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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, December 27, 1901, LAST EDITION, Image 3

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WOMAN’S
WORLD.
Art nouveau rings are to be hail in sev
eral of the’ large shops mot necessarily
jcwelsmitlis), and the prices asked for
them seem none too much when one ex
amines the exquisite workmanship of
those gems of gold and enamel. Flowers
lend themselves gracefully to the adorn
ment of these rings. Irises, orchids and
other aesthetic, blooms are tinted deli
rntely. anil each tiny petal and curved
le»f or tendril is wrought with bewilder
ing fidelity to nature.
Jn most of these rings the flower rests
on the finger, while Its stem and leaves
twine around Ihe circle of the ring. Elab
orate as these jewels may be. they are
seldom clumsy or awkward, and even a
long-stemmed iris, or lily will not take up
more space on the wearer s slim finger
flet ns assume that only slim fingers wear
rings:i than a hand of good sized pearls
or a marquise ring of average dimensions.
The art nouveau worker in jewels loves
symbolic sylphs with streaming hair and
long, slender, clinging arms. He calls
them variously “The Soul of the Rotas.
“The Heart of the Moonstone." “The
< ietiius of the Pearl,” etc. The lotus lady
has a sleepy, drooping head, and her hair
is twisted with blossoms. Her tresses,
with their lotus leaves and stems, twist
round tite finger, and the beautiful, min
ute head forms the jewel part of the
ling. Tlic moonstone naiad holds the
gem in her outstretched hands, her slim,
delicately chiseled body extended at right
angles to the ling.
The pearl siren simply wears the gem in
her hair, and the circle of the ring is a
continuation of her flowing golden-green
locks. Most of these rings have no gems
at all, and gems are really superfluous,
fur the beautiful modeling of the design
mid the color and lustre of the enameled
or colored metals supply all the brilliance
anil color needed. A wonderful ring in
dull, soft gold and brilliant blue and green
enamel has a peacock body for ornament.
The outspread tail is jeweled with
diamonds. The eyes are of palest, clear
. st emeralds. The color of the gold har
monizes with the greens and blues of the
enamels.
Fantastic and curious is the profile of a
fury, crowned with serpents chiseled In
greenish gold, the bodies of the reptiles
twining around the finger.
According to the smart jewelers
the favorite engagement ring of the
day is a pear shaped stone, preferably a
d amond. the setting almost invisi
ble, the circuit very thin. If a col
ored stone is chosen instead of a diamond
the accommodating jeweler will surround
It with the tiniest of diamonds, making
a brilliant line of white fire, but the indi
vidual stones so small as to have the
cfTect rather than the appearance of
u ms. A row of five diamonds, encircled
with tiny rubles, is also a favorite en
gagement ring. Rubies mean “felicity in
love" and diamonds—or at least to own
tin m—signify good luck, it goes without
saying.
_ * _
Furnishing newness, whether for Christ
mas celebrating or mere replenishing, is of
equal interest. There are any number or
new things at all sorts of prices. There
are conventional pieces and othere quite
out of the ordinary.
Turkish corner furnishings stl.l seU>
though there are not enough novelties to
tempt the person who is interested only
in that which is absolutely new.
Most fetching of the showings is a col
lection of Soudanese arms in ti>e darkest
and dimmest of horn-back alligator cas
ing" Even the ocabbards look very sav
age while a hand-shield, competed of one
large skin, tall and all strung on an iron
rod is the acme of picturesque savagery.
There are pouches, and clever water
cups and elephant prods done in gay
head?, as well as in the alligator.
It must be confessed, though, that the
corner is not in it with the den.
A whole room, be it ever so small and
humble, Is the preference. It must b copy
and homelike, a place where one invari
ably and instinctively goes for real enjoy
ment The FKmish den, and the d. n d >ne
in aid Dutch style are perhaps the great
est fads jmt .now. Either is capable of
' after'all.' the den or dens is the
one which is absolutely characterlstic of
its lucky possessor, a law unto «£«* «*
jov until it is worn out. A certain fa
mous expert has evolved one that make,
it- owner the envy of all who see it and
smoke therein: Indeed, the greedy femi
nine eye might well be tempted into de
s -ns on his bachelorhood.
. This den. then, !s (tone ,n ua.»
to,-' >>• UP « »•«*« 0f S1X Wh"e
.he , bony stein rail divide* it from the
Uhh- plain wall, which is in panels rep
r;WnC«K music, the sports and so on
Move the hrond window is a gro.esqu
* , .,|p>t a red background: two
cow- mils' dyed sapphlr. blue, figure as
mustaches, while another mnrr« «
whiskers. Arm* f rm the unlqtio, il war
’ike. chandelier, around wh.chcrMea
lot of stenciled ballet girls, who_ find ki..k
•ne the chandelier a mere wa.kover. ( t
n,;,v he whispered that a seance in this
T u.m makes one feel like a bald head in
the front row.i The Mack mantel is alive
w ,, devotees of ali the sport*, both male
a „1 female, not to mention the encored
dancer. These are painted.
\\\. have forgotten to state hat a few
of ihe panels are devoted to photographs
tone is labeled "Some of the Wars 1 H-\ve
>!er>: and Skits on friends-the sort ot
which no man would give an inkling in
his autobiography.
or course the den is named. The
Fumes was chosen by inspiration, and it
„ cmbtMdered on the red draperies at
the portal, monkeys Holding the F. whtie
‘he last lotfr. low down, is looped into
the Simian's tail.
Attractive and cheap is the mercerised
tapestrv. Hangings of it in rich or deli
cate Main colors are to be had utferi
per pair, and they are finished with a
heavy silk cord edge.
