OCR Interpretation


Bridgeton pioneer. (Bridgeton, N.J.) 1884-1919, March 20, 1884, Image 3

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068192/1884-03-20/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ICY END.
In the Winter of ’73, n man attempt
ed to cross the frozen surface of the
Merrimac. When about ten feet from
the shore he broke through. A work
man in a saw-mill near by seized a
plank and thrust it ouc to the drown
ing man. Unfortunately one end of
the plank was covered with ice, and
that end the workman, in his excite
ment, had extended to the struggling
man. He caught hold of it several
times and tried to pull himself up to
the solid ice. But at each attempt his
hand slipped and he fell back into the
water. At last he cried out in the
agony of terror:
“For mercy’s sake don’t reach me the
icy end of the plank!”
A perplexed student once went to a
college professor for help in a certain
study. “I am willing to help you,”
the professor said, with chilling cour
tesy, "but of course you know that my
time is fully occupied, and I can’t give
special attention to every student.
What is your difficulty?'’
The student stated what had per
plexed him. “Oh, that’s nothing,” an
swered the professor. “You don’t need
my help to get out of that difficulty.
Still, when you really need assistance
I certainly will give it to you. But
you won’t forget that my time is
valuable.”
The student bowed his thahks and
departed, without receiving the help
he really needed. The icy end of the
plank was held out to him. From that
day he bitterly though unjustly classed
all the college professors together, as
cold and unsympathetic. He carried
this prejudice through his college
course because he had been denied a
little sympathy.
A few years ago a young minister
and his wife began their work in a
growing Western town. Their people
were attentive and courteous, the
salary was ample, and a new church
edifice was erected. But in less than a
year the minister and his wife sought
a smaller church and a lower salary.
A friend, surprised at the change,
asked:
“What was the matter? Didn’t the
climate suit you?”
“Perfectly.”
“Well, wasn't your church harmo
nious?”
“Yes.”
“You had a fair salary?”
“Yes, more than I get now.”
“Why did you leave, then?”
“Because my wife and I were tired
of living in a moral refrigerator. Every
one was kind, but it was a kindness
wrapped up in ice, as if they were
afraid it would spoil. We had help
enough, but no real sympathy.”
The icy end of the plank had been
extended to the minister and his wife.
---—
A CURIOUS BEAR STORY.
Mr. George Swift, a ranchman in the
< muul Valley, tells a story which shows
how unenviable is the life of the stock
raiser in that wilderness. A short time
ago, Mr. Swift let his three-year-old
daughter ride upon his horse, and after
she had ridden about forty rods from
home lie lifted her off the animal and
told her to run home. On returning
about an hour later he found that the
little one had not reached home, and
going to the place where he had last
seen her, he found bear tracks in the
sand. A posse was formed, and all
night was spent in searching for the
lost child.
In the morning, as the searchers
were passing a swampy spot where the
undergrowth was thick, they heard
her voice. They called to the little
girl to come out of the bushes, but she
replied that the bear would not let her.
The men then crept through the brush,
and when near the spot heard a splash
in the water, which the child said was
the bear. They found her standing
upon a log, extending half way across
the swamp, and it seemed as though
the bear had undertaken to cross the
swamp on the log, and, being pursued,
left rlie child, and got away as rapidly
as possible. She had received some
scratches about the face, arms and legs,
and her clothes were almost torn from
her body, but the bear had not bitten
her to hurt her, only the marks of her
teeth being found upon h£r back,
where he had taken hold of her clothes
to carry her. The child told her res
----XK„X X1_1.. 1 1 , l
'/v»v‘u vtiv vvui tiuu J>Ul I1CI UUWU
occasionally to rest, and would put
nose up to her face, whereupon she
would slap him and he would hang his
head by her side and purr and rub
against her like a cat. Her father
asked her if she had been cold during
the night, and she told him the old
bear lay beside her and put his “arms”
around her and kept her warm.—Glas
gow Herald.
London wine-merchants are badly
off, owing to the decrease in the con
sumption of all wines except claret and
champagne, but the whiskey trade
flourishes.
-- ■ ■
“Yes"’ the Nebraska farmer said,
“barbed wire fence is expensive; but
the hired man doesn’t stop to rest
every time he has to climb it.”
