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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, June 08, 1901, LAST EDITION, Image 4

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-THE
JAMES LXJBY . . . . .. Editor
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
..BY—
THE CITY PUBLISHING COMPANY
OFFICE No. 251 Washington Street.
THE NEWS BUILDING
Telephone Call, Jersey City, 271,
NEW YORK OEEICE,
No. 311 BROADWAY.
THE JERSEY CITY NEWS, the only Democratic Dally Paper published In
.Airsey City—Single copies, one cent; subscription, three dollars per year, postage
paid.
Entered in the post offlce at Jersey City as second class matter.
All business communications should be addressed to the City Publishing Com
pany, all letters lor publication to the Managing Editor.
SATURDAY,' JUNE 8, 1901.
BIS rim IS DEMOCRATIC IX PRIXCIP-LBi AXD IS IXDEPEXDEXT
its risirs ox all local qvestioxs.
m . ■ ■
' 4 Her verting Youth for Advertising Purposes.
A New York newspaper, notable even among New York papers for Its vileness.
Is now engaged In shipping four or five unhappy boys around the world via
the Trans-Siberian Railroad and other means of education. We are told the
motive is education; it is really Barnumism of the lowest and most unscrupulous
type.
If the travellers were grown men, the enterprise would be harmless, though,
of course, essentially uninteresting and unimportant. Its interest and importance
is not increased through the victims being boys, but, of course, the appeal to
idiots and gulls is greater. It is from the victims, however, that the element
of viciousness comes in.
The proceeding can hardly fail to cause deep and permanent injury to the
character and morale of green lads who are taken from school to be paraded
before the public gaze in Indecent fashion, and endowed with a fictitious im
portance calculated to totally upset their minds and distort their views of life.
That there is anything educational in a trip in which not a moment's pause
is allowed even for rest or meals, not to speak of observation, is too absurd for
diseussion. That there is infinite demoralization in exploiting youth in such a
fashion must be plain to all decent men.
The ill effect of the whole performance on the youth of the country is well
illustrated in the ease of the unhappy little degenerate who has been amusing
the gobemouehes of the Waldorf-Astoria with his Munchausen yarns for the
last two or three days.
. Mrs. Eddy Hard Hit.
Although Mrs. Woodbury has failed in her libel suit against Mrs. Eddy, the
mother of the Christian Science cult, the trial has not been in vain. The manner
in which it laid bare the utter hypocrisy of the leaders of the movement and
showed their cupidity in all its shamelessness wae well worth the expense of the
proceeding.
It is very doubtful, however, whether what was brought out at the trial will
have any beneficial effect upon the poor dupes of this scheming old woman, who
are ready to give up their fortunes and even their lives at her bidding. They seem
to be too closely wedded to their idols to be turned away at this late day.
But there ie a probability that some who are hesitating on the border may be
influenced to step back before taking the final plunge, and there is the certainty
that one exposure after another must lead to legislation which will render the prac
tice of the cult unprofitable if not impossible.
The pretence of religion which has heretofore protected these swindlers and
murderer* from the law cannot withstand many more exposures.
A Paterson Abomination.
Paterson has a scheme for disposing of her sewage without emptying It into ths
Passaic, which is of vital Importance to the people of Jersey City and Hudson
county. The proposition is to build a trunk sewer across Bergen county and
empty it into the Hackensack River.
This is a new development of villainous selfishness which the people of (Hudson
county-should not tolerate for an Instant. If by any method Paterson is allowed to
sewer Into the Hackensack River, it will not be long before that stream will be
just such a pest hole and disease producer as the Paesaic is today, and the people
of this county will take the place of those of Essex who are now clamoring for
relief.- ■
The argument of the Passaic people is that the Hackensack flows through a
meadow district, uninhabited end to all appearance likely to remain so for years
to come, and therefore no injury would be done if the Hackensack should become
polluted. But this position, *9 anyone outside of Paterson can see, is entirely un
tenable. There is comparatively only a small distance between the waters of the
Hackensack and the western border of Jersey City, which i6 rapidly building up,
and the experience of the Passaic amply proves that any pollution of the river
would be a serious menace to the health of the city.
The authorities of Jersey City should keep their eyes on this latest plan of
Passaic and thwart any and every attempt that may be made to put it into opera
tion.
The Occult Reason.
They say that all great men are superstitious and the more superstitious the
greater the man. On this line of reasoning, what a great man must be David
Young, the trolley expert. Everything was ready to open the Plank Road yester
day morning but Mr. Young would not listen to It.
“What." he exclaimed in horror, “open the Plank Road on a Friday! No
eiree!"
So the road was opened at 11:46 P. M. Thursday night.
We Are Growing Good.
it must be some consolation to those who declare that the church Is declining
and the world is not as religious as it used to be to learn that Jersey City Is pro
gressing steadily In the right road. Several new churches have been erected in re
cent years and now It Is announced that the Browne Memorial Church, which the
Methodists organized only a short time ago, will build a handsome edifice at Clerk
street and Carteret avenue.
Keuiine Beveridge's Clothes.
The case of Kuehne Beveridge, the sculptress, directs renewed attention to the
atrocity of our customs regulations.
This young woman has been living abroad for some years. Naturally the
clothes which she took abroad with her got worn out and she had to buy new
ones.
When she reached New Tork on her way home she and her trunks were held
ap, because her purchases abroad had exceeded *100.
“Why what I have on,” said she to a reporter, "cost more than *100; I wonder
If they -will undress me and send me ashore pinned up In newspapers?"
They stopped at that, but they held everything she had for a day or two to be
pawed over by customs officials, and in the end Uncle Sam was enriched by *105
duties, which Miss Beveridge paid.
What a glorious vindication of our civilization it was, and how beneficial to
•ur Infant Industries, a majority of which now sell their products cheaper In Lon
don than they do In New Tork.
