OCR Interpretation


The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, September 17, 1902, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068097/1902-09-17/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

)t lorseg Citg Nem
JAMES LUBY,.Editor and Publisher.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON.
THE CITY PUBLISHING COMPANY.
Office, No. 251 Washington Street,
THE NEWS BUILDING.
Telephone Call, Jersey City, 271.
NEW YORK OFFICE—No. 22 Park Row (Room 42).
HOBOKEN AGENCY—J. Lichtenstein. No. 01 Second street.
NEWARK AGENCY—F. N. Sommer. No. 795 Broad Street.
The only Democratic Daily Paper published in Jersey City. Single copi
•ne cent; subscription, three dollars per year, postage paid.
Entered in the Post Office at Jersey City as second class matter. Kews;
All business communication* should be addressed to The Jersey ^ J
•11 letters for pnblication to the Managing Editor.
JERSEY CITY, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 17, 1902._
THE MACHINE TO START UP.
The annual farce of Republican enrollment will take place throughout the
county tomorrow evening. About a hundred members of the party w ill go to
the polling places; but probably the machine workers will place about fifteen him
dred names on the lists.
The primaries will take place some time in October for the election of dole
gates tp the County and Congressional district conventions. At these primaries
probably a couple of hundred of the immediate followers of the ring will cast
a thousand votes or so for the delegates whom Sam Dickinson. Ld. W oolley,
Ed. Fry and the other bosses have previously selected to make up the conven
tion.
Then the delegates will come together at the conventions and will nominate
the victims whom Sam and Co. will have slated for the various nominations.
It is said that this year there will be no rows at any of these functions.
Colonel Sam has his cohorts so thoroughly disciplined that Camden methods w i,l
not prevail. It is believed that no one will be shot, and no one will be sandbagged
except the candidates.
DONKEYISM IN THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT.
Sometimes it seems as if the chief aim of the United States Treasury Depart
ment is to make itself the laughing stock of the world. Its latest performance
is a ukase that hereafter imitation money must not be used on the stage. Roils
of bills and bags of coin must bo hereafter the genuine article, or else the prop
erty man will become liable to the pains and penalties of counterfeiting aud
uttering spurious currency.
Of all the nssinine orders that hare ever been issued from a rod tape and
sealing wax office, Ithis is, by far, the most absurd. We will next expect to hear
of stamp duty being assessed on the bonds and contracts upon which the fate of
melodrama so often depends, and excise duty being collected on the colored water
which takes the place of good red wine in scenes of the hilarious type.
It is to be hoped that some manager with a sense of humor will force the
issue on the Government and compel Shaw and his deputies to go into court and
show the entire country what absolute idiots they are. It would be a pity that
the combination should escape the penalty of laughter which the general public
will be sure to visit upon such an outrageous violation of the laws of common
sense.
ALWAYS GOOD FISH IN THE SEA.
The news that Mr. E. A. S. Lewis, of Hoboken, would not accept the Demo
cratic Assembly nomination, exclusively published in “The News’ on Monday,
caused much regret among members of the party; but the Democracy is never
at a loss for a good man, and the substitution of Mr. Rufus Besson, of the
same law firm, for Mr. Lewis, as exclusively announced in “The Xews of yes
terday, gives universal satisfaction.
Mr. Besson is a young man of the highest character and of fine ability. He
will be a credit to the party during the campaign and in the House. He
brings strength to a ticket which will be strong at every point.
OUTRAGEOUS POLICE METHODS.
At the meeting of the National Prison Association at Philadelphia, on Mon
day, Mr. Charlton T. Lewis, the Penological expert, came out in strong terms
against imprisonment except as an extreme measure and as a last resort, in
dealing with crime. He said it was degrading to the mental aud moral natures
of those who underwent it.
There can be no doubt of the propriety of this position. Unfortunately, it is
hard to suggest any substitute which would have any chance of suiting the stand
ards of the present day. One set of penalties that might be useful in certain cases
Is sure to be rejected by the ultra humanitarian spirit, and, on the other hand, the
world has not sufficiently rid itself of the spirit of revenge to abandon its pound
of flesk from those who happen to go astray. All that can be done, therefore,
In the matter of imprisonment inflicted as a punishment after the conviction of
crime, is to make it as little demoralizing as may be consistent with having it
truly penal.
