OCR Interpretation


The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, May 08, 1900, LAST EDITION, Image 3

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068097/1900-05-08/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WOMAN’S WORLD.
(Here Is an article that may be useful
to those who, while Ignorant of French,
f frequently dine at restaurants where
menus In that language are used:—
Cote (The Rlb)-Hence the term
"cotelette" (cutlet), which Is taken from
the loin and neck of mutton, etc. The
word “cote,” In the plural, frequently
figures on Continental menus, especially
in Switzerland and other places where
the delicious vegetable thus denominated
Is grown, it is rather like stick celery,
i but in delicacy it resembles the cardoon
still more.
Cougloff—This word, spelt in many dif
ferent ways, represents a fairly rich cake
i* made with yeast to ensure quick rising;
| It Is constantly served with tea or coffee,
especially in Germany and Austria.
Couleur—Culinary expression for the
' coloring substances used in some dishes.
Coulis—One of the reserve or stock
sauces which every chef is supposed to
keep ready for use. It resembles the
strong concentrated brown gravy which
forms underneath the fat poured off af
ter roasting a good joint. Naturally this j
never appears in any large or even suffi- i
dent quantity, so where it is often used
it has to be specially made. It is really
the German Grundsauce, and one of the
brown sauces meres of Continental re
ceipts.
(Kn) Couronne—The dishing up of cer
tain articles of food in the shape of a
ring or crown (c. f. en pyramide).
7 Court-Bouillon—The name given to the
preparation in which most Continental
cooks boil their fish, since it is a rare
thing abroad to use water alone for the
purpose.
J This practice has a double advantage,
for, beside imparting flavor to the dish,
the bouillon can afterwards be used in
the same way as ordinary stock, for pre
paring vegetables, making excellent mai
gre soups, etc.
It generally consists of an admixture of
* water, vinegar, white wine, spices, veg
etables, bay leaf. etc.
The court bouillon specified as au bleu j
is wine in which certain fish are immers
ed when it boils, thus acquiring a bluish
tint: this is the favorite way of cooking
trout.
There is another kind, viz.: a white
one. .rblch is prlndpally used for all
sorts of flit fish; it is called white be
cause the milk used in its composition
determines its color.
Crabes—The general term for the crus- I
taceans, of which the crab is the most i
« frequently served at our tables. There
are numerous varieties, some of them so
small as to be useless, except for pound- ;
ing into purees for “masking" certain
dishes. The large crab is generally eaten
cold, though it is even more delicious if
dressed and grilled, baked, or gratin.
> Crapaudlne—A term really implying
neither more nor less than grilling, either
over or in front of the fire, according to
the homely Dutch oven plan. For some
reason or other it is principally reserved .
for pigeons, partridges, etc.; these are
split open down the back, flattened, but
tered and grilled.
Craquelins (Cracknels) — A modern
French adaptation.
Crecy—The name given to a soup, of
which carrots form the principal part,
hence, any dish served a la Crecy im
plies a garnish of this vegetable.
Creme—Literally the substance which
forms over milk after it has been stand
ing. otherwise cream.
The French term applies to many prep
arations of which milk forms the prin
cipal component.
Cream in its natural condition is gen
erally served cold.
Needless to add that it is used to make j
butter, cheeses, and also for the manu- ;
facture of certain sweet3 and sauces. j
But whereas in English there are two .
distinct terms, cream and custard, the ;
one denomination does duty in the French
language, the only distinction being .that
there are cremes cuites (boiled) and
cremes froides.
The natural and most common way or
serving cream abroad is' whipped (at the
last moment) and very slightly sugared ;
and flavored; or it is sent to table in its
simplest form, with sugar and cinnamon
. handed round.
Then come the cremes crues (raw), in
cluding such articles as “mousses" or
other whipped preparations, with a va
riety of flavorings.
These are sometimes designated as a
la royale. ,
Then come the creme cuites. which rep
resent our custards; and finally, the
' creme patissieres, so called, because they
are used for filling tarts, etc., such as
eclairs, choux, etc.
Further, the cremes bavaroises must
be included, being much more of a fancy
kind: for instance, bavaroise au the and
aux feuilles de vlolettes, and this sub
division again includes a variety of
•Tromages,” which are firm and molded.
Crepe-Pancake (See pannequets, later j
°Cresson (Cress)—There are two kinds
referred to in French culinary books,
the cresson de fontain (watercress), gen
erally eaten in salads or with bread and
butter, and the cresson alenois (land
cress), which is more uncommon.
Cretes—Whether this expression be fol
lowed by the words “de coq” or not it
signifies cocks’ crests, much used in the
preparation of all kinds of garnishes and
forced meats. Those which are rather ;
large and whitish are considered the best, j
■By extension the word has come to signify
the miscellaneous collection generally
termed giblets, or abatis in French.
Crevette—Shrimp or prawn.
Croissant—-Literally crescent; the name
given to the breakfast roll of that par
ticular shape which prevails on the Con
tinent.
Cromesquis—The name for a stew or
hash of Polish origin.
Croqu-antes—A peculiar kin-d of cake,
made principally from almonds, which
has undergone a drying process in the
oven. The term sometimes refers to
sweetmeats consisting of fruit and boiled
sugar.
Croquettes—These are made with minced
remains (or fresh flesh) of fish, fowl,
meats, etc., and represent what we gener
ally call rissoles; the best ingredients, ac
cording to the French cook, are brains,
sweetbreads and other white substances.
Croquignoles—A species of pastry be
longing to the family of croquembouchea,
aiso included under the essentially Con
Wtial Shall Ws Hava for Dessert?
This question arises In the family every
flay Let us answer it today. Try Jell-O.
a delicious and healthful dessert. Pre
pared in two minutes. boiling no
baking! simply add boiling water and set
to cool. Flavors:—Lemon, orange, Rasp
berry and Strawberry. Get a package at
your grocers today. 10 cts.
tinental expression of "petlts fours.”
Crousfades—The name given to a gar
nish. It amy merely consist of fried
bread, or may be composed of short,
crisp pastry.