Where a Big Fact Talka
The New York trolley car syndicate has just thrown out a cable plant which
(tost 1ft‘the aggregate *14,000,000. The stuff Is old junk now. It may bring a trifle
like *£0,000 when sold.
Electric appliances hardly less costly than the cable plant have been put In.
The company has made the change of its own free will to keep up with the
times—to insure good, safe, pleasant locomotion and reduce running expenses.
What a commentary this affords on the municipal ownership craze. What
Would be said If a political body should have the courage to attempt such a re
form? _
Bryan and Other Democrats.
William J. Bryan has been talking again, and a big hall full of his dupes
Hung eagerly on his words and applauded to the echo his shop*worn platitudes.
It was at Kansas City that he talked this time, and the people who got him to
do the talking call themselves "Jackson Democrats," In the course of his
harangue Mr. Bryan practically said that he was opposed to allowing a twenty
per cent, minority to govern the party, and he made It clear that by this twenty
per cent, he meant the multitude of Democrats who have refused to follow hts
fatal leadership and who are now desirous of reorganizing Mr. Bryan and his
humbug out of the party.
If Mr. Bryan were within the reach of reason, he might be asked to study the
election returns of this State. Unfortunately, he is too much like the yellow re
porter, whose golden rule was never to allow a few facts to stand in the way
of a good story. If he could be influenced by the truth of events, he might be
shown that, in 189C, when he (Mr. Bryant ran for the first time on his populistic
socialistic platform Mr. McKinley’s majority In New Jersey was 87,692. Two years
later an election for Governor was held, In which Bryan and Bryanlsm were elimi
nated, and Foster M. Voorhees, the Republican candidate, received a plurality
of only 5,499. Bryanlsm and Bryan were again the issue two years later, in 1900,
and this Republican majority grew to 50,899. There are, therefore, some 50,000 or
moro Democrats, in this State alone, whom Mr. Bryan wants read out of the
party because they refuse to follow him and subscribe to his disastrous platform.
These men may be a minority of the total who call themselves Democrats; but
they are a controlling minority since without them it Is Impossible for the party to
win. As they have brains, patriotism and right on their side, they are a fixed
quantity. They will be as much against Bryan and Bryanlsm twenty years from
now as they are today. Indeed their number is increasing and in secret tens of
I thousands of voters who openly profess Bryanlsm are of their way of thinking.
Democracy can stand any number of defeats. Only one thing can be fatal to
it. This is a victory with Mr. Bryan as its standard bearer.
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
“North American Review” for Jut
The June number of the "North Ameri
can Review" contains a rare assortment
of timely and interesting articles. H. G.
Wells, the author of. that fascinating
story, “When the Sleeper Awakes,” con
tributes the first of a series of articles,
entitled “Anticipations—An Experiment in
Prophecy," in which he will endeavor to
forecast the conditions of human life and
society at the end of the present century.
Sir Norman Lockyer, director of the Solar
Physics Observatory at South Kensing
ton, gives an account of the results of
investigations recently undertaken by him
to determine whether there is any rela
tion between “Sun Spots and Rainfall.”
Professor Goldwin Smith writes of "The
Irish Question,” showing, historically,
how it arose, and indicating how it will
at length be settled. Dr. W. A. P. Mar
tin, president of the Imperial University
of China, discourses pleasingly on “The
Poetry of the Chinese,” illustrating his
theme by skillfully versified translations
of some of the more noted Chinese lyrics.
Signor R. de Cesare, a Member of the
Italian Chamber of Deputies, in "The
Pope and the Temporal Power,” argues
against the restoration of the Pope's civil
princedom. Sidney Webster communi
cates certain "Revelations of a Senate
Document,” the disclosures made as to
the course of the negotiations at the
Peace Commission in Paris, by the docu
ment containing copies of the President's
instructions to the American Commis
sioners, and of their communications to
the President. Dr. L. L. Doggett, apropos |
of the "Jubilee of the Young Men's Chris- I
tian Association,” sketches the history of I
the association in the United States, and |
describes the work it has done and is do- !
ing among the young men of the country. !
W. E. Henley contributes a second series \
of exquisite lyrics under the title, "Haw
thorn and Lavender, Songs and Madri
gals.” Jeremiah W. Jenks, Professor of
Political Science in Cornell University,
discusses the question, "How Trusts Af
fect Prices.” The Rev. Dr. Washington
Gladden is the author of an eloquent and j
inspiring paper on “The Outlook for i
Christianity” in the series of the "Great
Religions of the World;” and in “An
Earlier American”—a review of William j
J. Stillman's “Autobiography of a Journal
ist”—Mr. Howells presents a pleasing \
study of the sort of life Americans lived
half a century ago.
CUSTODIAN'S ROOM DRAPED.
Stats House Attaches Will Atteud
Funeral of Mr. Bonnell.
[Special to "The Jersey City News.”]
TRBXTON, July 8, 1901.—The custodian’s 1
room at the State House was draped in
black yesterday as a mark of respect to :
Custodian John H. Bonnell, who died at j
Newton, Thursday. The entrance, the
custodian’s former chair and ‘his desk
were all enveloped in black.
While no definite arrangements were
made to attend the funeral of Mr. tBon
nell, which takes place from Grace
Church, Newark, Monday afternoon, most
of the attaches of the State House intend
to go. It will probably be decided today ;
whether they will attend in a body. 1
The successor of Mr. Bonnell will be i
chosen by the State House Commission
and it is generally believed that the posi- ]
tion will go to Essex county, although j
many think that the place is one which j
can be best filled by a. man whose home ,
ie near the capital.
Assistant Custodian Thomas Watson of |
Paasaic, Document Clerk William ?*lrc-e- j
roll of this city and John Flavell of New- j
ark have all been mentioned, but as yet
the matter has not been coneidered by the
; State House Commission.
TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION EUCHRE
Handsome Prices Awarded Last
Night at Phillips Hall.
The euchre and reception held last
evening at Phillips’s Hall under the
auspices of the Jersey City Teachers’
Association was a decided success. The
hall was filled with players and the
games were exciting.
