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The Journal. (Caldwell, Ohio) 1934-1961, July 25, 1946, Image 7

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Thiirsday, July 25, 1946
Dr. F. Gerald Ensley
(Editor’s Note Dr. Gerald
Ensley is a son of Rev. L. A.
Ensley, former pastor of the
Caldwell Methodist church and
well known here. The follow
ing sermon appeared in The
Ohio Messenger, official organ
of the Ohio Women’s Christian
Temperance Union. Its appeal
is evident and appears in The
■Journal through the courtesy
of the Ohio Messenger and
Mrs. William McKee, of Cald
well.
"house, and the swallow a
■herself, where she may
young, even thine altars,
off hosts.”
The first observation we would
make is that if children don’t get
next to religion in their homes
they probably won’t ever get it.
Humanity doesn’t rise much above
the level of its home life religious
ly. It is a statistical fact, for ex
ample, that more people join the
Church before they are fifteen—
when they are presumably still
under the religious influence of
home—than all those who join
afterwards.
There are many reasons for this
phenomenon. Childhood is the im
pressionable time of life. If chil
dren don’t feel the impress of re
ligion
harden
plastic
reason,
family
bols from family life.
S E O/NETTE
Pastor of North Broadway Meth
fl ist church, Columbus
WHERE THE SPARROWS
MAKE THEIR NEST
“Yea, the sparrow hath found
nest for
lay her
an
O
Lord
The text tells us that
•well build our human homes
to the Holy of Holies. Let the altar
never be far away from where we
rear our brood. Let the atmosphere
of our home be such that every
thing they see and hear and feel
may remind them of religion. Let
the home and religion be kept to
gether that is our message in a
sentence.
Adolph Hitler is commonly
charged with starting a terrible
war. That’s an oversimplification,
of course, but he certainly was a
potent factor in it. One is baffled
as to how
the things
his home
drunkard
His mother, many years his father’s
junior, had been a servant to the
father’s first wife. She became an
invalid in the boy’s early life, died
when he was in his teens. When a
growing youth needed guidance
and control his father was coming
home drunk out of control himself
—to abuse the family. He never
felt the touch of a vital religion
upon him. He knew only drunken
ness, and bickering, and suffering.
Is it any wonder that he went out
of that home into the world a
warped, distorted personality, who
nearly wrecked a two-thousand
year-old civilization in his mad
ness?
anyone could have done
he did, until one recalls
life. His father was a
and died of alcoholism,
then their personalities
usually never to become
again. But there is a deeper
Christianity is by nature a
religion. It takes its sym-
We must acknowledge that it is
difficult to keep religion alive in
a modern home. The first reason
is that we live in a secular world.
We belong to a generation that
thinks it doesn’t need religion it
can get along without it.
God is just an elective, so far as
our civilization is concerned. Just
as when it gets cold outdoors you
must bestir yourself inside to keep
warm, so when a whole civilization
is cool to religion a home has to
keep up its religious hearth fires
or the coldness outside becomes a
coldness inside.
Secondly, we live in a genera
tion that is not only unfavorable
to religion but also unfavorable to
home life. We live at such a dizzy
pace that slow growth of family
life doesn’t have a chance to take
place. So it is very difficult to de
velop religion in an average rush
ing, bustling, American home.
Keeping religion alive in a home
these days is difficult business. In
the light of these facts what are
we to do? My answer is: Do the
best we can. We still do a splendid
job with our children religiously,
despite all the handicaps, if we
really want to. The trouble with
so many of us parents is that we
don’t see how important it is that
we train our children religiously.
We would banish from our com
pany any father or mother who
would starve their children bodies.
We compel parents to educate
their children’s minds And yet all
around us there are parents who
are starving their children’s souls
they are bringing up the little ones
God gave then in religious illiter
acy. It is so easy to assume that
a home just makes itself. Parents
“learn to play bridge, they learn
to dance, they train long years to
build a business or a profession
but they take no training to build
a home.”
These times may be hard for
religion, and yet the home is still'
way out ahead as an influence in
children’s lives. It is true from the
standpoint of time: a child is one
hour a week in ehurch school, forty
hours in day school, fifty or sixty
hours at home. Add vacations and
the balance is still more heavily
tipped on the side of the home.
From the standpoint of emotional
leverages nothing can touch the
home. Every educator, social work
er, and student of social problems
agrees that no other influence is
quite as potent as those which em
anate from father and mother and
brothers and sisters. The world in
fluences the home, but homes in
fluence the world still more. It we
keep the glow of religious faith
alive in our homes it won’t disap
pear in the world. If we do the job,
each of us in our own four walls
as we can, we need not worry for
the outcome in the great world at
large.
So long as there are homes to
which men turn
At the close of day,
So long as there are homes
where children are
Where women stay,
If love and loyalty
found
Across these sills,
A stricken nations
from
Its greatest ills.