Ever so modish and downright new are
the in1 : eerized moires with borders
These cost from *14 to SIS the pair, and
A GREAT SURPRISE
s In store for all who use Kemp’s Balsam for
.he Throat and Bungs, the great guaranteed
remedy. Would you believe that It is sold on
its merits and any druggist Is authorised by
the proprietor of this wonderful remedy to give
you n sample bottle free? It never fail* to
cure acute or chronic coughs. All druggists
sell ^Cemp’s Balsam. Price 23c. apd Me.
look like the most magnificent moire
vv.otH.
One pair has a -printed epingle border
a dainty design on a white ground. This
border is cut from a whole curtain and
applied. Others are adorned with borders
of printed linen taffeta, whlcn is very
r.ch, and still others with broclie velour,
a rich and effective finish.
i£ew. too. and original with this same
master mind are the velour hangings
wuh borders in leather applique. Very
effective are those in moss green velour,
with a broad and intricate border of
leather in russet color, the edges being
embroidered down in gold thread so
tightly done as to form a cord
» * *
The Gainsborough has found its place
in its relation to the winter gown, and
this is pre-eminently ahd decidedly in
connection with the velvet frock. Witn
nothing else does it look so web.
Too often ’he Gainsborough gives the
wearer a top-heavy look or there is an
unhappy contrast between its own pic
ture qualities and the duller ones of the
sown with which it is worn. But with
me velvet robe there is no such objec
tion: It is the hat of hats for velvet
sheen,
in putting on a Gainsborough let one
take care. It is a trying hat. ’hough ah
do not believe It: Tet. really, there x.
nothing that so greatly taxes ones nat
ural resources in jhe matter of goo !
looks. Il takes height and grace to look
well iu a Gainsborough, and unless
woman have both she would do well to
choose some other hat.
Then, too, aside from its size, there is
the matter of feathers. It takes a pe
culiar grace to carry off the training
plume, and, unless one possess it. one
can not. expect to look well with half a
yard of feather trailing down one's
back.
The Gainsboroughs that are decked ou:
with bows of ribbon at one side, each
bow with its narrow streamers, all to
trail upon the neck, is open to the same
objection, and to all who would seek this
hat let there be one word of caution.
Beware! Be sure that you can wear it.
Get the advice of'the milliner.
Then, if you are sure you are right, go
ahead, for there is nothing with half
the effectiveness.
It is quite remarkable to note, out me
velvet gown and the Gainsborough are
both having their effect upon gloves.
These are worn very much snugger than
they were and are of exceeding elegance.
If worn without a muff, and there is
something of a fad for this, they must
be of heavy kid. but they are very eiab
orately stitched, and often buttoned with
a special set of buttonfe. The latest ex
travaganza is the making of a set of
■glove buttons to match those upon the
bodice. In $he glove shades castor leads
as it has a pretty, soft, refined tone that
well become any gown. Castor, too,
whiie a gray, does not greatly increase
the size of the hand, as so many light
tones do.
* * *
The array of stocks and neckwear of
ali kinds is bewildering, indeed, and
especially so to one who is looking for
novelties. From the plain tailor model to
the dressy little confection of lace and
chiffon and lace, variations, present them
selves. a few of which are shown in the
Illustrations.
The military stock Is very much liked
for the flannel waist. It is a plain white
siik stock partly covered by another one
of some color. This reaches to within an
inch of the top and opens in front fully
three inches, where it is laced across with
gold cord through three eyelets embroid
ered a little way from the edge.
This outer collar is something made of
velvet and trimmed in a trefoil design
with gold braid, or in a Grecian border.
It is sometimes made to meet at the lower
edge, with a fancy clasp and cut away at
the top, in which case there is no lacing.
Again the outer band slopes down to an
Inch width from each side of the neck,
.lnd sometimes it is merely a band tied In
>i small bow or passed through a gold
buckle, with one end looped around and
falling below a few inches.
For wash stocks to wear with flannel
waists the embroidered linen ones are
very highly recommended. They are made
in colors and white as well.
* *
Will you stuff your little children'*
mouth* now with cakes, and leave them
to be careless or ashamed of you when
they are grown, or will you choose to
grow mentally and spiritually, keeping
well abreast of the day you live in. no
matter if your children's fare be plain?
ask* the “Woman's Home Companion.”
So shall they turn (o you in pride when
they become fully developed men and
women.
Give up slavery to show. Give up van
ity which feeds upon the envy of neigh
bors over trifling things. Give up feeding
your household with indigestible food
prepared by your - wn heavy toil. Give up
fripperies of the needle, all kinds of use
less gewgaws, and teach your hands, your
body and your feet the beauty of repose.
Learn to work at what is worth while,
to’think of real things, to avoid wasting
your powers upon the nothings of life.
. * -,
See that your plants get fresh air when
j ever it onti be given them safely, says the
"Ladies' Home Journal.” This means
I that cold air should he so admitted that
! it is rtlixed with the air of the room be
i fore it reaches the plants themselves,
i Give your plants the benefit of light and
i sunshine if you wish them to do well.
| Water only when the stirfare of the soil
; looks dry. This rule cannot be deviated
i from with .safety by the amateur. The
, experienced gardener will frequently dis
: cover conditions which make- it safe for
! him to vary or modify it, but these the
: amateur will uot discover, and it is not
j possible to lay down any instructions by
; which they may be discovered. Over
j watering does untold harm, as it causes
! souring of the soil, and brings on decay
of the roots. Apply fertilizers only when
a pjant is- growing, for then, and then
only, can it make use of them. Begin
with a small quantity of whatever fer
tilizer you use, and increase the amount
as the plant increases in growth, being
careful not to_overdo the matter.
. * *
Rich- women, even though they revel
; in diamonds, have no monopoly ot slides.
■ for, happily, stones of no great vaiue are
verv modish. These are pretty on ribbon
necklets as Well as rows of pearls. A
lovely one Is in steel, set with corals. Tur
quoises are very great favorites, too,
either --- void or platinum.
Methodist Episcopal Church
Will Admit Them as Dele
gates to Conference.