_— , ♦ -
A babe that was born in the court
house at Lawrenceburg, Ind., Sunday,
has been chistened Ohio Flood Walling
ford.
AN IMPOSTOR.
An extraordinary case of imposture,
said to have been successfully prac
ticed for twenty years, is reported
from Whitstable. “A woman named
Frances Wood, otherwise Janny Jor
dan, when about fifteen years old took
to her bed, and gradually grew worse
in appearance until her face was com
pletely blackened, with the exception
of a white mark down the centre of
the nose. She lost the use of her
whole body, except one arm, and could
take only brandy and water and light
dainties. Her case called forth much
commiseration, and elicited substantial
aid from every part of England. Be
sides the local practitioners she baffled
the questions and skill of three medical
men of standing and repute from other
districts, and has received relief from
both the parchial authorities and the
Whitstable charity trustees. Her
piety and resigned patience were
talked of as most edifying and “beau
tiful,” and a few years ago she was the
subject of a long article in Faithful
Words, wherein her unparalleled suf
fering and perfect resignation were re
corded. Hearing on Saturday week
that her brother hud been sentenced
to three months' imprisonment, she
suddenly recovered her natural hue,
and when discovered by her mother
said, “I felt as if something gave me
three raps on the head, and a thrill
passed through me.” She afterward
sent for a person who had often visited
her, and confessed that during all these
years she had acted the hypocrite, and
had been perfectly able to use her
limbs all the time. She had systemat
ically and gradually discolored her
features with burned cork, which she
kept in a box with a candle beneath
her . bed. These marks she hastily
wiped off with a llannel when she
heard the postman telling her mother
of the imprisonment of her brother.
She died on Wednesday at the age of
thirty-five. Her mother declares that
site was quite unaware of her daugh
ter’s deception.—Pall Mall Gazette.
THE MAN WHO SWEARS.
And just one word more, says Bur
dette: Suppose you are given to a
habit of profanity. You enter into
conversation with a man who never
swears: in other words, a gentleman.
By and bv vou beerin to nerceive that.
lie is the superior man. Your remarks
have a tame, flat, feeble sound to your
own ears. Your cheeks begin to burn
with the sense of your friend’s excel
lence. Your pert little damns sound
rough and coarse and vulgar as they
are. They begin to drop out of your
sentences, ashamed to remain in the
company of honest English words,
until, as you discover that you are
carrying on your part of the conver
sation without swearing you feel eas
ier, and your intellectual statue is in
creased by a foot. Just observe this,
my boy, and see if I am not right.
But you will rip out some time. Oh,
yes, in some way you will. I know
some good men—some of the best in
the world—who will confound it. and
even dog-gone it, and in New England
even a deacon has been known, under
a terrible strain, to condemn it.
Don’t swear. It isn’t any evidence of
smartness or worldly wisdom. Any
fool can swear. And a great many
fools do. I, my son? Ah, if I could
only gather up all the useless, uncalled
for, ineffective swears I have dropped
along the pathway of my life, I know
1 would remove stumbling blocks
from many inexperienced feet, and my
own heart would be lighter by a ton
than it is to-day. But if you are go
ing to be a fool just because other
men have been, oh, my son, what an
awful, what a colossal, what a hope
less fool you will be!
--—♦ ♦
IN REGARD TO DIET.
There is one inherent weakness in
the creed of vegetarians, and that is,
that they cannot get on without ani
mal food namely, milk and eggs. Of
course the fact stares vegetarians in
the face that Nature has provided food
for all young mammals, and that is a
very awkward and untoward fact.
Vegetarians,|however, in the face of it,
have thought it wise to include milk
as an article of vegetarian diet. But
milk cannot be gotten without cows,
and as the consumption of milk may
be expected to increase, and is said as
a matter ot fact to increase, where lit
tie or no other animal food is taken the
number of cows must be expected to
increase under a vegetarian regime;
but then there must be calves, and
these will grow up and become cows
and bulls, and cover the whole surface
of the globe in time if they are not
killed; but one of the great arguments
of vegetarianism is the cruelty of kill
ing animals. Nobody, of course, de
sires that any animal shall be killed
but with the minimum of cruelty, but
it would seem that if the vegetarians
yield on the subject of milk, they must
also yield on the subject of killing ani
mals, and if animals must be killed, it
is difficult to see why they should not
be eaten, seeing that there is no doubt
; they make excellent food. Milk, there
fore, seems to us to be the vegetarian’s
stumbling block, and until he throws
milk overboard, vegetarianism has lit
tle in it but a name.
