Nigbt
at Quartette Club Mall.
The celebration of the twenty-fifth an
niversary'Of Holy Innpcents Church, Ho
boken, concluded with a reception last
evening at Quartette Club Hall. Rector
McGill spared no pains to make the af
fair a successful one. The arrangements
perfected were of an elaborate nature.
The evening’s festivities opened with a
programme by professional talent. A
Punch and Judy show and tricks In ledg
erdemain by Professor Henderson; selec
tions from Norma by Professor Hradek;
Chopin’s Polonaise in A. by Cornelius Val
entine, were among the enjoyable fea
tures. An exhibition drill, by the Stevens
Cadets and the Honly Innocets’ Fife,
Drum and Bugle Corps followed.
The guests of the parish were received
by Recter McGill and Curate Ewens, as
sisted by Mrs. E. A. Stevens, Mrs. Rich
ard Stevens and Mrs. C. B. Alexander, of
Castle Point. Colonel E. A. Stevens act
ed as chairman of the Social Committee.
Every prominent Episcopalian In Hobo
ken was present. Visiting clergymen
from adjacent towns also participated in
the festivities. Supper was served in the
banquet hall at eleven P. M. Dancing
followed till midnight, when the affair
was brought to a close.
VAN HOUTEN POST INSTALLATION
The officers elected last month by G.
Van Houten Post No.,3, G. A. R., will be
Installed tonight at the quarters on Bel
mont avenue. Department Commander
Barrett of Camden will preside. A recep
tion and luncheon will follow.
■'1 ’ - r * v
Sports and
sportsmen.
Germanias Won Two Games
in American National
Tourney Last
Night.
FUTURE OF CYCLE RACING
International Split Looked
for—Matinee Handball—
Fourth Regiment
Games.
The Germania team of Paterson won
two games last night in the American Na
tional Tournament at the Germania As
sembly Rooms alleys. ^
The first game was between the Ge
manias and the Gle<ndales. The latter
put up poor figures and proved very easy
for the quartette from this State.
When the Morrangsides came to the
mark they forced the Glendales, a‘nd be
cause of the poor form shown by the lat
ler in the first game the Morningsides fig
ured that it would be easy for them to
score a victory. The Glendales sprang a
surprise, however, by rolling high figures
and winning by 19 pins.
In the last game the Germanias and the
Morningsides clashed and it was easy for
the former. Fuchs of the Glendales and
Armstrong of the Momingsddes tied for
high score of the night with 200. The
scores:—
FIRST GAME.
Glendale—Sch wager. 112; Schneider, 156;
Groeling. 110; Tl. Fuchs, 200; A. Fuchs, 1«9.
Total, 757. _
Genmania—W. Sauer, 1<9; L. Sauer, 166;
Clauss, 159; Chesterfield, 155; C. Sauer, lo4.
Total, 813.
SECOND GAME.
Glendale?—Schwager, 182; Schneider, 168;
Groeling, 169; R. Fuchs, 186; A. Fuchs1, 171.
Total, 876. ^ „ ,,
Morningside—Armstrong, 200; Nta.cidc-n,
185; Eiche. 162; Demmler, 187; Klingelhof
fer, 173. Total, 857.
THIRD GAME.
Germania—W. Sauer, 159; L: Sauer, 163;
Clauss. 139; Chesterfield, 158; C. Sauer,
142. Total, 781. „ ,.
Morningsidc—Armstrong, 104; Madd'ent
145- Piche, 142; Demmler, 183; Klingelhof
fer, 172. Total, 746.
The Roseville Club won a game and lost
■a game last night in the National League
tournament. The team beat the Oriental
; five in the first game and fell before the
American team in the third. The odd
game went to the Americas. They tallied
925 against the Orientals 873. The
scores:—
FIRST GAME.
Oriental—Mitchell, 142; Vogel. 142; Gill
haus. 126; Schultz, 191; Stumpfel, 1d7.
Total. 758.
Roseville Club—Wood, 17s; Badjer, 160;
Waters. 204; Van Ness, 192; Meyer, 163.
Total, 894.
SECOND GAME.
Oriental—Mitchel, 154; Vogel, 139; Glll
haus. 174; Schultz, 163; Stumpfel, 223.
Total. 873.
America—Heitzman, J70; Tedney, 154;
Cooke, 178; Feudenthal, 193; Buehler,
221; Total. 925.
THIRD GAME.