The prize winners were:—Miss Margaret
! Flynn, wallet; Mrs. Cross, picture; Mr.
picture frame; Miss Margaret Wall, can
dlestick; Miss Kathalyn Wall, cane; Mr.
Charles Cathcart, box of cigars; Mrs.
Whelan, cut glass dish; Mrs. F. Rhodes,
dress suit case; Miss L. B. Guinan, um
brella; Miss Helen Dougherty, rocker;
Mrs. H. P. Rooney, picture; Mrs. Pear
son, butter plate; Mrs. J. J. Phillips, jar
diniere and pedestal. Dancing followed
the distribution of prizes.
GERMAN HOSPITAL WORK.
At a meeting of the German Hospital
and Dispensary Association, held at the
dispensary, 'No. 122 Danforth avenue,
Greenville, last evening, the following
were elected members of the association:—
Dr. Howard S. Forman, Benjajmin L.
Stowe, John Mehl, Max Lang and Wm.
Reichelt.
The members have distributed sixty-two
cdllcetion boxes thfough the county and
they expect to distribute many more with
in the next week. The committee in
charge of the fair to be held at Columbia
Hall: on October 7 and 12, is working in
dustriously to make the affair a success
and there is every reason to believe that
Its efforts will be well rewarded. The
members of the Ladies’ Aid Society will
hold a meeting with the Board of Direc
tors next Wednesday evening to discuss
arrangements tor the fair.
“ THE BITTER WITH THE SWEET.
Residents along the line of the Plank
road are hot happy that that thorough
fare la again open -to traffic. They com
plain of the terrible din made all day by
the countless wagons going back and
forth. There Is talk of petitioning to hav.i
the street asphalted.
the rnsma
Newark Avenue Storekeep
er Writes of Its Ad
vantages.
A prominent Newark avenue store
keeper writes to "The News" as fol
lows:—
With each recurring summer season the
local press revives the perennial question
of what the Jersey City merchants pur
pose doing in the way of observing half
holidays. We are pleased to see the
papers take up and agitate vigorously the
matter of summer half-holidays, a mat
ter that so closely concerns the health
and well being of hundreds of clerks of
both sexes, the majority of whom are
young people, to whom a brief respite
every week during the warm and trying
period of the year means a great deal.
In almost every large city of the United
States business is suspended at noon on
Saturday during July and August in
factory, workshop, business place and
office. Jersey City is unfortunately an
exception to this general rule. We should
have very much liked to close our estab
lishment on Saturdays at noon during
July and August, but where such a large
percentage of the week's business is done
on Saturday, particularly between the
hours of 3 to 10 P. M„ we found it im
possible to do so, unless it became a gen
eral and united movement. Up to the
present time under the conditions noted
above no such effort has been made, nor
is there any likelihood of any being be
gun.
With this condition of affairs confront
ing us, and being anxious to start a half
holiday movement, we studied the situa
tion carefully, and finally fixed on Friday
as a good day to give all our employes
a half-holiday during the summer. We
began closing the first Friday in July,
1897, at 1 P. M., and have continued do
ing so without a single interval from
that day up to the present, and shall
continue doing so beginning with Friday,
July B, this year. The period is so long
(this being the fifth year) that we are
in a position to speak intelligently on the
advantages and disadvantages (if there
are any) of suspending business for a
half-holiday during July and August.
In the first place it removes the feeling
of discontent among the clerks at having
to work six days instead of five and one
half days, as the clerks employed in
New York, Newark and other places do.
Next it inspires them with a feeling of
lightness and buoyancy to begin the
week’s work with the knowledge that
there is going to be a little time for a
change from the weekly grind, and what
this means to young women particularly
(in many cases not too robust), who are
forced to work for a living, no true
hearted woman will fail to understand,
and If the sympathy as evidenced by the
signatures of over 10,000 Hudson county
women, registered with us as favoring
and supporting Friday Half-Holidays, is
any criterion, it would be an easy mat
ter for every merchant in Jersey City to
close his place of business on Friday af
ternoons in summer. It would make no
difference in any line of business, as we
are certain the ladies would take care
that the men would support the move
ment and help to make it universally
successful. We believe Friday is the best
day for closing for many reasons, chief
among them being that it gives the less
hardy clerks a chance to rest before the
trying, lengthy ordeal of Saturday’s
work, and the strong ones have a chance
to go to seashore or country to indulge
in swimming, wheeling or athletics, or,
pastimes of any kind that may appeal to
them. We are not, however, irrevocably
wedded to Friday and will gladly and
cheerfully join in any general and united
movement which may fix on some other
day for a half-holiday.
Knowing your sentiments on the half
holiday question, as frequently expressed
In your editorial columns, we have taken
the liberty of addressing you this let
ter, as we feel certain that a general
half-holiday movement started and heart
ily supported by the press of Hudson
county is bound to enlist the sympathy
and support of the public, and no worthy
cause supported and sustained by the
people and the press has ever been a
failure In this great country of our*.
FATHER ABDUCTS CHILD
Mrs. John Phillipsen, of No. 34S West
Forty-ninth street, New York, called at
Hoboken Police Headquarters yesterday
afternoon and reported to Captain Hayes
the kidnapping of her three year old
daughter by her husband. The couple
had beer, separated until a week ago, the
woman said. Then her husband met he,
on the street and asked her to live with
him again. She consented. Two days
later Phillipsen left the house with the
daughter, saying he was going . fob a
walk. He ha3 not returned since. Phil
llpsen is an Armenian. His wife believes
he is hiding with the child In Hoboker.
or West Hoboken. The police will try to
locate him.
S1RL WANTED TO DIE
Phoebe Randall, a seventeen-year-old
colored girl, of Jackson avenue and For
rest street, attempted suicide early Friday
morning by drinking, carbolic, acid. She
was more frightened than hurt. She re
fuses to tell why she tried to end her life.