NEW CONSTITUTION ADOPTED
General Conference at Chi
cago Accepts the Changes
By Vote of 8,196 to
2,613.
Word was received this morning that
the new constitution of the Methodist
Episcopal Church was formally adopted
yesterday evening late by the General
Conference sitting In Chicago.
This new constitution was adopted at !
the last conference in May, 1900, and by
that body referred to the various confer-,!
enees throughout the country. The vote
was as follows:—Ayes. 8,196; noes, 2.613,
and this is the required three-quarters ;
vote.
By this action women hereafter will !
be able lo sit as delegates to the confer
ence—a change which for years has
caused a great deal pf discussion in every :
church In the land and bitter figh;e In the
conferences. Finally the advocates of I
women’s rights in the church have come !
out triumphant. They had to encounter
the opposition of the old fashioned Metho
dist who insisted that the place for <
women in the church was to sit atilt, nut j
ta.k, get up the church teas, fairs and
sociables, and incidentally collect money
when the church was in debt; but to have
tnem in the government of the church,
make speeches and vote, the Idea was
preposterous.
The advocates for the women scouted
this viewr af woman's place and with
great eloquence contended th^t if a
woman was lit to do till the hard work
In the church surely she ought to get
something and was qualified to do better |
than maty of the men jyho attended ;
church and did nothing for its welfare j
ana advancement.
This new constitution also gives to lay
men the right to vote on constitutional j
questions tit their meetings—a concession
to a faction in the church already grow
ing extremely powerful and demanding
proper recognition. These changes will
go into effect at once.
-•.
HOBART MAUSOLEUM
- j
Architects of Jersey City
Library Are the
Designers.
The Hobart mausoleum, in Cedar Lawn j
Cemetery, Paterson, is now well under
way. It will be completed this winter.
Cedar Lawn Cemetery is on the River
road, near the Passaic River, between
Paterson and Passaic. "When the new j
structure Is completed the body of Garret ■
A. Hobart, Vice President of the United i
States will rest within its walls.
The Hobart plot at Cedar Lawn Ceme- j
tery Is Go by ?r> feet. The mausoleum. \
when completed, will be an imposing
structure, 28 feet wide and 44 feet deep,
including the porticoes, front and rear.
Brite & Bacon, of No. Ill Fifth avenue,
New York City, who. designed the Free ;
Public Library of this city, are the archi
tects, and they have designed a Doric
temple, simple and plain as can be, free
from all ornamentation, solid and mass
ive, and a pure example of Greek archi
tecture.
The structure will rise twenty-two feet
seven inches from the ground. The ma
terial will be granite from Barre, Vt.
The front and rear roofs of the porticoes
will he supported by four massive fluted
columns of granite, the mausoleum being
in the form of a double temple, with col- j
umns front and rear modelled after the [
form of an amphori style temple of the
Grecian Doric order. The columns will be
surmounted by Doric caps and will rise
twelve and one-half feet from tfte base
carved 'on the front and rear to the frieze
over the porticoes and two on each side
otherwise the building will be entirely
free of all carving.
The entrance will be through double
bronze doors, and the interior will be
lighted by a window opening out on the
rear portico through a heavy bronze quill,
made by the Gorham Company, of New
York City. y
The walls will be nearly two feet thick,
of granite, and the entire structure will
be lined with marble and will have floor
and celling of the same material. The
floor of the portico will be reached by
three granite steps, this odd number be
ing In keeping with the Greek Ideas of
architecture. The ancients held to the
belief that the foot placed on the first
steps must also be the one placed on the
temple floor. A study of old temples shows
that they always carried out this idea
by placing an odd number of steps lead
ing to their temples.
A double sarcophagus, of marble, to
! contain the remains of the late Vice
block of marble, will rest in the centre of
the vault and underneath the window. On
: either side of the door will be catacombs.
The late President McKinley, when on
his visit with Mrs. McKinley to Mrs. Ho
| bart, was very much interested in the
! plans, and spoke approvingly of them.
! Robert Catterson, of Woodlawn, New
| York. Is the contractor, and the stone set
i ting is being done by McWilliams Broth
I ers. Mills, Lamson & Co., are furnishing
| the granite from the quarry at Barre.
GREENVILLE REPUBS' OFFICERS
Lsagas Put Through the Sluts in
Great Shape.
; At the meeting of the Oreenville Repnb
1 Lean League Iasi night the following
' officers were elected for .li ensuing
; year:—President, William J. Charlock;
i Vice-President,. Benjamin Franklin. Sr.;
! Recording Secretary, Robert J. B. Lutz;
, Corresponding Secretary, -Rudolph C.
; Grossman: Treasurer, George Ferguson:
i Financial Secretary, George W. Vander
| pool: Assistant Financial Secretary. Rob
r crt F. Dacre; Sergeant-at-Arms, Joseon
' Herde; Trustees, J. S. Sothern, J. F.
Healey. J. G. Fremgon, William Vaughan
! and William E. Reed.
The slate was made up some time ago
and it went through without a hitch.
Wiliam J. Charlock, the Alderman-elect
' of the Seventh ward, was unanimously
re-elected President. The officers will b_
installed at the first meeting in January
NEW YEAR’S STAG
The Entertainment Committee of the
i Jersey City Club lias arranged a stag for
i New Year’s eve. Pipes and tobacco will
| be provided for all.
.
SPORTSMEN
Even
PRINCETON LEADS ALL
Goes to the Front in Inter
collegiate Chess — Ryan
Sues Jeffries—Notes
An even break was the result at Wood's
Hall alleys in the opening games of the
week In the tournament series. The con
testants were the Rahway. Aetna and
Arthur clubs. AH the1 scores were good
and the spectators were moved to en
thusiasm very often. The scores:—
FIRST OAlMK—RA'H WAY.
St. Sp. Sc
Wilson . 3 6 ISO
Fyffe . 2 4 1S5
Dunn . ....... 6 3 1SS
Ensworth . 0 4 124
Totals . 10 17 769
AETNA.