Roseville Club—Wood, 200; Badjer, 158;
Waters. 115; Van Ness, 126; Meyer, lo6;
Total. 755. _
America—Heitzman. 188; Tedney, 1d2;
Cooke, 158; Freudent'hal, 145; Buehler, 137;
Total, 780.
Mrs. Thomas F. O’Brien worn the prize
offered for the ladles of the Catholic Club
in the bowling department. Father BTady
selected the number 98, and the condition
was that tihe lady who made a score near
est that number during the month of
December would receive a handsome
chair. Mrs. O’Brien shored 98 even.
THE FUTURE OF CYCLE RACING
Governing Bodies Throughout the
World May Split Over the N. A. C
Future bicycle racing will be controlled
by two distinct bodies unless the League
of American Wheelmen, at its meeting
next month, relinquishes all control of
racing. The result will be that two sets
of international cycling championships
will be run the coming season.
The International Cycling Association
will hold a meeting this month in Paris,
when it is expected action will be taken
against the U. V. F. of France and the
U. V. I. of Italy, for refusing to- recognize
the control of the L. A. W. .in American
racing and sent their champions to this
country to compete against the National
Cycling Association riders. It is cer
tain the I. C. A. will censure the French
anid Italian organizations. They will
withdraw from the International agree
ment.
The controlling bodies in Holland,
Belgium and Germany, through their of
ficials, have practically agreed to fol
low the lead of France and Italy. These
five powerful organizations, with the Na
tional Cycling Association are expected
to formulate an international agreement,
forming a new body.
Secretary Sturmey, of the I. C. A.,
whose office is in London, recently an
nounced that Paris would be compelled to
give up the championship meet. Scot
land, according to Sturmey, is an. ap
plicant, and will be awarded the events
by the I. C. A. The Parisians have
already made announcement of the pro
gramme for a meet to be held during the
Exposition, with a prize list of about
$20,000 in money, and many valuable
prizes for the amateurs. Inasmuch as
Scotland, Endiand and Ireland have not
promoted professional sport, the fast
professionals of those countries are apt
to try for some of the French gold.
The U. V. F. has announced that -un
der no circumstances will its prize list
be changed, and that all the events will
be run off as scheduled. Under the cir
cumstances, the Paris competitions will
be the real championships of the world
and will be universally recognized as
such,
CHAMPIONSHIP HOCKEY.
Opening Game in the Amateur
Hockey League Played Lcuft Night
The Amateur Hockey League was open
ed last night at Clermont Avenue Ice
Rink. The contestants were the Crescent
A. C. team and the First Naval Battalion
team. The Crescents won by a score of
11—0. Kennedy was quickest at the face-"
off and got the sphere, which he passed
to Dobby, who tried for goal and was
blocked by Post.
A minute later Wall got the disk from
Dobby on a lightning pass sideways and
scored a fine goal straight through the
posts. The Crescents then had things
their own way. They ran up nine goals
in the first half-and two in the second,
letting up on their opponents, whom they
| had tired chasing the rubber. Summary:
Hallock ..Goal.— SheiTLer
McKenije .Point. Thompson
- Drakeley.Cover Point.Post
Kennedy.) Slack
Dobby.) (. Campbell
Harty.)Forwards.(. Kent
Wall, Capt,...) . (.* Walton
Referee—Charles J. Bowe, Clermont
A. C.
Umpires—Lesgang, South Brooklyn
Wheelmen, and B. Cook, Naval Reserves.
Time—Twenty minute halves.
BOTTLE POOL TOURNEY.
Cue Expert of the Castle Point Cy
clers in Exciting Competition.
The easily Point Cyclers- have Inaugur
ated a most interesting bottle pool tourna
ment at the clubhouse. This novel game
has taken a tirm hold on. the cue experts
and many exciting competitions have becin
held so far. Each entry plays 1" games
pf 100 points. So far each has played but
four games ,and there is plenty to inter
est the large crowd of spectators that
gathers nightly about the tables. P. Buck
is in first place and is playing great pool.
The records-:—
Won. Lost.
E. C. Miller .. * J
W. Bremer .,. “ i
V. Meyer . » 2
T. McGrane . 0 ■*
W. Midelsdorf . J
A. G. Pupke . 1 *
G. D. Taylor .. 4 \
-C. Meyer . 0 s
R. C. Welrner.
P. H. Burk .
W. A. Elcke .
W. Epper .
H. Hoorman .
C. Jann .
F. Dohrman .
C. Slonek ....
J. Obrelter ...
MATINEE HANDBALL.
Grand Street Court Games Prove In
teresting—T. Johnson a Winner.
