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The journal. (Caldwell, Ohio) 1934-1961, February 07, 1946, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87075277/1946-02-07/ed-1/seq-3/

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Thursday, February 7, 1946
No declaration was made in 1945
by either the President or by Con
gress setting the official end of the
war, therefore American farmers in
cluding Noble County, have been
given a virtual guarantee that price
supports on most farm products will
run for another three years, or until
the end of 1948. This statement
comes from Elmer F. Kruse, State
director for the field service branch
of the USDA’s Production and Mark
eting administration at Columbus.
Legislation directing price sup
ports fixes the support period for
the duration of the war and until
the “expiration of the 2-year period
beginning with the
January immediately
date upon which the
proclamation or the
concurrent resolution
hostilities in the present war have
terminated.” Since 1945 was per
mitted to slip by without any offic
ial declaration of the end of the
war, price
tinued for
of 1946,
war’s end
proclaimed.
Under terms of the Agricultural
Adjustment
October 2,
Amendment
1942, “basic
ed at 90%
cotton), and “Steagall”
ties shall be supported at
than 90% of the parity
parable price.
Mr. Kruse points out that the pe
culiar wording of the law may pos
sibly bring millions of dollars of
additional income to farmers as a
result of the extra year of guaran
ducts.
Courthouse News
Certificate to transfer
filed in the estate
Schoeppner.
Real Estate Transfers
Farm Products ‘Price Support’
Assured For Three More Years
first day of
following the
President by
Congress by
declares that
must be con-
supports
two years after the end
the year
is almost
in which the
certain to be
Act of 1938 as amended
1942, and the Steagall
as amended October 2,
crops shall be support
of parity (92i% for
commodi
not less
or com-
the Ag
of 1938
Crops named as basic in
ricultural
are com,
bacco, and
Adjustment Act
wheat, cotton, rice, to
peanuts for nuts.
commodities are those
the Secretary of Agricul-
Steagall
for which
ture or the War Food Administra
tor has requested increased war
time production, including hogs,
eggs, chickens (except those weigh
ing less than 3i pounds liveweight
and all broilers)’ turkeys, milk and
butterfat, dry peas and drv beans
of certain varieties, soybeans, pea-
Ameri
and
nuts and flaxseed for oil,
can-Egyptian cotton, potatoes,
cured sweet potatoes.
have
war
Other commodities which
been supported during the
years,
sugat
grain
canning,
cover crop seeds, and hay and pas
ture seeds- While the USDA is
not commited to support the prices
of these commodities at any spe
cific
made
vided
to a
basic
the extent that funds are avaailable.
but which are not included
beets, oats, rye, barley,
sorghums, vegetables for
fresh vegetables, winter
level, the statement has been
that supports may be pro
for this group to bring prices
fair parity relationship with
and Steagall commodities to
filed.
Monday—Will of L.S.McKee,
For hearing February 8.
Inventory and appraisement
in the estate of Alva Bigley.
filed
Cecil
First and final account of
Rutherford filed in the guardianship
of Paul Rutherford. For hearing
February 28.
First and final account of John
Carr, administrator in the estate of
Ellis Foster, filed. For hearing
February 28.
Tuesday—Order for distribution
of assets in kind filed in the estate
of Alma Bigley.
Certificate issued for transfer of
real estate filed in estate of Joseph
Michel.
First and final account of Mary
Mitchell, administrator in the estate
of Wesley Harriman, filed.
Thursday—Aplication filed in the
estate of Jackie S. Church.
Inventory filed in the guardianship
of Ernest S. Schott.
Friday—Bond approved and letters
of guardianship issued to Edgar L.
Alstott, guardianship of J. E. Clark.
real estate
of George
Blaine and
Maude King Davis to
Verona King. Summerfield. Lot 6.
Chauncey and Hazel Rich to A. R.
and Lalla Hicks. Center township. 77
acres.
Lizzie
acres.
Ralnh
Joseph Michel, deceased, to
Michel. Enoch township. 40.98
Herbert and Iva P. Guiler to
H. and Eunice E. Brumbach.
well, lot 22.