A rooster ut Verbena, Ala., has two
tails and three legs. This bird really
has something to crow over; but the
average rooster is very absurd. Some
of them have been known to cackle
when a modest hen lays an egg, thus
robbing the weaker sex of all glory.
Oscar Wilde told his Dublin audi
ence that the great American prairies
were shockingly devoid of artistic dec
oration.
PURE!
FRESH!
RELIABLE!
Garden Beed
FOR
Early Planting.
We can furnish any variety'of
seeds from any of the Seed
Growers in the country, at their
prices, delivered here either in
large or small quantities.
CABBAGE, TOMATOES,
EARLY PEAS,
LaiWl's Extra Early Peas,
And every variety of seeds
AT
46 Commerce St.,
DEALERS IN
Drugs, Medicines, Paint,
Oils, Varnish,
Carriage Trimming, &c.
THE SUN.
NEW YORK. 1884.
gone out of our establishment during the past
twelve months.
I f you were to paste end to end all the col
umns of all the Sunn printed and sold last year
you would get a continuous strip of interesting
information, common sense, wisdom, sound
doctrine, and sane wit long enough to reach
from Printing House square to the top of Mou nt
Copernicus in the moon, then back to Printing
House square, and then three-quarters of the
way back to the moon again.
Hut the Sun is written for the inhabitants of
the earth; this same strip of intelligence would
girdle the globe twenty-seven or twenty-eight
times.
If every buyer of a copy of the Sun during
the past year has spent only one hour over it,
and if his wife or his grandfather has spent an
other hour, this newspaper in 1883 has atTored
the human race thirteen thousand years of
steady reading, night and day.
It is only by little calculations like these that
you can form any idea of the circulation of the
most popular ot American newspapers, or ot
its influence on the opinions and actions of
American men and women.
The Sun is, and will continue to be, a uews
paper which tells the truth without fear of con
sequences, which gets at the facts no matter
how much the process costs, which presents tie*
news of all the world without waste of words
and in the most readable shape, which is work
ing with all its heart for the cause of honest
government, and which therefore believes that
the Republican party must go, and must go in
this coming year of our Lord, 1884.
If you know the Sun, you like it already, and
you will read it with accustomed diligence and
profit during what is sure to be the most inter
esting year in its history. If you do not yet
know the Sun, it is high time to get into the
sunshine.
Terms to Mail Subscribers.
The several oditions of the Sun are sent by
mail, postpaid, as follows:
DAILY—50 cents a month, $8 a year; with Sun
day edition, 7.
SUNDAY—Eight page's. This edition furnishes
the current news of the world, special ar
ticles of exceptional interest to everybody,
and literary reviews of now books of the
highest merit, a year.
WEEKLY—1$ a year. Eight pages of the best
matter Of the diiilv sin WrwMiltnrul
Department of unequalled value, special
market reports, and literary, scientific, and
domestic intelligence make the Weekly sun
the newspaper for the farmer’s household.
To clubs of ten with 10, an extra copy free.
Address I. W. ENG LAN D, Publisher,
The Sun, N. Y. City.
AN ABSOLUTK CU.vK F'JK
Dyspepsia, Liver and
Kidney Diseases.
Indigestion, Biliousness. Sick Headache
Heartburn, Waterbretsh, Distress af
ter Dating, Belching of Food, etc.
This purely vegetable preparation surpasses
any medicine recommended for the above dis
Wvo it a trial. Price, 25 and 50 cents.
W^For t oughs Colds, Croup and Throat Af
fections, use l>u Lac's Swiss IIausam. It never
tails. Contains no morphia or opium.
G. HOLDSTEIN, Proprietor,
! Sold by Geo. II. Whipple, Hrldgetol^uiinill
country storekeepers. oet 4-ly
USTIEW
HIM IB 5TIIII!
