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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, April 25, 1906, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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THE
f erny City gems,
published Every afternoon.
* THE CITY PUBLISHING COMPANY
' OBce, No. 251 Washington Street.
THE NEWS BUILDING.
Telephone Call, Jersey City, 271.
<
NEW YORK OFFICE—No 23 Park
„ Row (Room 42.)
HOBOKEN AGENCY—J. Lichtenstein,
i 81 Second street.
\ NEWARK AGENCY—F. N. Sommer,
No, 763 Broad street .
„ The only Democratic Daily Paper pub
Bshod In Jersey City. Single copies, one
, «mt; subscription, three dollars per year;
postage paid,
Entered March 1, 1839. at the post
«Hoa at rJersey City, N. J., as second
pNwb matter, under the Act of March 3,
t All hturiima communications should be
addressee to the Jersey City News; all
letter* for publication to the Managing
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1900.
One of the life insurance magnates has
been arrested for giving a large sum of
money, that should have been sacred to
the widows and orphans of the policy
holders, to the Republican National Com
mittee. President Roosevelt declared be
fore election that no tainted money was
being used in his campaign, but the evi
dence shows he was greatly mistaken,
for the insurance trust and other cor
porations “came down” handsomely. The
strange part of it is that the Administra
tion organs before the last national elec
tion declared that the president was man
aging the campaign on a “business
, basis” and receiving daily reports of the
, (finances of the Republican committee
;.from Chairman Cortelyou. Was the
deceived or did he then think
'Sbgrcrance money was not tainted? No
ipSuSftition ‘has yet been made, though it
.1
'fir»1ilO(.«eem that the ethics of the situa
tKS’efemand that the money be returned
tdtta rightful owners.
SThe annual recurrence of forest fires
cannot he wholly prevented, says the
Newark “Evening News.” As soon as
the snow is off the ground and the dead
leaves are dried, a locomotive spark or a
• careless smoker's match starts a blaze,
/and hundreds of acres are swept by
flames before the fire can be-put out. Al
(ready ihis year a portion of Atlantic
County has been subjected to the dam
age of one forest fire, and no doubt otli
‘ era will follow. It is estimated that oue
tihird of all such fires as occur in this
■States are started by sparks from loco
motives. and one-fourth by the careless
ness of smokers and brush burners. If
, these can be guarded against more than
one-half of the forest fires will be pre
vented.
It was supposed last year that the
fitate Forest Park Reservation Commis
i si on would assist in preventing forest
fires, but when the members looked up
-the law they concluded th'at their duties
/ end jurisdiction were confined bo lands
acquired by the State for forest reserves.
"No such excuse is available now, for the
legislature has passed and the Governor
I has signed a bill providing for the ap
pointment of a State fire warden, who
'has power to appoint county and district
(and township wardens. Not only this,
l^hut these wardens may employ as many
j emergency men as may be deemed neces
sary to prevent or extinguish fires, and
(the towns and counties must pay the
/trill*.
i The new law te very comprehensive.
Jit gives unusual powers, but it seems to
,%e necessary that »uch authority shall be
pested in soma competent person or per
sons Ta order that forest firs* may be
prevented or fought successfully. The
«lff plan- of allowing, eacih community to
•ght ite own fires prevailed too long, and
proved! so ineffectual that many of the
[fires spread far beyond township bounds
%nd threatened a number of the South
/Jersey cities.
[ In 1991 there were eiglity-one forest
/fires in this State, covering a total area
, [of 41,530 acres and doing damage
. [amounting to $193,413. In 1903 there
'jwere seventy-nine fires, 85,046 acres
jhtarned out, with a loss of $306,744.50.
jfa 1902 there were sixty-six fires, 98,850
|*cres swept, and1 the loss is estimated
i*t $169,323. The total acreage burned
Hu these three years was 22S.426, and
j&fCMtotfti estimated loss $668,480.50, or.
Pure Blood
Absolutely necessary for mental and
physical health and strength, vitality,
vigor and vim, is certain if you take
Hood’s Sarsaparilla
hiftijidor tablets, 100 Doses-Oue Dollar.' •'!.
| ^ . 1
a trifle less than an average of1 $3 an
acre. This does not seem xnucli. but it
is more than enough to pay for the fire
wardens and all the cost of extinguishing
the forest fires, if the new law operates
as is expected.
Apparently the territory swept by fire
in San Francisco is now known. If the
flames have not yet been wholy extin*
guifflied, the space in which they will be
confined is plainly indicated. Roughly
speaking, quite three-fourths of the city
lias been swept dear of structures, or
only the ruins of structures are there to
be seen now. The area of loss com
prises space where were the most pros
perous and stately quarters, whether of
business or of residence, as well as the
most squalid or the most humble. Fate
has been impartial and remorseless, says
the Brooklyn “Eagle.”
The first stage of the great calamity
has been nearly passed. That involve*)
the Impact of fire and' the march of ruin.
The next immediate stages will involve
the maintenance of order, the distribu
tion of food and raiment, and the pro
vision of temporary shelter.
Order is being maintained by the
United States Army, by the San Fran
cisco police and by organizations of citi
zens. Only the criminal and the crazed
have threatened disorder, or attempted
it. The criminal sought to produce it
in order to profit by it. That spectacle
is always seen in any terrific and appal
ling disaster or calamity in any concen
trated population. The criminal classes
in San Francisco have been cheeked by
the arbitrary extermination of such of
them as have been caught at their work.
In such circumstances as prevail in that
city, the public- saftey is the supreme law.
The army and the police are not ac
cused of having abused in any measure
the awful power placed in their hands.
They have exterminated only those who
should have been exterminated in such
conditions. Mayor Schmitz and General
Funston have heartily acted' together
and the country feels assured that Gen
eral Greely, who will soon.'arrive to take
command, will sustain and extend wliat
General Funston has done.
We may expect with' confidence that
the collection and distribution of food
will be rightly organized and effected'. At
first, that wilt have to he arbitrarily
done. The initial purpose is to avert a
starvation which already impends. Hun
ger, like love, levels ail ranks. Hunger
will be met with food for oil human
beings affected by it without regard) to
race or to color or to previous conditions
of poverty or of wealth. In time the dis
tinctions made by circumstances and
conditions will recur, but not until the
great first strain shall have passed, not
until those who can work and those who
can pay for work can get into normal
and reciprocal relations.
