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The journal. (Caldwell, Ohio) 1934-1961, December 19, 1946, Image 12

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87075277/1946-12-19/ed-1/seq-12/

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Page Twelve
I
County Farmers* Income Dollar
Now Biggest In The Entire Nation
Noble county farmers are better
off,
marketwise, than at any other
time in history. But things are not
going to stay that way.
This is the opinion of Lyle H.
Barnes, farm management special
ist, Columbus, who discussed re
cently the farm outlook for 1947.
Farmers are now getting $1.37 for
the goods they sell compared with
the $1 they pay for the goods they
buy.
"But the prices farmers receive
will level off soon and start down
ward while the prices they pay for
things they buy will continue up
ward”, Mr. Barnes warned. "That
means a lower net income for the
farmer—probably beginning in the
fourth quarter of 1947”.
Farmers are advised to trim pro
duction of corn and oats and to in
crease production of soybeans and
to maintain production of that dur
ing the 1947 growing season.
Hog marketings are expected to
decline shortly after the first of the
year but despite this, prices may be
lower. It was pointed out that "65
cents a pound bacon” will turn con
sumers away from pork. It may
mean lower hog prices.
Farmers are advised to "force”
feed early spring pigs and get them
to market early next fall to beat an
anticipated decline in hog prices.
Slightly higher prices can be ex
pected for eggs in the first half of
1947 with the net available supply
3 to 5 percent below the first half of
this year.
Heavier plantings of soybeans
were advised in face of the prospect
that available supplies of fats and
oils will be far below expected de
mand. This situation is expected to
remain until normal imports of fats
and oils resume in volume.
Barnes also pointed out that the
outcome of labor-management rela
tions within the next six months
will determine to a large extent
"how well the nation and state as a
whole survive the current infla
tions.”
It was pointed out that only 17
percent of the total working force
is employed in heavy industry 83
percent are engaged in consumer
trades and services. That means
that if prices are pushed to a point
where the 83 percent can’t pay
them, buying will slow down, pro
duction will decrease and unem
ployment will be the result.
People have found that
garine tastes pretty much
ter and that they can
pounds for the price of a
butter. With
FOR OVER 40 YEARS WE HAVE BEEN SUPPLYING
THE ABOVE ITEMS. THIS 40 YEARS OF CONTIN
UOUS BUYING NOW ENABLES US TO OFFER
MANY HARD TO GET ITEMS. SEE OUR STOCK
FREE DELIVERY- EASY TERMS
WAINWRIGHTS
212 Putnain Street Telephone 1070
MARIETTA, OHIO
“IT IS JUST A NICE DRIVE”
you’ll find a
NOW
wide
and
gifts
your
day and make your choice.
assortment of new
distinctive holiday
for every member of
family. Visit us to-
Musical Powder
Box
$6.95 to $9.95
Eversharp Pens
$15.00
Pen
I
and Pencil Sets
$21.50
also
milk
the
What
Noble county farmers can
expect a favorable ratio of
prices to feed prices during
first three quarters of 1947.
will happen in the fourth quarter
depends upon the extent of the busi
ness recession.
Farmers will have an uphill battle
to recapture lost markets for milk
and butterfat. While fluid milk con
sumption soared during the war
years, butter consumption dropped
from 19 to 18 pounds per capita.
oleomar
like but
buy two
pound of
milk at 20 cents a
quart here we can expect to switch
to evaporated and condensed milk,
This will result in dairymen be
ginning to lose fluid milk business
FURNITURE
RUGS
LINOLEUMS
APPLIANCES
MUSIC
SMOKING GIFTS
from four Drug 8 tore
A Distinctive
Gift For Any
Man!
Men’s Set Complete
STATIONERY
DRESSER SETS
MANICURE SETS
BOX CANDY
SHOP WISELY
RALSTON’S
THE E A STORE
CALDWELL OHIO
A Joyous Christmas Season
TO OUR FRIENDS AND OUR APPRECIATION
FOR YOUR PATRONAGE!
Cain Re-Named
T. B. CAIN
T. B. Cain, president of the West
Virginia Business college and a well
known native of Noble county, was
re-elected president of the West
Virginia Association of Business
schools at the annual meeting held
in Parkersburg, W. Va., Saturday.
At this annual meeting, the mem
bers were guests of the Mountain
State Business college at a lunch
eon. The meeting next year will be
held in Charleston.
and they will be forced to market
greater quantities of milk to manu
facturers of cheese, ice cream
canned milk.
Re-Schedule Hearings
To Abolish Trains
and
The state public utilities commis
sion Friday rescheduled hearings on
applications to discontinue four
Baltimore and Ohio railroad trains
between Belpre and Portsmouth and
between Belpre and Zanesville, be
cause of "concerted protests” by in
dividuals and chambers of com
merce.