ARLINGTON K & PICNIC
A large erowd Is expected at Greenville
Schuetaen-Parlt tonight, when the. Arling-.
ton Athletic Club will hold its annual
plcnio.
SUSSEX OF OLD.
Relics of “Gaols” Show She
Was Hard on Her
Prisoners.
DARK DUNGEOH UNDERGROUND
Interesting History of the
Structures and Those
Who Inhabited
Them.
On November 20, 1753, the first Court of
justice in Sussex County was opened in
the house of Jonathan Pettit in the
Township of Hardwicke, now known as
: Johnsonburg, Warren County, pursuant
to an ordinance of his Majesty, King
George II., received and read at that
time, says a Nwton letter in the Newark
“News.” No court house was ever erect
ed in that township, although an effort
was made to secure for that place the
permanent seat of justice. On March 21,
1754, the Board of Justices and Freehold
ers met in the house of Samuel Green
and ordered a meeting of the qualified
voters of the county on the sixteenth,
seventeenth and eighteenth days of the
following April. At that time a jail was
ordered to be built near Pettit’s tavern
on Green’s land, at the expense of the
rough, unhewn logs, and gave to early
Johnsonburg the name of “the Log Jail.”
The cost of erection amounted to £41 3c.
Id. Although guarded by a watchman
at the cost of 5s. per day of twenty-four
hours, the escape of prisoners was of fre
quent occurrence, and during the nine
years it was used for' the detention of
prisoners the county became responsible
for and paid nearly £600 on account of
the “flight of imprisoned debtors,” a sum
about fourteen times the cost of the jail.
In February, 1756, the court was removed
to the tavern of Thomas Woolverton, in
the township of Newton, situated on the
bank of the Pequest, where Huntsville
now stands. For the first few years after
the removal to the house of Woolverton,
no business was transacted by the court
“by reason of troublesome times with the
Indians.” A few years later Abraham
Van Campen was sent to Perth Amboy
with a petition to the General Assembly,
praying for the authority to erect a court
house and gaol. On December 12, 1761, an
act granting that privilege was passed bv
•the Legislature, buc authorizing that the
building be erected ”on the plantation of
Henry Hairlocker, or within forty chains
of said Hairlocker's dwellin-house; the
particular spot to be fixed, with the con
sent of the owner of the land, by a major
ity of the justices and freeholders of said
county.” The spot then occupied by the
'Hairlocker dwelling is the present site of
the 'Horton mansion. It is said that the
forty chains stipulated did not quite reach
the present site, but, as it would have
been inappropriate to locate his Majesty's
temple of justice at the base of a hill and
directly over a running stream, "a few
more links were added for good measure,”
and the building was erected on the hill
side, where the courthouse now stands.
To build the court house a tax of £5M
was levied on the inhabitants of the comi
ty in the year 1762, to which were added,
in after years, other assessments. The
totas cost >of construction was £2,±tx,
“proclamation money,” and it was erect
ed under the supervision and management
of Abraham V an Campen, Jacob Starn
and John Halkett. In 1763, the cels, or the
part devoted to the purposes of a jail,
"were so far completed as to admit of the
confinement of the prisoners therein.”
The structure was completed early in the
year 17S5, and there the May term of court
for that year was held.
This building, which was originally de
signed to support and enforce the royal
authority and soon destined to become
the agent of republican justice and equity,
was a massive stone structure, utterly de
void of any ornamentation. It laced what
is row caled tlhe “Green,” which was at
that time covered with dense woods, and
from the centre of the steep, angualr roof
there arose a tower similar in form to a
modern church steeple, on the top of
which was placed a wrought iron weather
vane, bearing the date 1756. This vane
was donated to and is now in the posses
sion of the Dennis Library Association of
Newton. Attached to it with a piece of
rustyl wire is a large, rusty key. which
was found many years ago in the woods
just outside of Newton, and is thought to
be the one taken from the jailer by the
old Tory. Bonnel Moody, on the night
during the struggle of the colonies for
their independence, when he ilberated all
the prisoners in the jail in the name of
the King.
For seventy-nine years the original
structure remained unchanged. In 1844
the building was enlarged and thoroughly
renovated. The pitched roof disappeared,
and massive stone columns, supporting an
ornamental entablature, adorned the
front, entirely changing the appearance of
the old structure. On Thursday, April 28,
1847, the grim, old, weather-beaten struc
ture was totally destroyed by fire. The
work of reconstruction was begun imme
diately, and the present Court House was
erected upon the ruins.
The land upon which the building stands
and the public park opposite were con
veyed to the Board of Freeholders by
Jonathan Hampton, of Essex county, in
1764. The first persons executed in Sus
sex county were Maxwell and McCoy,
who were hanged on the Green in the
year 1781, “for breaking into the house of
John Maxwell, of Greenwich Township,
robbing the same and severely beating
and bruising the owner.” They protest
ed their innocence to the last, and it was
subsequently proved that their assertions
were true.
In the cellar of the court house are
the old ceils in which vagrants, prison
ers and condemned criminals were con
fined. These cells, or more properly
dungeons, are four in number and below
ground. On entering the old jail from
what is now called Ward's lane one de
scends a few stone steps and enters a
hall, or corridor, five feet wide. On the
left of this hall is the largest and only
light cell, the one in which female pris
oners and persons of distinction were in
carcerated. It is about ten feet square
and is now used by Sheriff Hotalen for a
coal bin. Turning to the right one now
enters the main corridor of the old gaol.
This is about four feet wide, and on the
left are thre cells, each one being seven
feet by five. In the rear wall of the cell
is a small opening fitted with ah iron
shutter communicating with a long, nar
row room in the rear, which was form
erly the kitchen, and through which the
food of the prisoners was passed. Along
the wall of each dungeon is a wooden
bench about four feet in length for the
comfort of the inmate, and it is pre
sumed that a cot was formerly placed
thereon.
