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The journal. (Caldwell, Ohio) 1934-1961, October 10, 1946, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87075277/1946-10-10/ed-1/seq-7/

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Thursday, October 10, 1946
Philo
G1 ouster
Crooksville
possess
36. The
pick up
fourth
own.
ball
leak,
rimrr
ng
Caldwell and New Lexington
Battle to Scoreless Deadlock
The Redskins and the Panthers
battled tooth and nail last Friday
night in the league game that
was supposed to decide the out
come of the league race, but when
the smoke (or should I say dust)
of battle had cleared, the result
was a hard-fought scoreless dead
lock.
It was a pure example of two
evenly matched teams, charging
fast and tackling hard, e.
ing for a break which never
as they struggled back
MVL
ach wait
came,
and forth
w
Team
&
Caldwell
New Lex
New Concord
Pts.
Opp
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
26 12
19 7
34 0
51 13
14 33
25 32
12 56
12 40
3
3
between the 30 yard stripes. New
Lex advanced to Caldwell’s 18 on
ion. while the nearest the
the
one
Redskins could get towards
Panther goal was the 22.
New Lex missed their big scor
ing chance in the opening minutes
oi the first quarter when they got
sion of the ball on Caldwell’s
is had attempted to
yard or less on
vith Whitey carry
on ‘__
was hit at the line of
for no gain, the ball
out of his hands to be
quarterback
New Lex. The officials,
ruled that the whistle
had blown before the fumble, so
the Panthers simply took the ball
on downs on the 36. They managed
to get a first down on the 18,
where the Redskins stiffened to
hold foi downs. On the last down,
Abe Wollenberg tosed a pass to
Rankin in the end zone, but Ran
kin couldn't hold it.
The second quarter was a punt
ing duel, neither team being able
to advance through the air or on
the ground. On one occasion New
Lex moved to the Redskin 32, but
on the next two plays were thrown
for a loss of 20 yards to their own
48.
drive in the
Caldwell started a
third period, only to
... u bog down
deep Tn New Lex territory. With
the Panthers in possesion of the
ball on their own 47, Reed broke
through a cordon of blockers to
nal the ball carrier for a seven
yard loss. On the next play Bigley
recovered a fumble on the 40, from
which point the Redskins moved
to the 22 on a series of running
plays with Tilton carrying the ball.
New Lex took possession at this
point after Caldwell failed to pick
up two yards necessary for a first
down, and the only Redskins
threat was averted.
Both teams took to thq air in the
final quarter in the hopes of scor
ing to break the deadlock. Cald
well’s thrust was broken up when
a pass was intercepted by New
Lex on their own 28 and a few
plays later Potts stopped a Panther
drive by intercepting an aerial on
the Caldwell 30 and returning it 22
yards to New Lex's 48. From here
Caldwell advanced to the New Lex
35 by means of a double reverse
play with Slovak carrying the ball
as the game ended.
Elsewhere in the league Rose
ville downed Philo 14-6, McCon
nelsville trimmed Crooksville 13-6,
and New Concord battered Glous
teIGames this week include: New
Concord at Caldwell. Crooksville
at Roseville, New Lex at McCon
nelsville, Dresden at Philo.
Cald.
Reed
Merry
Young
Ferguson
Woodford
Vavrek
Bigley
Frederickson
Tilton
Slovak
G. Potts
Caldwell
New Lex.
LE
LT
LG
Winegardner
Ha tern
Pusey
Rodeheffer
Rambo
Finnen
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB
Sheppard
Lewis
Wollenberg
Wollenberg
A..
R..
Fisher
0—0
0—0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Officials—LaShelle, Snider,
bruster.
Macksburg
Arm-
SHORTS
By LONG
NEW CONCORD, always a stumb
ling block for Caldwell, will be en
tertained by the Redskins on
Thursday of this week. Our boys
are still very much in the league
race, but must defeat the Little
Muskies to keep in the running.