The handball court ‘on Grand street,
which has been idle for some time, was
the scene of some lively playing yesterday
aftern-oon. when some of the best players
of the club were 'on hand to enjoy some
needed practice. The best game of the
day was that one In which T. Johnson de
feated M. Ford and J. Riley after a hard
struggle. For -Sunday’s card an interesting
game has been arranged. T. Lynch and
P. McDonald will clash in a stake game.
Yesterday’s scores:—
J. Flynn aha J. ReVehl. &
J. Hogan and'W. McManus. 14 21
M. McDonald .•’.J® J £
P. Flood and T. Foley.•„ 21 2l
M. Geraghty and Robinson. 18 21 12
'in,. McGee and A. Forbes. 21 w . -1
M. Ford and J. Riley .J? ??
FOURTH REGIMENT GAMES.
Weekly Contests at the Armory To
night—The Entries.
The regular weekly athletic competitions
at the Fourth Regiment Armory will be
held this evening as usual. Six favorites
events have been placed on the pro
gramme and some rare spot is promised.
The soldier athletes show a decided im
provement since the beginning of this
series and -the handicaps are so arranged
that all are placed on as nearly an equal
footing as possible. Among the entries
will be W. G. Edgar, Co. B; G. H. Coward;
Co. H.; Frank Kolz, Co. G; Charles
'Munzing, Co. K; J. E. Sohrbeck, So. H,
Harry Barclay, Co. B; Joseph G. Shannon,
Co. B; William Payne, Co. G; William
Brister, Co. I; Samuel Koffman, Co. G;
William Christie, Co. B; John J. Burke,
Co. B; Perry Weston^ Co. A; William
Coleman, Co. G; Henry Thoman, Co. G;
Pocklers. Co. G; H. Keiser, Co. Gj B.
Vanfierminden, Co. G; John Regan, Co. G,
and William Phiilipson, Co. B.
Curling.
The curlers in and about this city have
taken advantage of the excellent ice on
the Hoboken Rink. Already the Jersey
City, Thistle, St. Andrews -and Empire
City curling clubs’ members have taken
the opportunity to get in. some preliminary
practice for the games to be played in the
near future. The most important match
of this month will be for the Gordan
medal.
Stevens Hockey Plans.
The Stevens Hockey team will he
_ much stronger this year than ever before.
A great many games have been booked,
the majority of which are heme games.
These, will be played: at the Hoboken
Skating Ring.
GREENVILLE TURNERS’ ELECTION.
The annual election of the Greenville
Turn Verein was held last night. It re
sulted in the following officers being
elected; Adolph Becker, president; George
Scherhr, vice president; William Holman,
recording secretary; William Meisterfield,
corresponding secretary; Paul Reitect,
first turnwart; C. Graef, second turnwart;
trustees, Ernest Gothberg and Charles
Gaughlin; Auditing Committee, R. J. B.
Butz,' Rudolph Klose, John Zachus, C.
Rochde and W. Weed. The School Com
mittee will be appointed at a future meet
ing. __
SEVENTH DEMOCRATS GETTING READY
The Executive Committee of the Sev
enth Ward Democratic Club met last
night at Olympia Hall, Jackson avenue
and Dwight street, with the intention of
organizing for the year. A number of
the recently appointed members failed to
materalize, however, and' it was decided
to postpone the important business until
the regular club meeting Monday evening,
January 15.
COLUMBIA CLUB’S GAME DINNER.
A hasenpfeffer and quail dinner was
held by the Columbia Club last night at
Columbia Hall, Ocean and Cator avenues.
The game served at the supper was sent
from Somerville. Among those present
were:—Police Captain Thomas Nugent,
Detective Robert Pearson, Thomas Kelly,
Joseph Kaiser, George Heiss, William
Heiber and Judge William, A. Collins.
WATCHMAN’S LANTERN EXPLODED
A lantern carried by an employe of the
Eagle Oil Works Company in a naphtha
shed exploded last night, causing a small
blaze, which was fortunately extinguish
ed before much damage could be done. .
The blaze was first discovered' by the
watchman. The reported damage is
slight.
LAFAYETTE ASSOCIATION CONTEST
The annual election of officers for the
Lafayette Republican Association will not
be held until February. Mr. John Hauck,
a brother of Commissioner Anthony
Hswk, is a candidate for the presidency.
Captain Charles C. Barker, the present in
cumbent, will also run again.
EUCHRE TOURNAMENT POSTPONED
The euchre tournament of the Crescent
Euchre Club has been postponed Until
next Thursday evening. Prizes will be
awarded every two weeks.