Upon the walls and dome-shaped ceil
ings the prisoners of half a century ago
wrote their names, many of which are
gtarttngly clear and legible. One of the
Iron-grated doors remains hanging on its
rusty worn hinges, and the others are to
be found hidden away in a dark corner.
The only light received in these cells or
dungeons is that which is shed through
two small, narrow windows set about five
feet above the floor and on Nte opposite
side of the corridor. 1N0 window Is near
the last of the three, and not a ray of
sunlight penetrates the darkness of the
Interior. The walls and foundations are
nearly three feet in thickness, and a more
gloomy, forbidding and damp hole can
scarcely be imagined than Is this old Es
sex county gaol. In these foul, loathsome
dungeons Innocent men wasted away in
the fever and consumption breeding at
mosphere while awaiting the action of the
grand jury.
The only persons who ever succeeded in
effecting an escape from this jail were
four men who were confined in the dark
est cell. One stormy night, while the
I north wind howled around the building,
t they dug a hole through the top of the
■ cell and escaped through the sheriff's
office, taking to the woods. Ail were re
captured with the exception of a burly
r< sro over six feet in height, named Elias
Horton.
In 1872, to relieve the sufferings of the
prjcinetB. a jail was built in the rear of
the court house P.t a cost of $S03. This
i was a two-story stohe structure, worse, If
eucb a thing were possible, than the ether, .
i In 1893 this was tofn down and the present
1 commodious structure, perfectly ventl
• laird, steam heeted and supplied with hot
and cold runnlni water.
Read Your Diotionary.
Life Insurance.—An
act or system to
guarantee the return
of pecuniary indem
nity, in case of death.
The Prudential goes
further and distribu
tes profits to policy
holders as well.
The
Prudential
Insurance Go. of America.
Home Office:
Newark N. J
JOHN P. DRYDEN, President.
LESLIE D. WARD, Vice President.
EDGAR B. WARD, 2d V.Pres. and Counsel
FORREST F. DRYDEN, Secretary. 1258
h k a F?ller Bldg.No. Ill Hudson street. Jersey City. N\"j.
S' S' Supt.No. 573 Newark avenue, Jersey City, N. J.
i;: G- 7*™' ?y-:.w- cor. Hudson and Newark Sts.. Hoboken. N J.
Sfl sAn SliPt.. . Ave. D. Bayonne, N. J.
DAVID RisINHART, Supt.440 Spring St.. West Hoboken, N J.
The New Jersey
83 MONTGOMERY STREET, JERSEY CITY, N. J.
Offers to the public the privileges of its
Safe Deposit Vault
At prices that are within the reach of all. The
Vault is protected against burglary, fire, etc., by
every known device. A box may be rented for one
year for $5. Vault open daily, 9 to 5 P. M. Satur
day, 9 A. M. to 12 M. Public inspection invited.
_WAX TED.
WANTED FOR U. S. ARMY—ABLE
bodied, unmarried men, between ages of 21
and 35, citizens of the United States, of good
character and temperate habits, who can speak,
read and write English. Recruits specially de
sired for engineers, cavalry and infantry. For
information apply to Recruiting Office. No. 68
Montgomery street. Jersey City, N. J.
LOST.
LOST OR STOLEN—BANK BOOK NO.
203.029, of the Emigrant Industrial Sav
ings Bank; payment stopped. Please re
turn book to bank, No. 51 Chambers
street, New York City.
BEAL ESTATE
AN $11,000 RESIDENCE FOR $9.50); CASH
$3,900; monthly, $5S. Owner, Box 146, East
Orange.
MEETINGS
OFFICE OF THE COLONIAL LIFE INSUR
ANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA,
43 Montgomery Street.
Jersey City. N. J.f May 23, 1901.
Notice Is hereby given that it is the inten
tion of the Board of Directors of the Colonial
Life Insurance Company of America to increase
the capital stock of said Company from one
hundred thousand dollars to one hundred and
fifty thousand dollars, according to the pro
visions of an act of the Legislature of the
State of Nev Jersey, entitled “An Act to pro
vide for the regulation and • incorporation of
insurance companies,’’ and according to law.
E. J. HEPPENHEIMER.
Secretary.
THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
stockholders of the Transcontinental
Advertising Company will be held on the
22d day of June. 1901, at ten o’clock in the
forenoon, at the registered office of the
company, to wit, at the office of the Cor
poration Trust Company of New Jersey,
No. 15 Exchange place, Jersey City, New
Jersey, for the purpose of electing a
Board of Directors and receiving and act
ing upon the reports of the officers, and
for the transaction of such other business
as may properly come before the meeting.
F. G. CUNNINGHAM.
Secretary.
Dated June 1, 1901._
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the 2Sth day
of May, 1901,' application was made to this
Board by Mary Vreeland and others for the
VACATION OF CUSTER AVENUE, .
between Garfield avenue and Avenue E.
The street to be vacated is Custer avenue
between Garfield avenue and Avenue E, as the
same Is shown, fifty feet in width on “Offic al
Assessment Map of Jersey City, N. J.. 1894,
made by L. D. Fowler,” also as it is shown
sixty feet in width on the “Map of property
belonging to Mary Vreeland. situate in Green
ville, Jersey. City, N. J.,” filed June 10th, 187b,
in the Hudson County Register’s office, on
which map said street is delineated between
Washington avenue (now Garfield avenue) and
Avenue E, and without any name.
And that the 25th day of June, 1901, at two
o’clock P. M., and the Assembly Chamber of
the City Hall are hereby fixed as the time and
place when and where the Board of Street ana
Water Commissioners will meet to hear all
parties interested in said application and all
remonstrances against the said proposed vaca
tion that may be presented in writing.
By order of the Board of Street and W ater
Commissioners.
WM, A. TOLSON,
Clerk pro tem.