The world ought to be ready, however, to deal with the hideous abuse of
imprisonment without or before conviction. The manner in which supposedly
free men, living under the protection of that principle of the common law
which holds all men innocent until proven guilty, are gathered in by the police,
clapped behind bolts and bars in dark and noisome cells, and often kept there for
prolonged periods of time awaiting trial is a disgrace to the civilization of the
period. It is not necessary to take extreme instances, such as that of Molineux,
who has now been in prison three years on suspicion of crime; the multitudinous
case of the man who is locked up in the Jersey City police station, or the police
station of any other place, from Saturday night to Monday morning for some
trifling misdemeanor, of which he may not be guilty, is a display of public incom
petence and public brutality of which we should all be ashamed.
There is, however, a worse phase of the imprisonment question even than
this, and that is the outrage to which witnesses are not infrequently exposed.
On Monday evening an unfortunate man was knocked down by a bully in New
York. His skull was fractured and he died yesterday morning. Two women
with whom he had been drinking were witnesses of the crime. They were abso
lutely innocent of all share in it. The law is unable to touch a hair of their
heads on its account. Nevertheless, they were both arrested by the New York
police, locked up in cells for a part of the night and haled to court yesterday
morning as if they had been thieves or common street walkers.
There is some reason to think that these two women are not very nice, but
this has nothing to do with the case. As long as they are uot guilty of any of
fense against the law, they have just the same rights as' the Quest lady in the
land and all that can be said of tlie treatment which they received is that it
was barbarous. It was what one might expect in the province of Foo Chow or
in Tripoli or in Zanzibar or some other two-third savage region.
The notion people have to be locked up in cells and dragged through the
street in the custody of th$ police in or-der to secure their testimony, is simply
to say that the New York police machine is idiotically incompetent and that the
whole machinery of American Twentieth Century civilization is, at least in this
respect, no better than that of the Chatelet or of the Parliament of Paris in the
pleasant reign of Tjouis the Eleventh.* In this matter of the treatment of wit
nesses we are two hundred years behind every other “civilized country.” Snell
outrages on personal liberty as are habitual with us would be impossible in any
country this side of the Russian frontier.
ALL SERENE IN THE NINTH.
The “Journal’s” maliciously false account of the proceedings at the Ninth
Ward Democratic Club meeting on Monday night may impose upon the mem
bers of its own party who are content to take their news, unsalted, from its
columns. It will do no harm among Democrats, however, and thus it will fail
in it* principal object, which was to create trouble and dissension.
The truth of the matter was plainly sot forth in the columns of “The
S’ews.” Mr. James F. Fielder is likely to win the nomination for Assembly for
iat part of the city, because he has the backing of the majority of the County
Jornmitteemca of the wards which it embraces. Mr. Burke appears to have
ought the same sort of support and failed to get ns much of it as Mr. Fielder.
Hr. Burke Is, however, a most estimable citizen and a Democrat of high stand
ing and he would undoubtedly have made a good candidate and a good legisla
tor had ho proved to be the favorite in the race. If Mr. Burke or his friends
think he is n stronger man than Mr. Fielder, it is still quite open for them
to test the issue at the primaries, and, if he wins, Mr. Fielder will be the first
to bow to the will.of the majority and give him support.
The attempt of the “Journal” to drag Mr. Davis into the contest or to
make Mr. Daniel V. Lewis in any way responsible for the result is the thing
Grover Cleveland christened “pernicious activity.” As far as we can see, the
very existence of the contest is the best possible proof that there is no dictation
whatever in the case. We can think of nothing more in the nature of home
rule than to leave to the committeemen In each section of the city the option as
to whom they will support. This is what has been done, and we are well con
vinced that the majority of Democrats are loyal enough to abide by the result.
We arc confident that Mr. Burke and Mr. Saul, the.two gentlemen spoken
of as Mr. Fielder's rivals, will be found talking and working for him, if he gets
the nomination, among the most earnest of his supporters.
GAMBLERS ANQ REPUBLICANS.
““We'are shocked at the revelations of Republican misgovernment which
we find in the editorial columns of the "State Gazette” of yesterday. We have
been living under the delusion that a county governed by Republican officials
was the next thing to Utopia, but, alas, once in awhile, the stern facts shatter
our idyllic conceptions.