GOLp DUST
GOLD DUST.
/' Scrubbing Floors
* r*
can never be made
a pleasing pastime,
but one - half the
labor will be saved
and the results im
proved by using
Gold Dust Wash
ing Powder.
Send for free booklet—“ Golden Rules
for Housework.”
THE N. K. FAIRBANK COMPANY
Chicago St. Louis NewYork Boston
SURROGATE7S NOTICES
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—NOTICE
is hereby given that the supplemental
account of the subscriber, surviving exec
utor of the estate of Hartman Vreeland,
deceased, will be audited and stated by
the Surrogate of the County of Hudson
and reported for settlement on Friday,
the 12th day of January, 1900.
Dated December 4, A. D. 1S99.
HARTMAN VREELAND.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT-NOTICE
is hereby given that the account of the
subscriber, executor of the estate of Liz
zie M. Knowlton, deceased, will be au-.
dited and stated by the Surrogate of the
County of Hudson, and reported for set
tlement on Friday, the 12th day of Janu
ary, 1900.
Dated November 29, A. D. 1899.
THOMAS F. WATSON.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF
GEORGE P. HOWELL, deceased; Will
iam H. Corbin, one of the executors of
George P. Howell, deceased, by order of
the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson Counts',
dated November 27th, 1899, hereby gives
notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, un
der oath or affirmation, within nine
months from the date of said order, or
they will be forever barred of any ac
tion therefor against said executor.
WILLIAM H. CORBIN.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF
PATRICK SULLIVAN, deceased; John
F. Nagle, executor of Patrick Sullivan,
deceased, by order of the Deputy Surro
gate of Hudson County, dated November
29th, 1899, hereby gives notice to the cred
itors of said decedent to bring in their
debts, demands and claims against the
estate of said decedent, under oath or
affirmation, within nine months from the
date of said order, or they will be forever
barred of any action therefor against said
executor. JOHN F. NAGLE.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF
DOROTHEA GROB, deceased; Joseph Graf,
executor; Dorothea Grob deceased, by order of
the Surrogate of Hudson County, dated,
October 28th, 1899, hereby gives notice to the
creditors of said decedent to bring in their
debts, demands and claims against the estate
of said decedent, under oath or affirmation
within nine months from the date of said order,
or they will be forever barred of any action
therefor against said executor.
JOSEPH GRAF.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF -JOHN
J. HILL, deceased; Richard C. Washburn,
administrator de bonis non of John J.
Hill, deceased, by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated November 17th, 1899,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the estate of said decedent,
under oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said ^rder, or they will be
forever barred of any action therefor against
said administrator de bonis non.
RICHARD C. WASHBURN.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
ALEXANDER J. GEORGE, deceased; Mark
S. Williams, administrator of Alexander J.
George, deceased, by order of the Surrogate
of Hudson County, dated November 21st, 1899,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the estate .of said decedent,
under oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of any action therefor against
said administrator.
MARK S. WILLIAMS.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS —v ESTATE OF
ELLEN F. IGOE, deceased; Joseph M. Igoe,
executor of Ellen F. Igoe, deceased, by order
of the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson County,
dated November 23d, 1899, hereby gives notice
to the creditors of said decedent to Dnng in
their debts, demands and claims against the
estate of said decedent, under oath or affirma
tion within nine months from the date of
said order, or they will be forever barred of
anv action therefor against said executor.
any • JOSEPH M. IGOE.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT — NOTICE IS
hereby given that the account of the sub
scriber, assignee of the estate of Moses E.
Clark an insolvent debtor, will be audited and
stated by the Suiffogate of the County of Hud
son and reported for settlement on Friday,
the 19th day of January, 1900.
Dated December 11, A. D. 1899.
HENRY EWALD.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
SIMON DOWNEY, deceased; Charles C.
Kelly administrator of Simon Downey, de
ceased, by order of the Deputy Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated December 7th, 1899, here
by gives notice to the creditors of said de
cedent to bring to their debts, demands and
claims against the estate of said decedent,
under oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of any action therefor against
said administrator. CHARLES C. KELLY.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
MARY KOOPMAN, deceased; Charles
Koopman, administrator of Mary Koop
man, deceased, by order of the Surrogate
of Hudson County, dated December 5th, 1899.
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the estate of said decedent, un
der oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of any action therefor against
said administrator. CHARLES KOOPMAN.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT — NOTICE IS
hereby given that the account of the sub
scriber, administrator of the estate of John L.