Dated Jersey City, June 3, 1901.__
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the 2Sth day
of Mav, 1901, application was made to the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners by
Mary Vreeland and others for the
VACATION OF AVENUE E,
between the southerly line of Gates avenue on
the north and the lands of the Lehigh Valley
Terminal Railway Company on the south, as
the same is shown on the “Official Assessment
Map of Jersey City, N. J., 1834, made by L. D.
Fowier.” •
And that the 23th day of June, 1901, at two
o’clock P. M., and the Assembly Chamber of
the Ci,ty Hall are hereby fixed as the time and
place when ‘and where the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners will meet to hear all
parties interested in said application and all
remonstrances against the said proposed vaca
tion that may be presented in writing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
WM. A. TOLSON,
Clerk pro tem.
Dated Jersey City, June 3, 1901.
IN CHANCERY OF NEW JERSEY.
Irt re Furniss Estate.
$100 reward for discovery of legal proceedings
or any indenture, appointing Solon Humphreys,
dec., or his executors, Grace L. or Louise E.
Furniss. Hetty M. Furniss or another, guardian
of the undersigned, or trustee of his estate as
that held for an insane minor or ward in
Chancery.
Also 8600 reward to any attorney securing
the arrest and conviction of parties concerned
in production of certain certificates in lunacy
obtained by Hetty McFarland Furniss, 1885, vs.
the undersigned, or submitting papers as de
scribed or sworn above statements prejudicial
to the sanity of the undersigned, to any cfcurt.
WILLIAM P. FURNISS.
_LEGAL NOTICES.
TO GEORGE H. HARRINGTON, CARRIE J.
Harrington, his wife; John J. Mahn, Esther
Mahn, his wife; Maria Bremer, widow; John
j Schaffer, Henry B. Schaffer, Sophia Schaffer,
I his wife; John Schaffer, Mary Schaffer, his
wife; Mary L. Lawall, William Lawall, her
| husband; William Coyne, Delia Caulfield,
William Caulfield, Mary Hanley, James Han
ley, her husband; Maggie Hund, August
Hund, her* husband; Kate Mauss, William
Mauss, her husband; Julia Shyne, Henry
Shyne. her husband; Annie Kerner, George
Kerner, her husband; John Coyne, William
Coyne. Edward Coyne, Thomas Coyne, Lottie
Coyne, his wife; Francis Coyne, John Ber
mingham, James Bermmgham, infant; Rich
I ard C. Washburn, George W. Washburn,
i John T. Washburn, partners trading as
i Washburn Bros.; Horace R. Hacker, Daniel
l E. Cleary, Beadleston and Woerz Empire
Brewing- Company of N. Y. and the State of
New Jersey.
! You are hereby notified that at a public sale
j made by the City Collector of Jersey City, on
the 24th day of April, 1394, The Mayor and
, Aldermen of Jersey City purchased for the sum
; of forty-nine dollars and eighty-one cents ALL
the land and real estate situate in Jersey City,
in the County of Hudson and State of New
Jersey, fronting on Terry Alley, which is laid
down and designated as lot 20, in block num
ber 622, upon an assessment map annexed to a
I report number 85, made by the “Commission
i ers of Adjustment’* appointed in and for said
! City by the Circuit Court of the County of
| Hudson, a certified copy of which report and
map was filed in the office of the City Col
' lector of Jersey City, on the 30th day of August,
1892, said report and map and said sale being
made pursuant to the provisions of an act of
the Legislature of New Jersey, passed March
30th, 1886, entitled:—
I “An Act concerning the settlement and collec
tion of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess
; ments and water rates or water rents in
cities of this State, and imposing and levy
ing a tax. assessment and lien in lieu and
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce
the payment thereof, and to provide for the
sale of lands subjected to future taxation
and assessment.”
| And the several supplements thereto.
And you are further notified that you appear
to have an estate or interest in said land and
real estate, and unless the said land and real
j estate shall be redeemed, as provided in said
! acts, before the expiration of six months from
and after the service hereof, a deed for the
same will be given conveying to The Mavor
and Aldermen of Jersey City the fee simple' of
said land and real estate according to the pro
visions of the said act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J., May 27th, 1901.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JERSEY
CITY.
E. HOOS,
Attest;— Mayor,
M. J. O’DONNELL.
City' Clerk.
(Sale No. 4,483.)
New Jersey Title Guarantee & Trust Company
TO GEORGE H. HARRINGTON, CARRIE J.
: Harrington, his wife; John J. Mahn, Esther
1 Mahn, his wife; Maria Bremer, widow; Juha
Schaffer, Henry B. Schaffer, Sophia Schaffer,
1 his wife; John Schaffer, Mary Schaffer, his
wife; Mary L. Lawall, William Lawall, her
husband; William Coyne, Delia Caulfield,
William Caulfield, Mary Hanley, James Han
ley, her husband; Maggie Hund, August
Hund, her husband; Kate Mauss, William
Mauss, her husband; Julia Shyne, Henry
Shyne, her husband; Annie Kerner, George
Kerner, her husband; John Coyne, William i
Coyne, Edward Coyne, Thomas Coyne, Lottie j
Coyne, his wife; Francis O'vne, John Ber- j
mingham, James Bermingha.Ti, infant; Rich
ard C. Washburn, George W. Washburn, »
John T. Washburn, partners trading as !
Washburn Bros.; Horace R. Hacker, Daniel
E. Cleary. Beadleston and Woerz Empire i
Brewing Company of N. Y. and the State of
New Jersey.
You are hereby notmea that at a public sale
made by the City Collector of Jersey City, on
the 24th day of April, 1894, The Mayor and
Aldermen of Jersey City purchased for the
sum of sixty-eight dollars and eighty-seven
cents ALL the land and real estate situate in
Jersey City, in the County of Hudson and
State of New Jersey, fronting on Terry Alley,
which is laid down and designated as lot 19,
ir. block number 622, upon an assessment map
annexed to a report number 83, made by the
"Commissioners of Adjustment" appointed In
and for said City by the Circuit Court of the
County of Hudson, a certified copy of which
report and map was filed in the office of the !