Croutee-au-Pot—These represent pecu
liarly thin slices of household' bread,
which are cut into the tureen before the
bouillon or pure meat stock is poured
into it. An egg is frequently beaten
into the tureen at the same time. This
plan is not at all understood by the Eng
lish cook, whose slices are invariably
too thick.
Croutons—(Sippets.) Triangular or other
fancy-cut pieces* of fried bread used for
garnishing hashes, etc.
• * *
“I do wish,” sighed a big-hearted friend
of mine, “I had courage enough to do cer
tain gracious little acts without fear of
stepping on conventionality’s toes.
"Just fake, for example, "Street Car
courtesies. Scarcely a day passes that I
don’t have a chance to extend them, and
yet beyond a few ordinary attentions I
dare not go.
”If the car Is crowded I can hunch
along and make room for a late comer,
and I may perhaps venture to hold a
child on my lap if the mother has to
stand.
“Sometimes I offer my seat to an older
woman, but I’m pretty wary of this for
fear of offending that age sensitiveness
of my sex.
“What I’m thinking of mainly in tne
way of street car courtesies is helping
women who must stand by holding their
bundles. With their arms heaped with
packages it makes me miserable to sit
still and see them reaching for a strap.
I often long to say to one in front of
me:—'Won’t you let me hold your pack
ages till you get a seat?'.
“It would be a simple thing, but a real
help, I’m sure of that. Yet if I sug
gested it I should feel as uncomfortable
as If I intended making way with the
articles. And what’s more, pessimistic
as it sounds, I’m much afraid I would
get a first-rate snubbing if I offered.
I advised her to take the risks, how
ever. And any woman who doesn’t ap
preciate this girl's thoughtfulness de
serves to swing from a trolley strap for
the rest of her days.
“I think,” says Ella Wheeler Wilcox,
n the charming May “Success,” “there
s more danger of disaster in early mar
•iaggs than in those contracted at full
naturity. The youthful choice is apt to
>e unwise. The man whom a girl thinks
:he loves at seventeen would rarely ap
jeal to her so strongly if she were twen
y-five, and the girl whom a young man
>f twenty-one believes he would like to
narry would probably not be his selec
tor, if he were thirty.. A knowledge of
he world before marriage is conducive
o contentment afterwards. The most
infortunate unions I have known were
ormed while the husband and wife were
till in early youth. The man, when he
ssumes the responsibility of matrimony
lefore he has reached maturity, has had
Ittle or no experience in the typical
lachelor life, and its attractions are like
y to seem much greater to him than if
e has already tested them. The wife
fho was married -very early also feels
he temptation to taste of life beyond the
irosaic domestic circle, although usually
n less degree than the man. She has
lot experienced enough of ballroom and
ummer resort flattery to have wearied
if it and to have become cognizant of
ts emptiness. There seems to her to be
-ayety in life which she whose youth
las been devoted to home duties has
lever known, with the result that she.
ts well as her husband, becomes rest
ess. Unless there are strong ties and
vill power to keep a husband and wife
vho are in this mental condition to the
■oad which leads away from this tem
>orary unrest, they may stray into by
>aths which lead to dissatisfaction and
.Itimate misery. It is comforting to
enow, however, that the number of un
lappy marriages is small compared to
he immense number of marriages.
Hre»-cornered fichus of white mousse
de sole edged with rich lace or
nille fringe also constitute a favorite
iming. says the “Dry Goods Econ
st.” These are not ready prepared, bu.
he last moment are carelessly draped
ass the bosom of both high and low
=ses, forming festoons and fixed by a
ich or buckles, and, according to their
ir or arrangement, totally change the
ect of the dress. It is not only on
sts that these scarfs and fichus are
pted as they are also employed for
adornment of skirts, hats and muffs.
Gauzy flowers and gauzy ribbons and
ganzv rosettes or pompons are the natur-'
al trimming tor one of the. new hats of
Hmp horsehair, "yedda” braid or soft
silky straw. These have no appreciable
weight and are a relief in hot weather,
which make a heavy hat a species of tor
ture. Double-faced satin ribbon, bows
and fans of velvet, Jetted wings and
crowns, to say nothing of birds’ plum
ages, make a hat or bonnet incredibly
hea/y to press upon the brow of a warm
day. , .
* *
A novelty in skiht-finisfhing, where the
material used is cloth or some pastel
shade, is to ornament the box pleat by
rows of machine stitching in silk of a
darker color than that of the cloth. Self
colored stitching would not be apt to show
very well.
The same scheme of ornamental rows
of machine stitching is applied to the
heavy folds of cloth which nearly meet
in the inverted back. Finish the rows
by arrow-head points where the fullness
is released from the folds.
* * •
A Baechelfk is the name of a pointed
hood which has a seam, down the centre
and a tassel on top. It must be roomy
enough to cover a bonnet or small round
hat in case of a sudden rain storm. The
Baschelik’s cut in the same piece as the
collar or little cape which covers the
shoulders, and terminates with two tassel
ed points which tie in front.
* . *
Foulard scarfs, or simple lengths of
foulard silk without the conventional wo
ven border, are used to twist about straw
hats for wear of a morning. A foulard
gown is not a robe to be worn on cere
monious occasions, and you will be well
up in the front of fashion if you have a
simple straw hat trimmed with a breadth
of foulard matching your street gown, for
wearing in the cars or down the street on
a hot summer morning.
' • . *
Mousseline de sole is used for trimming
on many silk petticoats in place of chiffon.
One skirt which is trimmed with it has
the mousseline edged with a wash blonde
lace and made up with a Tom Thumb
fringe of the silk.
HOBOKEN BOMBS.
Common Council Surprised
Everyone by Doing Many
Queer Things.
FAGAN’S WISHES DISREGARDED.
Reasons for Various Ap
pointments Puzzle Even
Those in the Game.
The most interesting feature in con
nection with the reorganization of the Ho
boken Common Council yesterday after
noon was the objection of Councilman
Richard Greden to the appointment of
Henry V. Kessler as Second Assistant
City Clerk. Greten objected to Kessler's
appointment because he believed that he
was not old enough for the office.
"I have heard It said that young Kess
ler is still a minor,” he said. "The truth
of this assertion. I am not in a position
to deny or affirm. But I must say that
Kessler, In my opinion, is not experienced
enough to realize tho important respon
sibilities of the office this Board is about
to el,eet him to and on this ground I
cannot vote for him.”