Cald-,
Clayton McKee, sheriff to the Cald
well Building and Loan Co. Sarahs-
ville li acres. $500.
The Caldwell Building and Loan
Co., to George and Rosella Young.
Sarahsville. 11 acre.
William Marshall
Bessie Fleeman.
acres.
Freda A. Cullen
Bessie Fleeman.
acres.
to Clyde and
township. 76
Elk
to Clyde and
township. 76
et al
Elk
Stanley Dalrymple to Jessie Dal
rymple. Summerfield. .54 acres.
Lulu H. and J. E. Patton to The
Concord Coal Co. Brookfield town
ship. 141.63 acres.
Russel and Mabie R. Boyd. Brook
field township 320 acres.
Robert and Daisy B. Buckey to
Faye Rayner, Ava. Lot 33 and part
of Lot 34.
Leonard Scchoeppner, deceased, to
George Schoeppner, Enoch township
40 acres.
PUNXY GROUNDHOG SAYS
HIS SHADOW’S SHOWING
Punxsutawney, Pa., Feb. 6—
Punxsutawney groundhog club
ported today that precisely at
a. m., the groundhog emerged from
his Canoe Ridge Weather Works at
Gobblers Knob and saw his shadow.
The
re
7:52
In accordance with an old tradi
tion the groundhog thus forecast to
the world that winter weather will
continue for six more weeks.
A representative of the club said:
“The verdict is six
winter. I needn’t
shadow’s meaning,
you well know, six
rain, sleet, wind, cold, ice and snow.”
more weeks of
enlarge on the
It stands for, as
more weeks of
TxkkUfand
Tonwviou)
by
Don Robinson
MEALS .... grind
I shouldn’t take time to write a
column this week. I’m much toe
busy cleaning and cooking. For the
last six days, with my whole fam
ily in bed with grippe, I’ve been a
housewife during every available
waking hour.
How anyone can bear up un
der the prospects of keeping
house for a lifetime is more
than I can understand.
Of course I realize that my
burdens are increased by in
exneri'-nce. I sunpoe some
trained women, for instance,
could poach an egg and have
the whole thing over with in
practically no time at all. My
wife said you simply get the wa
ter boiling, drop the egg in, let
it cook for a minute or two,
scoop it out and put it on a
piece of toast. She didn’t tell
me, however, the trick of catch
ing the egg when the two min
utes are up, nor that it wouldn’t
work, if the egg breaks, to try
to save the remains by pouring
the whole mess into a strainer.
Nor did she remind me that
while cooking the egg, you must
remember to keep one eye on
the toast.
But egg poaching was merely a
minor experience of My Day. If I
could have just struggled with the
egg and then sat back and relaxed,
things might not have been so bad.
But the thing that really got me
down was the endless grind of meal
getting—the constant recurrence of
appetite even among sick people.
You get a meal, clean up the
dishes, and then find someone has
glanced at the clock and informs
you it is almost time for the next
meal.
It didn’t take me long to realize
that if man’s place is ever in the
home, people, like most other de
cent animals, would soon be trained
to eat one meal a day.
SCIENCE problems
I won’t take space here to discuss
the gravy tragedy, the mashed po
tato disaster, or the other discour
aging highlights of my struggle
with the pots and pans. For I want
to make a plea to the inventive
genius of American scientists—men
like those who were able to work
out the mysteries of the atomic
bomb—to apply their skill and en
ergy to doing something about
housekeeping.
Surely, modem rmt, wlw
was able to smash the atom, if
he applied himself to it, should
be able to
answer to
pan.
Golden Opportunity
To buy
Bowling Alley Fixtures
(complete)
We have FOUR Bowling Alleys, complete, for
sale and believe that Caldwell is an ideal spot to
open up this form of recreation. Priced so cheaply
that the first buyer will take them.
If interested, contact THE JOURNAL OF
FICE, for complete details.
find some adeuuate
cleaning a burned
some Einstein of
Certainly
the kitchens should be able to
concoct a work'’:’*- method of
removing egg yolk rvrn a plate
which has been left standing
overnight.