Kelly, deceased, will be audited and stated by
the Surrogate of the County of Hudson and
reported for settlement on Friday, the 26th
dav of January, 1900.
Dated December 2fet, A. D. 1899.
. JAMES E. KELLY.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT — NOTICE IS
* hereby given that the account of the sub
scriber, administrator of the estate of Lottie
R Baxter, deceased, will be audited and stat
ed by the Surrogate of the County of Hudson
and reported for settlement on Friday, the
26th day of January, 1900.
Dated December 20, A. D. 1899.
GEORGE ROCHESTER.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
JENNIE E. WARNE, deceased; Gilman B,
Warne, executor of Jennie E. Warne, deceased,
by order of the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson
County, dated December 15th, 1899, hereby gives
notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, under
oath or affirmation, within nine months from
the date of said order, or they will be forever
barred of any action therefor against said ex
ecutor. GILMAN B. WARNE.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATF OF
BRIDGET MORAN, deceased; Andrew Kerin
and Henry Ewald, two of the executors of
Bridget Moran, deceased, by order of the Sur
rogate of Hudson County, dated December
16th, 1S99, hereby give notice to the creditors
of said decedent- to bring In their debts, de
mands and claims against the estate of said
decedent, under oath or affirmation, within
nine month* from the date of said order, or
they will be forever barred of any action
therefor against said executors.
ANDREW KERIN,
HENRY EWALD.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE t>F
ALEXANDER A. AHRENS, deceased; Mary
E Ahrens, executrix of Alexander A. Ahrens,
deceased, by order of the Surrogate of Hud
son County, dated December 13th, 1899, hereby
gives notice to the creditors of said decedent
to bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate' of said decedent, under
oath or affirmation, within nine months from
the date of said order, or they will be forever
barred of any action therefor against said ex
ecutrix. MARY E. AHRENS.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
SAMUEL WELLMAN CLARK, deceased;
Saidee M. Clark, executrix of Samuel Wellman
Clark, deceased, by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated December 16th, 1899,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the estate of said decedent, un
der oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of any action therefor against j
said executrix, SAIDEE M. CLARK.
NOTICE TO, CREDITORS - ESTATE OP
JOHN E. CRONHAM, deceased; Letltia
Amelia, Cronham, Mary Prances Snyder and
John E. Snyder, executors of John E. Cron
ham, deceased, by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated December 18th, 1899,
hereby give notice to the creditors of said
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the estate of said decedent, un
der oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of any actibn therefor against
said executors.
LETITIA AMELIA CRONHAM,
MARY FRANCES SNYDER,
JOHN E. SNYDER.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT — NOTICE IS
hereby given that the final account of the
subscriber, administrator of estate of John
H. Bloomer, deceased, will be audited and
stated by the Surrogate of the County of
Hudson, and reported for settlement on Friday,
the 2d day of February. 1900.
Dated Dec. 26th, A. D. 1S99.
FREDERICK L. RADER.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
HENRY- F. ELSS, deceased; Minnie Elizabeth
Elss. executrix of Henry F. Elss, deceased, by
order of the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson
County, dated December 22d, 1899, hereby gives
notice to the creditors of said decedent to bring
in their . debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or
affirmation, within nine months from the date
of said order, or they will be forever barred
of any action therefor against said executrix.
MINNIE ELIZABETH ELSS.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
JULIUS RANKEWITZ, deceased; Frederick
Bussing, executor of Julius Rankewitz, de
ceased, by order of the Surrogate of. Hudson
County, dated December 18th, 1899, hereby
gives notice to the creditors of said decedent
to bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, under oath
or affirmation, within nine months from the
date of said order, or they will pe forever
barred of any action therefor against said ex
ecutor. FREDERICK BUSSING.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT — NOTICE IS
hereby given that the account of the sub
scriber, administrator de bonis non cum
testamento annexo of Alexander Wyllie, de
ceased, will be audited and stated by
the Surrogate of the County of Hudson and
reported for settlement on Friday, the 9th day
of February next.
Dated January 2, A. D. 1900.
JOHN B. VREELAND.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
CHARLES LODDICK, deceased; Mary E.