The lobby broke out into cheers when
Greten finished speaking, but the appoint
ment of Kessler was announced neverthe
less. It was a big surprise to every one.
In appearance Kessler is a mere boy.
His friends in Hoboken say he is not
older than nineteen at the most. Coun
cilman Peter Kessler, his father, denies
this, however.
"My son is not a minor,” he said, em
phatically, when questioned by a reporter.
“He attained his majority two years ago
and he will be twenty-four years old his
next birthday. If he looks young it is
no fault of his. As for being able to as
sume the responsibilities of the office I
can say that he is well able to do that.
There have been plenty of worse appoint
ments Jn Hoboken. My eon will make a
conscientious and painstaking public of
ficial.”
The appointment of Councilman James
Londrigan as first assistant to City Clerk
John Haggerty came as expected. “The
News” predicted this over >a month ago.
Londrigan submitted his resignation as
a member of the Council to the new
board, and as everything had been ar
ranged it was accepted without comment.
The reorganization of the board was
made eventtul by several unlooked for
deals. Among these was the election of
Councilman Carl Schultze as chairman.
This deal was consummated not earlier
than Sunday night and came as a big
surprise to everyone. Even those who
professed to be on the inside were com
pletely nonplussed when the selection was
made known.
Another of the surprises was the retire
ment of Second Assistant City Clerk
Joseph McGovern and his appointment as
License Inspector. With this came Mayor
Lawrence Fagan's announcement of dis
approval and his suggestion of Rounds
man David Fall as a fit appointee to the
office. The Mayor in a communication to
the Council expressed the opinion that it
was an unnecessary expense to the city
to pay an extra salary for this office
when a member of the police department
could do the work just as well. The
Council disagreed with the Mayor, how
ever, and appointed McGovern Instead of
Fall.
McGovern and the Chief Executive have
always been the closest of friends, and
just what led to the rupture between
them is a matter of much conjecture. A
little incident in connection with the ap
pointment may throw some light on the
matter. Just before the new Council
convened the Mayor and McGovern had a
lively tilt in the former’s private sanc
tum in the City Hall.
“I never stepped over your traces and
I don't see why you should turn me down
now,” McGovern is reported as saying to
■his Chief.
"That’s all right, Joe, but I don’t mean
to stand for any such nonsense as this,”
the Mayor replied. "The office of License
Inspector can be looked after by the po
lice department, and I don’t mean to have
any private man fill it if I can help it.”
Fagan and McGovern are on the outs,
and whether or not they will patch up
their differences remains yet to be seen.
There were several other things done
by the new Council that occasioned as
tonishment. Among these were the reap
pointments of Building Inspector Freder
ick Steigleiter and Street Commissioner
Bernard Boyle. The axe was to fall on
both these officials’ heads, it was an
nounced authoritlvely weeks ago, and
much hard work must have been ac
complished by them to ward off the
blows.
The appointments to all the minor of
ficers was agreed upon long ago and
they occasioned no surprise.
The Mayor’s annual message was a
much tamer document than was antici
pated by his friends and enemies. It was
accepted without comment by the poli
ticians generally. The different city de
partments were given credit for their
efficiency and the usual suggestions and
recommendations were made to each.
Among other things the Mayor urged up
on the Council the necessity of establish
ing public recreation grounds for the
children of the poor and the need of a
new public school In the meadow sec
tion. The finances of Hoboken, in his
opinion, compare favorably with those of
any city in the State. The bonded debt
of the city is now $1,424,000, o‘f which
amount $495,000 was issued in his en
cumbency. Bonds to the amount of $185.
750 were redeemed in £is administration.
No bonds will come due during the years
1900 and 1901, but from 1901 to 1902 *196,
090 of uptown street certificates will have
matured. The tax levy for 1S99-1900 was
$647,662.51, of which $243,195.97 was for State
and county purposes. The sinking funds
of the city amount to $55,000 and will in
crease at the rate of about $20,000 yearly,
that being the amount directed by law
to be placed in the tax levy for the re
demption of bonds. There Is $94,876.83
worth of outstanding Improvement cer
tificates, which Is '$20,923.69 less than was
outstanding last year.
BAD SCARE OVER SMALL FIRE
The residents in the neighborhood of
Crescent avenue and Harmon street were
given a bad scare last night about nine
o’clock, when smoke was seen coming
from every window of the three-story
brick house occupied by Mrs. Buckley, at
No. 25 Crescent avenue. A telephone
message was sent to No. 5 truck, on Com
munipaw avenue, and the firemen broke
in the front door to reach the fire. It
was discovered in the kitchen. The
family was out at the time.
A rumor got abroad that thieves had
entered the house and caused the fire. An
investigation failed to disclose any evi
dence of a burglar's visit. The family
moved in but a few daya ago
A GREAT RUSH EXPECTED TODAY
FOR THE PREFERRED SHARES OF
THE SIEGEL-COOPER COMP ANY.
.F.H.Cooper
VICE PRES..
ff&txy Siegel
B.J-GfiEEriHUT
Secy, a me as
CHICAGO
Judging from present Indications, there
will be an unprecedented rush for the 6
per cent, guaranteed shares of the S'legel
Cooper Co. Co-Operative Stores, subscrip
tions for which opened this morning at 10
o'clock. Already letters have been re
ceived by the thousand from all over the
country, and every incoming mail swells
the mountain of applications that will be
opened Monday by a special force of
clerks employed for the purpose by the
Central Trust Co., who is acting for the
corporation in this matter.
The plan itself has aroused great inter
est not only in New York and Chicago,
where the two great stores to be united
into one mammoth business are located,
but throughout the land. It simply means
that co-operation is to be tried on a large
scale, not by amateurs in the business,
not by theorists, but by practical and emi
nently successful merchants of national
reputation.
The central. Idea governing Is to not only
interest in the work of building up to still
greater proportions a business that is al
ready reaching way up Into dazzling mil
lions of annual sales every one of its 6,000
or 7,000 clerks, but also to interest in its
army of co-workers some 60,000 or 93,001
customers who, by purchasing 1, 2 or 3
shares of stock, become directly and un
divorceably chained to the store and its
future. It is accepted as a fact, and it
certainly stands to .reason, that a con
sumer of dr>‘ goods or any other of the
70 different lines of merchandise these
great stores deal in, once he becomes a
shareholder, will prefer to deal with the
store he is part owner of in preference to
stores he has no interest whatever in.