St. Sp. Sc.
Russell .... 3 4
Lamster . 2 6 169
Fizel . 3 4 ,1»*
Dev . 6 1 1SJ
Meakin. 3 3 160
Totals .17 1*
SECOND GAME—RAHWAY.
St. Sp. Se.
Wilson . 3 4 161
Fyffe . 3 6 182
'Bliss . 0 1 194
Ensworth . 0 3
Dunn . 3 V°
Totals .11 22 821
ARTHUR.
St. ■ Sp. Sc.
Barnett.i. 1 3
Heinz . 3 1 1«2
■Marx .i . 1 3
Brown ...... .f..... J J __
Totals . 12 23 807
THIRD GAME—ARTHUR.
St. Sp. Sc.
Barnett . 3 Hi
Heinz . 2 1 “®
Marx . 3 f J®2
Brown . _« J
Totals .1S 19 881
AETNA.
St. Sp. Sc.
Russell . 3 ? Hi
iLamster . 1 *
Meakin .} _f . 15°
Totals .12 21 SA
But four member* or tne ruium
put in an appearance last night to bowl
against the Tnvincibles and Frazers, but
thev did very well in view of all the
circumstances. The Invincibles won two
games. The odd one went to the Frazers.
The scores:—
FIRST GAME—INVINCIBLE.
Wallace ...14n
Sweeney ...
Ktnkel ../. ,
Van Vleek ...,...
Total ..• 809
FULTON.
Schaller .Ug
Van Slcklen . jig
Kirk .Jf!
Total .680
SECOND GAME—FRAZER.
’ 144
Hayden . jjl
Smith . j™,
Douglas .. ,-4
Chalmers —.. __
Total . 822
FULTON.
Schaller ...
Van Slcklen .
Remsen . lip
|jhnelder 186
Total .. 943
THIRD GAME—FRAZER.
Hayden ..'.jp?
Garrison . IS;
Smith ....
Douglas . Ilf
Total ..
INVINCIBLE.
Wallace . 3S5
Sweeney . I2J
Ostrom . jlo
Klnkel .
Van Vleek. l >
Total . 823
PRINCETON LEADS ALL
Goes to the Front in First
Round of Intercollegiate
Chess Tournament.
Princeton leads at the end of the first
round of the Intercollegiate cness tour
nament, the experts from the New Jer
sey university defeating Harvard men by
the good score of three to one. Columbia
won two games, drew one and lost one
to Yale. Yale’s score being one and one
half wins, two and one-half losses.
The tournament was opened at i P. M
yesterday at the rooms of the Columbia
Grammar School, Manhattan, and will
be continued today and finished tomor
row.
The pairing, openings and results of
the round were:—
Board 1—Sewall, Columbia, vs. Sawm,
Yale: French defense; won by Columbia
after 41 moves.
Board 2.—Adams. Yale, vs. Iveeler, Col
umbia; irregular opening, 1. P—K3;
drawn.
Board 3—Von Sholly, Columbia, vs.
Roberts. Yale; French defense; won by
Col um'ola.
Board 4—Russ. Yale, vs. Tucker, Co
lumbia; Irregular opening; won by Yale
In 27 moves.
Board 5—Hunt, Princeton, vs. Rice.
Harvaid- irregular opening; won by
Hunt.
Board 6—Hyde, Harvard, vs. Hankin
son, Princeton: queen’s gambit declined;
won by Hyde in 43 moves.
Board 7—Pilgram, Princeton, vs. Cateh
ings. Harvard; Sicilian defense; won by
Piigram. ‘
Board 8—Carr, Harvard, vs. Dodd,
Princeton, French defense; won by Dodd
after 41 moves.
The -pairings for the seepnd round to
day are: Hunt, Princeton, vs. Sewall.
Columbia; Keeier. Columbia, Vs. Hari
klnson,' Princeton: Pilgram. Princeton,
vs. Sholly, Columbia; Tucker, Columbia,
cs. Dodd, Princeton; Rice, Harvard, vs.
Sawtn, Yale; Adams, Yale vs. Hyd.»,
Harvard: CatcbiBgs, Harvard vs. Rob
vajfl. " ' '''
ATHLETICS AT PRINCETON
Return of Students to College
Instills New Sprint in
4^ Tigers. _
,'jJYith the return of the Princeton slu
idjent.s to college after the holidays,
Lfralner Robinson will, start tne basket
ball team on rigid training and with the
material at band he hopes to make a firs'
class team with a good chance for the
championship. Severul of the football
.players are among the candidates and
they will strive to make a showing in the
new field of sports.
, The track team will also start in train
ing in the gymnasium, and will continue
ilis work until tne field, track is In good
conditldn and the weather permits out
door training. Princeton this year has
a number, of new' men, who with good
training should make a record fpr them
; selves as weil as for the Princeton track
! team. As soon as the diamond is fit for
practice Captain Steinwender will cal!
on the student body for candidates, and
after several practices the weeding wd>
j begin. A number of the old players are
I still in college, and with the assistance
!;of “Doc" Hillebrand, former captain of
football and baseball teams, “Stemmy"
Will try to run out one of the beat^teams
that Princeton can put forth. Hliiebraml
' will remain the w'hole season, and under
his supervision the team should round
i Into championship form.
With the renewed relations ii. basebali
with the Harvard management the
schedule will again be replete with in
teresting games. As for the prospects of
tne coming football' season, little can be
said as yet, but the new captain. Rail h
Davis, recently elected, and with the lrt
I coming material which is hoped the
freshman class will bring In Princeton
will try her best to run out a champion
ship team next fall.
THE BASEBALL SITUATION
' * 1 ' '
| Spalding Active as an Indivi
dual—Bolter Will Not Ham
per National League.