After a while, the hand of authority
Direct from Our Distillery to YOU
Saves Dealers’ Profits
Prevents Adulteration
HAYNER
WHISKEY
4 FULL QUIRTS $0.20
WE PAY EXPRESS CHARGES 1#*““"
We will send you, In a plain sealed
ease, with no mark, to show contents,
FOUR FULL QUART BOTTLES of
HAYNER PRIVATE STOCK RYE for
$3.20, and we will pay the express
charges. Try it, have your doctor test
it, test it any way you like, if you
don't find It all right and the purest
and best whiskey you ever
tasted, ship it back to us at
our expense and your $3.20
will be promptly refunded.
At our distillery, one of
the largest and best
equipped in the world, we
distill an average of 9,580
gallons of PURE WHIS
KEY a day. When you
buy HAYNER WHIS
KEY, it goes direct to you
from our distillery, thus
assuring you of perfect
purity and saving you the
dealers’ big profits. HAY
NER WHISKEY is pre
scribed by doctors and
used in hospitals and by half a million sat
isfied customers. That’s why YOU should
try it.
WHITE OUR NEAREST OFSTCK
THE HAYNER DISTILLING CO.
DAYTON, 0. ST, LOUIS, MO.
ST. PAUL, MINN. ATLANTA, GA.
Orders for Ariz., Cal.,CoL, Idaho, Mont., Nev..
N. Mex., ©re., Utah, wash.. Or Wyo,. must be
on the basis of 4 WARTS £or«4.tt>by EXPRESS PRE
PAIU, or 2tt qi’AKTSfor Sii.SOby PRitKQUT F1U£PAID.
Di stilled y> Troy, 0. Established 1866,
300 Capital $500,800,00 Paid In Full.
..mi i mm i
t /. V.viA:-'.':'
will be slackened, people will act for
themselves and for one another. For
the present, however, and to meet the
elementary wants which arbitrarily
•tfSaeCiiiipPh all, in geting for'all,' and utl
will- cpbeur frith the aetjon of authority.
' * ' ' 1 ' , • ; |, •
That ris’tBei lease in ait estrenie dpstpue
ttons,,juat as it is often the" case in ship
wrecks. ’Till the people can resume com
mand of their own capabilities, and of
their own resources, they will very prop
erly be “commandered.”
Between the contemplation of the
great mass of citizens, thus acted upon,
and the consideration of their leading
spirits, getting ready soon to act for
themselves, the contrast is inspiring and
ennobling. Those who have lost every
thing are in a sense consoled by the fact
that opportunity has been newly created,
■and that in them are the hearts to re
spond to it. Those who have lost nearly
everything are not mourning over their
loses but are intent upon quickening their
remaining resources and embarking them,
in a new war against adversity. Those
with large means still in their hands are
not thinking of withdrawing them from
the city or the state, but are intent upon
reconstructing the structures and upon
again starting the enterprises with which
they have been identified. If for days
past San Francisco suggested death, it
now suggests the reinvigornfion of the
living to new battle Which lifted that city
to the height of influence, of affluence, of
audacity and of achievement.
We do not apprehend there will be any
abandonment or despair of San Francis
co. It has a history of over half a cen
tury of development. Its destiny has
been started, and cannot be stopped. Its
development lias been retarded, but will
be resumed. The resumption will follow
the law of stimulation and expansion
which marked Chicago, Boston, Balti
more and other> cities, when under
the prostration of great disasters and of
great sorrows. There is something in
the American spirit which assures this.
There is something in the American heart
which make® this a certainty. There is
something in the American temperament
which makes the glory of every second
city - greater than that of the first.
Chances will be taken on nature and on
disaster. Even earthquakes will not
still mankind' to despair, but will stir
mankind to competition, and fires of
whatever scope or magnitude will kindle
i,
mere courage in men than they can in
flict in destruction upon property. Each
generation in eTteh great city lias in dif
ferent forms to meet supreme crises. To
no crisis has any American community
been unequal and by none has, it been
other than stimulated to greater heart,
to greater hope and to greater achieve
ment.
AMUSEMENTS
Tile Shuberts’ Plans
The Shuberts and their allies will have
no fewer than forty companies of the
first class on the roadi next September.
The Shuberts’ own plans are many and
varied. They will have Mms. Bernhardt
under their banner and will present E.
H. Sothern and Julia Marlowe jointly in
revivals and new productions, among the
latter being Justin Huntley McCarthy’s
“Joan of Atc,” and among the former
“The Sunken Bell” and the comedies of
Shakespeare. Margaret Anglin will be
established at the head of a particularly
strong company at the Princess Theatre,
New York, appearing in a variety of
emotional roles; Virginia Harned is'to
be starred in a dramatization of “The
Girl in Waiting,” and Mrs. Patrick
Campbell returns frbm England to act
under Shubert direction in a repertoire
of plays. Mrs. Campbell is not the only
English celebrity the Shuberts will have,
however, since Cyril Maude and Wini
fred Emery are to make their American,
debut early in September^ and 6inee
Oliarles Cartwright is to- star jointly with
Drina De Wolfe in a comedy being writ
ten for them by a well known American
author.
Arnold Daly remains with the Shu
berts and will offer four one-act pieces,
“The Man of Destiny,” “The Monkey's
Paw,” “The Lemonade Boy” and “The
System of Dr. Gouron,” besides “Arms
andl the Man”- and a new romantic com
edy. Henry- Miller is to have a new
Play, as is also Guy Standing. Mary
Shaw will head a strong company-, pre
seating “The Love that Blinds,” and W.
H. Thompson is about to open his tour
in Cleveland Moffett’s drama of contem
poraneous American life, “Money Talks.”
Louis Mann and Clara Lipman will cling
, to their this season’s success, “Julie Bon
bon,” as will Henry Woodruff, whose hit
in “Brown of Harvard” is one of the,
most solid in New York. New plays .to
be offered hv tha Shnharts. in additkt#
Who Gets the Most
Out of Lifer
' *1* » l'- ■ ■ ■■■■ ■ ■ *iim num . >0 -v
Not the wealthiest;' ‘riot the most learned; nor tha idler-i-but the
man who has good health and Works for his living. This truth is
trite, but not trivial.