Now, SO.COO shareholders can, by pur
chasing but $2C0.03 a year from the Co
Operative Siegel-Cooper Stores, increase
their business $16,003,010.00 annually, which
amount of business would make them
enormously successful and highly profit
able even should the rest of the world
not buy a single dollar's worth from these
stores. But when you consider that th s
increase Is to follow a retail business that
already reaches Into the tens of millions
of dollars annually, the prospects of the
Co-Operative Siegel-Cooper Stores seem
indeed very brilliant.
In Europe the co-operative plan of store- I
keeping is more familiar than here. It !
has been in vogue there for centuries, and |
its worth is known. Glasgow, practically
the home of the co-operative storekeeping
idea, is full of such concerns with a bril
liant record of merchandising behind
them. In London the great Army and
Navy Stores, strictly a co-operative in
stitution, which was started with $50.03
shares, is now doing the largest retail
business in England, and its prosperity
has reached such a height that the
original $50.00 shares now seH for over
$5CO.OO in the open market. The Bon
Marche, the greatest retail store in
France, is strictly a co-operative concern,
even the Board of Directors being an
nually elected from the ranks of its most
able employes. Sir Thomas Lipton, Eng
land's, if not the world’s, greatest tea
merchant, appreciated the value of enlist
ing the interest of the public and sold to
his customers in shares of £5 one-half
interest in his great chain of tea stores.
Thesa shares, as the result of the great
increase of business following the reor
ganization, now sell for three times the
subscription price of £5.
Here ir. America Messrs. Proctor &
Gamble years ago decided that the best
way of getting the best work out of em
ployes was to give them an interest in
the business, and their success was in
stantaneous, the yearly dividends paid to
its employes having steadily and greatly
increased.
Siegel-Cooper Co. will provide a fund of
$2,053,000 worth of its common stock to be
held in trust by the Central Trust Co. of
New York, the dividends upon which will
be annually paid to such of its employes
as have been there three years or more,
and should any of them after 10 years of
service become incapacitated from further
work the dividends will be paid to them
for life, thereby providing a pension fund
for empldyes who heretofore were always
and entirely thrown upon their own re- ;
sources. As the Siegel-Cooper Stores also
have a benevolent feature that furnishes
doctors and medicines free of charge for
all its employes, pays weekly allowances
to sick members, secures for them vaca- ;
tions in summer, and finally buries them
at its own expense should they die while
in the employ of the store, it can be said .
that the owners of these two great stores
have certainly done everything that could1
possibly be devised for the welfare of the
army of helpers.
The investment feature will surely be
popular with the great mass of people
who now keep their money in savings
banks at 3 or 3% per cent, interest per
annum, for the preferred shares of the
Siegel-Ccoper Co. are guaranteed to pay
6 per cent, annually for 5 years, and will
no doubt pay eventually considerably
more. Just as soon as the influence of the
great army of shareholders makes itself
felt, and the business keeps on growing
and growing, the shares that now can be
had for ?50 each will be worth consider
ably more.
The present owners will remain in con
trol. there being no change of manage
ment contemplated—in fact, it is part of
the plan to deposit all the stock holdings
of the present owners with the Central
Trust Co. of New York for 10 years, there
by absolutely insuring to the shareholders
the stability and continuance of the same
business policy that has made the great
success of Siegel-Cooper Co. possible.
The President of the new Siegel-Cooper
Co. will be Mr. Henry Siegel, who ever
since Siege!, Cooper & Co. was started in
Chicago 13 years ago has occupied the
position at the helm. To his great ability
as a merchant is to a large extent due
the remarkable success of the enterprise
at the head of which he has stood now
for so many years. Well known both in
the East and West, his sterling character
and open-hearted charity have made him
honored and beloved amongst all men.
Mr. P. H. Cooper is to be the Vice
President of the Siegel-Cooper Co., and
has occupied the same office ever since
the Arm began business. He is a man of
strong individuality, a past master of the |
art of advertising, and at present directs
the affairs of the Chicago store, the won
derful success of which is a monument to
his ability.
Mr. B. J. Greenhut is to be the Secretary
and Treasurer of the Siegel-Cooper Co.
Co-Operative Stores, and the finances of
the firm will enjoy his special care and
attention. They could not rest in abler
nor more conservative hands.
It is proposed to begin taking subscrip
tions for the 6 per cent, guaranteed pre
ferred shares of the Siegel-Cooper Co. Co
Operative Stores tomorrow and to keep
on taking them all week. The right, how
ever, is reserved to close subscriptions at
any moment upon one day’s notice in the
daily papers, and it goes without saying
that within a very few days this notice
will appear; so all tvho do not want to bo
too late should speak up quickly.
ORGANIZED AID ELECTION
Same Officers Chosen at Last
Night’s Meeting for
Ensuing Year.
At a meeting of the Organized Aid As- j
soclation, held April 30. it was decided
that the Board of Directors should meet
at a later date for the special purpose of |
electing officers, and accordingly the May
or’s office at City Hall was thrown open
last evening to the Aid people.
It was not a lengthy meeting, lasting
perhaps from thirty to forty minutes, and
owing no doubt to the fact that the
Directors had already made up their
minds to re-elect all officers. In conse
quence the officers for the ensuing year
now stand:—Hon. Gilbert Collins, presi
dent; Mr. Thomas Gopsil, Mr. Robert
Davis and Mrs. G. W. Clerihew, vice pres
idents; Mr. Myron J. Purst, treasurer, and
Mrs. Brice Collard, secretary. Mrs. Badg
ley was also re-engaged as agent for the
ensuing year.
About the only matter of business dis
cussed aside from the election was an en
tertainment to be given for the benefit
of the Organized Aid in the Jersey City
Club Theatre, May 29, under direction of
Miss Frankenfield, ef this city.
The members of the Board of Directors
are:—G. T. Smith. Dr. T. R. Chambers,
C. H. Hartshorne. W. E. Drake, J. W.
Hardenbergh, Robert L. Flemming, A J.