And it hardly would seem logical
to suppose that the American chem
ists, who have made nylon stock
ings and plastics out of air, coal
and water, cannot work out a sim
pler plan for making gravy without
lumps in it.
Board of Review
Set-up For Awards
A board of review for decorations
and medals, headed by Admiral
Frederick J. Horne, USN, has been
appointed by Secretary of the Navy
James Forrestal to prevent any over
sights, injustices or omissions in the
presentation of awards to officers
and enlisted men of the navy, ma
rine corps and coast guard.
The board, composed of regular
and reserve officers of the navy,
marine corps and coast guard, will
review such cases as may be advis
able in order to assure, insofar as
may be practicable, that there may
be no oversights, injustices or omis
sions,” Admiral Horne explained.
All present and former command
ing officers, in service or released
to inactive duty, should submit to
the board any recommendations for
service during the present national
emergency desired for personnel of
their present or former commands
who have not previously been recom
mended. Individuals who consider
they merit an award for service per
formed during this period should
communicate with their former com
manding officer, setting forth per
tinent details.
New Road Maips
Are Now Available
New 1946 Ohio touring road maps,
firs, printed since the outbreak of
World War II, are robing oft the
presses and probably will be ready
for distribution the week of Feb. 3.
State Highway Director Perry T.
Ford said today.
The last maps printed by the
State Highway Department were
distributed in 1942, but that was re
printed in 1943.
Two hundred thousand of the 1946
road maps are being printed, Mr
Ford said, “but undoubtedly more
will have to be printed later in the
year as the demand for Ohio’s
beautiful road maps is tremendous.”
The map will be 26” 22”, unfold
ed, and is being printed in four colors
-dark blue, red and yellow. Th?
state’s 18.443 mil's of state highways
.v:ll b? on the map by a scale of 10
miles to an
inch.
features have been n
year’s map: al! ro
or more wide (30
Two new
this
lanes
th re
mr-ic ftet) will be designated by an
extra line along regular road line,
and location of Ohio’s con5’.1
stn e parks will be marked in
Other features the mi',
include marking of all pun s
err in Ohio such as stit-J
parks, the Y bridge at Z«:
roadside parks, dam, college
versifies, etc., in red, and the location
of all State Highway Patrol
stations.
of i't-
HOME
DEMONSTRATION
NEWS
.. ..............—----------------------------•».----------------
Two meetings were held on the
minor project, sugar saving desserts.
These demonstrations were given by
Margaret T. Donohoo, home dem
onstration agent, in the Harrietts
ville and Ava communities. Molasses
dumplings and spicy fruit bars were
made as examples of sugar savers.
Many other useful recipes may be
found in the bulletin which is given
to each homemaker attending.
Those from Harriettsville who at
tended on Monday, Jan. 28, at the
high school building were: Hazel
Frihauf. Edith Stevens. Velma Kel
by, Lottie Crum, Bertha L. Johan
ning. Amanda Lee, Stella Schoepp
ner, Emilene Schramm, Elsie Unger,
Kathryn Ayers, Emma Ridgway,
Margaret Kilzer, Freda Baker, Rose
Schoeppner and the home economics
class and their teacher, Mrs. Howell.
The meeting in Ava was held at
the home of Mrs. Gladys Dudley on
Thursday evening at 7:30. Those at
tending were Mr. and Mrs. Luther
Rayner, Mrs. Sade Moore, Mrs. Nola
Dudley, Glen and Joe Dudley, Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Stiers, Mrs. Ruby
Geary, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Dudley,
Betty Stiers, and Robert Clark.
Refinishing Furniture Meetings
Mt. Zion Community
Demonstraticns on refinishing fur
niture were conducted in four com-
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
THE JOURNAL, CALDWELL, OHIO
Much has been
by the
“Any inert
production as
legislation
borne by the
With ‘this
At noon a delicious pot luck dinner
was served and enjoyed by all. Those
in attendance were: Mrs. Florence
Beebe, Mrs. Florence Church, Mrs.
Mildred Slentz,
Mrs. Charlotte
Russell, Alice
Trenner, Mrs.