Every man should guard his health as his most valuable posses
sion. The more so because health is easier to retain than regain.
Keep your grip on health by regular exercise, reasonable care
m eating and requisite sleep. Take Beecham’s Pills occasionally,
to tone the stomach and keep the liver and bowels in good working
order. And don’t worry.
Observe these simple rules and you will agree that the one who
gets the most from life is
The Man Who Uses
BEEGHAM’S PILLS
Sold Everywhere in Boxes. 10c and 25c.
to those mentioned, are “A Midsummer’s !
Eve,” by Evelyn Greenleaf Sutherland,
ft comedy by George Hazleton, author of
“Mistress«XeIl,” and a dramatization of
“Tlie Secret Orchard” made by Channing ,
Pollock.
The Schuberts’ activity in the field of
musical comedy will not be abated by
their increased activity in dramatic pro
ductions. De Wolf 'Hopper is to be con
tinued in his great success, “Happyland,”
and Eddie Foy in “The Earl and the
Girl.” iPaula Edwardes will appear in
New York in an opera by the tuthor of
■*3rminie” and the composer of “The
Yankee Consul,” entitled “The Princess
Beggar.” Jefferson De Angelis will sub
stitute a new musical comedy for the
long tried “Fantana,” while Julia San
derson, Marguerite Clark and Christie
MacDonald Will blossom out as new
stars in musical productions. Peter
F. Dailey is to have ah excellent sub
stitute for “The Press Agent” and the
Shuberts will make brilliant productions
of a new extraaganza entitled “vQueen
Xixi of lx,” by the author of “The Wiz
ard of Oz”; of “Veronique” and' of an
English hit called: “The Biue Moon,”
“Mexicana is to remain on the road
with a cast including Louis Hairson,
and “The Social Whirl” will run at the
Gasino. The Shuberts declare that they
have still other plans in abeyance.
WANTED-A VOCATION
What shall I be? said a maiden fair;
Can I find a vocation anywhere?
What can I be? Perhaps yon can tell;
Has anyone here any talents to sell?
What can I be? from professions fine,
Surely there must be some in my ’line.
What can I be? an artist rare,
And paint a landscape wondrous fair?
What can I be? an authoress with fame,
Who. wherever she goes, precedes her
her name?
What can I be? a musician fine,
Or singer fair with voice divine?
What shall I choose, what shall it be?
Alas! I fear only just plain—me.
( M. M.
“Which' is it—‘Winter Ungers in the
lap of spring,’ or ‘Spring lingers in the
lap of winter?’ ” “Don’t remember; but
of late years I should say it had been
lap and! lap.”—Brooklyn Life,
-♦-'/t,
JESTS
“What do you think! That boss poli
tician says he has divorced himself from
politics.” “Then I’ll bet he secured ali
mony.”—'Baltimore American.
“Have you heard of the engagement
of Ethel and Frank?” “No. Then Frank
succeeded at last, did he?” “Not exact
ly. Succumbed ”—Milwaukee Sentinel.
“The girls are working hard, getting
ready for tlie church fair.” “Bless ’em!”
“Ye»s this week they are taking lessons
of a short-change artist, and practising
six hours a day.”—Puck.
“I understand,” said old Mr. Munni
man gruffly, “that my daughter means
to marry you. But how about support
ing her?” “Well,” replied young Ker
rey, “I’m willing to help some.”—Phila
delphia Press.
.
Korie—“So Mildred has applied for a
divorce. Her only reason for marrying
him, too, was love.” Violet—“Well, I
understand that her present reason is
the same. But the man is different.”—
American Spectator. \
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT ON THE
16th day of April, 1906, a petition was filed
with the Clerk of the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners by the “Coast Line Tele
phone Company” in accordance with Chapter
36 of the Laws of 1906, for the granting for a
period of twenty years, of permission to the
said Coast Line Telephone Company, its suc
cessors and assigns to locate, construct, oper
ate and maintain conduits with the necessary
manholes, junction # boxes, distributng poles and
other necessary equipment for containing caoles
and wires, together with the necessary con
nections for entering public or private prop
erty in certain streets, avenues, lanes, high
ways and public places, for the purpose of
maintaining a telephone system in the City
of Jersey City, such streets, avenues or public
places being more specifically designated as
follows: Grand street from Hudson River to
Bramhall avenue; Exchange Place from Hud
son River to Hudson street; Montgomery street
from Hudson street to West Side avenue; New
ark avenue from Montgomery street to Sum
mit avenue; Bay street from Hudson River to
Henderson street; Washington street from Sec
ond street to Pennsylvania Railroad; Wash
ington street from Grand street to Gap;
Hudson street from Grand street to Gap; Van
Voret street from Grand street to Morris Canal;
Warren street from Bay street to Second
street; Henderson street from Grand street to
Hoboken line; PavoniA avenue from Henderson
street to Hudson River; Erie street from New
ark avenue to Eighteenth street; Coles street
from Newark avenue to Nineteenth street;
Barfow street from Grand street to Newark
avenue; Varick street from Grand street to
Newark avenue; Brunswick street from
Colden street to .Sixteenth street; Sec
ond street from Brunswick street to Mer
seles street; Merseles street from Bright
street to Pennsylvania Railroad; Fremont
street from Grand street to Pennsylvania Rail
road; Center street from Bright street to
Grand street; Woodward street from Grand
street to Harold street; Pacific avenue from
Grand street to Caven Point avenue; Ash
street from Halladay street to Pine street;
Maple street from Manning avenue to Garra
brant street; Communipaw avenue from Philip
street to Hackensack River; f Forrest street
from Pine street to Woodward street; Caven
Point avenue from Morris Cana! to Claremont
Station; Ocean avenue from Bramhall
avenue to Merritt street; Union street
from Ocean avenue to Garfield avenue;
Carteret avenue from Ocean avenue to Com
mercial street; Myrtle avenue from Ocean