TUFFY
keeping shirts on his back,
jersey was ripped off in the
ond half, so he borrowed
King’s Three plays later this
Lex
5
1
6
123
9
2
20
47
1
0
Statistics Cald. New
First downs rushing 6
First downs passing 0
Total first downs----- 6
Yards gained rushing 121
Passes attemped __
Passes completed .—
0
Yards gained passing 0
Yards lost rushing 4
Passes intercepted by 1
Fumbles recovered by 1
Yards penalized---------5
Macksburg, Oct. 9 Miss
Macksburg, Oct. 9 Miss Mary
Cox of Caldwell is visiting at the
home of her sister Mrs. George
Morris. ,,
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Longfellow
and son, George, spent Saturday
at Columbus.
J. Hunter is home from Canton.
Mrs. Alma Longfellow and Mrs.
Ethel Dutton have returned after
an extended visit at Tulsa, Okla.,
and other points of interest.
Mrs. G. E. Longfellow has re
turned after spending a week in
Cincinnati with her daughter, who
is a teacher in a high school there.
John Bates. Jr., student at Bliss
College at Columbus spent the week
end at his home here.
Mr. and Mrs. Glen Clark and
daughters of Bremen visited Mrs.
Barbara Clark last week.
Robert Diehl, who is employed at
Barberton spent the weekend with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John
Mr.’ and Mrs. C. C. Wharton and
daughter spent Saturday at the
home of Mrs. Hattie Brown.
Mrs. Ollie Darrah has moved to
Caldwell.
Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Schramm of
Whipple spent Thursday at the John
Bates home.
Photo Developing—Gillespie’s
PONT
KEMPS BALSAM
ro« COUGHS DUE TO COLDS
so
deserve your support,
a point to come out to
on Thursday. Reflectors
Monday and installation is
rushed along in an attempt
They
make
game
rived
being
to play this game at night. If the
game is played at night, the largest
crowd in Caldwell’s history should
be present for the occasion.
the
ar-
BACKFIELD STATISTICS for the
New Lex game are as follows:
TCB A
vg
Slovak ____ _____ 7 28 0 4.0
Tilton _____ ____ 21 79 0 3.7
Potts ______ _____ 6 14 0 2.3
Frederickson ____ 2 0 0 0.0
Riski ______ _____ 2 0 4 -2.0
CALDWELL'S backfield was out
weighed 25 pounds to the man.
averaging 132 pounds to New Lex’s
157. On the line, however, the
Redskins averaged 174 to the Pan
thers 161.
PAUL PUSEY, Panther left guard,
was the outstanding
player for New
member he was
mention on the
all-Ohio football
defensive
Lex. If you re
given honorable
-Associated Press
team last season.
CALDWELL BAND stole the show
during the halftime despite the
fact that earlier in the week they
had been politely “asked” not to
make the trip. New Lex had never
seen our band perform, conse
quently they were wild in their
enthusiasm for Caldwell’s snappy
rhythm
and marching steps.
TILTON had a hard
time
His
sec
Don
one
was torn to shreds, with Bernard
Lori making the loan of the third
jersey. Tuffy also had to discard
his helmet for Ben Craft’s in the
late stages of the game.
SLOVAK suffered a
nose early in the first
Luke Young received a
and Fergy was
MILAN
bloody
quarter,
gash over the eye, ....
pretty well battered up in the last
period, for CaldwelXs main casu
alties.
ATTENDANCE was estimated at
2500, including one dog which the
referees had to put off the field
early in the game, reminding us of
the Crooksville contest. Unusual
about the game was New Lex’s
kickoff with the ball lying flat
on the ground. This made the kick
wobbly and hard to catch.
“OUTPLAYED" would hardly fit
the Redskins last Friday night as
they turned in a performance that
should serve to silence other league
critics. All teams in the league this
year seem to be evenly matched
the going getting tougher each
week. Attention will be focused on
the & New Lex game this
weekend, as both are still un
beaten.
ALTHOUGH it had no direct bear
ing on the outcome of the game,
New Lex was presented with a
nice little gain of 10 yards when
the officials reversed the field at
the end of the third quarter. The
Panthers had the ball at the close
of the period on Caldwell’s 47 but
when the change was made, the
ball was put in play on the Red
skin 37, a gain of 10 yards for New
Lex. No amount of arguing could
change the decision of the referees,
who according to §ome, unwi itten
code can “do no wrong".