Mr. A. G. Spalding, the enjoined Na
I Conal Baseball League President, is
’ busy these days as an Individual
acting in baseball affairs. He said some
warm things Sunday night that elicited
j no reply f rum his opponents.
; ‘‘Sporting Life” is authority for the
1 statement that representatives of the
I Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Pittsburg and
| Chicago Clubs met Lawyers Rogers,
; Kiddle and Northrop in Jersey City last
! week and mapped out a comprehensive
plan of campaign for the Spalding fac
tion In the League muddle. In accord
ance With this plan the injunction’ issued
by Judge Leventritt Was a.lowed to
stand without argument pending trial
of the case.
"Sporting Life” says further: “We sav
emphatically and advisedly that the Na
tional League will be In the held next
season with eight strong clubs in th.
old cities and with the organized base
ball world at its back.' The door Is still
open for the bolters (New York, Cincin
j nati, St. Louis and Boston),'to return,
| cnastened and humbled. But if they do
riot avail themselves at the/opportunity
to return to the fold with! na reasonable
time stern measures will be taken and
the seceders left to founder in the shoals
Into which they have steered themselves.
For the present, and probably for all
time, every door except thr Natlona,
League door is shut to them.”
RYAN SUES JEFFRIES
W*Hai-*W«igfct Want* $1,000 for
Training the Champion.
Tommy Ryan, the noted welter-weight
prize fighter, has brought suit against
James J. Jeffries to recover *1.000, which
he alleged is due him for training the
world’s champion for his fight with
! James J, .Corbett at Coney Island in
May, 1899.
The papers were served on Jeffries
while he was in a Turkish bath, but he
paid no attention to it, turning over
and continuing his sleep without making
reply. Ryan in his petition says he
rendered the services expected of him
and that the service is reasonably
worth *2,500. Of this amount Ryan says
Jeffries paid him *1.500 in three different
j Instalments and that *1,000 is still due,
I for which amount he asks judgment.
AMATEURS BEING WATCHED
A. A. V. Officials Will Kaep I<»
Members la Line or Punish Offenders
Unregistered athletes and billiard
players are being closely watched by the
A. A. U. officials. At a meeting of the
Registration Committee of the Nes
England Association of the A. A. U. in
Boston recently. It was voted to protest
Charles Threshie and C. H. Smith, both
of Boston, who are entered to play In
the A. A. XT. National championship bil
l’ard tourney, to be held at thevKnicker
bocker A. C. next month.
Threshie and Smith are charged with
not being registered and also with com
peting at unsanctioned meetings while
registered.
YALE BASKETBALL TROUBLE
Tub m Lengthy Trip While A. A
XJ. Decides to Disquellfy It.
Yale's team of basket-ball players left
last night for the longest trip ever taK
en by a basketball team. Their itinerary
mcludes^ames in Pittsburg. Cincinnut',
Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Cleve
land, Elmira and Waverly, N. ,Y
The team comprises: Captain Lockwood.
'C3 law, guard: Hyatt, 03, forward; Hall.
'02. forward: Wei'inolith. '03 law. centre:
Morehead. '02. guard: and the three ^in
stitutes, Church, 03: Colton. '03 law. and
Meade. '02, Scoffield and Manager White
head, 03. it was said yesterday that the
officials of the A. A. U. will closely
watch the Yale team's games. In case
they compete against any unregistered or
disqualified basketball players, of whom
there are many in the various A. A-( X .
divisions, the entire Yale team will bo
disqualified.
KEARNY ROAD COMPLETED
Inspector William Flood reported at last
night's meeting of the Board of Freehold
er* that the Passaic avenue improvement
in Kearny was completed and the road in
excellent condition. He recommended
that the five per cent, retained percentage
be paid the contractor. The communica
tion was referred to the Road Commit
tee for action.
The Superior Facilities possessed by the <
.. JOB ..
PRINTING
DEPARTMENT
of “The Jersey City News” enable it to expe
ditiously and economically perform every
class of printing in a satisfactory manner. <
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JERSEY CITY
.. NEWS ..
No. 251 Washington St. Tel. No. 271 \
S’ URR OG ATE’S NOTICES
NOTICE fO CREDITORS — ESTATE OK
JOHN GOLDEN, ileoeased; Eugene Devitt.
administator of John Golden, deceased, by or
der of the Deputv Surrogate of Hudson Coun
ty, dated October ISth. 19M„ hereby gives no
tiee to the creditors of said decedent to bring
in their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decdent, under oath or af
firmation, within nine months from the date
of said order, or they will he forever barred
of any action therefor against said adminis
trator. EUGENE DEVITT.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
HENRY HAUCK, deceased; Susanna Hauck,
executrix of Henry Hauck, deceased, by order
of the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson County,
dated October 18th, 1901, hereby gives notice to
the creditors of said decedent to bring in their
debts, demands and claims against the estate
of said decedent, under oath or affirmation,
within nine months from the date of said or
der. or they will be forever barred of any
action therefor against said executrix.
SUSANNA HAUCK.
Claims to be presen ted at office of Hudspeth
& Puster, Jersey City, N. J.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS — ESTATE OF
JOHN HELBIG, deceased; Louisa Helbig.
administratrix of John Helbig, deceased, by
order of the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson
County, dated October 15th, ISfol, hereby gives
notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, under oath
or affirmation, within nine months from the
date of said order, or they will be forever
barred of any action therefor against said
administratrix. LOUISA HELBIG.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS-ESTATE OF
Frederick A. Mollenhauer, deceased; Egmont
Mbllenhauer, administrator' of Frederick A.
Mollenhauer; deceased; by order of the Deputy
Surrogate of Hudson County, dated October
29. 1901, hereby gives notice to the creditors
of said decedent to bring in their debts, de
mands and claims against the estate of sa:d
decedent, under oath or affirmation, within
nine months from the date of said order, or
they will be forever barred of any action theie
for against said administrator.
EGMONT MOLLENHAUER.