Newbury, Joseph A. Dear, Dr. B. P.
Craig, Mrs. W. D. Edwards. J. J. Toffey,
E. B. Klersted. John W. Heck, Otto
Crouse, Mrs. Hudspeth-Benson, William
C. Brown, the Rev. E. L. Stoddard, the
Rev. Cornelius Brett, Miss Cornelia F.
Bradford.
ONE LEGGED RUNAWAY BOY.
Voting William Kelly's Absence
Alarms H:s Father.
John Kelly, of No. 118 Lembeck avehute,
reported to the Fifth precinct police last
evening that his son, William Kelly, fif
teen years old, had been absent ifejra
home since noon yesterday. H!e explain- ,
ed that this was something unusual, as
the boy had but one leg, and was forced 1
to use crutches and had never been in the !
habit of going far from home. When last i
seen the boy was playing with two com
panions whose names he did not know.
Up to a late hour the boy had not re
turned. The police of the variotns pre
cincts were notified to look out for the
runaway.
TO PUNISH RAILROAD.
Counsel Wants Lehigh Valley
Attached for Contempt.
An application was made to Vice Chan
cellor Emery yesterday morning to have
the officers of the Greenville and Hudson |
Railroad Company, which Is the name un- '
der which the Lehigh Valley is building a '
line across Hudson county, at- j
tached for contempt of court. Some
time ago the Morris and Cumming Dredg
ing Company through the Attorney Gen
eral, obtained an injunction from the
court restraining the company from con
structing tracks across Chapel avenue in \
the Greenville district. Tracks were laid
across Chapel avenue a few days ago and
the complainants in the case allege that
the Greenville and Hudson people violat
ed the solemn injunction of the Court of
Chancery in putting down the rails.
To this the company replied that the
rails were not laid by the Greenville and
Hudson Company but by another corpor
ation duly incorporated under the laws of
this State, and. therefore, the Greenville
and Hudson Company had not violated
any injunction.
To this Linsley Garrison, representing
the Attorney General, replied that al
though the work of laying the tracks was
done under another name it was really
the same company which did the work,
and it was therefore guilty of contempt.
The Vice Chancellor took the matter un
der advisement.
Charles and William H. Corbfti, repre
senting the railroad company, moved that
the injunction restraining the Greenville
and Hudson Company from laying the
tracks be dissolved, and after consider
able argument the Vice:Chancellor denied
the application.
OLD ORDER GERMAN BAPTISTS.
Reduced Rates to Catoden, Ind.*
Pennsylvania Railroad
For meeting of Old Order of German
raptist Brethren at Camden, Ind., June
to 5, 1900, the Pennsylvania Railroad i
Company will sell, from May 31 to June 3, j
inclusive, excursion tickets to Camden, j
Ind., from stations on its line west of
Baltimore, Md. (not inclusive), west of |
and Including -Lancaster, Reading, and j
from stations south of and including Sun
bury, at rate of one first-class limited
fare for the round trip. Tickets will be
good returning until July 5, Inclusive,
AUTOMOBILE SCORCHING.
Bicyclists Complain of Danger From
Fast Vehicles.
Bicycle riders, drivers and pedestrians
have joined In a request to the Street
and Water Board and Boulevard Com
missioners to have ordinances passed lim
iting the speed of automobiles on the
Boulevard and through the streets of Jer
sey City. There are more of these mod
ern vehicles in use than most people
imagine and the speed of some exceeds
the limit put on bicycle riders and drivers.
About eight miles an hour is the speed al
lowed a cyclist on the Boulevard or in
the streets. The ordinance also provides
explicitly for turning corners and the
speed allowed.
Bicycle riders who patronize the Boule
vard and asphalted thoroughfares are
somewhat afraid' of these automobiles,
when run at a high rate of speed. An
instance of the speed employed was not
iced yesterday on York street, which
street is well patronized by riders, being
the only good approach to the Boulevard.
An automobile raced up and down York
street, from Henderson to Hudson, at a
speed not less than twenty miles an hour.
Every day these machines can be seen
going at a very fast rate of speed on
the Boulevard and York street. The
Boards having power to pass these ordin
ances will be earnestly requested to act
in this matter as soon as possible.
BARNEY WADE'S GOOD WORK.
Police Captain Cox returned to duty at
the Montgomery street station yesterday
after an illness lasting seven weeks. The
attack came shortly after the Armory
ball. During the Captain's absence Ser
geant Bernard Wade was in command.
He handled the affairs of the precinct like
a veteran and things were run like clock
work, The precinct was entirely free
from crime during his time as commander,
which speaks well for his efficiency as a
police officer. __
KNIGHTS TEMPLAR BANQUET.
Fast Commanders Met Last Evening
—Annual Conclave Meats Friday*
[Special to "The Jersey City News.”]
TRENTON, May 8. 1900.—The forty-sec
ond annual conclave of the New Jersey
Grand Cemmandery, Knights Templar,
will convene in Masonic Temple today.
Tho Past Commanders' Association
held its eleventh annual meeting In the
asylum of Palestine Commandery last
evening, at which the officers for the
ensuing year were chosen, as follows:—
President, Isaac S. Roberts, St. Elmo,
No. 14; vice president, Leonard L. Great,
Melita, No. 13; secretary and treasurer,
Charles Bechtel, Palestine Commandery,
No. 4.
After the meeting the members of the
association adjourned to the colonial
room of the Trenton House, where a
banquet had been spread in their honor.
