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The journal. (Caldwell, Ohio) 1934-1961, October 10, 1946, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87075277/1946-10-10/ed-1/seq-2/

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State Highway Department To
Make Survey Of County Roads
State Highway Director Perry T.
Ford today granted
a 90-day “mor­
atorium” on the recently-tightened
truck
overweight and oversize
regulations issued by the State
Highway Department.
The decision to grant the “mor
atorium” was reached after two
meetings with protesting haulers
affected by the regulations and by
the mounting shortage of freight
cars. The second meeting was held
in Director Ford’s office yesterday.
The director also announced that
his department would make a sur
vey during the next 90 days in
every one of the state’s 88 counties
to determine the type of hauling
that originates from Ohio manu
facturers, dealers, and any other
heavy-load users of the state’s
highways. The present regulations
will be reviewed after the survey
is completed and the findings of
the survey will be incorporated in
new regulations which will go into
effect about January 1, 1947. Mr.
Ford said.
All the affected haulers attend
ing yesterday’s meetings agreed
with the Highway Department
that the war-loosened restrictions
should be tightened. Director Ford
said. They requested a transition
period, however. They also agreed
that during this 90-day period all
requests for overweight or over
size loads should be screened care
fully by the Highway Department
and that permits should be issued
only where the type of load and
condition of road warrant and
where an emergency exists.
Director Ford said the chief rea
son for granting the 90-day “mor
atorium” was the shortage of rail
road freight cars which has be
come acute since the recent new
overload regulations were written.
It would be impossible for con
struction of roads and private pro
jects to proceed during the re
mainder of the construction season
if heavy equipment cannot travel
by rail, the director pointed out.
The director said that a recent
business publication predicted a
weekly freight car shortage of
75.000.
Farm Bureau Announces
Legislative Program
Setting its gear for action during
the next legislative session of the
General Assembly and the U. S.
Congress, the Ohio Farm Bureau
announced a 10-point program to
day which is aimed at bettering
conditions on Ohio farms, accord
ing to D. R. Stanfield, assistant
legislative director of the organiza
tion.
The program favors enactment
of legislation improving rural
schools, expansion of cooperatives,
improved rural health services,
better farm marketing conditions,
a national fertilizer program, ex
tension of REA lines, conservation
of natural resources, improved
rural telephone service, regulation
of strip mining, and the expansion
of foreign trade.
At the same time, legislative de
partment officials are urging the
farmers to study the mnirn ol
candidate 5 before voting in the fall
election. “All records snow the
fighting i ep resenta ion given the
farmers’ cause in both state and
national capitals by the• Ohio and
the American Farm Bui eau Feeler
ation” St,anfield stated. Voting re
cords of the Ohio de egation in
Washingtin on major 1 arm iss ties
are beimI mailed Far Bui eau
members. Similer facts arc bi■ing
prepared about the reco ds of s 111
senators and representstives.
“The I•’arm Bureau has n ver
engaged in partisan polities and
does not back candidates,” Stan
field said, but we do urge every
farmer to talk with his repre-enta
tives. and to study the voting re
cords where they can be had.
Where there is no voting record,
we must judge candidates on the
basis of past statements and opin
ions. Most representatives welcome
an intelligent interest on the part
of voters and want to serve the
best interest of the people they
represent.
Councils Discuss
Depression Possibility
Whether there will be another
depression or not. County Farm
Bureau Advisory Councils over the
state have been discussing the
possibility, Harry Culbreth, organ
ization director of the Ohio Farm
,Bureau, Columbus, reports.
Nearly 6,000 farmer-members of
these neighborhood discussion
groups, who feel that there will be
a national “bust.” after the present
“boom days” are over, outlined
eight methods in which farmers
can meet the situation: 1. Pay off
debts. 2. Study ami adopt efficient
farm practices. 3. Do not go into
debt. 4. Do not buy more farm
land. 5. Do without non-essentials.
6. Market cooperatively. 7. Invest
igate before investing in stocks,
etc. 8. Build up farm land.
ENJOYING FURLOUGH
T/4 Raymond Drake. Jr., son of
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Drake. 829
Lewis street, is home on an 18-day
furlough and will receive his dis
charge at Ft. Sheridan, 111., the
21st of October.