Claims presented at office of D. W. MeCrea,
76 Montgomery street. *
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE OF
Sophie Heeve, deceased. John Wright,
executor of Sophie Heeve, deceased, by
order of the Deputy Surrogate of Hudson
County, dated September 30, 1901, hereby
gives notice to the creditors of said dece
dent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against ttye estate of said decedent,
under oath or affirmation, within nine
months from the date of said order, or
they will be forever barred of any action
therefor against said executor.
JOHN WRIGHT.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF
Mary Emma Ivins, deceased; Henrietta \V.
Allison, administratrix of Mary Emma Ivins,
deceased; by order of the Deputy Surrogate
of Hudson County, dated November 8, 1901,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the estate of said decedent,
under oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of' any action therefor against
said administatrix.
HENRIETTA W. ALLISON.
Brlnkerhoff & Fielder, Proctors.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF
Mary Ives Young, deceased; Jean B.
Stouvenel, named in the will as John B.
Stouvenel, one of the executors of Mary Ives
Young, deceased; by order of the Deputy Sur
rogate of Hudson County, dated November 11,
1901, hereby gives notice to the creditors of
said decedent to bring in their debts, demands
and claims against the estate of said de
cedent, under oath or affirmation, within nine
months from the date of said order, or they
will be forever barred of any action ther«nor
against said executor.
__JEAN B. STOUVENED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF
Daniel McWilliams, deceased; Charles E.
McWilliams, Adolph Dexheimer and William
Brown, executors of Daniel McWilliams, de
ceased; by order of the Surrogate of Hudson
County, dated November 9, 1901. hereby gives
notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims
against the estate of said decedent, under oath
or affirmation, within nine months from the
date of said order, or they will be forever
barred of, any action therefor against said
executors.
CHARLES E. McWJLLIAMS,
ADOLPH DEXHEIMER,
_ WILLIAM BROWN, j_
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—NOTICE IS
hereby given that the final account of the
subscriber, administrator of the estate of John
I Vahey, deceased, will be audited and stated
by the Surrogate of the County of Hudson,
and reported for settlement on Friday, the 27th
day of December next.
Dated November 21st, A. D. 1901.
__DENNIS B. RYAN.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—ESTATE OF
Joseph Brennan, deceased; Mary Brennan,
administratrix of estate of Joseph Brennan,
deceased; by order of the Deputy Surrogate
of Hudson County, dated November 21, 1901,
hereby gives notice to the creditors of said
decedent to bring in their debts, demands and
claims against the, estate of said decedent,
under oath or affirmation, within nine months
from the date of said order, or they will be
forever barred of any action therefor against
said administatrix.
MARY BRENNAN.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS—E»TATE_ OF
Frankiin II. Holloway, deceased: Elizabeth G.
Holloway, administratrix of Franklin H. Hollo
way, deceased; by order of the I>eputy Surro
gate v of Hudson County, date<J November 14,
1901, hereby gives notice to the creditors of
said decedent to bring in their debts, demands
i and claims against the estate of said decedent,
i under oath or affirmation, within nine months
! from the date of said order, or they will be
i forever barred of any action therefor against
i said administratrix. _
ELIZABETH O. HOLLOWAY.
I Claims to be presented at office of Queen *Sr
Tennant, lft Exchange place, Jersey City. __
NOTICE-OF SETTLEMENT .—NOTICE IS
i hereby given that the final account of the
j subscribers, executors of estate of Mary E.
Lane, deceased, will be audited and stated by
the Surrogate of the County of Hudson, and
reported for settlement on Friday, the 10th
day of January. 1902.
Dated December 4, A. D. 1901.
JOHN GOUGH,
_CHARLES KYDD._
NOTICE 1» HKnui t,I' r,.> i r,i , lie- Ac
count of the executors of Bridget Moran, de
ceased, will be settled by the Hudson County
Orphans' Court on January 17, 1902.
V ANDREW KERIN,
HENRY KWALD.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.—ESTATE OF
Archibald Dick, deceased; James A. Hamlll,
executor of Archibald Dick, deceased; by ort.er
of the Surrogate of Hudson County, dated No
vember 29, 1901. hereby gives notice to the
‘ creditors of said decedent to bring in their
' debts, demands and claims against the estate
1 of said decedent, under oath or affirmation,
i Within nine months from the date of said or
der. or they will be forever barred of any
action therefor against said executor.
JAMES A. HAMILL.
CHARLES M. EQAN, Proctor.
CORPORATION NOIICE
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the hKh day
of December. 1901. the Commissioners of As
sessment filed in the office of the Clerk of the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners
their final assessment map ami report for the
IMPROVEMENT OF TENTH STREET,
from Erie street to Jersey avenue, in accord
ance with petition previously presented to said
Board on the 10th day of October, 1901, and
conformably to the provisions of Chapter 217
of the I^aws of 1S35, and the same is now open !
to public inspection in the office of the Clerk
of said Boqrd:
And notice is also given that the following
streets or avenues or particular sections there
of are Included in said assessment, namely:—
TENTH STREET,
from Jersey avenue to Eirie street.
JERSEY AVENUE,
on the east side, from Tenth street to points
about 50 feet north and 25 feet south thereof.
EP.IE STREET,
on the west side, from Tenth street to points
about 25 feet north and 100 feet south thereof.
An 1 that in accordance with the provisions
of the Act above cited the 31st day of Decem
ber 1901, at 2 o’clock P. M., and the Assembly
Chamber of the City Hall are hen by fixed a,
the time and place when and where the Board
of Street and Water Comm saioners will meet ;
to hear, consider and adjudicate upon all ob- i
lections to the confirmation of said final as- s
sessment map and report that may be pre
sented in writing. _ „ , _ .