TO Htux xx FLOOD, DENNIS FLOOD. HER
husband; Catherine Black, Hugh Black, her
husband; Honora Lyng, Infant; Lizzie Lyng,
infant; Martin Lyng, Elizabeth Lyng, his
wife; Amelia C. Macomber, Effle C. Wlnant,
Louise C. Van Winkle, Sophie C. Henderson,
Individually and as executrices under the
Will of Abraham Collerd, dec'd; Henry
Macomber, James Winant, John E. Van
Winkle, Charles Henderson, Horace Mon
tague, Clara Montague, his wife; Abraham
Collerd, George W. Conklin, Dodge and Bliss
Company, Charles B. Converse, and Winifred
Collins, Eliza Deevy, James Scarry, tenants:—
You are hereby notified that at a public sale
made by the City Collector of Jersey City, on
the 14th day of April, 1806, The Mayor and
Aldermen of Jersey City purchased for the
sum of nine hundred and thirty-eight dollars
and thirty-eight cents ALL the land and real
estate situate in Jersey City, in the County of
Hudson and State of New Jersey, fronting on
Beacon avenue, which Is laid down and desig
nated as lot 7a, In block number 665,
upon an assessment map annexed to a report
number 99, made by the “Commissioners of
Adjustment” appointed In and for said City by
the Circuit Court of the County of Hudson, a
certified copy of which report and map was
filed in the office of the City Collector of Jer
sey City, on the 14th day of May, 1895, said
report and map and said sale being made pur
suant to the provisions of an act of the legis
lature of New Jersey, passed March 30th, 1886,
entitled:—
“An Act concerning the settlement and collec
tion of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess
ments and water rates or water rer ts in
cities of this State, and imposing and levy
ing a tax, assessment and lien in lieu and
instead of such arrearages, and t> en
force the payment thereof, and to provide
for the sale of lands subjected to future
taxation and assessment.”
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are further notified that you appear
to have an estate or interest in said land and
real estate, and unless the said land and real
estate shall be redeemed, as provided in said
acts, before the expiration of six months from
and after the service hereof, a deed for r»je
same will be given conveying to The Mavnr
and Aldermen of Jersey City, the fee simple
of said land and real estate according to the
provisions of the said act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J.. March 8th, 1900.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JER
SEY CITY.
E. HOOS,
(Seal.) Mayor.
Attest- M. J. O'DONNELL.
City Clerk.
(Sale No. 6174.)
TO HETTY FLOOD, DENNIS FLOOD. HER
husband; Catherine Black, Hugh Black, hes
husband; Honora Lyng, infant; Lizzie Lyng,
infant; Martin Lyng, Elizabeth Lyng, his
wife; Amelia C. Macomber, Effie C. Winant,
Louise C. Van Winkle, Sophie C. Henderson,
individually and as executrices under the
Will of Abraham Collerd, dec’d; Henry
Macomber, Jame§ Winant, John E. Van
Winkle, Charles Henderson, Horace Mon
tague, Clara Montague, his wife; Abraham
Collerd. George W. Conklin, Dodge and Bliss
Company, Charles B. Converse, and Patrick
Elward, tenant:—
You are hereby notified that at a public sale
made by the City Collector of Jersey City, on
the 14th day of April, 1836, The Mayor and
Aldermen of Jersey City purchased for the
sum of five hundred and ninety-three dollars
and ten cents ALL the land and real
estate situate in Jersey City, in the County of
Hudson and State of New Jersey, fronting on
Beacon avenue, which is laid down and desig
nated as lots 8b and 8c, in block number 663,
upon an assessment map annexed to a report
number 99, made by the “Commissioners of
Adjustment” appointed in and for said City by
the Circuit Court of the County of Hudson, a
certified copy of which report and map was
filed in the office of the City Collector of Jer
sey City, on the 14th day of May, 1895, said j
report and map and said sale being made pur
suant to the provisions of an act of the Legis
lature of New Jersey, passed March 30th, 1886,
entitled:—
“An Act concerning the settlement and collec
tion of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess
ments and water rates or water rents in
cities of this State, and imposing and levy
ing a tax, assessment and lien in lieu and
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce
the payment thereof, and to provide for
the sale of lands subjected to future taxa
tion and assessment.”
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are further notified that you appear
to have an estate or interest in said land and |
real estate, and unless the said land and real
estate shall be redeemed, as provided in said
acts, before the expiration of six months from
and after the servipe hereof, a deed for the
same will be given conveying to The Mayor
and Aldermen of Jersey City, the fee simple
of said land and real estate according to the
provisions of the said a^t.
Dated Jersey City, N. J.. March 8th, 1900.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JER
SEY CITY.
E. HOOS,
(Seal.) Mayor.
Attest:- M. J. O’DONNELL,
City Clerk.
(Sale No. 6175.)
TO WILLIAM FOSTER, ELIZA J.
Nelson, widow; Anna Riley, widow;
Robert Watson, Fannie Watson, his
wife; Charlotte Clapp, and James N.
Nelson, surviving executor and trustee
under the will of Isabella Webb, dec’d:
You are hereby notified that at a pub
lic sale made by the City Collector of
Jersey City, on the 16th day of April,
1895, The Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey
City purchased for the sum of ninety-five
dollars and ninety-nine cents ALL the
land and real estate situate in Jersey
City, in the County of Hudson and State
of New Jersey, fronting on McAdoo ave
nue, which is laid down and designated
as lots 123 and 124, in block number 1274,
upon an assessment map annexed to a
report number 93, made by the “Commis
sioners of Adjustment” appointed in and
for said City by the Circuit Court of the
County of Hudson, a certified copy of
which report and map was filed in the
office of the City Collector of Jersey
City, on the 24th day of October, 1893.
said report and map and said sale being
made pursuant to the provisions of an
act of the Legislature of New Jersey,
passed March 30th, 1SS6, entitled:—
“An Act concerning tne seiu^-men,. and collec
tion of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess
ments and water rates or water rents in
cities of this State, and imposing and levy
ing a tax, assessment and lien in lieu and
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce
the payment thereof, and to provide for
the sale of lands subjected to future taxa
tion and assessment.'* *
And the several supplements thereto.
Ana you are further notified that you ap
pear to have an estaie or interest in said land
and real estate, and unless the said land and
real estate shall be redeemed, as provided in
s&id acts, before the expiration of six months
from and after the service hereof, a deed for
the same will be given conveying to The Mayor
and Aldermen of Jersey City, the simple
oi said land and real estate according to the
previsions of the sa»d act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J., May 1, 1900.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JER
SEY CITY.
E. HOOS,
[Seal.] Mayor.
Attest— M. J. O’DONNELL,
City Clerk.
(Sale No. 5376.)
HUDSON COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT.