avenue to Garfield avenue: Bay View avenue
from Ocean avenue to Garfield avenue; Fulton
avenue from Ocean avenue to Van Cleef
street; Van Cleef street from Fulton avenue
to Armstrong avenue; Sheffield street from
Ocean avenue to Rutgers avenue; Rutgers ave
nue from McAdoo avenue to Cator avenue;
McAdoo avenue from Rutgers avenue to Hud
son Boulevard; Danforth avenue from Garfield
avenue to Princeton avenue; Princeton ave
nue from Danforth avenue to Cator avenue;
Jackson avenue from McAdoo avenue to Vir
ginia avenue; Hudson Boulevard from Sip ave
nue to Morris Canal; Hudson Boulevard from
Sip avenue to Nelson avenue; Nelson avenue
from Hudson Boulevard to Secaucus Road;
Lenxbeek avenue from Hudson Boulevard to
Romar avenue; Romar avenue from Lembeck
avenue to Neptune avenue; Cator avenue from
Hudson Boulevard to Spring street; Fowler
avenue from Greenville avenue to Stevens ave
nue; Claremont avenue from Hudson Boulevard
to West Side avenue; Mallory avenue from
Communipaw avenue to Fisk street; Williams
avenue from Hudson Boulevard to Bergen ave
nue; Bennett street from Clark avenue to
Clendenny* avenue; Clendenny avenue from
Bennett street to Marcy avenue; Marcy ave
nue from Clendenny avenue to Communipaw
avenue; Belmont avenue from Hudson Boule
vard to Hackensack River; West Side avenue
from Belmont avenue to Gautier avenue;
Gautier avenue from West Side avenue to Mal
lory avenue; Duncan avenue from Hudson
Boulevard to Hackensack River; Monticello
avenue from Montgomery street to Bramhall
avenue; Bramhall avenue, from Monticello ave
nue to Sackett street; Sackett street from
Communipaw avenue to Oak street; Summit
avenue from Grand street to Hague street;
Colden street from Fremont street to Factory
street; Factory street from Colden street to
Kenneth street; Dupont street from Factory
street to Cornelison avenue; Fairmount avenue
from Cornelison avenue to Summit avenue;
Cornelison avenue from Fairmount avenue to
Academy street; Academy street from Cornel i
son avenue to Summit avenue: Wayne street
from Cornelison avenue to Summit. avenue;
Newkirk street from Baldwin avenue to Sum
mit avenue; Tuers avenue from Montgomery
street to Vroom street; Bergen avenue from
Vroom street to Sip avenue; Stuyvesant ave
nue from Hudson Boulevard to Corbin avenue;
Sip avenue from Summit avenue to Emerson
avenue; Bryant avenue from Sip avenue to
Logan avenue; Logan avenue from Bryant ave
nue to Wright avenue; Wright avenue from
Logan avenue to Broadway; West Side avenue
from Sip avenue to Broadway; Van Wagenen
avenue from Sip avenue to Broadway; Garri
son avenue from Sip avenue to Broadway;
Magnolia avenue from Summit avenue to
Waldo avenue; Magnolia avenue from Trenton
street to Magnolia avenue; Oakland avenue
from Newark avenue to Court House Place;
Court House Place, from Oakland avenue to
Paterson Plank Road; Baldwin avenue from
Hoboken avenue to Ferry street; St. Paul’s
avenue from Baldwin avenue to Concord street;
Hoboken avenue from Summit avenue to Pali
sade avenue; Ferry street from Central avenue
to Ogden avenue: Hutton street <*from Central
avenue to Palisade avenue; Ogden avenue from
Ferry street to Franklin street; Franklin street
from Ogden avenue to Paterson Plank Road;
Bowers street from Central avenue to Paterson
Plank Road; Congress street from Central ave
nue to Paterson Plank Road; Paterson Plank
Road from Palisade avenue to city line; St.
Paul’s avenue from Summit avenue to Duf
fleld avenue; James avenue from Newark ave
nue to Howell street; Howell street from James
avenue to Amelia street; Van Winkle avenue
from Tonnele avenue to Lareh avenue; Ton
nele avenue „from Newark avenue to Van
Winkle avenue; Carlton avenue from Hudson
boulevard to Tonnele avenue; Zabriskie street
from Hudson Boulevard to Terrace avenue;
Terrace avenue from Zabriskie street, to Waller
street; Waller street from Terrace avenue to
Tonnele avenue; Thorne street from Hudson
Boulevard to Tonnele avenue; North street
from Hudson Boulevard to Tonnele avenue;
Secaucus Road from Nelson avenue to City
Limits; Tonnele avenue from North street to
Lundy’s Lane; Lundy’s lame from Tonnele
avenue to Bedford avenue.
Notice is also given that conformably to the
provisions of said act, the Wtta day of May
1906, at 2 P. M., and the Assembly Chamber
of the City Hall, have been designated by the
Board of Street and Water Cofaimiaslonera as
the time and place when and where such peti
tion Shall be considered.
For the Board of stVeet and Water Com
missioners,
. cm rr. bouton,
- . r , citrk.
(DitUi >■"■■■ cut*. ’J»ll It. m __”
KENILWORTH INN
BILTMOBE
There Is no scfenery in the world.,. ’
that will compare with the view '
from this place. Located on the
highest point in Asheville. Sur
rounded by one of < the finest
parks of 160 acres, with springs
and winding macadamized paths
—Mt. Mitchell in full view.
Dry invigorating climate, ad
joining Biltmore Estate, mag
nificently furnished, cuisine un
surpassed. Orchestry. golf, liv
ery, hunting and fishing.
Open all the year.' Write for
booklet. (
EDGAR B. MOORE,
___Proprietor.
AN ORDINANCE FOR T1IE RELIEF OF
Colgate & Co. In the construction, mainte
nance and operation of railroad siding of
single track.
The Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City, by
the Board of Street and Water Commission
ers, for and on behalf of the municipality of
said city, do ordain as follows:
Section 1. That permission be and is hereby
accorded to Colgate & Co. to lay, maintain and
operate a siding consisting of a single line of
railroad track on the westerly side of Hudson
street beginning ait the South Block line of
York street; thence running southerly and
along the westerly sidewalk line of Hudson
street about one hundred and sixty (160) feet
to a point; and thence curving to the south
east and continuing to and across Grand
street to a point about fifty (50) feet south
of the south line of Grand street, and there
connecting with track now. laid at this point.