By order of the Board of Street and W ater
Commissioners. ^TTrT,^^T
GEORGE T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, December 23, 1901._
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the 10 th, aa j j
of December. 1901, the Commissioners of As
sessment filed in the office of the Clerk of the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners
their final assessment map and report.forr the
IMPROVEMENT OF MILTON A\EME,
from Griffith street to Lincoln street, in ac
cordance with petition previously presented to
said Board on the 5th day of March lOOl
and conformably to the provisions of Chapter
217 -of the Laws of 1895. and the same Is nog
open to public Inspection in the office of tne
Clerk of said Board. ....
V'vi notw O also Riven that the following
streets or avenues or particular section thereof
are included in said assessment, namely:—
MILTON AVENUE,
from Griffith to Lincoln streets.
GRIFFITH STREET,
on the north side, from Milton avenue to a
point about SO feet east thereof.
LINCOLN STREET.
on the south side, from Milton avenue to a
point about 23.7 feet east thereof.
■, t ... ; n-.-or.liinee with ‘he provisions
of the Act above cited, the 31st day of Decem
ber 1901 at 2 o’clock P. M.. and the Assembly
.’hamber of the City Halt are hereby fixed as
the time and place when and where toe Board
f Street and Water Commissioners will meet
u> hear all f.arii.-s interested in said applica
tion. and all remonstrances against the sa'd
proposed improvement that may be presentee?
’ lDBy rorSer of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners. GEORGE T. BOUTON.
Clerk. ;
Ttated Jersey City, Dec. 23, 1901._ 1
IN CHANCKBV OK NK\v JbKobl.
To Serena Rossing or Xiessing.
By virtue of an order of the Court of
Chancery of New Jersey, made on the
day of the date hereof, in a cause where
in John Rossing is petitioner and you are
defendant, you are required to appear ami
answer to the petitioner’s petition on ir
before the ninth day of December next,
or that in default thereof such decree
will be made against you as; the Chancel
lor shall think equitable and just lhe
Bald petition is filed against you for a d -
voice from the bond of matrimony.
Dated October 7. 1801. _____
J. HERBERT POTTS,
Solicitor of Petitioner.
_ 15 Exchange Piac*
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
final account of the executors of Rose Con
nell, deceased, will be settled by the Hudson
Countv Orphans* Court on January 17. 1902.
T JAMES CONNELL.
ISAAC CANNING.
THE CREDITORS O F ROSAN N A K ELLY,
deceased, are. by order of the Deputy Surro
gate of Hudson County, dated December 6.
1901. upon application of the administrator of
said deceased, notified to bring in their debts,
demands and claims against her estate within
nine months from above date.
JAMES A._KELLY.
THE CREDITORS OF RICHARD N. TUCKER,
deceased, are, by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated December 9. 1901, upon
application of the administrator of said de
ceased, notified to bring in their debts, de
mands and claims against’ his estate within
nine months from above date..
JAMES E. PYLE,
15 Exchangf place, Jersey City, N. J. _
THE CREDITORS OF JOHN P. KUXTZ.
deceased, are, by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated December 9. 1901. upon
application of the administrator of said de
ceased, notified to bring in their debts, de
mands and claims against his estate with.n
nine months from above date.
GEORGE R. BEACH.
THE~CREDITORS OF FRANKLIN J. MAL
LORY. deceased, are. by order of the Deputy
Surrogate of Hudson County, dated December
5, 1901, upon application of the executors of
said deceased, notified to bring in their debts,
demands and claims against his estate within
nine months from above date.
CATHARINE CORDELIA MALLORY.
GEORGE S. MALLORY.
COWLES & CAREY. Proctors.
THE CREDITORS OF LUIGI ZEO. DE
ceased. are, by order of the Deputy Surrogate
of TT Jsoo County, dated December 3. 1901.
upo;. application of the administratrix of said
deceased, notified to bring in their debts, de
mands and claims against his estate within
nine months from above date.
__, JOSEPHINE ZEO.
THE ACCOUNT OF THE GUARDIAN OF
John Merrick, minor, will he settled by the
Hudson County Orphans’ Court on January
24. 1901 ' . , ’ •
_PATRICK H. KILROY, Guardian._
THE ACCOUNT OF THE GUARDIAN OF
John Aeill, minor, will be settled by the
Hudson ijminty Orphans’ Court on January
24 1902.
_ PATRICK J. )fcNDI.TIf, Gu aril I a n_
CREDITORS OP ANN HI'TMAN, DK
ceased. are. by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated December 21, 1901. upon
application of the administratrix, notUied to
bring In their debts, demands and claims
agains her estate within nine months from
above date.
AKN E. HUGHES,. -Administratrix.
CONSOLIDATED TRACTION COMPANY.
Jersey City, N. J., December 26. 1991.
The Hoard of Directors have this day or
dered paid on January 15th, 1902, out of the
rental payment made by the North Jersey
Street Railway Company to the Consolidated
Traction Company, under terms of the lease
between said companies dated May 25th, 189$,
a dividend of one per cent. (1%) on the capital
stock of the Consolidated Traction Company.
Payment will b* made to stockholders of
record the 51st day of December, 1901. Trans
CORPORATION NOTICE
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed proposals will be received by (he R.-ari
of Street and Water Commissioners on Tuesday.
December 31, 1901. at 2 o’clock P. M.. in the
Assembly Chamber o? the City I-Iall, for the
IMPROVEMENT OF PERRINE STREET,
from High street to the Pennsylvania Rail
road.
Said improvement to be madfe conformably
to the provisions of Chapter 217 of the Laws
of Uty5, iind in accordance with specifications
on /lie In the office of the Clerk of said Beam.
Plank forms of bid and. agreement of sureties
must be obtained at the office of the Chief
Engineer. Cltv Hall. Jersey City, N. J.
ESTIMATE OF QUANTITIES.
100% standard
of cost.