So long as there
where fires bum
And there is bread,
So long as there
where lamps are lit
And prayers are said,
Although a people
through the dark
And nations grope,
Back of these little homes
We still can hope.
we and faith be
may
close
Protest Use Of Red
For Danger Signals
Buckeye Cackle, official publica
tion of the Ohio Liberal Layer’s
League, carries an organization
protests against the international
use of red as a danger signal.
Through their Better Biddie’s com
mittee, the League points out that
red in the poultry house designates
good egg production.
The League spokesman says a
very popular book read by hund
reds of thousand people but these
readers found no information in
“The Egg and I” that a red comb
and crimson wattels are badges of
honor worn by working h£ns. The
book’s author apparently saw red
so often she did not recognize its
significance.
Poultry husbandry specialists at
Ohio State University declare the
hens have a valid ground for their
protest of the human discriminia
tion against red. The specialists
say the culling records from thou
sands of poultry flocks prove that
the best producers have bright red
combs and wattles but have lost
the yellow pigment from their
beaks and shanks.
The poultry experts advise Ohio
poultrymen to cull their flocks
closely enough in July and August
so the daily average egg produc
tion is at least 60 eggs from each
100 hens. The signs of a non-layer
are dull eyes, pale comb and
wattles, but bright yellow beak
and shanks.
Most poultrymen already have
learned there is a
margin now between production
costs and total income from eggs.
Loafing hens eat their share of the
high priced feed, but except for a
little increase in body weight the
feed is wasted. Every non-layer in
the flock reduces the margin of
profit, and prices for poultry meat
are good.
•Lua
very narrow
Hunting Trapping
Law Now In Effect
The hunting and trapping regu
lations for Ohio as set tentatively
at the June meeting of the Ohio
Conservation Commission became
law last week when the Commis
sion in session in Columbus offici
ally voted the adoption of the rules
and regulations governing the fall
and winter season. The regulations
set the open season of November
15 to November 30 on pheasants,
ruffed grouse and hungarian par
tridge, with a daily bag limit of
two and limit of two in possession.
On rabbits the open season will
be November 15 to January 1 with
daily limit of four and possession
limit four. The squirrel season was
set at September 14 to September
28 for the entire state with a daily
limit of four and possession limit
four.
Trapping season for the inland
district will open November 15 and
close January 15. There will be no
open season on skunk in district 7
(southern Ohio). For the Lake Erie
district the open season will be
December 1 to March 15.
All hunting and trapping will be
gin at 12 noon, Eastern Standard
Time, on the opening day, with the
exception of racoon hunting which
will begin at the usual 6 p. m. time.
All dates are inclusive.
ARTHRITIS
Sufferers! Try Reiner’s Rinol!
Quick comforting relief from pains
of Rheumatism, Arthritis. Neuritis
Lumbago. FREE BOOKLET. Ask
for Reiner’s Rinol, $1.50. (4 bottles
for $5.00).
HATTIE VANFLEET. Agent
Phone Caldwell 346 21
G. R. FARLEY & SON
ALL KINDS OF INSURANCE
hoi
recover
can
homes
are
homes
are
falters
ROSALIND RUSSELL is cast
as a brilliant psychoanalyst in
“She Wouldn’t Say Yes” which
stars her with Lee Bowman at
the Roxy Theatre Sunday and
Monday, July 28 and 29.
Find Postwar Boost
In Club Enrollment
Ohio’s increasing enrollment in
4-H club work is another indica
tion of postwar improvements in
farm conditions and in farm living,
in the opinion of
state clulb leader,
versity, who says
of the 88 counties
51,224 projects under
counties.
COURTESY-
There are few drives in Ohio
or, for that matter, in the country
that have the scenic charm of the
lake road in the Sandusky area.
The highway hugs the shore of
this great inland body of water
lor many miles.
At one point it crosses Sandusky
Bay on a long bridge.
Lake Erie is worth seeing in an
seasons and in all weathers. When
the winds are blowing, huge
waves beat against the sandy
shores and the rock ledges.
Far out can be seen freighters
carrying their cargoes of ore from
Lake Superior to the steel mills of
Ohio and Pennsylvania.
Closer in are usually myriads of
W. H. Palmer,
Ohio State Uni
reports from 81
on
July 6 show
way in those
in 1945 had
so the farm
The same counties
41,854 club projects,
boys and girls have increased their
efforts by better than 22 per cent
in those counties. Mr. Palmer
points out that the rural young
sters are no more ambitious this
year, but have more free time from
war production duties which tied
them down last year.