Section 2. That the rails herein authorized
to be laid shall be of a pattern to be approved
by this Board and shall be laid at grade of
street and sidewalk in such manner as to af
ford the least inconvenience to the traveling
public.
The beneficiaries shall also protect and main
tain any and all portions of any public sewer
or sewers over which it may be necessary to
place any of the tracks or other obstructions
herein authorized, and shall pave • and main
tain to the satisfaction of this Board all that
portion of street between the rails herein au
thorized to be laid and for two (2) feet out
side such rails and shall further causa to be
provided and maintained a smooth sidewalk,
from the west curt) line on Hudson street, be
tween York and Grand streets to the outer
rail of track herein authorized and shall for
the additional safety of the traveling public
cause to be erected along the line of track be
tween York and Grand streets and outside of
the outer rail thereof a barrier at least four (4)
feet in height and in such manner as to leave
a clear and unobstructed walk between curb
and barrier of nine (9) feet in width.
Section 3. When, during the life of this ordi
nance, it becomes necessary to remove cars
from Block thirty-seven (37) to and across the
sidewalk line and roadway of Grand street
care and caution must be exercised and no car
shall be put in motion with a view to cross
ing as aforesaid until a man stationed for the
purpose shall have signalled that such crossing
may be safely made.
Section 4. In the operation of the track herein
authorized no steam propelling power shall
be used nor shall such track be operated ex
cept between the hour& of 9 o’clock P. M. and
6 o’clock A. M., such operation being further
subject to such reasonable regulations as the
city authorities may des;re to establish.
Section 5. The ordinance granting these privi
leges to be of full force and effect for a period
of twenty (20) years and thereafter until such
time as this Board or Its legally authorized
successors shall revoke or modify the same;
an acceptance of any of the privileges herein
accorded shall be a recognition of the right of
the city to so amend or revoke, and while the
privileges accorded are for the benefit of the said
Colgate & Co.,, the city hereby further reserves
the* right at any tihne during the life of this
ordinance, to grant similar privileges to other
applicants, and in so doing permit and require
the use in common of the afore described
tracks or any portion of them.
’ All work herein authorized and required is
to be performed and maintained under the
supervision and to the satisfaction of the
proper city officers, and the operation of such
tracks to be subject to such reasonable regula
tions as the city authorities may desire to
establish.
Section 6. That all costs and expenses Incident
to the Introduction, passage and publication of
this ordinance shall be paid for by the appli
cant for same; and such amount therefor as is
estimated by the Clerk of this Board to be
necessary shall be deposited with that officer
on demand.
Passed April 9, 1906.
ANTHONY HAUCK, President.
Approved April 18, 1906.
M. M. FAGAN. Mayor.
Attest:
GEO. T. BOUTON. Clerk.
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on the 17th day
of March, 1903, application was made to the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners by
Dennis McLaughlin and others for the
IMPROVEMENT OF TENTH STREET,
between Jersey avenue and Monmouth street.
Said Improvement to be made conformably
to the provisions of Chapter 217, of the Laws
of 1895, and in the following manner, including
all intersections.
To have the street, for the full width thereof,
graded to the eeiablished grade, by excavating
or filling the same to the established grade.
To have new 20-inch curb set on each side
thereof.
To have the present curb reset, and new 20
inch curb jet where necessary.
To have new blue-stcme flagging 4 feet wride
laid on each sidewalk.
To have the present flagging relaid and new
flagging laid where necessary.
To have the carriageway paved with Belgian
pavement.
To have the present bridge-stone crosswalks
relaid and new bridge-stone laid w'here neces
sary.
And all other work done that may be neces
sary to provide for the flow of surface water,
and to complete the improvement in a good
and substantial manner.
And notice is also given that on the 12th
day of April, 1906, the Commissioners • of
Assessment filed in the office of the Clerk
of the Board of Street and Water Commission
ers their preliminary map for said improve
ment, showing the probable total cost of the
contemplated improvement and the probable
amount to be assessed on property specially
benefited thereby, and the same Is now open
to public inspection in the office of the Clerk
of said Board.
And notice is also given that the following
streets or avenues or particular sections there
of are included in said assessment, namely:
TENTH STREET,
from Monmouth street to Jersey avenue.
JERSEY AVENUE
on the west side from Tenth street to points
100 feet north and 25 feet south thereof.
COLES STREET,
on the east side from Tenth street to points
about 100 feet north and south thereof; on the
west side from Tenth street to points 100 feet
north and 20 feet south thereof.
MONMOUTH STREET.
on the east side from Tenth street to points
about 100 feet north and 25 feet south thereof.
And that in accordance with the provisions
of the act above cited, the 23rd day of April,
1906, at 2 o’clock P. M., and the Assembly
Chamber of the City Hall are hereby fixed as
the time and place when and where the Board
of Street and Water Commissioners will meet
to hear all parties interested in said applica
tion, and all remonstrances against the said
proposed improvement that may be presented
in writing.
By order of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated, Jersey City, April 16. 1906.
CForon of Abstract of Report of Condition of
Trust Company, as required by Section
16, of Chapter 174, of Laws of 1899.)
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE
Bergen and Lafayette Trust Company, of Jer
sey City, N. J., at the close of business, April
6, 1906.
RESOURCES.
Bonds and mortgages .$ 469.451.36
Stocks and bonds .. S42.182.43
Demand loans on collaterals . 387,350.00
Notes and bills purchased . 297,180.55
Overdrafts secured . 12*1.60
Due from Banks, etc. 2S6.-i75.85
Banking house, safe deposit vaults.. 70.000.0*)
Cash on hand . 56,622.83
Checks and rash items . 52.35
Other asset/ . 9,979.56
$2,419,415.53
LIABILITIES.
Capital stock paid in . 100,000.00
Surplus fund . 30.000.00
Undivided profits (net). 52,617.35
Time deposits . 1,308,829.90
Demand deposits . 786,323.91
Demand certificates of deposit . 2,123.10
Certified checks 2,266.26
Treasurer’s checks outstanding. S.303.67
Bills payable . 100,000.00
Other liabilities . 12.15S.32
Due on mortgages . 16,793.02
$2,419,415.53
State of New Jersey, County of Hudson, so:
William C. Heppanheimer, President, and
Joseph Harrison, Treasurer, of. the above
named Company, being severally duly sworn,
each for himself deposes and says that the
foregoing statement is true to the beat of his
knowledge and belief.