White & Moore,
Are now ready to supply the public with the
best the market will afford, wholesale and re
tail, such as
Flour, Patent, 1-8, 1-4 or cwt.
“ Best Red Wheat, “
GRAHAM FLOUR.
Corn, Oats,Corn and Oats, Fine Meal,
Fine Shorts, Coarse Bran, Buck
Bran, Fine Bran, Screenings.
Our motto is to "Live and let live.” All we ask
is a trial to convince you.
We have also opened a
COAL LTALRLD,
On Atlantic Street.,
And are prepared to furnish the best
LEHIGH COAL.
Wo superintend the screening and picking our
selves, and guarantee entire satisfaction and
lull weight.
WOOD! WOOD!
J. T. WHITE. J. F. MOORE.
Cor. Broad and Atlantic Sts.,
ISKIDGETON, N. J.
1I SHARPLESS'
PHILADELPHIA
CANDY MANUFACTORY
Wholesale and Retail.
Sunday Schools and storekeepers will save
money by buyingHtheir candies where they are
made. Greatest variety of
FINE AND PLAIN CANDY
In South Jersey, fresh, pure and|eheap.
Mixtures, per lb., 13; 2 lbs- for 25cts.
j Caramels, all flavors, 25 cents.
: Molasses Candy, all flavors, 15 cents.
Gum Drops, 15 cents,
i Japanese Cocoanut Strips, 15 cents.
Try our celebrated
COUGH DROPS.
No. 11 North Laurel St., Bridgeton.
Philadelphia & Reading R. R,,
New Jersey Southern Division.
Commencing October 28th, 1883.
For Bridgeton Vineland intermediate stations.
&c.
Leave New York, foot of Liberty St., 1.30 p. m.
LEAVE BRIDGETON,
7.39 a. m. for New York, Newark, Elizabeth,
South Amboy,Long Branch,Red Bank,
Farmingdale, Toms River, Waretown,
Barnegat, Whitings, Atsion, Winslow,
Vineland, &c.
7.39 a. m., 2.05 p, in. for Vineland, Winslow
Junction, Atsion.
9.5(5 a. m. (5.54 p. m. for Bay Side and intermedi
ate stations.
FOR PHILADELPHIA.
Leave Bridgeton 7.39 a. m.,
LEAVE PHILADELPHIA.
(Vine Street Wharf.)
For Bridgeton and way stations, 4:30 p. m.
Above trains connect to and from Atlantic
City and all points on the Camden and Atlantic
K. R. C. G. HANCOCK,
,, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agent.
R. BLODGETT. Supt.
J. E, WOOTTEN, Gen. Manager.
WEST JERSEY RAILROAD.
On and after February 25, (884.
Trains leave Bridgeton as follows:
For Philadelphia and Wav Stations, at 7.00,
and 8.10 a. m., and 12.29 and 3.10 p. m.
For Salem Branch 8.10 a. m. and 3.10 p. m.
l or Trenton and New York via Camden, 7.00
ami 8.10 a. m„ 12.29 and 3.10 p. m.
For Sea Isle City, 8.10 a. m. and 3.10 p. m.
l or Atlantic City and Cape May, 8.10 a. m..
and 3.10 p.m.
Returning,
Leave Philadelphia 8.00 and 11.49a. m., 3.30 and
5.40 p. m.
Leave Salem 7.40 a. m. and 2.25 p. m.
Leave Sea Isle City, (5.55 a. m. and 4.20 p. m.
Connecting Railroads.
Trains leave Vineland for Millville. 9.42 and
10.0(5, a. m., 4.40 and 7.08 p. m., and on Sunday
9.29 a. m.
For Cape May, leave Vineland, 10.0(5 a. m.. 4.40
p. m. On Sunday, 9.29 a. m.
JUS. LKAWFORD, Supt.
J. H. WOOD, Ger’l Pass. Agent.
PHI for the working class. Si nd 10 cents
UULU for postage, and we will mail you
t ree, a royal, valuable box of sample goods
that will put you in the way of making more
money in a few days than*you ever thought
possible at any business. Capital not required.
\> e will start you. You can work all the time
or in spare time only. The work is universally
adapted to both sexes, young and old. You
can easily earn from 50 cents to $5 every even
ing. 1 hat all who want work may test the bus
iness, we make this unparalled oner: to all who
are not well satisfied, we will send to pay for
the trouble of writing us. Full particulars, di
i l ections, &c., sent. free. Fortum's will be made
i by those who give their whole tpneto the work.