He entered service in December,
1944 and received basic training at
Camp Blanding, Florida, going
overseas June 1945. Serving with
the 7th division on Okinawa and
later with the occupation forces in
Korea.
He wears the Asiatic Pacific
theatre ribbon, good conduct medal
World War II victory medal, oc
cupation ribbon, and the expert
infantryman’s badge.
He was a student at Mt Union
college prior to his induction into
the service.
SALES TAX RECEIPTS
Sales tax receipts for the week
ending September 21 were $792.94
as compared to $591.03 for the
same period in 1945. Total col
lected in the county to date is
$27,515.89.
LICENSES ISSUED
Fifteen marriage permits were
issued during the month of Sep
.ember by Probate Judge Otto Pol
ing. In August, 11 were issued.
Photo Developing—Gillespie’s
MOVE TO NEW HOME
Mr. and Mrs. William Gillespie
moved last weekend to their new
home on Fairground street, recent
ly completed by the R. C. Moore
lumber company. Their property
on Lewis street has been purchased
by Mr. and Mrs. Ward Murphy.
More Noble County
Boys Enlist In Army
A new recruiting procedure was
announced today by Lt. R. L. Mc
Kenzie in charge of recruiting for
the regular army in this area which
includes Muskingum, Guernsey,
Coshocton. Noble and Perry coun
ties whereby previous service men
of the army navy, marine corps and
coast guard may enlist in the regu
lar army with a grade commensur
ate with their previous training or
experience while in the service.
Heretofore, only ex-army men
could enlist in the army and re
tain a grade commensurate with
previous training but the new pol
icy provides that if the ex-navy,
marine corps or coast guard men
were discharged anytime on or
after May 12, 1945, and provided
the enlistment is for a period of
three years they may be eligible
for a rating ranging from the sec
ond to sixth pay grades.
Verification of the ex-service
man’s previous records will be
based on their discharges and sep
aration certificates, which, for the
army men, the Form 100 NAV
PERS Form 533 for navy and coast
guard personnel and NAV MC
Form 78-P for marine corps per
sonnel.
Throe men from the Caldwell
area were accepted for enlistment
through the Zanesville office. They
were: Harold G. Hanes, Summer
field George C. Bell, Route 1,
Malta and Stephen E. Thomas of
Belle Valley.
WAC VISITED HERE
Sgt. Lucille Blanchflower WAC,
v/idow of Lt. J. Roy Blanchflower
of Chicago, Ill., visited the w’eekend
at the home of Mrs. Earl Danford,
West street, enroute to Fort Sheri
dan for separation.
Sgt. Blanchflower has been sta
tioned in Washington at the Head
quarters of the Continental Air
Forces, where she prepared top
secret material for the conferences
of the top ranking generals.
After her separation, Mrs. Blanch
flower will attend the Conservatory
of Music in the University of Miami
as a graduate student of organ and
piano.
VISITED HERE
Mrs. C. C. Barnes, Detroit, Mich.,
spent the weekend with friends
and relatives in the ’Summerfield
community. Mrs. Barnes was called
here in the settlement of her hus
band’s estate, whose sudden death
occurred one month ago. A widely
known author and university pro
lessor, Mi. Barnes was a native of
the Summerfied community.
MARRIAGE PERMIT
A marriage permit has been is
sued to James E. Leonard, Jr., of
Caldwell route 6, farmer and Anna
Elizabeth Hill, Caldwell.
YOUTH FOR CHRIST
The Youth for Christ rally this
week will be held Friday evening,
October 11, at the Crooked Tree
Methodist church, now known as
the Mary Reed Memorial. The
meeting will begin at 7:30 o’clock
and all young people in the county
are invited to attend.
WE MAKE
I YOUR OLD
IyI
1 RADIO SING
LIKE NEW
JOHNNY WEISMULLER and
Brenda Joyce are starred in
“Tarzan and the Leopard
Woman”, the new jungle pic
ture showing at the Noble on
Friday and Saturday, Oct. 11
and 12, and featuring Acquan
etta as the Leopard Woman.
Price Is Big Factor
In Farm Prosperity
Farm income is the product of
total farm goods multiplied by the
price per unit but a comparison
of the parts played by volume
of goods and by the prices received
for them indicates to rural econom
ists at Ohio State University that
god times for farmers are much
more a matter of price than of big
crops and large herds.