The state leader predicts belated
returns from the seven missing
counties will bring the Ohio state
St
HESSON BROS., Berne
HARRY O. NICHOLS, Caldwell Route 2
C. W. GIBSON, Lewisville
WATSON HILL SERVICE, Senecaville Route 1
LILLIAN SNIDER, Fulda
EVANS & SON, Florence (U. S. Route 21)
THE JOURNAL CALDWELL OHIO
X.eVsYxpVorc
—--7
TUtsrAHDMiOOiLCO.-(OMW)MO^ Perry’s Monument
at Put-in-Bay
Good Swimming at Cedar Point
pleasure craft—sail boats, speed
boats, row boats. From the latter
hopeful fishermen drop their lines
in what is considered one of the
state’s best fishing grounds.
But scenery is not the only at
traction by any means. From
Sandusky ferries take the visitor
to the group of islands which pic
turesquely dot the western end
of Lake Erie.
Mr. Palmer claims he does not
like to boast, but he suggests that
national leaders concerned with
problems of juvenile delinquency
search the citizenship records of
present and former 4-H club mem
bers. The 4-H boys and girls have
definite tasks which they have
chosen themselves and they are
helped in their projects by one or
two adults who volunteer to direct
their local club.
The record for total enrollment
in Ohio was set in 1939, with 63,
000. Club members in this state re
main in the work for an average
of more than three years, and out
standing boys and girls usually
have service records of eight or
more years. Buckeye members for
the first time since 1941 will
play the products of their skill
industry at the State Fair.
i*
Here is Put-in-Bay with its
towering shaft commemorating
Perry’s victory over the British
in 1813. On the very top of this
352-foot granite column is a plat
form giving the visitor the mag
nificent view of the lake islands
and the Ohio shores to the west.
In Sandusky Bay itself is John
son’s Island where Confederate
project total to about 63,000. Some
club members carry two or more
projects so the total enrollment of
individual boys and girls will be
somewhere near 55,000.
officers who were prisoners of war
were housed.
Nearby is Kelley’s Island with
its mysterious Inscription Rocks
and its huge Glacial Grooves.
Near Castalia is the amazing
Blue Hole. The outlet to an un
derground river, the level and
the temperature of the water re
main constant. Tradition says that
the depth has never yet been
plumbed.
At Cedar Point there are beach
es for those who wish to lie on
the sand and sun themselves or
enjoy the coolness of Lake Erie’s
water.
dis
and
Churches May Now
Buy Surplus Goods
Veterans organizations, churches,
religious institutions and certain
other non-profit organizations will
be permitted where feasible to buy
government surplus property at
the same price as small retailers,
Rowland D. Schell, Regional Di
rector, Was Assets Adminstration,
stated.
Because these organizations func
tion generally in the public inter
est assisting with veterans prob
lems and community welfare, they
|FRANK
and tourist houses are
for those who wish tc
longer time in this his-
Hotels
plentiful
spend a
toric and scenic area.
will be afforded a reasonable op
portunity to fulfill their needs from
surplus at the commercial level,
provided that their orders can be
handled without interference with
normal disposal practises, Schell
said.
Heretofore, such organizations
were not permitted to buy surplus
property because they do not oper
ate in normal channels of trade”
and are not included in the group
of scientific, educational, public
health, public welfare, charitable
and elementary institutions defined
in SPA Regulation 14. Under the
new ruling, these buyers are held
to be ultimate consumers as de
fined in Special Order 24.
Tours of northeastern Ohio poul
try farms showed poultrymen the
great value of Ladino clover as
poultry pasture. John Sutherland
in Stark county was running about
3,000 pulletts on two and one-half
ahead of the foragers. Last year’s
range on the same farm showed
excellent self seeding and a good
growth
where
Ladino
ory as
INSURANCE & SURETY BONDS
I. O. O. F. Bldg.
Phone 43
CALDWELL
Phone 204
of clover even on spots
shelter houses had been,
alone seemed as satisfact
in mixtures with grass.
improved pastures which
Ohio
produce forage enough so cows
can make 3,500 pounds of milk
while grazing an acre of ground
give the dairyman a return above
the cost of milking and marketing
of about $70 per acre. That rate of
return compares very favorably
with returns obtained from raismg
cash grain crops. Lime and fertil
izers put the pasture in shape for
heavy forage production.
REED
OHIO
EW PREMIUM OIL/^
S. W. AYERS. Harriettsville
McVAY BROS, Stafford
L. D. MILLER. Sarahsville
G. P. MOORE, Quaker City
C. A. REED, Elba
C. E. SMITHBERGER, Fulda
COURTHOUSE
HAPPENINGS
Probate Court
Application to determine inheri
tance tax filed in the estate of E.
D. Hedge.
Precipe for subpoena filed in the
estate of H. S. Shriver.
Twenty-third partial account of
Maggie Phillips filed in the guard
ianship of George Carter Steele,
for hearing August 31.
Inventory and appraisement filed
in the estate of Frank A. Smith.
Affidavit in lieu of schedule of
claims filed in the estate of Jessie
Woodford.