We have not yet gotten over the nervous prostration caused by the recent
raids on gambling dives in Monmouth, when the Trenton Republican organ bobs
up with admonitions to Judge Hendrickson of Atlantic County to clean out the
gambling dens of Atlantic City in the same way that Judge hort did those of
Long Branch. “Judge Fort.” shouts the “Gazette.” “has set the pace for Judge
Hendrickson. He has shown the proper course to pursue. The laws that apply
to Long Branch apply to Atlantic City and it only requires courage and de
termination on the part of Judge Hendrickson to secure the same results that
Judge Fort obtained.”
This is awful. Atlantic County is even more Republican than Monmouth.
It has a Republican Judge, Judge Endicott; a Republican Prosecutor, Mr.
Joseph E. Abbott; and a Republican Sheriff, Mr. Smith E. Johnson. The dis
covery that, with this combination of virtue in control of its affairs, gambling
still flourishes in the gay seaside resort, simply destroys our faith in human
nature of the Republican brand.
We are no longer surprised to hear that the Jersey City Police Board is pro
tecting more than one pool room in this city.
GENERAL OLIPHANT.
In the death of General Oliphant, the State loses a faithful and an able offi
cer. Through his training at Annapolis, General Oliphant had a true professional
knowledge of military affairs and his interest in the profession of arms caused
him to always keep abreast of the times.
The New Jersey National Guard -has many capable officers; but it is no
slight to them to say that it will be difficult if not impossible to find anyone in
the State as thoroughly fitted for the position of Adjutant General as Geueral
Oliphant was.
He was besides a genial friend and an estimable citizen. He will be greatly
missed.
IN AID OF THEDISPENSARY
German Hospital Association Will
Give a Euchre Party.
The German Hospital and Dispensary
Association of Greenville met Tuesday
evening to complete arrangements for a
euchre Thursday. September 25, in
Columbia Hall, Ocean and Cator ave
nues. Many handsome prizes have been
secured for the occasion.
The euchre will be given at 8 o’clock
in the large assembly hall, after which a
reception and dance will be held. Those
in charge anticipate a large attendance,
as the event is given to help the work
of the dispensary in Danforth avenue.
-*
- CHURCH TROLLEY RIDE.
Lutherans of the Holy Trinity Will
Go to Carlstadt.
The annual trolley ride of the Evan
gelical Lutheran Church of the Holy
Trinity will be held at Zimmermanu’s
Grove, Carlstadt, Wednesday .evening
September 24. The cars will leave Grove
and Wayne streets at 7.45 P. M. Tick
ets are fifty cents.
A large attendance is expected, and
plans are being made for a most enjoya
ble evening.
--♦
TO WELCOMEDR. CRONIN,
The Ladies’ Society of the Second
Presbyterian Church is making prepara
tions to give the pastor, the Rev. Henry
C. Cronin, a reception Thursday evening
in the church. This is Dr. Cronin’s
tenth annual home coming. All the mem
bers of the church and their friends are
invited to attend and welcome Dr.
Cronin home after his long vacation.

VETERANS’ LEAVE OF ABSENCE
All the veterans in the employ of the
city who are under the supervision of the
Street and Water Board were made hap
py yesterday by the adoption of a resolu
tion giving them a leave of absence of
three days with full pay to enable them
to attend the encampment in Washing
ton, 1). C., beginning October 8.
-•
NEW PUBLICATIONS
“Country Life in America” for Sep*
tember.
“Country Life in America” for Sep
tember has to do with timely matters of
the month from fall planting for tulip
bulbs to the opening of the hunting sea
son. Among the superbly illustrated
leading articles, “Salmon Fishing,” by E.
T. D. Chambers, tells of ideal camps
where Americans seek thirty-pounders in
Canadian woods; “The Essentials of
Peach Growing” treats of the methods of
growing fine fruit; and “Touring in a
Carriage” is a story of a trip from Illi
nois to Boston. Other important features
include “Biltmore,” an elaborate presen
tation of George W. Vanderbilt’s great
North Carolina estate, a country seat
comprising a small city and a community
of varied agricultural interests; and
“The Irish Terrier in America,” being
an illustrated sketch of the pugnacious
little hunting dog by .Tames Watson. A
series of photographs of live toads is an
interesting study by A. B. Phelan. In
a practical way the eighth part of the
country home making series offers sug
gestions for planning the exterior of
country homes to harmonize with their
surroundings. .The “How to Make a
Garden” department deals with tulip,
hyacinths, narcissuses ml other beautiful
spring flowers for which seed is sown
in the fall. The outdoor calendar chroni
cles the opening of the hunting season,
the return of the birds on their south
ward flight, and the tilings of the autumn
fields and woods, together with hints for
things to do on the form and in the
garde#.