To tls Unknown Owners and Persons Inter
ested in the Lands Below Described:—
Take Notice that on the sixteenth day of
April, eighteen hundred and ninety-five, The
Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City purchased
for the sum of seven hundred and forty-seven
dollars and fifteen one-hundredths dollars
($747.15), at a sale for adjusted taxes, etc.,
made by the City Collector of Jersey City,
pursuant to Chapter CXII of the Laws of
1886 and the supplements thereto and amend
ments thereof, the lands known as lot No. 8,
in block 1299, fronting on Bergen avenue, Jer
sey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, as desig
nated and laid down upon an assessment map
annexed to report No. 93, made by Commis
sioners of Adjustment'appointed for said City
by the Court pursuant to said Chapter of the
Laws of 18S6, and the supplements thereto,
which lands so sold are described by metes
and bounds as follows, to wit:—All that cer
tain lot of land and premises, situate, lying
and being in Jersey City, Hudson County, New
Jersey, beginning at a point in the westerly
line of Bergen avenue, distant 503.20 feet north
erly from the northerly line of a iane as shown
and laid down on map aforesaid and In line
of lands now or formerly of the estate of Mar
garet Woods, deceased: running thence souther
ly along the westerly line of Bergen avenue
seventy-three feet; thence westerly 149.33 feet
to a corner of lands now or formerly of the
estate of Margaret Woods, deceased; thence
northeasterly along a line of the lands of said
estate 58.73 feet to a corner; thence south
easterly along another line of the lands of
said estate 148 feet, more or less, to the place
of beginning, and by virtue of an order made
on the sixteenth day of February, nineteen
hundred, by the Surrogate of the County of
Hudson, you are required to redeem said lands
from said sale on or before the fourteenth
day of September, nineteen hu:\dred, or to
show' cause on said day before said Court, at
the Court House, in Jersey City aforesa’d, at
ten A. M., why a deed therefor should not be
delivered to said purchasers, their legal repre
sentatives or assigns, pursuant to the statute,
and whv such further order should not be
made as is by the statute provided.
Dated Jersey City, February 16th, 1900
THE MAYOR & ALDERMEN OF JERSEY
CITY.
By EDWARD HOOS.
Mayor.
(Sale No. 5389.)
•NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT.—NOTICE
is hereby given that the final account
of the subscriber, administratrix with the
will annexed of Christopher R. King:, de
cea.«ed. will be audited and stated by the
Surrogate of the County of Hudson, and
reported for settlement on Friday, the
25th day of May next.
Dated April 18, A. D. 1900.
AGNES E. KINO.
SPECIAL MASTER'S HALE—IN CHANCER7
of New Jersey.
Between Bridget Hoffman et al., complain
ants, and Michael E. Hoffman et ux., et als.,
defendants.
On bill for partition and decree for sale.
Jwhn J. Mulvaney, Solicitor.
By virtue of a decree of the Court of Chan*
eery of New Jersey, made in the above stated
cause bearing date March 12th, 1900, directing
j a sale of all and singular the premises men*
| tloned and described in the bill of complaint
! In said cause and said decree for sale, I,
William G. E. See, one of the Special Masters
in Chancery of New Jersey, snail sell at pub
lic vendue to the highest bidders, in such por
tions as to me shall seem most for the interest
of the parries, on *
THURSDAY, the thirty-first day of May,
A. D. 1900.
at two o’clock in the afternoon, at the room*
of the Board of Trade, No. 65 Montgomery
street (under Second National Bank), Jersey
City, N. J., all the following lands and prem
ises, being the same described in said decree
for sale, to wit:—•
All that certain tract or parcel of land and
premises situate, lying and being In Jersey
City, in the County of Hudsofi ^nd . Btate of
New Jersey, known aird describe on a 'map
entitled “Map of property belonging to Stephen
W\ Smith, situate In Jersey City, tariMm
County, New Jersey,” and filed'in the office ot
the Clerk of said County November 7th, 1849,
as lot numbered one hundred and nineteen, and
bounded afe follows:—Beginning at a point on
the southerly aide of Morgan street, three
hundred and seventeen (317) fefct westerly from
the southwesterly comer of Morgan and War
ren streets; thence running Southerly seventy
two (72) feet and seven (7) inches; thence west
erly twenty (20) feet and two (2) inches; thence
northerly sixty-nine (#9) feet and ten (10)
inches to the southerly side of Morgan street;
thence easterly along the southerly side of
Morgan street twenty (20) feet Co the- place of
beginning.
Also all that certain piece or parcel of land
known and described on a map entitled “Map
of property belonging to Stephen W. Smith,
situate in Jersey City, Hudson County, New
Jersey,” as lot numbered one hundred and
twenty (120), and bounded as follows:—Begin
ning at a point on the southerly side of Morgan
street three hundred and seventy-five (375) feet
easterly from the southeasterly, corner of Pros
pect and Morgan streets; thence running south
erly seventy-two (72) feet and seven (7) inches;
thence easterly twenty (20) feet and two (2)
Inches; thence northerly seventy-five (75) feet
and five (5) inches to the southerly aide of
Morgan street; thence westerly along the south
erly side of Morgan street twenty (20) feet t#
the place of beginning.
Also all that certain tract, piece or parcel
of land and premises hereinafter particularly
described, situate, lying and being in Jersey
City in the County of Hudson and State of
New Jersey. Commencing at a point distant
eighty-five (85) feet one (1) inch from the
southwest corner of Morgan and Warren
streets; thence running westerly on the south
side of Morgan street sixteen (16) feet five (5)
inches; thence southerly and parallel with
Warren street ninety-six (96) feet three (3)
inches; thence easterly sixteen (16) feet five (5)
inches; thence riortherly ninety-six (96) feet ten
(10) inches to the point or place of beginning.
Known as Cottage number six Marine Terrace,
being part of lots one hundred and thirty
(130) and one hundred and twenty-nine (129) in
Block fifty (30) on the map aforesaid.
Also all that certain tract, piece or parcel
of land and premises hereinafter particularly
described, situate, lying and being in Jersey
City in the County of Hudson and State of
New Jersey: Commencing at a point one hun
dred and one (101) feet six (6) inches from the
southwest corner of Morgan and Warren
streets; thence running westerly on the south
side of Morgan street sixteen (16) feet four
(4) inches; thence southerly and parallel with
Warren street ninety-five (95) f£et eight (8)
inches; thence easterly sixteen (Nr* feet four
(4) inches; thence northerly jginet&six (96) feet
three (3) inches to the point of place of be
ginning. Known as Cottage number seven.