Great success absolutely sure. Don’t delay.
Mart now. Address Stinson & Co., Portland,
Maine. dee 8T-tf
WE A Loading T.ondon Phys*
■I 11 III El iciim establishes na
Bg ■ Olllecfn New York
■ ■ JB lor (he Cure of
.1 B B ll EPILEPTIC FITS.
■■ ■■ H Ww From Am. Journal of Medicine.
e* ^eser°le(latoof Ijondon),whomakesnepee
Epilepsy, has without doubt treated and cured
l!itl.r?cas?8Jk,inany Other living physician. His success
«™»oI?p * keen astonishing; wo nave heard of cases of
stondmg, successfully cured by him. Ho
„,?*8kP^i^hshed a work on this disease, which ho sends
with a large bottle of his wonderful euro freo to any
sunerer who may send their express and P.O. address
" oacivise any one wishing a cure to address
Da. AB. MKbBROLE, No. 96 John St., New York,
an 24-4t
1884.
HARPER’S BAZAR.
ILLUSTRATED.
Harper's Bazar is at once* the most brilliant
an<l useful Household Journal in existence. It
is the acknowledged arbiter of fashion in this
country. Its fashion plates are the newest and
most stylish; and its pattern sheet supplements
and economic suggestions alone are worth
many times the cost of subscription. Its illus
trations of art needlework are from the la st
sources. Its literary and artistic merits are of
the highest order. Its stories, poems and essays
are by the first American and European au
thors. Its choice art pictures would fill port
folios,and its humorous cuts are the most amus
ing to be found in any journal in America. A
host of brilliant novelties are promised for 1884.
HARPER’S PERIODICALS.
Per Year:
HARPER’S BAZAR. 4 00
HARPERS MAGAZINE.4 00
HARPER’S WEEKLY. 4 Off
HARPER’S FRANKLIN SQUARE LI
BRARY, One Year. (52 Numbers.) —10 00
Postage Free to all subscribers in the railed
States or Canada.
The Volumesof the Bazar begin with the first
Number lor January of each year. When no
time is mentioned, it will be understood that
the subscriber wishes to commence with the
Nlltnhor nevt uftur thu ronoint nf dpiR-p
The last Four Animal Volumes of Harper's
Bazar, in neat cloth binding, will be sent by
mail, postage paid, or by express, free of ex
pense, (provided the freight does not exceed
one dollar per volume,) for 7.00 per volume.
Cloth Cases for each volume, suitable for
binding, will be sent by mail, postpaid, on re
ceipt of $1.<X) each.
Remittances should be made by Post-Ofticc
Money Order or Draft, to avoid chance of loss.
Se>rsjtapers are not to ropy this advertisement
without the espi'ess order of Hauper & Bros.
Address
HARPER A BROTHERS, New York.
1884. '
HARPER’S MAGAZINE.
ILLUSTRATED.
Harper's Mftgazinebeifins ibs sixty-eighth vol
ume with the December Number. It is the
most popular illustrated periodical in America
and England, always fully abreast of the times
in its treatment ot subjects of current social
and industrial interest, and always advancing
its standard of literary, artistic and mechanical
excellence. Among its attractions for 1884are:
a new serial novel by William Black, illustrated
by Abbey; a new novel by E. P. Roe, illustrated
by Gibson and Dielman; descriptive illustrated
papers by George H. Houghton, Frank D. Mil
let, C. H. Farnhain. and others; important his
torical and biographical papers; short stories by
W. D. Howells, Charles Reade, Ac.
HARPER'S PERIODICALS.
Per Year:
HARPER'S MAGAZINE.$4 00
HARPER'S WEEKLY. 4 00
HARPER'S BAZAR. 4 00
HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE. 1 50
HARPER'S FRANKLIN SQUARE LI
BRARY, One Year, (52 numbers,. ... 10 00
Postage Free to all subscribers in the United
States or Canada.
The volumes of the Magazine begin with the
numbers for June and December ot each vear.
When no time is specified, it will be understood
that the subscriber wishes to begin with the
current Number.