Gladys Groves,
Mrs. Ada Davis,
1'ams, Mrs. Helen Secrest, Mrs. Cora
D. Nicholson. Mrs. Grace Marie
Wheeler, Mrs. Olive Shriver, Mrs.
Mary Anna Bond and Mrs. Juanita
Drake.
Fulda Meeting Jan. 36
FOR FINANCING COME TO THE
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
CALDWELL, OHIO
WE CAN LOAN YOU THE MONEY TO BUY
YOUR FARM ON OUR MODERN PAYMENT
PLAN ... YOU CAN REPAY IN PAYMENTS
SUITED TO YOUR PARTICULAR CIRCUM
STANCES.
RATES LOW! SEE US FIRST!
The Fir& National Bank
CALDWELL, OHIO
COAL OPERATORS PRESENT
CASE FOR STRIP MINING
BY LARRY COOK
Ohio is the fifth largest coal mining state
000,000 tons of coal yearly, of which strip min
state, however, yearly consumes over 70.000.000
uses 6,000 tons of coal da.ly 120 railroad cars
business, and industry. Coal is therefore an ei
take th" factor into
Armed with facts, figures, and
supporting evidence to prove the
validity of their statements, the
operators sought to establish the
following points:
1. That agriculture suffers
practically no ill-effects from strip
mining, because of the type of
ground stripped, and because the
land can be reclaimed to greater
worth after stripping.
2. That all the coal stripping in
the state—past, present, and pos
sible in the future—will effect only
of 1% of the area of Ohio, and
only 1% of the twenty counties in
which stripping occurs.
3. That 75% of all strip land is
sub-marginal for agriculture be
fore stripping, beir.g a part of
Ohio’s 1,590,000 acres of “worn out
and abandoned agricultural land.”
4. That the agrictultural possi
bilities of strip lands after strip
ping, through the growing of trees
and forage crops, are far greater
on the whole than before stripping
5. That the availability of low
whether industry locate
and therefore upon th
Ohio maintains in the
picture of the nation.
6. That
force out of I
era tor and
that depend
their existent
7. That further
permit out-of-state ___
with Ohio coal on a basi
further
the sn-
munitit
A
Mt
■ritten about te eft
to confol it. Herein
their
this ma
st of coal
strip mine
unded by
E. H. Davis,
Ohio Coal As
erators of O
against any
the industry before the Strip Mine
Study Commission in Columbus.
The testimony offered by the op
erators, marked by frequent clash
es between the witnesse
members of the Comrni
Cadiz, tended to show
lation was unnecessary and might
very easily have harmful reactions
upon the industry and upon the
state in general.
an acre,
cost coal for
taxes would
during the past week.
meeting was held in the
Zion community at the home of
Mary Anna Bond on Tuesday,
January 29. The old finish was re
moved fiom a dining room table, a
pedestal and three picture frames.
Plans were made for completing the
refinishing processes Friday, Mar. 8.
Florence Church,
Mrs. Mary Groves,
Russell, Norma Jean
Knight, Mrs. Lola
Maude Russell, Mrs.
Mrs. Grace Wheeler,
Mrs. -Zelma Wil
The final meeting on refinishing
furniture was conducted in the Ful
da community at the home of Mrs.
Marie M.ller on Wednesday, Jan. 30.
A total of six nieces of furniture
were refinished at the series of
meetings. A cherry stand belonging
to Mrs. Marie Miller, a kitchen chair
belonging to Mrs. Emma Snider, a
chair and end table belonging to
Mrs. Frona Kress (refinishing done
by Miss Florence Kress), a pedestal
brought by Miss Annie Schwallie,
and a small stand brought by Miss
Lucy Crum. 1
was present at
with the work
furniture.