From 1915 to 1919, total U. S.
farm income rose 180 per cent but
farm production went up only
about 25 per cent. That is one of
the periods which the rural econo
mists point out as illustrating the
relative importance of prices as
compared with volume of products
sold.
Another convincing mass of evi
dence is contained in the records
for the years 1930-32, when farm
income in the U. S. dropped almost
60 per cent although the volume
of farm goods sold went up slightly
in the same three years. From 1932
to 1937, U. S. far income rose more
than 90 per cent although the
amount of farm goods sold in
creased only a little over 25 per
cent.
In 1945, total income of farmers
of this nation was almost two and
one-half times as great as the an
nual average in the period 1910-14,
but agricultural production in 1945
was up only about 70 per cent
above the average per year for
1910-14. There has been an almost
constant slow upward trend in
farm production since 1915 but
farm income has swung in wide
see-saws up and down.
The University rural economists
say that Ohio farmers have some
advantage over producers in some
other areas, because Ohio cities
provide local markets for lots of
farm goods. Prices for farm goods
on these Ohio markets do not fall
quite as low as at places where
all produce has to be shipped long
distances.
ATTENDS GRADUATION
Mrs. John G. Bauer, Marrietta, at
tended the graduation ceremonies
at St. Francis School of Nursing,
Pittsburgh, Pa., from which her
daughter, Rosemary, graduated.
She is the third daughter in the
family to become a nurse. The late
John G. Bauer was employed at
the Caldwell Journal for several
years.
Photo Developing—Gillespie’s
RADIO REPAIR
1—Our new and scientific re
pairing is prompt and efficient.
2—A delicate mechanism should
receive the best of care.
3—Expert technicians are on the
job to service your radio.
1—Repair for better
Clark & Barnett
—ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES—
Phone 96 Caldwell, Ohio
FURNITURE
RUGS
LINOLEUMS
APPLIANCES
MUSIC
FOR OVER 40 YEARS WE HAVE BEEN SUPPLYING
THE ABOVE ITEMS. THIS 40 YEARS OF CONTIN
UOUS BUYING NOW ENABLES US TO OFFER
MANY HARD TO GET ITEMS. SEE OUR STOCK
FREE DELIVERY EASY TERMS
WAINWRIGHTS
212 Putnam Street Telephone 1070
MARIETTA, OHIO
“IT IS JUST A NICE DRIVE”
THE JOURNAL CALDWELL OHIO
Dexter City
Dexter City, Oct. 9 Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Moseley left last Wed
nesday, having been called to Salt
Lake City, Utah, where Mr. E. E.
Lee is ill in a hospital, Mr. Lee is
Mrs, Moseley’s father. They expect
to spend several weeks in Calif
ornia with Mrs. John Moseley and
Leonard and Harry Lee.
Bernard Hayes and son, David,
of Columbus, spent the weekend
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Al
bert Hayes.
Mrs. Minnie Stallings spent Sun
day with her brother, Quinn Til
ton, of Marietta, and enjoyed a
family dinner. The guests included
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Hayes and
son, David, of Columbus, Mrs.
Rachel Mosely of Los Angeles,
Calif., Mr. and Mrs. Van Riney and
the host and hostess.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clymer
spent the weekend with his par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Clymer.
Mr. Clymer is moving his family
to Columbus from Norfolk, Va.,
where they have lived since being
discharged from the navy.
Manford and Bert Young of Can
ton spent the weekend with their
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Young
of Crooked Tree.
Beverly Robinson and Adelle
Miller spent Sunday p. m. with
4
UNITED
Tall
Cans
49c
TREET IS
THE MEAT
12 oz. can 35c
Special
2
Cans
CREAM OF
tomato
23c
BORN
3W~~aiN VACUUM CAHS
Vacuum Packed lb. 44c
2 PACKAGES
WHITE OR YELLOW
33c
WHin
Regular Size .... 6c
Tri-Brand
CORN
2 Can
16c
Virginia Wickens and attended the
services at Crooked Tree church.
There will be preaching services
next Sunday evening by Rev. How
land, the pastor.
Walnut Ridge
Walnut Ridge, Oct. 9 Several
from this vicinity attended the
celebration Sunday at the Carlisle
grange hall in honor of Dorinda
Smith’s birthday.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gene
Wharton of Summerfield were
callers on the Ridge Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Horton, of
Zanesville spent Sunday night
with Mr. and Mrs. Mose Horton.