The last bight Volumes of Harper's Magazine
in neat cloth binding, will be sent by mail
postpaid, on reeeipt of S3.00 per volume. Cloth
cases, for binding, 50 cents each—by mail,
postpaid.
Index to Harper's Magazine. Alphabetical.
Analytical and Classified, for Volumes 1 to HO
inclusive, from June 1850 to June 1870. one vol
Remittances should be made by Post-Office
Money Order or Draft, to avoid chance of loss.
Newspapers are not to copy this advertisement
without the express order of Harper & Bros.
Address
HARPER & BROTHERS. New York.
1884.
HARPER’S WEEKLY
ILLUSTRATED.
Harper's Weekly stands at the head of Ameri
can illustrated weekly journals. By its unpar
tisan position in politics, its admirable illustra
tions. its carefully chosen serials, short stories,
sketches and poems contributed bv the fore
most artists and authors of the day, it carries
instruction and entertainment to thousands of
American homes.
It will always be the aim of the publishers to
make Harper's Weekly the most popular ami
attractive family newspaper in the world, and,
in the pursuance of this design, to present a
constant improvement in all those features
which have gained lor it the confidence sym
pathy and support of its large family of readers.
HARPER’S PERIODICALS.
Per Year:
HARPER’S WEEKLY.§4 00
HARPER’S MAGAZINE. 4 00
HARPER'S BAZAR. 4 (10
HARPER’S YOUNG PEOPLE. 1 50
HARPER'S FRANKLIN SQUARE LI
BRARY, One Year (52 Numbers).10 00
Postage Free to all subscribers in the United
States or Canada.
The Volumes of the Weekly begin with the
first number of January of each year When
no time is inentioned.it will be understood that
the subscriber wishes to commence with the
number next after the receipt of order
The last Four Annual Volumes of Harper's
11 eekly, in neat cloth binding, will be sent by
mail, postage paid, or by express, free ot cx
nense (provided the freight does not exceed one
dollar per volume), for S7.IX1 per volume.
Cloth cases for each volume, suitable for
nindinjr, will be sent by mail, postpaid, on re
ceipt of Sl.00 each.
lu minances should he made bv Post-Office
Money Order or Draft, to avoid chance of loss.
Newspapers are not to copy this adrertisement
without the express order of Harper & Bros.
Address
HARPER & BROTHERS, New York.
1884.
An Illustrated Weekly—16 Pages.
SUITED TO BOYS AND GIRLS OF FROM SIX TO
SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE.
Volume V commences Nov. 0, 1883.
Harper’s Young People is the best weekly
for children in America. -Southwestern Christian
Adroeate.
All that the artist’s skill can accomplish in
the wav of illustration has been done, and the
best talent of the country has contributed to
its text.—New England Journal of Education,
Boston.
In its special Held there is nothing that can
be compared with it.—Hartford Evening Post.
TERMS:
HARPER’S YOUNG PEOPLE, )
Per Year, Postage Prepaid, i
Single Numbers, Five Cents each.
Specimen copy sent on receipt of Three ets.
The Volumes of Harper's Young People for
1881, 1882 and 18HJ1, handsomely bound in Illu
minated Cloth, will be sent by mail, postage
prepaid, on receipt of §3.00 each. Cloth Cases
for each volume, suitable for binding, will be
sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt of 50 cents
each.
Remittances should be made by Post-Office
Money Order or Draft, to avoid chance of loss.
Sewspapers are not to ropy this advertisement
without the express order of Harper & Bros.
Address
HARPER & BROTHERS, New York.
Guns! Guns! Guns!
HAVING received an additional supply of
Double and Single Barrel Shot Guns. Pow
der, Shot, Percussion Caps, Powder Flasks, Slug
Pouches and Belts, Wad Cutters and Gun Wad
ding, uH of whic h is ottered clump for cash.
DANIEL BACON,
tf Bridgeton. N. J.
REMOVAL!
GEO. LAWRENCE’S
IROIT
AND
Has been removed
From No. 13 to 43 S. Laurel
Street, Bridgeton,
"'here he has laid in a new and large stock of
Iron & Steel of all kinds
And a general line of
Carriage Makers’ Material
Such as
T7.11 T T 11
i uiucs, i iuuus, opoices, onattP
Poles & Carriage Trimmings.