WM. C. HEPPKNHEIMER,
President.
JOSEPH HARRISON,
Treasurer.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this
twentieth day of April, 1906.
THOS. R. GORRY,
Notary Public, New Jersey.
Correct-Attest:
R. R. DDBAOHER,
, . ‘ , | \ l HENRY MEHL,
; ' t L<ayLii4 : tfOBN MEHL. Jr.. -
... L. ©Jreatt* *.
NOTICE TO BRIDGE BUILDERS
Sealed proposals will be received and read
at a meeting of the Board of Chosen Free
holders of the County of Hudson to be
‘ held on
at the Court House, Jersey City, N. J«, for
the construction of a now highway bridge over
the
MORRIS CANAL AT AVENUE C
Between Jersey City and Bayonne, N. J.
Printed conditions under which the proposals
must be made, plans and specifications of the
work, form of contracts and blanks for pro
posals can be had at the office of the Clerk
°£ to*5 Board of Chosen Freeholders, next to
toe Court House, in Jersey City, on and after
April 23, 1906; also character of securities re
quired.
Each proposal must be accompanied by a re
ceipt of the County Collector showing that a
certified check or cash in the sum of five
thousand dollars ($5,000; has been deposited
with him, and the proposition of a Surety
j Company authorized to do business in the State
i of New Jersey to the effect that it will become
j surety for such bidder, in the event of a con
I tract being awarded to said bidder, in the sum
i of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for the faith
| ful performance of the work; and any bid
i which fails to comply with any of said terms
: and conditions will be rejected as informal.
, The Board of Chosen Freeholders reserves the
right to reject any or all proposals If it be
deemed for the best interests of the County so
to do.
By order of resolution of the Board of Chosen
Freeholders, adopted April 5, 1906.
JOHN P. EGAN,
Clerk.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Sealed proposals will be received by the Board
of Street and Water Commissioners on Monday,
April 30th. 1906, at 2 o’clock P. M.. in the
Assembly Chamber of the City Hall for the
IMPROVEMENT OF HOWARD PLACE,
from Summit avenue to Storms avenue.
Said Improvement to be made conformably to
the provisions of Chapter 217 of the Laws of
1895, and in accordance with specifications on
file in the office of th6 Clerk of said Board.
Blank forms of bid and agreement of sureties
must be obtained at the office of the Chief
Engineer, City Hall, Jersey City, N. J.
ESTIMATE OF QUANTITIES.
100 °t Standard
of Cost.
Aoout 276 cubic yards of Earth Excava
tion, per cubic yard .$ .30
About 6 cubic yards of Rock Excava
tion. per cubic yard . 3.00
About 2 cubic yards of Earth Filling,
per cubic yard .10
About 293 cubic yards of Sand Filling,
per cubic yard . 1.30
About 1433 square yards of Paving (Bel
gian) per square yard . 1.30
About 25 lineal feet of Curb Stone,
5x16, set in concrete, per lineal foot.. ,90
About 13 square yards cxf Repaving, per
square yard . .30
About 900 lineal feet of Reset and Dress
ed Curb Stone, In concrete, per lineal
foot .20
About 184 square feet of Relaid and
Dressed Bridge Stone, per square foot. .05
About 4 Reset Manhole Heads, each.... 2.00
About 2 Water Gate Boxes, each. 2.00
Time allowed for the completion of the work,
40 working days.
j The making of the above improvement and
I award of the contract therefor will be subject
I to the remonstrance of the owners of the prop
j erty liable to more than one-half the assess
| m^nt therefor on the basis of preliminary
: sketch.
i Proposals must be enclosed in sealed envel
opes, endorsed “Proposals for the Improvement
I 9* Howard Place,” directed to “Mr. James 3.
j Nolan. Chairman of the Committee on Streets
I and Sewers,” and handed to the Clerk of the
1 B<\ar<i in opep meeting when called for in the
I order of business relating to sealed proposals,
j The bonds required to be furnished on pro
posals (and a possible subsequent contract) are
f those of some surety company authorized to do
business in the State of New Jersey.
Bidders must state a single fixed percentage
of the hundred per cent, standard above quoted
for which they will furnish ail materials and
do all the work comprehended in specifications,
and if final award of contract be made, the per
cent, so stated will form the basis upon which
payment will be made for all items.
The Board may, under the provisions of the
Act above cited, exercise its right to reject any
or all proposals.
The attention of bidders is especially called
to Section 7, Chapter 134, of the Laws of 1891,
under the terms whereof no contract shall be
binding upon the city, or become effective or
operative until the bonds offered by the con
tractor have been approved as to sufficiency by
this Board, and as to form by the Corporation
Counsel, President of this Board having the
power to examine the proposed bondsmen under
oath.
By order of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
GEO. T. BOUTON,
Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, April 21, 1906.
CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that the Commision
ers of .Assessments for Jersey City, N. J., will
meet at their office. Room 39, City Hail, Jersey
City, N. J., on Wednesday, the 2nd day of
May, 1906, at 3 o’clock P. M.. to appraise and
determine the value of the lands to be taken
and the damages fchat may be sustained by rea
son of the
OPENING AND EXTENSION OF WILKIN
SON AVENUE,
from its present westerly terminus to Jackson
avenue.
The land to be taken for said opening and
extension of Wilkinson avenue may be de
scribed as follows:—
The avenue to be 50 feet in width, being 25
feet on either side of the following described
center line: Onnmencing at a point, said point
being the intersection of the easterly line of
Plot A. Block 1304, on Official Assessment Map
of Jersey City, 1894, and the center line of
of Wilkinson avenue, as now opened .said
point al6o being distant 635.97 feet, meas
ured in a westerly direction, along the center
line of Wilkinson avenue, from the westerly
line of Ocean avenue; thence running from
said point in the easterly line of Plot A, Block
1304. along a line which would be the center
line of Wilkinson avenu * as now opened, if
the same were produced westerly in a straight
line or course 687.69 feet to Jackson avenue.
(The difference in the description of land
taken given here, and that as appears in the
petition, Is on acfcount of an accurate survey
being made after the filing of the petition.)