Each homemaker who
the
on
meetings assisted
these pieces of
all
day meeting with
dish dinner being
This was an
a delicious covered
served at noon. Those attending this
meeting were: Mrs. Emma Snider,
Miss Annie Schwallie, Miss Florence
IHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIL
me-third. The
strip mining on the
in
servation measure in that 75$
the coal could not be mined by
other method, and in that it
covers over 90$
underground mi
coal
ivers
That
on from
are not
either leveled or un­
leveled spoil
grasses grow
leveled hanks,
banks, but that
very readily on un
and more favorable
occur on unleveled
on banks that have
banks
been 1
11 That partial leveling of spoil
banks would cost $280 to $770 an
acre, and restoration to original
contour would cost $2185 to $3776
although the land was
s than an average of $30
an acre before stripping.
12. That any leveling would be
“conducive to serious erosion.”
13. That a “severance tax”
could be interpreted to include the
farmer, who also “severs from the
ground.”
14. That there is a very great
doubt that any legislation so far
suggested on the strip mining of
coal would be Constitutional.
15. That the greatest objection
to strip mining is the looks of the
ground between the time it is
mined,and the time it is reclaimed,
and that no amount of legislation
can overcome this situation
A total of fifteen witnesses were
used by the operators in the pre
sentation of their case. At the con
clusion of all testimony, the Strip
Mine Comm ssion will draft a re
port for submission to the
lature. Members of the Comrni
are: Senators, Evert E. Addisi
Columbus,
Younj
Piqua
ion
of
of
Clingan Jackson
wn, Theod re M. Gray
■veland, J. A. Gordon of Ca
Administrative Appo:ntees,r
of CL
diz ____
Milton Ronshe'm of Cad z, Wm. A.
Stinchcomb of Cleveland, Richard
Lindeman of Delphos.
Kress. Mrs. Lucy Schockling, Mrs.
William B. Schott, Mrs. Marie Miller
and Miss Lucy Crum.
Three Forks Community
i the
coun
on
A first meeting was held in
Three Forks community at the
try home of Mrs. Frank Reed
Thursday, Jan. 31. Five pieces of
furniture were brought to this meet
ing, a dresser, two stands, a sewing
machine and a porch swing. The old
finish was removed from all of these
pieces and a coat of burnt sienna
stain was' applied to the dresser.
Plans were made to complete the re
finishing of these pieces on Feb. 22
at the home of Mrs. Esther Garvin.
This was an all day meeting and
at noon a delicious covered dish din
ner' was served. Those attending
were: Carrie Reed, Thelma King,
Grace Radicliff, Helen Lewis, Edna
Boney, Norma King, Edna Davis.
Sara King, Guila Garvin. Esther
Garvin, Edna Boyd, Ina Boney. Chloe
NOBLE
SATURDAY, FEB. 9
Matinee and Evening
Pli-*
ROBERT ALDA AS GEO.
GERSHWIN JOAN LESLIE
ALEXIS SMITH CHARLES
COBURN AS THEMSELVES
AL JOLSON* OSCAR LE
VANT PAUL WHITEMAN
GEORGE WHITE HAZEL
SCOTT ANNE BROWN
Oi,«t.d by IRVING RAPPER
February 16
“G. ». JOE”
February 23
“WEEKEND AT THE
WALDORF”
March 2
“ROUGHLY SPEAKING”
March 9
“THE DOLLY SISTERS”
March 16
“ALLOTMENT WIVES”
March 23
“KISS AND TELL”
March 30
“LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN”
April 6
“THEY WERE EXPENDABLE’
April 13
“DOLL FACE”
Pierce. Greeten Woodford, and Mrs.
Clarice Boney.
Renrock Ladies Meet Feb. 1
The homemakers from the Ren
rock community came to the grange
hall on Friday, Feb. 1. for their final
meeting on refinishing furniture.
Seven pieces were refinished at this
meeting. An oak stand, belonging to
Mrs. Freda Ziler, a top and drawers
of a sewing machine and other
pieces of furniture from the grange
hall. Following the waxing of these
pieces, one homemaker suggested
that a coat of wax be applied to
each woman’s shoes. This was a
recommendation made by a clerk in
a prominent shoe store in a nearby
town As a result each homemaker
went home with their shoes clean
and shining.