Whitmore, executrix of Charles Loddlck. de
ceased, by order of the Surrogate* of Hudson
County, dated December 2$th, 1899, hereby
gives jiotice, to the creditors of said decedent
to bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, under oath
or affirmation, within nine months from the
date of said order, or they will be forever
barred of any action therefor against said
executrix. * MARY E. WHITMORE.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
CHARLES P. FRIEND, deceased; William
Klein, administrator of Charles P. Friend, de
ceased, by order of the Surrogate of Hudson
County, dated December 29th, 1S99, hereby
gives notice to the creditors of sard decedent
to bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, ur.dei
oath or affirmation, within nine months from
the date of said order, or they will be forever
barred of any action therefor against said ad
ministrator. WILLIAM KLEIN.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
MARY E. BYRNE deceased; Julia Thorn
hill, executrix of Mary E. Byrne, deceased, by
order of the Surrogate of Hudson County, dated
December 27th, 1899, hereby gives notice to the
creditors of said decedent to bring in their
debts, demands and claims against the estate
of said decedent, under oath or affirmation,
withxn nine months from the date of said
order, or they will be forever barred of any
action therefor against said executrix.
JULIA THORNHILL.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
JOHN BRADY, deceased; Daniel Somers,
Thomas Murtha and John E. Hewitt, exec
utors of John Brady, deceased, by order of the
Surrogate of Hudson County, dated December
26th, 1899, hereby give notice to the creditors
of said decedent to bring in their debts, de
mands and claims against the estate of said
decedent, under oath or affirmation, within
nine months from the date of said order, or
they will be forever barred of any action i
therefor against said executors.
DANIEL SOMERS,
THOMAS MURTHA.
JOHN E. HEWITT,
TO SUSIE LEE CHADDOCK, WIDOW;
Helen Isable Chaddock, Infant; Belle C.
Murch, infant; Gilbert Collins, executor and
trustee under the will of William H. Chad
dock, deceased; John Van Horne, Jr.; Pat
rick Keeley and Bridget Keeley, his wife:—
You are hereby notified that at a public
sale made by the City Collector of Jersey City,
on the 6th day of October, 1896, The Mayor
and Aldermen of Jersey City purchased for
the sum of thirty dollars and two cents ALJL
the land and real estate situate in Jersey
City, in the County of Hudson and State of
New Jersey, fronting on Clendenny avenue,
which is laid down and designated as lots 14
and 16, in block number 547—1749, upon an
assessment map annexed to a report number
101, made by the “Commissioners of Adjust
ment” appointed in and for said City by the
Circuit Court of the County of Hudson, a
certified copy of which report and map was
filed' in the office of the City Collector of
Jersey City, on the 3rd day of September, 1895,
said report and map and said sale being made
pursuant to the provisions of an act of the
Legislature of New Jersey, passed March 36th,
1886, entitled:—
“An Act concerning the settlement and col
lection of arrearages of unpaid taxes, as
sessments and water rates or water rents
in cities of this State, and imposing and
levying a tax, assessment and lien in lieu
and instead of such arrearages, and to en
force the payment thereof, and to provide
for the sale of lands subjected to future
taxation and assessment.”
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are further notified that you appear
to have an estate or interest in said land and
real estate, and unless the said land and real
estate shall be redeemed, as provided In said
acts, before the expiration of six months from
and after the service hereof, a deed for the
same will be given conveying to The Mayor
and Aldermen of Jersey City, the fee simple
of said land and real estate according to the
SEY CITY- E. HOOS.
(Seal.) Attest_ M J.- 0’DONNSLlty0r'
City Clerk.
(Sale No. 6659.1
IN CHANCERY OP NEW JERSEY.
To Alfred E. Van Doren, Mrs. Alfred E.
Van Doren, George W. Waslee, Harriet
N Waslee and Mrs. William H. Myers:
Bv virtue of an order of the Court of
Chancery of New Jersey, made on the
day of the date hereof, in a cause where
in Alberta Commerce, Eugene Commerce
and Lucetta Commerce, by Albert Com
merce of Jersey City, Hudson County,
New jersey, their father and next friend,
and the said Albert Commerce, are com
plainants and you, Alfred E. Van Doren,
Mrs Alfred E. Van Doren, George W.
Waslee, Harriet N. Waslee, Mrs. William
H Myers and Susan J. Wortendyke, are
defendants, you are required to appear,
plead, answer or demur»to the bill of said
complainants, on or before the twenty
fourth day of January next, or the said
bill will be taken as confessed against
y The said bill is filed to partition certain
lands in the City of Jersey City, in the
County of Hudson and State of New Jer
sey, and of which Elizabeth M. Waslee
died seized, and you, Alfred E. Van
Doren, are made defendant because you
are one of the tenants in common therein;
and you. Mrs. Alfred E. Van Doren,
George W. Waslee, Harriet N. W'aslee
and Mrs. William H. Myers, are made
defendants because you claim to have
some estate or interest In said lands or
some part thereof.