NEWSPAPERMEN’S OUTING
Legislative Correspondents Col.
Thompson’s Quests at West Point.
Colonel Robert M. Thompson, late of
the Governor’s staff, entertained the
members of the New Jersey Legislative
Correspondents’ Club yesterday. At
eleven o’clock the Colonel and his guests
embarked on the handsome steam jurcht
Lady Torfrida, at the Adams’ Express
Company’s wlyirf in this city, and sailed
up the Hudson to West Point. On the
trip luncheon was served in the spacious
cabin of the yacht, and the occasion re
solved itself into one of the club’s fa
mous symposiums. Silent toasts were
drunk to the late William H. Koons, of
Trenton, who was the originator of the
| organization, and to Adjutant-General
1 Alexander C. Oliphant, who was a warm
personal friend of the club.
Owing to a combination of tide, wind
and current, the yacht did not make her
usual fast time, and It was nearly six i
o’clock before West Point was reached.
Colonel Mills, commandant at the Acad
emy, had prepared a reception for the
New Jersey newspaper men, but owing
to the lateness of the hour it had to be
foregone. He, however, held back the
evening pnrade of the cadets until thr
last possible minute, and the visitors
were afforded an opportunity to witness
the best part of that imposing and in
spiring ceremonial,
There wffs only time for a brief hand
shake with Colonel Mills and the other
officers of the post when the newspaper
men returned to the yacht, where dinner
was served. The exculionists returned
to this city by the West Shore Railroad.
■-«
KEARNY’S BRIGADE ELECTION
; W. H. Frowning, of Jersey City, Is
Made Secretary.
[Special to “The Jersey City News.*']
EDGE WATER PARK, Sept. 17
3902.—The 400 grizzled veterans of Phi'
; Kearny’s First New Jergey Brigade, who
! were the guests of General E. Burd
Grubb here yesterday, elected the follow
ing officers:—
President, Charles Murphy, Tenth
Regiment. Trenton; Vice Presidents.
First Regiment, E. K. Nell: Second
Regiment, E. Brandick: Third Regiment
P. Rogers; Fourth Regiment. L. Horner;
Tenth Regiment, R. M. Hillman; Fif
teenth Regiment, M. Cline; Twenty
third Regiment, E. H. Estell; Fortieth
Regiment, E. K,. Bennett; Recording
Secretary, W. H. Browning, Jersey City;
Treasurer, Thomas T. Tillow, Elizabeth;
Corresponding Secretary. Samuel D.
Aspinwall, Newark; Chaplain, the Rev.
I W. H. McCormick, Dover.
The next reunion will be held at
Crampton Pass, Va., where a statue of
| Kearny will be unveiled.
-*-.
! PUBLIC LIBRARY CIRCULATION
The record of circulation of books for
! home reading for the week ending Sept.
13, 1902, was as follows:—General
works, 100; philosophy, 31; religion, C8;
sociology. 230; philology, 10; natural
I science, 18S; useful arts, 50; fine arts,
I 55; literature. 439; fiction, 3,049; juvenile
fiction, 1,734; history, 317; biography,
1,102: travels, 102. Total, 8,141.
Of this number there were delivered
: through the delivery stations, 4,734.
Number of borrowers registered during
j the week, SI.
PICNIC OF THE PYTHIANS.
Jinny Knights of Pythias are expected
to attend the annual picnic'of Urant
Lodge, No. 89. K. of P., this evening at
Arlington Park, Bayonne. Every effort
lias been made to ciake the utfnjr u suc
cess. Knights from other lodges in the
county hove been Invited.
. I-,...'-'- ' -tV'
THREE CHICAGO DOCTORS
Failed to Do for Miss Mabelle L. La
Monte What Was Accomplished
by Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable
Compound.
She Has Written a Faithful Account of Her Case to
Convince Other Suffering Women.
The beautiful young lady whose portrait v/c publish in this article has
Only one object In view in allowing us that great privilege, and that is to help
convince other young women that Lydia. E. Pinkhani's Vegetable Com
pound will positively restore their health and relieve their suffering as
6urely as the Bun shinc3.