PATENT WHEELS A SPECIALTY
I believe I can sell you the last Patent Wheel
in South Jersey, lor the money. 1 shall also
keep a general line of
-IT
All of which I shall offer low for cash,
sep 20-6m GEO. LAWRENCE.
NEW
Fruit Store.
M. C. ENGLISH,
Dealer in
No. 36 South Laurel St, Bridgeton.
Call anil see the new stock, fresh from the city
markets. Louis Gahre’s old stand, next to
Moore s Opera House. jan 24-tf
BEAUTIFUL EVER BLOOMING
ROSES
THE BEST IN THE WORLD.
Our great specialty is growing and distributing
these beautiful Roses. We deliver Strong Pot
Plants, suitable for immediate bloom, safely bv
mail, at all post’offices. 5 splendid varieties
your choice, all labelled, for SI; 12 for §2- 11) for
S3; 2S for $4; 35 for So: 75 for S10; 100 for *13
Send for our New Guide to Rose Culture, 60
pages, elegantly illustrated, and choose from
over Five Hundred Finest Sorts. Address,
THE DINGEE & CONAKD CO..
Rose Growers. West Grove, Chester Co.. Pa.
feb 7
STAGE LINE.
MILLVILLE & BRIDGETON
WINTER ARRANGEMENTS.
This line of stages will run as follows:
Leave Millville at >.20 a. m., (on the arrival of
the train from Cape May), and at 3 p. m
Leave Bridgeton at S.OO a. m. and 3.00 p. m„
(in tame to connect with the morning and even
ing trains for Cape May*) Fare, 50 cents
•T. W. PANCOAST,
i. a. Dubois,
Proprietors and Drivers.
N. B.—Passengers on the Port Norris Railroad
wishing to connect with stage in the afternoon,
will stop i>1 at the East Bridgeton Station.
dec.23-tf
FERRY’S
SEED ANNUAL!
FOR 1884.
" 01 bo mailed FREE to all applicants and to
customers of last year without ordering it. It
contains illustrations, prices, descriptions and
directions for planting all Vegetable and Flower
Seeds, Plants, etc. Invaluable to all.
D. M. FERRY & CO.,
feb 7- titeow '
FOR SALE.
Two Farms !
Two find <ill<*.h:ilt' mi Ins from Ri'iilirnfAn V 1
one-half mile from Finley's Station. W. J. R. R.
one mile from N. J. S. R. It.
Farm No. 1 contains 5(> acres. Farm
No. 2 contains 09 acres.
For price and particulars, address
„ ,, PHILIP E. SOUDEK,
I. O. Box 301. Bridgeton, X, ,r.
dec 13-3m
POSIES.
(> for $1.00; 14 for $2.00,
Post paid. Greenhouse and Bedding Plants.
Hardy shrubbery. Seeds, etc., by mail. Cata
logue free.
J. T. PHILLIPS,
feb 7-tf West Grove, Chester Co., l*a.
BUSKIN'S WORKS.
Sesame and Lilies, paper, 10 e.; cloth 35c
Cliown of Wild Olive, paper, 10e.; eloth,S5e.
Ethics of the Dust, paper. Kit*.; cloth, 35e.
sesame and Lilies, Crown of Wild Olive
ami Ethics ok the Dust, in one volume, half
Russia, red t*dges, 50 cts. Modern Painters
Stones of Venice, etc.,in preparation. Large
catalogue free. .JOHN 11. ALDEN, Publisher,
is > escy St., New York. fob 7-4t
^ FAY’S CELEBRATED
Q WATE1UPBOOF
on MANILLA ROOFING
X Resembles tine leather; for Roofs, Outside
1- Walls and Inside in place of plaster. Very
strong and durable. ( atalogue with testimo
L ,lials !Ultl samples FREE. Established in ISM
D W. if. FAY & CO., Camden. N. .1
O mar t»-4t
A WORD TO FISHERMEN.
Tho place to buy Gill Twine, Gill Lines either
Cotton or Hemp Hanging Twine, Gill Corks &0
DANIEL BACON’S,
Oct 14-ti Bridgeton. N. J.

xml | txt