City Collector of Jersey City, on the 3t)ih day I
of August, 1892, said report and map and said 1
sale being made pursuant to the provisions
of an act of the Legislature of New Jersey,
passed March 30th. 1886, entitled:—
“An Act concerning the settlement and collec
tion ,of arrearages of unpaid taxes, assess- |
ments and water rates or water rents in i
cities of this State, and imposing and levy- “
ing a tax, assessment and lien in lieu and ;
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce j
the payment thereof, and to provide for the I
sale of lands subjected to future taxation J
and assessment."
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are further notified that you appear
to have an estate or interest in said land and
real estate, and unless the said land and real
estate shall be redeemed, as provided In said
acts, before the expiration of six months from '
and after the service hereof, a deed for the i
same will be given conveying to The Mayor !
and Aldermen of Jersey, the fee simple of said !
land and real estate according to the provisions '
of the said act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J.. May 27th, 1901
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JERSEY
CITY.
E. HOOS, i
Attest:— M Mayor.
M. J. O’DONNELL.
City Clerk. !
(Sale No. 4.482.) !
New Jersey Title Guarantee & Trust Company !
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT. — NOTICE IS
hereby given that the account of the sub
scriber, guardian of the estate of Henry j.
Harmed. 4 lunatic, will be audited and stated
by the Surrogate of the County of Hudson and
reported for settlement on Friday, the 22d day
of March next.
Dated February 14. 1»L
TO CA*,I,„UNS m-NN. CAHOLLYE HEX*.
t reuerlck Hens, Lena Henn. hie wne
Josephine Kohlhund. Koblhund Sad
ericka Henn, Mary Alice Godfrey, aud ?»»»
New York Security and Trust Company of
New York, administrators, with the will an
nexed. of El zaheth Howell, dr-ceased; Louie
Parlaette. Oscar Setter, Martin Cook, The
New York Susquehanna and Western' Ha l
road Company, The People’s Hank of Yew
York and J. Prank Crawford
You ere hereby notified that at a publlo
**le, made by the city Collector of Jersey
City, on the 18th day c»f October, 1892 tj,"
Mayor and A.derroen ofj.reey City pu-chassi
tor the sum of elghty-iwo dollars snd fort- -
seven cents ALL the land and real estat*
attuate in Jersey City, In the County cf Huj
aon and Stato of New Jersey, fron-inz on
It. Paul’s avenue, which is laid down and
designated as lots 11 and II, in block nun her
«7. upon an assessment map annexed to a
report number 72. made by tlta ’•Commleeion
ers of Adjustment’’ appointed in and for sa'd
City by the Circuit Court of the County of
Hudson, a certif.-d copy of which report and
map was flied In the office of the City Col
lector of Jersey City, on the 16th day of July
1191, said report and map and said aale being
made pursuant to the provisions of an act of
the Legislature of New Jersey, passed March
Mth. 1886. entitled:—
"An Act coneernid* the settlement and collec
tion of arrearages of unpaid taxes, jiss-ss
tnenls and water rates or water rents In
cities of this State, and Imposing and leav
ing a tax. assessment and lien in lieu and
instead of such arrearages, and to enforce
the payment thereof, and to provide for the
sale of land? subjected to future
and assessment"
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are rartlxer netted tnat you appear
to have an estate or interest In said land ajJ
real estate and unless the said land and real
estate shall be redeemed, as provided :n said
act. before the expiration of six months from
and after the service hereof, a deed for cha
same will be given conveying to The Mayor
and Aldermen of Jersey City, the fee simple
of said land and real estate, according to the
provisions of the said act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J., May 36. 1901.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JER.
SEY CITY.
B. H009.
fSeaL] Mayor.
AttestM. J. O’DONNELL.
City Clerk.
(Bale No. MX)
TO LE GRAND JBOUKBR, TRUSTEE OF
the estate of George Tise. dee d, Sarah Ana
Van Winkle, widow; William Brinkerhoff.
Melissa Brinkerhoff, his wife; Eleanor A.
Fielder, George B. Fielder, her husband;
Elizabeth Brinkerhoff, widow; Henry H.
Brinkerhoff, Elia BrinkerhoC, his wife; John
Brinkerhoff, Augusta Brinkerhoff. his wife;
George Tise, Rachael A. Tise. his wife;
Rachael D. Ramsey. Matthew J. Ramsey,
her husband: Sarah C. Tise, Melinda S.
Tise, widow ; William A. E. Tise, Eff:e Tise.
his wife; William H. Tise, Susan Tise, his
wife; Frances Clark, John Clark, her hus
band; Sophie Grundt, Alfred Grundt, her
husband; George H. Tise, Infant; Racftael
VV. Demarest, widow; John H. Demarest.
Sarah C. Buchs, Christian Buchs, her hus
band; Estelle D. Rinn, Martin Rinn. her
husband; Elizabeth Wilson, Archibald Wil
son, her husband; Daisy D. Bagley, Patrick
Bagley. her husband; Amelia S. Demarest.
Jasper Wandle. William S. Keegan, Jennie
Keegan, his wife; Winfield T. Keegan. Min
nie Keegan, his wife; Elizabeth V. R. Wil
son, George Wilson, her husband, Jacob B.
Merseles. Elizabeth Merseles. bis wife; Mabel
T. Kelly, Charles C. Kelly, her husband;
Mary F. Blauvelt, Daniel Blauvelt, her hus
band; Edward Garrison, Josephine Garrison,
his wife; Rachael A. Wilson, William B.
Wilson, her husband; Edward C. Hart,
Sarah E. Hart, his wife; Charles Starkey,
William H. Lewis, Alice E. F. Lewi»: hie
wife; Charles Manner, tenant, and The SUte
of New Jersey;—
You are hereby notified that at a public sale
by the City Collector of Jersey City,
on rhe 16th day of yjpril. 1895, The Mayor and
Aldermen of Jersey City purchased fer the sum
or one thousand and five hundred and ten dol
lars and nine cents ALL the land and real
•®ta*e Js,tuate in Jersey City, in the County
of Hudson and State of New Jersey, fronting
on Back I^ane. also known as West Side l^ane.