MISS MABELLE L. LaMONTE,
Leader Nielsen Singing Society, Chicago, 111.
u Dear Mrs. Pinkjiam : —I was in an awful state for nearly three
years with a complication of female troubles which thi'ee physicians
called by different names, but the pains were all the same. I dreaded
the times of my monthly periods for it meant a couple of days in bed in
awful agony. I finally made up my mind that the good doctors were
guessing; and hearing from different friends such good reports of
Lydia E. Pinkliam’s Vegetable Compound, I tried that. I bless the
day I did, for it was the dawning of a new life for me. I used five
bottles before I was cured, but when they were taken I was a well wo
man once more. Your Compound is certainly wonderful. Several of
my friends have used it since, and nothing but the best do I ever hear
from its use. Yours, Mabelle L. LaMonte, 222 E. 31st St., Chicago, 111.”
If Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound will cure Miss
LaMonte —why not you? You cannot tell until you try it. If
you are ill, and really want to get well, commence its use at once,
and do not let any drug clerk persuade you that he has something
of his own which is better, for that is absurd. Ask him to pro
duce the evidence wo do.
Women who are troubled with painful or irregular menstruation, back
ache, bloating (or flatulence), leucorrhcea, falling, inflammation or ulceration
of the uterus, ovarian troubles, that bearing-down feeling, dizziness, faint
ness, indigestion, nervous prostration or the blues, should take immediate
action to ward off the serious consequences, and be restored to perfect health
and strength by taking Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound,
and then write to Mrs. Pinkham, Lynn, Mass., for further free advice. No
living person has had such a vast and successful experience in treating female
ills. She has cured thousands of others and she will cure every suffering
women who will simply ask and follow her advice.
dtp AAA BE WARP. — Wo have deposited with the National City Bank of Lynn, $5000,
which will be paid to any person who can And that the above testimonial letter
. krlll|H|fl is not genuine, or was published before obtaining the writer’s special per
$ W w W w mission. Lydia E. i'Jpkham Medicine Co., Lynn, Mass.
CH0W9ER BY EHRHART,
His Association Wi'l Turnout to
Test His Cooking
The Peter Ehrhart Association met
last night in its quarters in Rose avenue
and made arrangements for the chowder
party Sunday, September 21, in Winter
bottom’s Woods, near West Side avenue.
Over 100 members will attend this event
and test the excellent chowder to be
made by Alderman Ehrhart, the club
standardbearcr. He is an expert at ma
king clam chowder, and will be chief
cook.
Besides a baseball game between chos
en teams there will be various athletic
sports. .
-♦
ARNOLDS’ JOLLY GLAM BAKE.
The John Arnold Association held a
clam bake and chowder party yesterday
in Winterbottom’s Woods, Greenville.
More than one hundred members and
their friends attended. Athletic games
were played by the younger members un
til P. M., when a chowder dinner was
served. Many entertained those around
the table with humorous stories and
comic songs. It was neArly sundown
when the jolly party started for home.

THANKFUL FOR A SEWER. |
A letter from the Bergen Republican
Club was received at yesterday’s meeting
of the Street and Water Board thanking
the Commissioners, Mayor and Board of
Finance for acting promptly on the ap
peal of property owners in Montieello
and Gardner avenues for relief from
flooded cellars by constructing a new and
large sewer for that section.

ELECTION OFFICERS NAMED.
The County Board of Elections has !
completed the list of election officers to ;
serve at the varioijs polling places at the :
coming fait election. The names selected
ere those presented by the organizations
of the two great political parties, but the
failure of seme of those named to qualify
leaves vacancies in some of the districts.

NO GQRQNERjSJURY READY
The inquest into the death of Erick
Reinertz, who was found dead in the
yard at his uncle's place, was postponed
again last night until Friday evening.
The coroner could not get a jury or wit
nesses.
-*- ;
M ssisMppi Levees. (
Since the dose of the Civil War the
State of, Louisiana ha* spent more than
sag,000,000 on Mississippi levees. i
■ A.'
IT IS TO LAUGH.
In His Business:—“Are you interested
in literature?” said the young woman.
“I should say I am,” replied the bust
ling person. "I always did say that a
great deal depends on tlie way an idea
is expressed. But at the same time lit
erature is no good unless the article
you're booming gives satisfaction after
it is purchased.”