At noon a pot luck luncheon was
served and was enjoyed by all. Those
present were: Floy Tilden. May Belle
Engle, Louie Hall, Stella Caldwell,
Ixra McNutt, Felecia Thorla, Freda
B. Ziler, Olive H. Pitts, Itol Reed.
Alice Blackburn, Leia Paisley and
Frances Roberts.
Two Final Meetings
Two final meetings on refinishing
furniture will be held in Harrietts
ville and at Brookfield.
The demonstrations will be given
in the Harriettsville community on
Wednesday, Feb. 13, at the Elk local
high school building at 10:30 a. m.
In the Brookfield township com
munity the demonstration meeting
will be held on Friday, Feb. 15, at
the home of Mrs. Grace Hedge. This
ROXY
“House of Hits”
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 6-7
2—Big Features—2
“The House On
92nd Street”
with
WILLIAM EYTHE
LLOYD NOLAN
—2nd Swell Feature—
“Night Club Girl”
Starring
FRFD SANBORN
VIVIAN AUSTIN
Both Features Shown After 8:45
FRIDAY SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 8-9
Matinee Saturday 2:00 P. M.
EDDIE DEAN
“SONG OF OLD
WYOMING”
In Gorgeous Natural Color
News Cartoon Chapter 11
“Raiders of Ghost City’
SUNDAY MONDAY
FEBRUARY 10-11
SMatinee Sunday 2:00 P. M.
lUJ.
G&*6*
GMiwiff I
ROBERT ALDA AS GEO.
i GERSHWIN it JOAN LESLIE
U ALEXIS SMITH CHARLES
COBURN AS THEMSELVES
JV AL JOLSON OSCAR IE-
VANT PAUL WHITEMAN W
iB GEORGE WHITE’-HAZEL I
SCOTT* ANNE BROWN
by IRVING RAPPER
February 17-18
“G. I. JOE”
February 24-25
“WEEKEND AT THE
WALDORF”
March 3-4
“THE AFFAIRS OF SUSAN”
March 10-11
“THE DOLLY SISTERS”
March 17-18
IN HOLLYWOOD”
Page Three
will be an all day meeting, begin
ning at 10:30 a. m.
Anyone who is interested in at
tending these meetings is invited to
attend.
Meeting at Batesville
A demonstration on the making of
molasses dumplings and spicy fruit
bars as sugar saving desserts will be
given in the Batesville community,
Monday evening, Feb. 11, 7:30, at
the school building. Anyone in that
community who is interested is in
vited to attend.
New shipment of Spring Purses,
$2.79 to $8.95. GRAY’S.
Goods News For
Asthma Sufferers
Thousands quickly and easily pal
liate recurring choking gasping
wheezing Bronchial Asthma symp
toms with a doctor’s prescription
called Michigan Asthma Prescrip
tion. Taken exactly as directed at
meals, it usually quicklv helps na
ture remove thick strangling excess
mucus and thus promotes welcome
restful sleep.
—For Sale At—
Ralston’s Pharmacy
CALDWELL. OHIO
Expert Radio and
Appliance Repairing
CLARK & BARNETT
ELECTRIC APPLIANCE
“On the Square.” Caldwell, Ohio
TUESDAY, FEB. 12
Our Big Night!
THE FIRST BIG HUMAN
STORY OF THE WAR!
FOSTER -IjRjtf NOUN
BETO-Ricinnf COMTE
Anttwiy QUIMM
WEDNFgday THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 13-14
2—Big Features—2
ROBERT LOWERY
PHYLLIS BROOKS
in
“HIGH POWERED”
—2nd Swell Feature
ALAN LADD
Shooting hit way
into trouble
again with a gun in htt fist—
tough little mug
hn hair!
i. ^Sf Pcromw/nl
prtamt
ALAN LADD
GAIL RUSSELL
SALTY
O’ROURKE
WUMM MMAUST MUO
i STANLEY
CLEMENTS
4 plt»w3 by »AOUl WALSH
Both Features Shown After 8:19
March 24-25
“KISS AND TELL”
March 31-April 1
“LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN”
April 7-8
THEY WERE EXPENDABLE”
April 14-15
“DOLL FACE”
April 21-22
“DUFFY’S TAVERN”

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