All the lands within the lines of the fore
going description being required for the Open
ing and Extension of Wilkinson avenue, as
aforesaid, as will more fully appear by refer
ence to the resolution in regard to the same,
adopted by the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners October 2nd, 1905. and peti
tion on file In the Office of the Clerk of said
Board.
At which time and place the said Commis
sioners of Assessments will hear all parties in
terested, who desire to be heard before them,
on the value of the land to be taken and the
damages which any owner or owners of such
land, or of any interest the eta, may sustain
by reason of the said Opening and Extension
of Wilkinson avenue.
The above proceedings arc taken under the
provisions of Chapter 289. of the Laws of 1S95.
Dated Jersev City N. J. April 13. 1906.
CHARLES MERKER.
THOMAS P. CONNELLY,
THOMAS F. MURRAY.
Commissioners of Assessments.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE
People’s Safe Deposit and Trust Company, of
Jersey City. N. J., at the close of business
April 6. 1906.
RESOURCES.
I Bonds and Mortgages .$1,431,763.14
! Stocks and bonds . 2,155.828.26
I Demand loans on collaterals ........ G92.300.0l
Loans on cities and towns . 14.0W.00
1 Notes and -bills purchased . 533,660.40
Overdrafts . 65.52
Due from banks. Ac. 375,151.30
Bankinghouses, furniture and fix
tures, and safe deposit vaults. 136.966.12
Other real estate . 5,000.00
Cash on hand . 105.527.07
Chocks and cash items . 8,041.29
Other assets . 30,517.52
$5,493,820.62
LIABILITIES.
Capital stock paid In . 150.0W.W
Surplus fund . 1W.0W.W
Undivided profits (net) . 96.003.44
i Time deposits . 4,058,321.36
| Time certificates of deposit .. 75.000.00
Demand deposits . 956,091.21
i Certified checks . 21,495.61
Treasurer's checks outstanding . 75.00
Other liabilities . 36,334.00
$5,493,820.62
{•State of New Jersey, County of Hudson, ss:
William C. Heppenheimer, President, and
Frederick E. Armbruater, Treasurer, of the
above-named company, being severally duly
sworn, each for himself deposes and says that
the foregoing statement is true, to the best
of his knowledge and belief.
WM. C. HEPPENHEIMER. President,
F. E. ARMBRUSTER. Treasurer.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 20th
day of April, A. D. , 1906.
ALBERT E.BEUCHNER,
j Notary Public, N. J.
Correct-Attest: \
RICHARD SCHLBMM,
JOHN MEHL, Jr.,
1, i . 4m?. hbxamer.
' 1 b -t( i \ Dirac tap*. (
-1-■J.'.T ■-t
^ HELP WANTED.
MALE. ^
HAVE YOU EXECUTIVE ABILITY?
M«n with the capacity for getting results from cth«*
"“for carrying out big undertakings—are scarce. If yol
have such ability vepte us -Way, stating jtf&oJ» .
i^aiMPfficKAdvertising. Traffic and General 2/anrJ
eqBffyers. yyedit Men* Auditors, Secretaries?, 'feral
from fr.ooo to $5,004 :2<
lanuAxi pdMtions for men having money to itivesf '
with Their seij*esi Offices iu 12 cities. —. ■_». _ f
"nsdl^igfr&riftaiaftfr
AGENTS MAKE BIG* MONEY In
troducing our $1.50 Toilet Oombina.
dons containing Perfume, Taieum Powj
aer, Dentifrice, Soaps, for 35c. ;Aiso I
and 8 bar Soap assortments; they sell
at sight; establish yourself in permanen}
business; general agents wanted. DAVIS
SOAP \\ORKS, 31 Union Park Pla<fe
Chicago. M
ROCKMEN WANTED. — EXPEP.I
cnced Foremen Blasters and Haul
Drillers. Apply John Slattery, No. 364
Park Ave., bet. 52d and 53d Sta.. Neil
York, N. Y. Nj
BILL CLERK WITH SOME EXPERIENCE
in wholesale plumbing supply business. Adi
dress Box 2. News office.
LATH HAND WANTED; YOUNG MaN]
hall BUTTON CO., 27 Grant Ave.
MAN WANTED FOR FLOOR WORK A'J
HALL BUTTON CO., 27 Grant Ave.
‘LATHE HANDS ON SMALL WOR’.i
for tool room." The Midvale Stea
Co.. Xicetown. Philada.
- |
BOV WANTED TO LEARN BOOKBINDING,
JAMES BROWN. 6" Montgomery St. Jersey
City,
WANTED—STRONG BOY, PLAIN WRIT EM
general work around warehouse; residing ut
Jersey City or Hoboken. Address COLB>*Jb
CO.. 15 William St., N. V. 7^
FEMALE. '
\
GIRLS—THREE PRESS HANDS WANTED'
at HALL BUTTON CO., 27 Grant Ave.
TO HENRY C. KLEINHAU3, HIS UN
known heirs or devisees.
Take notice, that The Hudson County Park'
Commission has deemed it proper to acquire'
for a public park certain lands and rights in
lands described as follows:—All those certain
lots, tracts or parcels ot land situated in Jer
sey City, Hudson County, New Jersey, k»o>.a
and designated as lots Nos. 41 and 42, in block.
No. 1743, as laid down on map of property'
belonging to Charles A. Grant, 1900, fronting
on 4
DELAWARE AND OLEAN AVENUES, i
mor<? particularly described in the petitioal
hereinafter referred to.
And because said The Hudson Coustfy Park!
Commission, or Its agents duly authorized, is.
unable to agree with you, the owner or owner#]
and persons interested in said lands and rights!
in lands as to the price and terms of thS
purchase thereof, it has made application bj?S
petition to His Honor, Jonathan Dixon, one of
the Justices of the Supreme Court of the State
of New Jersey, for the appointment of three
disinterested freeholders to fix the compensa
tion to be paid and to examine and appraise
the said lands or property, and to assess the
damages, as provided in an act entitled. "An
act to regulate the ascertainment and payment
of compensation for property condemned or
taken for public use," (Revision of 1909); that
said Justice has by order assigned
SATURDAY, the Fifth day of May, 19QC,
at ten o'clock in the forenoon of that day, at
the Court House, in Jersey City, before him
self, as the time and place for hearing said
petition and making said appointment, and di-.
rented notice thereof to be given you by the'
publication of this notice in the Jersey City
News once a week for two weeks.