Dated November ,23d, 1399.
GARRICK & EWALD,
Solicitors for Complainants,
JS Montgomery St.,
jersey City, N. J.
CORPORATION NOTICE
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the 11th day
of July, 1899, application was made to the
Board of Street .and Water Commissioners by
Anton W'inbkler and others for the
WIDENING AND IMPROVEMENT OP
* FERRY STREET,
from Palisade avenue to a point about 102 feet
west of Sherman avenue to the full width of
fifty ffeet.in accordance with map accompanying
said petition, and conformably to the provi
sions of Chapter 289 of the Laws of 1895, and
in the following manner:—
The street to be fifty feet wide the centra
line thereof beginning at a point being Cha
intersection of the westerly line of Palisade
avenue and the present northerly line of Ferry
street; from thence running westerly along the
present northerly line of Ferry street 852 feet
to a point, said point being the southwesterly
corner of lot 410a, block 734, City Map; from
thence running northerly along the westerly
line of said lot 410a 25 feet to a point, said
point being th.e northwesterly corner of said
lot 410a; from thence running easterly parallel
to the present northerly line of P'erry street
and distant 25 feet measured northerly at right
angles therefrom 851 feet 4 inches to a point
in the westerly line of Palisade avenue, dis
tant 25. feet measured northerly along the
westerly line of Palisade avenue, from the
point of beginning; from thence running south
erly along the westerly line of Palisade ave
nue 25 feet- to the point or place of beginning.
To cause a grade to be established and said
street graded to the established grade; to
have curb, 20 inches in depth, set on each
aide thereof; sidewalks 4 feet in width and
gutters paved 36 inches in width on either
side thereof, and bridgestone laid where nec
essary.
The lands to be taken for said proposed
widening may be described as follows:—All of
lots 58a, 59a, block 738; lot 174a, 175a of block
737; lot 290a, 291a, block 736, and lot 410a, block
734.
And notice is also given that on the 2nd
day of January, 1900. the Commissioners of
Assessment filed in the office of the Clerk of
the Board of Street and Water Commissioners
their preliminary map and report for
said improvement. showing the probable
total cost of the contemplated improve
ment and the probable amount to be
assessed on property specially benefited
thereby, the real estate to be taken for said
improvement with awards for real estate
taken .and. damages sustained, and the same
is now open to public inspection In the office
of the Clerk of said Board.
The property to be assessed for said pro
posed widening and improvement may be de
scribed as follows:—
All property fronting or abutting on
MANHATTAN AVENUE,
ffom Central to Sherman avenues.
'';A' ■ CENTRAL AVENUE,
from a point about 33 feet north of' Manhat
tan<*avenue to a point about 96.5 feet south
of Ferry street.
FERRY STREET,
from Central to Palisade avenues.
RAVINE AVENUE,
on the north Bide, from Abbett street to •
point about 135 feet west of Webster avenue.
SHERMAN AVENUE,
from Ferry street to a point about 125 feet
north of Manhattan avenue.
WEBSTER AVENUE,
, from a point about 61.6 feet south of Ferry
street to a point about 425 feet north of Ferry
street.
NEW YORK AVENUE,
from Ferry street to a point about 425 feet
north thereof.
PALISADE AVENUE,
from Ravine avenue to a point about 425 feet
north of Ferry street.
And that In accordance with the provisiona
of the Act abotfe cited the 23d day of Janu
ary, 1900, at two o’clock P. M., and the
Assembly Chamber of the City Hall are here
by fixed as the time and place when and
where the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners will meet to hear all parties inter
ested in said application and all remonstrances
againfet the said proposed improvement that
may be presented in writing.
By order Of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, January 4, 1900.
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the 2d day
of January, 1900, the Commisaionfjto^of As
sessment tiled In the office of the 'ISferk of
the Board of Street and Water Commission
ers their final assessment map and report
for the
IMPROVEMENT OF NORTH STREET,
from Central to Summit avenues, in accord
ance with petition previously presented to
said Board on the 1st day of August. 1899,
and conformably to the provisions of Chapter
217 of the Laws of 1895, and the same is now
open to public inspection in the office of the
Clerk of said Board.
And notice is also given that the following
streets or avenues or particular sections there
of are included in said assessment, namely:—
NORTH STREET,
from Summit to Central avenues.