ON THE OTHER HAND, it's easy
for anyone to get confused on the
matter' of just where the ball is
resting on New Lex s field. Spec
tators are entirely in the dark
since the gridiron has no line
markers and the down marker is
so small that it can't be seen with
anything less than a pair of four
power binoculars. Surely a town
that can afford a $5500 lighting
system for the field can afford to
spend three or four dollars for
some line markers. This is one of
the several small matters existing
During the war you heard a lot
about how hard it was going to be
for returning veterans to get ad
justed to civilian life ... how
they’d be “different.”
Well, plenty of them have re
turned to our town, and a finer,
steadier bunch you couldn’t ask
for. Most of them are back at the
same jobs going with the
same nice home-town girls (get
ting married, some of them, and
setting up families) ... renewing
the same old friendships.
Even their amusements are the
DANNY KAYE is starred with
Virginia Mayo in the techni
color glitter show of the year,
“Wonder Man”, showing at the
Noble on Sunday and Monday,
October 13-14.
in the league which could be
ironed out by the league officials
but as long as most schools are
content to just “get along” with
the others, fans must expect to get
the short, end of the horn.
Makes Extra Dollars
From Scenic Beauty
when
will
CALDWELL’S LIGHTS,
they are finally installed,
mark another link in the circuit of
lighted fields in the league, leaving
only Philo and McConnelsville
without lights. The Electrics, so
they say, are contemplating a new'
field over in Philo proper, and
when that is built, lights will in
all probability be installed.
ROSEVILLE has let a contract for
a new fence around their field
costing around $600, and it is also
rumored that they are working on
a stadium fund of $3500.
25 YEARS AGO this week, Cald
well defeated Williamstown, West
Virginia, in a football game 43-0,
although we don't know who
played on that team.
SHORTS—Fred Cox, Jerry Week
ley, Eddie Thomas and Gene Hanes
have all entered the military ser
vice for a two-year period
Noble County O. R. Y. group met
at Brookfield school house last
Wednesday night for their month
ly meeting and square dance
Stan Mazgay’s orders have been
changed again calling for him to
play with Albany of the Interna
tional League next season
Johnson's Dry Cleaning on West
street has a nice little football dis
play in the window of their store
last
Merle Barnhart, who is quite
good with a brush, is now sketch
ing folks about town, having done
several “notables” already.
just
Travelers on route No. 40
east of Brownsville often slow up
a bit to get a better look at a herd
of dairy cows grazing on the farm
of T. S. Hamilton, who has worked
out a pasture program that pro
vides a scene of rural beauty and
also puts extra dollars in the milk
checks.
Mr. Hamilton’s pasture system
provides grazing for his dairy herd
through a long season, plus an oc
casional bite
winter days
14 acres of
it
about two acres of small grain, and
alfalfa grass mixture second
growth during July and August.
The bluegrass pasture on the
Hamilton Farm has received suffi
cient lime to permit growth of
legumes in the sod, and commer
cial fertilizer is applied regularly.
This farmer uses 10-6-4 or 8-8-8
fertilizer when he can get one of
those, he compromised on 4-10-6
for the last application.
Even with this treatment of his
pasture land, Mr. Hamilton finds
provision must be made for supple
mental forage. He turns the cows
on a couple acres of wheat or rye,
and either lets the cattle graze the
grain down completely or takes
the herd out after a period and lets
the wheat continue its growth for
harvest if grain is more important
than pasture that year.
Midsummer pasture is provided
by the second growth of an alfalfa
Ladino clover-timothy meadow
mixture, which produced a first
cutting for hay. Mr. Hamilton re
cently has seeded brome grass in
stead of timothy in the meadow
mxiture but the brome has
been growing long enough to
come well established.
Are Returninc, Veterans
"Different"?
same. Nothing more exciting than
fishing Seward’s creek or pitch
ing horseshoes enjoying an
outdoor barbecue with friendly
wholesome beer and pleasant -alk.