THE HUDSON COUNTY PARK COMMISSION.
By FRANK H. HALL. Attorney.
' “ ‘ ‘ “|
TO HENRY C. KLBTNHAUS, HIS UN
known heirs or devisec3.
Take notice, that The Hudson County Park'
Commission has deemed it proper to acquire*
for a public park certain lands and rights in
lands described as follows:—All those certain -
lots, tracts or parcels of land situated in Jer
sey City, Hudson County, New’ Jersey, known
and designated as lots Nos. 32, 34. S6, 40, 41,
42, 43 and 44, in block No. 1710. as iaid out on.
map of property belonging to Charles A, Grant,
1900, fronting on
FREEMAN AND BENTLEY AVENUES,
more particularly described in the petition
hereinafter referred to.
And because said The Hudson County Park
Commission, or its agents duly authorized, is
unable to agree with you, the owner or owners
and persons interested in said lands and rights
in lands, as to the price and terms of tlie
purchase thereof, it has made application by
petition to His Honor, Jonathan Dixon, one of
the Justices of the Supreme Court of the State
of New Jersey, for the appointment of thres
disinterested freeholders to fix the compensa
tion to be paid and to examine and appraise
the said lands or property, aad to assess the
damages, as provided in an act entitled, "An
act to regulate the ascertainment and payment
of compensation for property condemned or
taken for public use,” (Revision of 1900); that
said Justice has by order assigned
SATURDAY, the Fifth day of May. 1ft*,
at ten o’clock in the forenoon of that day, at
the Court House, in Jersey City, before him
self, as the time and place for hearing said
petition and making said appointment, and di
rected notice thereof to be given you by the
publication of this notice In the Jersey City
News once a week for two weeks.
THE HUDSON COUNTY PARK COMMISSION,
By FRANK H. HALL. Attorney.
TO MARTIN ECKERT, AND THE HEIRS,
devisees or personal representatives of Mar
tin Eckert:
Take notice, that William Koelsch, of Jersey
City, Hudson County, New Jersey, has filed his
application with the Clerk of the Court of Com
mon Pleas of said County, addressed to the Hon
orable John A. Blair, Law Judge of the County
of Hudson, in and by which It appears that
said William Koelsch, together with his wife,
made, executed and delivered unto Martin
Eckert a certain mortgage bearing date Janu
ary 4th. 1S7S, to secure the principal sum of
three hundred dollars, with Interest, which
said mortgage was registered ip the office at
the Register of Deeds of the said County of
Hudson February tsth, 1873, in book 101 ec
mortgages, page 38 fte.. that the mortgaged
premises described therein is lot twenty-nine
(29). block live (5), situated on tbs northerly
side of Walker avenue, betwoen Essex ttrest
and Bergen Road, as the same is laid down on
a map on file in said Register’* office entitled.
"Map of property of D. Gould and A. btorrsn,
a- Woodlawn, Greenvilie. Hud. Co., N. £.
mads by G. L Van Horne. C. E. ft Town Sur.
veyor;" that said mortgage has been paid and
fully satisfied, but has not been cancelled of
record: that after due and diligent inquiry for
the whereabouts or any knowledge of said,
Eckert and the names and residsnoes of heirs, '■
devisees or personal representatives of said
Martin Eckert, he, said petitioner, has been
unable to ascertain either Ot the same, and
that said petitioner, after careful and dili
gent inquiry, has been unable to ascertain
whether said Martin Eckert Is dead or tulvei
that in and by said petition said Martin BeVert
pravs that an order may be made directing
the'Register of the County at Hqdeofl. in the
State of New Jersey, to cancel of record the'
said mortgage above referred to.
That on the sixth day of April, in the year I
nineteen hundred and six. at the Court House»
in Jersey City, at the hour of ten o'clock he
the forenoon of that day, application will be
made to the Honorable John A. Blair,Law Judge*
of the County of Hudson aforesaid, being Pre-;
siding Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of
Hudson County aforesaid, tor an order to can
cel of record the said mortgage made by Wil-v
Ham Koelsch and wife to Marti* Eckert, and.!
for such other and further relief in the prem* i
lses as may be agreeable to the said Law
Judge, and agreeably to the statutes In suofc
case made and provided. . i
The above notice being given pursuant to anl
order of the Honorable John A. Blair, Law
Judge of the County of Hudson aforesaid,
dated March 5th, 1908.
Dated March 5th, 1908. V
Signed, *
WILLIAM KOELSCH.
BRINKERHOFF ft FIELDER.
15 Exchange Place,
Jersey City, N. J.. - :
Attorneys of William Koelsch.
TO THE CREDITORS OF THI REX FIRM
Apparatus Company, a corporation.
By virtue of an order of the Court of-Chaa
eery of New Jersey, made on the day of the
date hereof. In a cause wherein Walter A Har
iand is complainant, and the Rex Fire Appa
ratus, a corporation, is defendant, you are
hereby notified to present to me. the receiver
of said corporation, under oath or affirmation
or otherwise to prove to my satisfaction, your
several claims and demands against said cor
poration within two months of the date or
said order, or sou will be excluded from the
benefits of such dividends as may be thereafter
made and declared by said court upon the pro
ceeds of the effects of said corporation.
Claims to be presented at the receiver’s office.
No. 15 Exchange Place, Jersey City, New
Jersey.
Dated April 16. 1906.
PHILIP F. BOTZONO. Receiver.
. I „
THE BASS FOUNDRY * MACHINE COM
PANY.
Notioe Is hereby given that, pursuant to the
by-lawa the annual meeting of the Bass
Foundry & Machine Company will be held at
tht office of the Company, No. 359 Washington
St.. Jersey City. N. I.. on the Wednesday
next following the first Monday to May
namely. May 5th, 1906, at 13 o’clook noon, for
the purpose of electing a board of directors and
tor the transaction If such other business ae
may properly come before the meeting.
The transfer books of the company will be
closed on the l»th day of April, 1906,'aiSd wild
nut he opened until the i#th day of Mfcr, 1906.
C. T. STRAWBRIDGK,

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