Mrs. Lizzie Pepper of Cleveland
spent a few days recently at Hidge
King’s.
Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Horton, Irene
and Jimmy Horton were callers at
Caldwell Saturday afternon.
Mrs. Emma King has gone to
Akron to spend the winter with
her daughter, Gay.
Maxine and Janet Morris spent
the weekend at Otis Martin’s.
Mabel Horton spent Tuesday
afternoon with Mrs. Esther Horton.
Mrs. Mary Huffman and son,
William Warner, were callers at
John and Welcome Horton’s Sun
day afternoon.
ewes
lb
HOME
FINEST CAKE FLOUR
MVITALOXj
SOUP
OWNED^*STORES
Coal Ridge
Coal Ridge, Oct. 9—Mrs. George
Spisiak, Sr. ,and children, George
and Julia, of Painesville, spent the
weekend with her sister, Mrs.
George Galayda and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Ginn and
daughter, Alice, of Byesville, vis
ited Sunday afternoon with Mr.
and Mrs. Andy Zudell and famliy.
Mr. Jerry Shestina and Mr. Paul
Pirebeck of Lakewood visited
friends and relatives here over the
weekend.
Mrs. Martin Slovak and Mrs.
George Kerestes of Florence ad
dition attended the Slovak Luther-
Telephone 261
Don’t miss these Winning Specials and Big Values at your M-K Food Store
Chicken Noodle Soup—Scott Co. 15c
Soda Crackers—Bulk lb. 19c
Oyster Crackers—Bulk ...... lb. 19c
Prunes—60-70 Size.................2 lb. 35c
Mother’s Oats—Quick or Reg. 31b. 29c
Post Tens........................... package 25c
V-8 Cocktail—No. 2 Can ., -...........16c
Aunt Jemima Pancake .... 20 oz. 15c
ROBIN HOOD FLOIQ
THE ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR THAT’S
BLENDED AS CAREFULLY AS THE
Yellow Corn Meal........ 5 lb. sack 35c
Great Northern Beans .............2 lb. 29c
Eat-Mor Catsup ..................... 14 oz. 17c
Eat-Mor Mustard—Qt...........2 for 25c
Hot Finger Peppers—D. M. qt. 25c
Libby Home Made Pickles pint 25c
Mince Meat—Rum Flavored ,. qt. 45c
s niunx
ADDS MEAT FLAVOR TO
Armour’s Potted Meat ,. 5^2 oz. 10c
Macaroni or Spaghetti 3 lb. box 43c
Bounty Kist Peas—No. 2 Can ., 15c
Dependable Blackberries
no.
2
Salt Mackerel...................... 3 lb. jar 99c
Black Pepper—Imitation ... lb. 25c
Bran or Middlings 100 lb. sack $3.89
Vinegar—Pure Cider—Bulk gal. 43c
COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE
ALL MAKES
CHEVROLET COMPANY
can
'BREAKFAST OF CHAMPION'
PRESH PRODUCE
Potatoes—U. S. No. 1’s ,.,,,,. ,,, peck 48c
Jersey Sweet Potatoes .. ., 4 lb. 25c
California Oranges—Medium Size .. doz. 30c
Fancy Tokay Grapes.................. ... 2 lb. 35c
Yellow Onions...............................10 lb. bag 29c
Idaho Baking Potatoes.............. 6 lb. 25c
New York Bartlett Pears.................... bu. $3.89
the
Thursday, October 10, »46
S Ind Children, Nancy, and
StMr niGeorSe Hronec,
BARNHOUSE
LU A
Large Size
31c
42c
For lighter,
better tasting
8 oz. 23c
Jr., and
Mr. Geo Lakewood vis
ilS wHh tS mother. Mrs. Mary
Andy Zudell last week.
rionf to hear the
rU church is ill a good
preacher ,the enuren
place for listening to God.
Photo Developing—Gillespie’s
Street
Miller
All Soaps When Available
50AP\
Cake 7
Lux Flakes Ige. 23c
WASHES
Sm. 10c
Large 23c
7c
....
cakes that
stay fresh
l-o-n-g-e-t
Lb. 28c
PKG
3 Lbs. 80c
40 oz
W'
Jackson
Sauerkraut
No. 2% Car
13c
markets

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