,Most Annoying:—“Goodness! How
embarrassing!” exclaimed the buffalo
moth, whom an unkind fate had blown
into a strange wardrobe.
“What’s the matter?'’ demanded his
wife.
“Why, it’s surely after G o'clock, and
there doesn’t appear to be any dress
suit here for me to get into.”
Its Joys:—“There are just two things
I like about a vacation,” remarked Uncle
Jerry Peebles; “the goin’ away and the
gittin’ back.”—Chicago Tribune.
Club Thoughts:—An ability to look at
threatened adversity with a calm coun
tenance has won many a jackpot.—Puck.
A Judge:—'He—“Do you think blondes
have more admirers than brunettes?”
She—“I don’t know. You might ask
Miss Turner: she has had experience in
both capacities.”—Chicago Daily News.
A Parting Shot:—“Before I came
here,” said the boarder, after settling his
bill,” when 1 read your announcement
that your house had ‘few equals as a
summer resort,’ I was disposed to scoff,
but I must say you weren’t far wrong.”
“Indeed!” replied the proprietor with
delight, and considerable surprise.
“Yes; you really should say more than
that. You might properly add:—‘And
positively no inferiors,’ ”
-•
CLAREMONT CLUB OUTING.
The members of the Claremont Club
are hoping for a pleasant Sunday, as it
is the date set for the club to go to
Maucli Chunk, Pit. About a dozen
members will go, carrying cameras in
order to photograph some of tlie excellent
views for which that section is noted.
Tlie party will leave headquarters, Jacs
son and Ege avenues, at 7:30 A. M.
Tlie committee in charge of arrange
ments is composed of Herrmann Wenzel
and Jay Hill.
LOOK LOOK
- ONCE AGAIN -
WM. BRODERICK CIGAR
£3o«t for lOo,
NAME STAMPED ON BACH CIGAR
w houssale Depot
EI» CHRISTO CIGAR COMPANY
91 Montgomery Street.
A Beautiful Illustration
of the Golden Rule is Life
Insurance. It takes the
burden which would crush
a single family and so dis
tributes it that no one is
overburdened and all are
helped. Secure this help for
your family.
Th3
II,
Iflsaraoce Co. /
of America. (
Fosw Offloe: 1
Newark, N. J. 1
JOHN F. DRYDEN, *
President.
LESLIE D. WARD.
Vice-President.
EDGAR B. WARD,
FORREST F. DRYDEN. **
Secretary. 14QQ
F. B. REILLY, Supt., Tel. No. 2«32, J. C....N0. Ill Hudson St., Jersey City. N. J.
H. R. CROOKfiTON, Supt., Tel. No. 3072. J. C...N0. 573 Newark Ave., J. C., N. J.
E. G. JACKSON, Supt., Tel. No. 143 I Union....S. W. cors. Hudson and Newark
Sts., Hoboken. N. J.
W. A. ALEXANDER, Supt., Tel. No, 3 A, Bayonne..782, 744 Avenue D, Eayonne,
N. J.
D. REINHARTZ, Supt., Tef. No. 154 I Union..440 Spring St., West Hoboken, N.J.
El) VC A TIONA L. I
EDUCATIONAL.
WILLIAM E. DRAKE, Founder, A. J. GLEASON, President.
DRAKE
BUSINESS CULLECE.
Day and Night sessions entire year.
Students may enroll at any time.
Graduates assisted to positions.
RATES FOR NIGHT SCHOOL.
Ore Year (48 weeks), $35.00 Evening Classes
Three Months, - 10.00 j German, Spanish and
Six Weeks, - 5.00
One Week, - - 1.00 Drawing.
The atcve rates offer an unusual opportunity to young men and
women employed during the day to secure a Commercial or
Shorthand Education.
YOUNGr MEN.
There are hundreds of young men in this city working for from
four to seven dollars a week who would be receiving from $io
to $15 a week if they had a Commercial Shorthand Education.
We could have located 300 more young men last year.
Office Hour-s, 8 to 9.30 Dailt.
CATALOGUE FREE. T. 6. O’BRIEN, PRiNCrPAU
HiSBRBDCK INSTITUTE
(Incorporated.)
JERSEY CITY, N. J,
FORTY-SEVENTH YEAR;
WILL ELGIN SEPTEMBER Uth I
A thoroughly organized school, with
Separate departments for boys and girls ;
from four to twenty years of age.