About 140 cubic* yards of earth excava- »
tion, per cubic yard . >0.10
About 5 cubic yards of rock excavation,
per cubic yard . 2.00
About 300 cubic yards of earth filling, per
cubic yard . 30
About 80 cubic yards of sand filling, per
cubic yard . 1.23
About 230 square yards of Belgian pav
ing. per square yard . 1.23
About 700 lineal feet of curb stone, per
lineal foot .65
About 10 square feet of bridge stone, per
squure foot .43
About 2,700 square feet of flagging, per
square foot ..15
Afyuut 40 square feet of relaid and dressed
bridge stone, per square foot.0»
About ICO square feet of relaid and dress
ed (lagging stone, per square foot.02
Time allowed for the completion of the work.
2o working days.
The making of the above improvement ana
award of the contract therefor will be subject
to the remonstrance of the owners of the prop
erty liable to more than one-half the assess
ment therefor on the basis of preliminary
sketch. ***•
Proposals must be enclosed In sealed en
velopes. endorsed “Proposals for the improve
ment of Perrine Street.” directed to “Mr. Jas.
S. Nolan, Chairman of the Committee on Streets
and Sewers.” and handed to the Clerk of the
Board in open meeting when called for in the ^
order of business relating to sealed proposals.
The bonds required to be furnished on
posals land a p *ssj!>k* subsequent contract) Mg|
those of some surety company authorized to
business in the State of New Jersey.
Bidders must state a single fixed percentage ^
of the hundred per <*enti sinralnrd* above -quoted
for which they will furnish all materials and ,
do all the work comprehended in specifications, /
and if final award of contract be made the r»r •
cent, so stated will form the basis upon whisk 1
payment will be made for all items. _ /
The Board may, under the provisions of the'
Act above cited, exercise Us right to reject
any or all proposals.
The attention of bidders is especially called
to Section 7, Chapter 134 of the Laws of 1891.
under the terms whereof no contract shall be
binding upon the city or become effective or
operative until the bonds offered by the con
tractor have been approved as to sufficiency
by this Board, and as to form by the Corpora
tion Counsel, the President of this Board hav
ing the power to examine the proposed bonds
men under oath.
By order of the Board of Street and Wat*:*
Commissioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON.
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, Dec. 23. 1901.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed proposal* will be received by the Board
of Street and Water Commissioner* on Tues
day, December 31. 1901, at 2 o’clock P. M., in
the Assembly Chamber of the City Hall, for
the
IMPROVEMENT OF JEWETT • A VENUS,
from Monticello avenue to a point about 525
feet west of Bergen avenue.
Said improvement to be made conformably
to the provisions of Chapter 217 of the Laws
of 1895, and in accordance with specification*
for same on liie In the office of the Clerk at
said Board.
Blank forms of bid and agreement of sureties
must be obtained at the office of the Chi*f
Engineer, C'itv Hall. Jersey City, N. J.
ESTIMATE OF QUANTITIES.
standard
of cost.
Ab-*ut 815 cubic yards of earth excava- *
tiun, per cubic yard . $o.M
About 20 cubic yards «>f rook exeavattoto.
per cubic yard . I.W
About 3.2S0 square yards of asphalt pav
ing. per square yard . 1.71
About 870 lineal feet of curb stone, per
lineal foot .tt
About 20 square yards of repaving, per
square yard .30
About 1.13*1 lineal feet of reset and dressed
curb stone, per lineal foot .20 j
About ISO square feet of relaid and dress- :
ed bridge stone, per square foot.ti I
About 1 receiving basin head to be reset,
at.. .. .. :’.a|
About 5 manhole heads to be reset, each 2.(W
About *» water gate bdxes to l»e reset,
each ..
About 5 noiseless manhole covers, each,
All Belgian paving in gutters to be the prop
erty of the ?ity.
Tihie allowed for the completion of the work.
50 working days. _
The making of the above Improvement and
award of the contract therefor will be subject
to the remonstrance of the owners of the prop
erty liable to more than ono-half the assess
ment therefor on the basis of preliminary
sketch. , , .
Proposals must be enclosed in sea lea en«
vslopes, endorsed "Proposals for the improve
ment of Jewett Avenue." directed to "Mr.
jas Nolan. Chairman of the Committee -n
Streets and Sewers," and handed to tha Clerk
of the Board in open meeting when called for
In the order of business relating to sealed pro
posals. •. v
The bonds required to be furnished on pro
posals (and a possible subsequent contract) art
those of some surety company authorised t«
do business in the State* of NV.w Jers«>.
Bidders must state a single fixed percents**
of. the hundred per cent.' standard abov«
quoted for which they will furnlsli^all ma
terials and do all the work comprehended dr
s peri fie* ii«>ns, and if final award *»f contract
be made the per ceht. so stated will form tht
b»s!.“ upon which payment will be made foi
alt Items. r ’ ** "a . r * .
The Board mnv. nnuer the provisions of th«
Act ah *ve cited, ■xercise its right to r» J«l
any or all proposals.
The attention n: bidders is especially called I
to S*>c-I.in 7. Chapter 124. of th** Laws of 139k k
imder the terms whereof no contract shall b« ^k
binding upon tDo city, or become effective
operative until the bonds offered by the
tractor have been approved as to stifficiencj^»
by tills Hoard and as to form by the Corporfe^Kj
tion Counsel, the President of this Board hav
ing the power to examine the proposed bond** ^
men under oath.
By order of the Board of Street and Watw
Commissioners.
GEORGE T. BOUTON.
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, Dec. 23. 1901.__
william \\. Edvvarcts, decease; Emma i
Edwards, executrix of William W. Edwards
deceased: by order of the Deputy Surrogate of
Hut is on County, dated September 13, ldOl. here
by gives notice to the creditors of said <3e*
cedent to bring in their debts, demands ar»«
claims against the estate of said decedent
under oath or affirmation, within nine month]
from the date at said order, or they will b»
forever barred of any action therefor again*
said executrix.
EMMA J. EDWARDS.
I

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