If uiey’ve changed at all it’s in
the direction of maturity and tol
erance ... tolerance for everything
except dictators, and those who
would destroy our democratic
principles of live and let live. And
from where I sit, that’s another
reason to be proud of them.
Copyright, 1946, United Statet Bnwen foundation
THE JOURNAL CALDWELL OHIO
Kenrock
of grass on warm
His program includes
-f improved bluegrass,
not
be-
TO MARIETTA COLLEGE
James Carter is continuing
studies at Marietta college for
winter term,
in education.
he has been working part time in
the office of Recorder Clyde Whar
ton.
his
the
Carter is" majoring
During the summer,
DISCHARGES MADE
Over 500 requests for copies of
their discharges were made by
veterans the past month at the
office of Recorder Clyde Wharton.
This was in. line with their applica
tions for terminal leave pay. This
work gets the preference in the re
corder’s office and is done free.
From where I sit... //Joe Marsh
CALDWELL HIGH CLUBS
ORGANIZE FOR YEAR
The Caldwell student body has
perfected their various organiza
tions for the coming year, accord
ing to an announcement made to
day by Gilbert Weekley, principal.
The various classes have named
their officers and advisors for the
school term and all clubs are now
holding regular meetings.
Newly elected officers who will
serve in this capacity are as fol
lows:
Seniors:
President, Dana Reed vice pres
ident, Donald Seffens treasurer,
Martha Estadt secretary, James
Casto sergeant-at-arms, Richard
Davis advisor, Minerva Frazier.
Juniors
President, Rodney House vice
president, Glenn Potts treasurer,
Donald Ferguson: secretary, Doris
Craft sergeant-at-arms. Jack Fred
erickson advisor, Dwain Dyer.
Sophomores
President, Bonnie Waite, vice
president, Donald Pilcher, secre
tary and treasurer, Betty Archer
sergeant-at-arms, James Robinson
advisor, Marvin Wood.
Freshmen
President, Marilyn Davis vice
president, Jack Fowler secretary,
Leeba Hupp treasurer, Bernard
Riski advisor, A. R. Rich.
MISS CLYTA MUSSER
AT MUSKINGUM COLLEGE
Miss Clyta Musser, 820 Walnut
street, Caldwell, has enrolled as a
f'eshman at Muskingum college for
the year 1946-47.
Miss Musser is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Musser and
was graduated from Caldwell high
school in May, 1946. She is prepar
ing for a career in music super
vision.
In order to accomodate veterans
who applied for admission, Musk
ingum college has raised the regis
tration limit to 900, 200 above the
normal enrollment. Several bar
racks have been erected on the
college campus to house the GI’s
and their families.
MIXED DANCE
Another mixed dance has been
announced for Saturday evening at
the VI* W hall in Caldwell. Burns
orchestra will furnish the music.
Dale Ackley, chairman of the com
mittee, extends a cordial welcome
for everyone in the county to at
tend.
TO OHIO STATE
Miss Rose Marie Harper has re
sumed her studies at Ohio State
university, Columbus, where she is
majoring in the study of food. Miss
Harper is a senior.
TO COLUMBUS
Charles Patton, Dexter City, left
Sunday for Columbus, where he is
now employed. He is a son of Mr.
and Mrs. William Patton.
Renrock, Oct. 9—Renrock grange
met Friday evening with a good at
tendance. The following program
was presented.
Song by grange, talk, “Plant some
tulips this fall’’, Louis Hall current
events, E. R. Tilden duet, Phyllis
and Jane Lanier paper, “Slick
tricks for the housewife,” Itol Reed
piano solo, Sandra Manifold. Games
were enjoyed by all present.
The W. S. C. S. met this Thurs
day. October 10, at the home of Mrs.
F. E. Thorla with pot luck dinner at
the noon hour. The meeting in the
afternoon was in charge of the pres
ident, Mrs. Leura Dickinson.
A planning meeting for the Ren
lock Institute will be held at the
home of E. R. Tilden, Tuesday eve
ning, October, 15. All committee
members are asked to attend.
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Nelson of
Brookfield township have moved
fiom their country home to Beverly,
where they have purchased prop
erty.