Application for letters of admin
istration filed in the estate of Alice
C. Finley, for hearing July 24.
First, final and distribution ac
count of Hazel Woodford filed in
the estate of Jessie Woodford.
Application for transfer of real
estate filed in the estate of Ethel
S. Talbot, certificate issued.
Letters of guardianship issued to
Ferdinand Gerst as guardian of
Sylvia Gerst.
Real Estate Transfers
Auditor Ray McVay to Mike and
Susie Sarisky, Florence Addition,
lots 178, 176, and 175, $8.17.
Auditor Ray McVay to Craig
Cleary, Jefferson township, (100
acres, $250.00.
to
George L. and Mary Brown
Henry and Rose Sill, Caldwell.
Edna May Perkins et al
Homer C. Perkins, et al, 4.02 acres.
to
Kenneth Perkins et al to Homer
C. Perkins, Noble township, 4.02
acres.
Margaret Carpenter to Floyd and
Grace Henderson, Caldwell, lots 11
and 12 .undivided interest.
Margaret and Joseph Carpenter
to Floyd and Grace Henderson,
Caldwell, lots 11 and
3/4 interest.
Wartime improvements in motor oil quality now benefit
you when you use new Sinclair Opaline Motor Oil. This
new premium grade oil not only lubricates safely, but also keeps your motor clean
as a whistle. That means more power, fewer repairs, longer motor life.
New Opaline contains two special chemicals developed to keep the motors of
Army tanks and trucks clean and powerful under the toughest conditions.
When you use the new Opaline, carbon, lacquer, sludge and acids don’t steal
your power as they do when you use ordinary oil. Ask for new Opaline Motor Oil
at your Sinclair Dealer’s.
SINCLAIR OPALINE
MOTOR OIL
EHLERMANN
Agent, Sinclair Refining Company
“On the Square”
12, undivided
Johnson to
et al, Wayne
Julius and Fossie
Robert E. McCormick
township, .09 acres.
Auditor Ray McVay to James
Caldwell, Ohio
Page Seven
Wickham, East Union, lot 16, $5.00.
Hazel Woodford to Zail E. and
Shelah Spear, Olive township, 20
acres. $3500.
Ruth and Charles F. Thompson
to Richard Farley, Caldwell, part
of lot 20.
Herbert and
township, 46
Ernest Farson to
Iola Groves, Jackson
acres.
to Gay Bett-
O. J. Lorenz et al
inger, Jackson township, 80 and
1/10 acres.
Harry Mitchell, administrator of
the estate of Wesley Harriman to
Frank Harriman,
ship, 8 acres.
Jefferson town-
Ollie M. Reed to
Caldwell, 20/100
Robert E. and
R. D. Buckey,
acres.
Ethel S. Talbot, deceased, to H.
E. Talbot, Sarahsville, lots 11 and
12.
W. E. Rose to Dillon Brumley et
al, Seneca Lake, lots 46 and 47.
Photo Developing—Gillespie’s
NEURITIS PAINS LIKE
AN ELECTRIC SHOCK
TO A LOCAL WOMAN
Just recently a middle-aged wom
an of this vicinity told us that she
had suffered 3 years of torture with
neuritic pains. She said she felt
like a sharp knife was being gouged
into her muscles, and sometimes
these pains would strike her like an
electric shock. She said one eould
hardly stand it. Today this lady is
again enjoying life, and she says the
change is due to taking RHU-AID.
Her pains are gone now. No more
feeling like a knife gouged into her
muscles. She is entirely free of her
misery, thanks to this remarkable
compound.
the new liquid form
three valuable medi
These
RHU-AID is
ula containing
cal ingredients.
Medicines, all blended
right to the very cause
and neuritic aches and
able people soon feel
over. So don’t go on suffering! Get
RHU AID.
FURNITURE
RUGS
LINOLEUMS
APPLIANCES
MUSIC
FOR OVER 40 YEARS WE HAVE BEEN SUPPLYING
THE ABOVE ITEMS. THIS 40 YEARS OF CONTIN
UOUS BUYING NOW ENABLES US TO OFFER
MANY HARD TO GET ITEMS. SEE OUR STOCK
FREE DELIVERY EASY TERMS
WAINWRIGHTS
212 Putnam Street Telephone 1070
MARIETTA, OHIO
“IT IS JUST A NICE DRIVE”
Three Great
into one, go
of rheumatic
pains. Miser
different all
Ralston Pharmacy—Caldwell
Gillespie’s Drug Store Caldwell
OIL
Grode
Reg. U. S. Pat. Off.
TH YR & RIDENOUR, North of Ava (U. S. Route 21)
HILL & RUBIN, Cumberland'
VERNON HUGHES, Caldwell Route 3
MOORE BROS., Ava
EHLERMANN SERVICE, Caldwell
R. D. CROY, McConnelsville

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