SUMMIT AVENUE,
oh the southeast side, from "North street to- a
point about 25 feet northwest thereof.
CENTRAL AVENUE,
on the northwest side from North street to
points about 25 feet northeast and 28 feet
southwest thereof.
And that in accordance with the provisions
of the Ac.t above cited the 16th day of Janu
ary, 1900. at two o’clock P. M., and the As
sembly Chamber of the City Hall are hereby
fixed as the time and place when and where
the Board of' Street and Water Commissioners
will meet to hear, consider* and adjudicate
upon air objections to the confirmation of said
final assessment map and report that may be
presented in writing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
i Clerk.
/ Dated -Jbr^ey Cjty, January 4, 1900.
corPoraTion notice.
' Notice is hereby given that on the 2d day
of January, 1900, tire Commissioners of Assess
ment filed in the office of the Clerk of the
Hoard of Street^ and Water Commissioners
their final assessment map and report for the
IMPROVEMENT OF. CLAREMONT AVENUE,
from Bergen avenue to Hudson Boulevard, in
accordance with petition previously presented
to said Board on the* 10th day of October. 189S,
and conformably to the provisions of Chapter
217 of the Laws of 1895, and the same is no#
open to public inspection in the office of the
Clerk of said Bokrd,
. And notice i* also; given that the following
Street^,oj" d£?er&e% o# particular sections there
of ar6 mb! tided in said assessment, namely:—
1 CLAREMONT AVENUE, >
from Hudson Boulevard to Bergen avenue. J
BERGEN AVENUE,
*on the northwest side from Claremont av,
to points about 97.44 feet northeast and 50/^
southwest thereof.
And that in accordance with the provisions
of the Act above cited the 16th day of Janu
ary, 1900, at two "o’clock P. M., and the As
sembly Chamber of the City Hall are hereby"* *
fixed as the time and place when and where
the Board of Street and Water Commissioners
will meet to hear, consider and adjudicate
upon all objections to the confirmation 6f said
final assessment map and-report that may be
presented in writing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City. January 4. 1900.
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the 2.1 flay
of January, 1900, the Commissioners of Assess
ment filed in the office of the Clerk of th®
Board of Street and Water Commissioner*
their final assessment map and report for the
IMPROVEMENT OF VIRGINIA AVENUE,
between Bergen and West Side avenues. In
accordance with petition previously presented
to said Bo&rd, 18th day of July, 1899. and
conformably to the provisions of Chapter 217
of the Laws of 1S95, and the same is now
open to public Inspection in the offiee of th®
Clerk of said Board.
And notice 1s also given that the following
streets or avenues or particular sections there
of are included in - said assessment, namely:—
VIRGINIA AVENUE,
from West Side to Bergen avenues.
WEST side avenue, .
on the southeast sideT from Virginia avenu®
to points about 78.41 feet northeast and 25.84
feet southwest thereof.
BERGEN AVENUE.
on the northwest side from Virginia avenue to
points about 88.66 feet northeast and 24.9 feet
southwest thereof.
And that in accordance with the provision*
of the Act above cited the 16th day of Janu
ary, 1900, at two o’clock P. M., and the As
sembly Chamber of the City Hall are hereby
fixed as the time and place when arid where
the Hoard of Street and Water Commissioners
will meet to hear, consider and adjudicate
upon all objections to the confirmation of said
final assessment map and report that may b®
presented in writing. , _
By order of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, January 4, 1900.
IN "CHANCERS: OF NEW JERSEY.
To Luke Nolan, John Nolan, Jame9 Nolan,
Johanna Nolan and Laurence Nolan:—
By virtue of an order of the Court of Chan
cery of New Jersey, made on the day of th®
date hereof, in a cause wherein Laurenc®
Brophy is complainant and you and others ar®
defendants, you are required to appear, plead,
demur or answer to the bill of said complaint
on or before the nineteenth day of December
next or the said bill wiJl be taken as con
fessed against you.
The said bill Is filed to set aside a certain
decree of the above named Court and the sal®
thereunder made on or about February 25,
1892, and particularly set forth ifi said bill,
and foregoing an accounting, and that th®
premises therein described may be delivered ujr
to the said aomplainant, subject to all equitable
liens .thereon.
And you are made defendants because you
or one of you took part in obtaining said
fraudulent decree and received the proceed* In
money derived therefrom.
Dated October 18, 1S99.
J. HERBERT POTTS.
SoTr of Complainant,
Mo. 1 Montgomery St.,
Jersey City, N. J,

xml | txt