Marine Terrace, being part of lot one hundred
and twenty-nine (129) in Block fifty (50) on the
map aforesaid.
Also all that certain piece or parcel of land
and premises with the three story and base
ment brick dwelling house thereon erected,
situate and being in the Fourth Ward of Jer
sey City in the County of Hudson and St^te of
New Jersey, bounded and described as follows,
to wit: Beginning at a point on the southerly
side of South Seventh (now Second) street,
distant one hundred and ninety-six (196) feet
and five (5) inches easterly from the easterly
side of Erie street (being twenty-one (21) feet
and five (5) inches east of the easterly side of
lot twenty-seven (27) in Block one hundred
and forty-nine (149) as the same are laid down
on the “Map of Jersey City, Hudson County,
New Jersey,” made in 1861 by R. C. Bacot) and
from thence as a beginning point running
southerly perpendicular to South Seventh
street, to, through and beyond the centre of a
party wall standing partly on the premises
hereby conveyed and partly on the premises
next adjoining westerly thereto one hundred
(100) feet; thence easterly parallel with South
Seventh street seventeen (17) feet ten (10)
inches; thence northerly perpendicular to South
Seventh street, to, through and beyond a party
wall standing partly on the premises hereby
conveyed and partly on the premises next ad
joining easterly thereto one hundred (100) feet
to South Seventh street; thence westerly along
the line of South Seventh street; seventeen
(17) feet ten (10) inches to the point or place
of beginning. Being a plot of ground seven
teen (17) feet and ten (10) inches in front and
rear by one hundred (100) feet deep through
out.
Also all that certain lot of land and premise*
situate, lying and being- in Jersey City afore
said, which upon the map of the Oommissfon
er3 appointed by the Prerogative Court of New
Jersey to divide the estate of the late John
Van Vorst, deceased, between his heirs at law,
recorded with the said Commissioners' Report
in the office of the Clerk (now Register) of
Hudson County in Book 4 of Deeds, is known
and distinguished as lot numbered twenty-two
(22), in block lettered B, fronting on the north
erly side of Newark avenue and being twenty
five (25) feet wide in front and rear and one
hundred (100) feet deep on each side; the 6aid
lot being also known as lot number forty-six
(46) on block numbered one'hundred and thirty
seven (137), on the 'Map of Jersey City, Hudson
County, N. J., made by R. C. Bacot in 1861,
including the estate and interest of the com
plainant, Bridget Hofman. In the said prem
ises, and including also the inchoate right
of dower of the defendant. Catharine Hofman.
wife of said Michael E. Hofman, and of Ida
M. Hofman, wife of the said Peter Hofman,
together with all and singular the heredita
ments and appurtenances to the said premia*
belonging or in any wise appertaining.
Dated April 2Sth, A. D. 1900.
WILLIAM G. E. SEE.
Special Master in Chancery of New Jersey.
TO MARGAKET V. R. GEMMEL, WIDOW*
Mary Wise, Joseph Wise, her husband;
George A. Van Winkle, Annie E. Van
Winkle, his wife; Mary F. Haskell, Elmer
E. Haskell, her husband; Sophia Ireland,
Margaret Bell, Hillary Bell, her husband;
Daniel Van Winkle, Waistle Van Winkle, his
wife; Catherine Morris, Edith Leeker, Will
iam Lf-eker, her husband; Ann S. Van Horn,
John A. Van Horn, her husband; 8arab
Van Winkle, widow; Sarah Jane Percy,
widow; Elizabeth Van Winkle, widow; Ed
ward Van Winkle, Margaret Van Winkle,
Mary Van Winkle, Arthur Van Winkle, Ann
Van Winkle, his wife; Frank Van Winkle,
Elizabeth Van Winkle, his wife; Adeline
Chandler, Addie Myers, infant, and Diedrich
Mablenbrock, tenant*—
You are hereby notified that at a public sals
made by the City Collector of Jersey City, on
the 26th day of April, 1892, I purchased for
the sum of thirty-six dollars ALL. ths
land and real estate situate in Jersey
City, in the County of Hudson and State of
New Jersey, Meadow Lot. which is
laid down and designated as lot 1203, In
block number 2500, upon an assessment map
annexed to a report number 70, made by •‘Com
missioners of Adjustment” appointed In and
for said City by the Circuit Court of the
County of Hudson, a certified copy of which
report and map was filed in the office of the
City Collector of Jersey City, on the 11th day
of May, 1S91, said report and map and said
nale being made pursuant to the provisions of
an act of the Legislature of New Jersey,
passed March 30th. 1SS6. entitled:—
“An Act concerning the settlement and collec
tion of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess
ments and water cates pj water rents In
cities of this State.. and .imposing and levy
ing a tax, assessment and lien in lieu and
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce
the payment thereof, and to provide for the
sale of lands subjected to future taxation
and assessment.'1
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are further notified that you appear
to have an estate or Interest In said land and
real estate and unless the said land and real
estate shall be redeemed, as provided in said
act, before the expiration of six months from
and after the service hereof, a deed for the
same will be given conveying to the purchaser
the fee simple of said land and real estate
acording to the provisions of the said act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J.. January 19. 1900.
WILLIAM.<2. BUMSTKD.
Purchaser.
Attorney and Agent for. Purchaser, Jersey
City, N. J.
(9hl« No. »lf.) 1
The New Jersey Title Guarantee $ Trust Co..
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OB
Henry- N. Van Wagenen, deceased;
William S. Cokelet and William G. Bum
sted. executors of Henry N. Van Wag:*
enen. deceased; by order of the Deputy
Surrogate of Hudson County, dated April
24th, 1900, hereby give notice to the credi
tors of said decedent to bring in theii
debts, demands and claims against tht
estate of said decedent, under oath oi
affirmation, within nine months from thi
date of said order, or they will be forevei
barred of any action therefor against saii
executors.
WILLIAM S. COKELET,
WILLIAM G. BUMSTED*

xml | txt