^toich is laid down and designated as lot X
in block number 1281, upon an assessment map
annexed to a report number 93, made by the
Commissioners of Adjustment*' appointed in
and for said City by the Circuit Court cf the
County of Hudson, a certified copy of whlca
report and map was uled in the office of the
City Collector of Jersey City, on the 24th day
October, 1893, said repot t and map and
said sale being made pursuant to the pro
visions of an act of the Legislature of New
Jersey, passed March SOtn. !$*». entitled
“An Act concerning me settlement and col
lection of arrearages of unpaid taxes, as
sessments and water rates or water rents
in cities of this State, and imposing and
levying a tax, assessment and Hen In lieu
and instead of such arrearages, and to en
force the payment thereof, and to provide
for the sale of lands subjected to future
taxation and assessment.’*
And the several supplements therete.
Ana you are rurther notifies that you ap
pear to have an estate or interest in said land
and real estate, and unless the Said land and
res! estate shall be redeemed, as provided in
"Aid acts, before the expiration of six months
trom and after the service hereof, a deed for
the same will be given conveying to The
Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City, the fee
simple of said land and real estate, according
to the provisions of the said act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J., October 3, 1900.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JER
SEY CITY.
E. H003.
[Seal.] Mayor.
Attest— Iff. J. O’DONNELL.
City Clerk.
(Sale No. 8408.)
TO WILLIAM S. GILBERT. ROSALIE GIL
bert. bis wile; George Y. Gilbert and Harry
Gilbert:—
You are hereby notified that at a public sale
made by the City Collector of Jersey City, on
the 14rh day of April, 1898, The Mayor and
Aldermen of Jersey City purchased for the
sum of one hundred and twenty dollars and
sixty-six cents ALL the land and real estate
situate in Jersey City, in the County of Hud
son axid State of New Jersey, fronting on Sec
ond street, which is laid down and designated
as plot 3, iu block number SOI, upon an as
sessment map annexed to a report number 100,
made by the ‘'Commissioners of Adjustment”
appointed in and for said City by the Circuit
Court of the County of Hudson, & certified
copy of which report and map was filed in the
office of the City Collector of Jersey City, on
the 1st day of July, 1895, said report and map
and said saie being made pursuant to the
provisions of an act of the Legislature cf New
Jersey, passed March 30th. 1888. entitled:—
“An Act concerning the settlement and col
lection of arrearages of unpaid taxes, as
sessments and water rates or water rent*
in cities of this State, and imposing and
levying a tax. assessment and lien in lien
and instead of such arrearages, and to en
force the payment thereof, and to provid*
for the sale of lands subjected to future
taxation and assessment.”
And the several supplements thereto.
And you are further notified that you ap
pear to have an estate or interest in said land
and real estate, and unless the said land and
real estate shall be redeemed, as provided m
said acts, before the expiration of six month*
from and after the service hereof, a deed for
the same will be given conveying to Tba
Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City, the fee
simple of said land and real estate according
to the provisions of the said act.
Dated Jersey City, N. J., Nov. 10th, 1900.
THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN OF JER
SEY CITY.
B. HOOS,
(Seal.) Mayor*
Atte**- M. J. O’DONNELL,
City Clerk,
(Sal* N& MU)
STATE OF NEW JERSEY—DEPART
ment ot State—Certificate of Filing of
Consent by Stockholders to Dissolution.
To ah to whom these presents may come.
Greeting:—
Whereas, It appears to my satisfaction,
by duly authenticated rgcord of the pro
ceedings for the voluntary dissolution
thereof deposited in my office, that the
Pitchfork Cattle Company, a corporation
of this State, whose principal olTice is
situated at No. S3 Montgomery street, in
the City of Jersey City, County of Hud
son, State of New Jersey (New Jersey
Title Guarantee & Trust Co. being the
agent therein and in charge thereof upon
whom process may be served), has' com
plied with the requirements of "An Act
concerning corporations (Revision of
1S9B)," preliminary to the issuing of this
certiticate that such consent has been
tiled.
Now, therefore, I, George Wurts, Secre
tary of State of the State of New Jersey,
do hereby certify that the said corpora
tion did, on the twenty-third day of Feb
ruary, 1901. tile in my olTice a duly exe
cuted and attested consent in writing to
the dissolution of said corporation, exe
cuted by more than two-thirds in Inter
est of the stockholders thereof, which
said certificate and the record of the pro
ceedings aforesaid are now on file in my
said office as provided by law.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto
set my hand and affixed my offi
(Seal.) cia! seal, at Trenton, this twenty
third day of February, A. D. an*
thousand nine hundred and one.
GEORGE WURTS,
Secretary of State.
pursuant to and BY VIRTUE op an
order of the Orphans' Court, made cn the
twenty fifth of January, A. D. nineteen hun
dred and one, the undersigned, administrator
with the will annexed of Ernest Woehike, de
ceased, will Bell at public vendue. :n the
highest bidder^ on Wednesday, the twentieth
day of March, A. D. nineteen hondr&d and
one. at two o'clock in the afternoon, oh the
premises.
All that certain lot, tract and parcel of land
and premises,' situate, lying and being
City of Jersey City (formerly Hudson City)
Hudson County. New Jersey, beginning a
point on the southerly side of Bieecker
(formerly Newark street), two hundred feet
east from the easterly line of Pa&s»tc avenue
running easterly along the southerly line ~f
Bieecker street, fifty feet; thence southerly
one hundred feet; thence westero* fifty *221
and thence northerly one hundred feet to" the
place of beginning.
Dated February 14. 1901.
HENRY HOLSTS.
Administrator With the Will Aaratd.
V.v ■ 4

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