A fellowship meeting of the
churches on Renrock charge was
held at the Renrock grange hall.
Tuesday evening of this week, Oct
ober 8. Pot luck supper was enjoyed
Young Man
with a Hoe
The whole world owes a debt of gratitude
to America’s young farmers. These young
people, 4H Club and FFA members, are
serving nobly in the merciful war against
starvation everywhere. Our country’s
young farmers have staked a great claim
for a peaceful, happy and prosperous
future. We know they will make full use
of the assistance modern rural telephone
service will give them in making that
bright future a reality.
Eighth Grade
President, Mack Fowler vice
president, Neil Dutton secretary,
Lois Roberts treasurer, Nancy Se
crest sergeant-at-arms. Hugh Wal
ters advisor, Gerald Rarnsey.
Seventh Grade
President, Eddie Ditch vice
president, William Duffalo secre
tary and treasurer, Charlene Har
ris advisor, Inez Clark.
Boosters Club
President, Martha Mae Estadt
vice president, Bonnie McCauley
secretary treasurer, Donna Gail
Brown adviser, M. P. Wood.
Home Economics Club
President," Mary Jane Farley
vice president, Martha Mae Estadt
secretary, Georgiania Rice treas
urer, Doris Swank advisor, Inez
Clark.
Latin Club
President, Ben Craft vice presi
dent, Bonnie Waite secretary,
Rose Drake treasurer, Durward
Cecil advisor, Inez Clark.
Modern Steno Club
President, Virgina Lonzrick vice
president, Mary Lou Leonard sec
retary, Joan Dutton treasurer,
Carolyn Archer sergeant-at-arms.
Donna Brown advisor, Byron
Steen.
by those present. Dr. A. A. Hunter
was a guest.
Boyd Morrison underwent a ton
sil operation in a hospital in Cam
bridge last week and is recuperating
at his home here.
Garner Dickinson, who has been
quite ill. is improving and able to
be up
Jean Hall of Cleveland spent sev
eral days the past week with Mr
and Mrs. J. W. Hall.
Salesville
Salesville, Oct. 9 Mrs. Pauline
Lashley of Buffalo spent Monday
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John
Roe, and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Meighen and
daughters visited Mr. and Mrs. Her
land Reynolds and family of Cam
bridge, Friday evening.
Eileen Stillion has been ill for a
few days.
Miss Mildred Ford of Cambridge
visited Mrs. Vinnie Frame last Wed
nesday evening.
Mrs. B. N. Dodson and son, By
ron, and R. J. Boyd of Cambridge
and Mrs. Earl Newman. Old Wash
ington, spent Tuesday afternoon
with Miss Vinnie Frame.
Carl Mendenhall is spending this
week in Columbus.
Mrs. Olive Davis returned home
last Thursday after spending the
past month with relatives at Shelby.
Mr. and Mrs. James Mendenhall
of Newark spent the weekend visit
ing with Mrs. Olive Davis
ASSURE
THEIR EDUCATION
WITH
LIFE INSURANCE
CLAYTON BELCHER
Caldwell. Ohio
FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE CO.
Hom* Office Columbus, Ohio
6
X0OTBRW
7OMIGHT1
Follow the Crowd ...
To Caldwell’s First
Night Football Game
... Under the Lights!
CALDWELL
REDSKINS
VS.
NEW
CONCORD
THURS., OCT. 10
7:30 O’Clock P. M.
Caldwell’s New
Athletic Field
Rear of High School Building
O You’ll want to be part of the crowd at
Caldwell’s first night football game when they
meet the strong New Concord Muskies. It’s
a league game and the Redskins need a victory
to keep in the running.
All boosters should be on hand to help
increase the attendance and boost the boys
and Coach Ramsey to victory.
The High School Band will furnish the
music and perform at the half.
Join the Booster Club NOW!
Support the Team, the Band, the School!
Tickets On Sale by Club Members!
This Particular Ad Sponsored By These
CALDWELL BOOSTERS
GRAY’S STORE
BUCKET’S HATCHERY
TARLETON’S COFFEE SHOP
RALSTON’S PHARMACY
McVAY FURNITURE STORE
Page Seven

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