Small classes and a large faculty in
sure to every pupil all necessary indi
vidual attention.
The Institute prepares thoroughly for _
all the leading colleges, professional
schools and for business. Its diploma
secures New York State Regents’ pass
of 48 counts for entrance to all the pro
fessional schools and to many of the col
leges without examination.
DEPARTMENTS: Kindergarten, Pri
mary, Intermediate. Academic, School of
Music and School of Art.
ADVISORY BOARD.
HON. GILBERT COLLINS, LI.. D.. CHAIRMAN
LEON ABPETT Wm. C. HRPPENHEIMER
Charles E. Annktt Bov. Charles Herr D. D
Hou. J. n. Bkolk J. E. Hulshizeh
David a. Bishop Robert M. Jarvia
Bev.CoENEUOB Brett D.D James Luby
Joel W. b.own John Mkhl, Jr.
George caRRauan John E. Muller
Dr. Burdette h. Craig Samvel tt. N'egub
joseph A. Dear Henry E. Niesr
,i j. Detwiu.es George e. Pkrkinx
Warren Dixon Hev. John l. sccdder
Charles Elkin Kev. E. L. Stoddard, Pii.D.
John B Grkvatt John J. Vookhees
J. Warren HardekberorDk. Geohoe Wilkinson
I . \ . . x ....
Catalogues and further information on
application at the office of Institute, cor
ner Crescent and Harrison avenues.
CHAS. C. 8TIMETS.
Principal.
-1
WANTED.
WANTED FOIi U. S. AltMY—ABLE
bodied, unmarried men between ages
of 21 and 35; citizens of United States,
of good character and temperate habits,
wlio can speak, read and write English.
For information apply to Recruiting
Officer. 47 Montgomery street, Jersey
City. N. J
HELP WANTED. ^
Taylor’s School Dresscutting
Branch from New York City, will open j
at 140 Newark avenue, Jersey City. ;
Great reduction this week to all. Investi
gate the Taylor's system. A perfect-fit- j
ting sleeve pattern free. Apprentices I
wanted. Trial lessons free, day or even
ing. Tnylor’s. 140 Newark Avenue.
HAND RODLKRS IN CHEROOT DEPART
roent at 104 First street.
ACTIVE PERSON TO WORK AT
home: ?3G paid for 12 days' trial: per
manent if satisfactory. Address Man
ager Engwall, Lakeside Bldg.. Chicago.
WANTED—100 LABORERS ON PIPE
line for new water works; apply on i
work at Secaucns. N. ,T., Monday morn- !
ing. The T. A. Gillespie Company. J
T.TIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR LADIES AND '
J"L Men's Ca»t Oft Clothing. Call or send I
postal to (tore, 317 Henderson street, Jere-y .
J."a ,
FT. PETER S COLLEGE.
GRAND STREET. JERSEY CITY.
Conducted by Jesuit Fathers.
WILL REOPEN ON SEPT. STH.
The course is classical along the lines
of the well known Jesuit system. It con
fers an excellent equipment for intellec
tual life, as well ns the best possible
preparation for success in professional
careers.
Students holding certificates from St.
Peter's are entitled to the special priv
ileges in the study of -.aw and Medicine
by the Regents of the State of New York
to registered colleges.
-STEVENS SCH9QL
THE ACiDESIC DEPASTBBSr
—OF THE
Stevensinstitute of T Bchnology
RIVER STREET,
Between 6th and 6th Streets,
Hoboken, N. J.
- - REOPENS - -
SEPTEMBER 15,1932
Registration day for applicants for admission
on September 10th.
Examinations for admission on the 11th ana
12th of September.
Complete courses or study preparatory to all
Universities, Colleges. Schools of Science, La*wr
and Medicine.
The rate of tuition for all classes Is $150 per
year, or $30 per term.
These terms include all the studies.
For catalogues apply to the Principal of
Stevens School.
SPENCER’S BUSINESS COLLEGE
THIRD NAT. BANK BUILDING,
GROVE & MORGAN STREETS,
Jersey City.
The Leading Cotnm-rcial and Short*
hand f'chool.
THE ACCOUNT OF THE SUB
scriber, administrator of Catharint
Cnffrey, deceased, will be settled by tin
Hudson County Orphans’ Court on Sou
Umber 12, 1902.
JAMBS CAFFREY.

xml | txt