Originally scheduled Dec. 18, the
hearings will be re-scheduled about
mid-January, the commission said.
The & O applied on Oct. 30 to
discontinue trains No. 43 and 44 be
tween Belpre and Portsmouth. No
tice of the new hearing on the ap
plication has been served on pros
ecutors of Washington, Athens, Vin
ton, Jackson, Lawrence
counties and mayors of
ing towns:
and Scioto
the follow-
Coolville,
Belpre, Portsmouth,
Athens, Zaleski, Hamden, Wellston,
Jackson, Oak Hill, S. Webster and
New Boston.
Application by the & O to aban
don trains
Belpre and Zanesville was filed the
same day. Notice of the reassign
ment of hearing has been served
on prosecutors of Washington, Mor
gan and Muskingum counties and on
the mayors of Marietta, Lowell,
Stockport, Malta, Belpre and Zanes
ville.
No. 55 and 56 between
ARCHER BROTHERS
BUTCHERS
Distributors For
All Kinds of Meat
SPECIAL CUTS
BEEF PORK
—Call—
Mt. Ephraim Exchange
Three Miles East of Mt.
Ephraim (Mud Run Road)
—WE DELIVER—
Ray C. Archer—Manager
CHRISTMAS TOILETRY BAR
&
NOME
CARA
HUD NUT
EVENING IN PARIS
W I S E Y S
COTY
50c to $3.00
$4.95 to $15.00
$1.00 to $7.50
THE JOURNAL CALDWELL OHIO
Loan Provides Floor
For 1946 Corn Crop
floor
Ohio farmers can put a
price under their 1946 corn crop
through the corn loans offered by
the Production and Marketing Ad
ministration and Richard G. Hand
ley, supervisor of this loan program
in Ohio, says the loan rate runs
from $1.17 a bushel in western Ohio
counties to $1.24 a bushel in the
eastern counties.
In spite of a small carryover from
the 1946 corn crop, total corn sup
plies now are at an almost record
level. Cornbelt farmers have from 10
to 15 per cent more corn available
per animal unit than was in sight
at this time last year. The 1946 corn
crop is huge and the number of
livestock on farms has been reduced.
Mr. Handley explains that this
year’s corn loan is available on any
corn grown in 1946 in states where
farm storage is feasible. Loans will
be available any time until August
1, 1947. Corn producers who will
change farms before the next crop
season can buy corn, store it on the
new farm, and obtain a loan upon
it.
Corn to be eligible for a loan must
grade No. 3 or better, or No. 4, on
test weight only. It must be stored
in cribs which will protect it from
the weather. Mr. Handley says that
farm storage in Ohio must be in
cribs six feet or less in width in the
north half of
seven feet in
half.
the state
width in
and not over
the southern
on corn
Borrowers
will pay a
service fee of one and one-half cents
a bushel, with a minimum charge of
$3.00. The interest rate is 3 per cent.
The borrower makes good any loss
in quantity or quality of corn under
loan and the loan plus interest must
be paid before September 1, 1947,
or the corn must be delivered to
the Commodity Credit Corporation
before October 31, 1947.
State Highway
Approves Projects
post­
Ohio’s original 1947 (second
war year) Federal-aid primary
highway program, including Noble
county, has been approved by the
Public Roads administration, it was
announced today by State highway
director Perry T. Ford.
The approved program includes
one state-wide highway planning
survey project and 18 construction
projects, with a total estimated cost
of $9,283,748.
Plans for these projects are under
way, Director Ford said, and the
highway department hopes to have
them ready for sale by the time the
Legislature provides matching
funds. The jobs were programmed
before state funds were available so
that Ohio would not lose its share
of the Federal post-war highway
program funds.
Additional 1947 primary projects
to use up the full amount of Fed
eral-aid money are under design but
were withheld from the program
until it is determined that the price
trends will allow their accomplish
ment within the allotted funds.
Egg Price Balances
Rise In Feed Cost
Egg prices have held strong
enough to keep the egg-feed ratio
at a level almost as good as at this
time in 1945. C. M. Ferguson, spec
ialist in poultry husbandry, says
the big problem now in feeding lay
ers is to keep the protein in the
total ration high enough to main
tain high average egg production.
High protein supplements still are
scarce and the price is up, but lay
ing hens need 15 to 16 per cent of
protein in their ration. Poultrymen
who feed a 20 per cent mash should
keep the amount of grain fed about
equal pound for pound to the mash.
That will give a 15 to 16 per cent
protein level in the total ration.
Mashes which contain less than
20 per cent protein will require the
poultry man to cut down the propor
tion of grain fed, or egg production
may drop. With mashes which run
from 24 to 32 per cent protein, grain
may be fed free choice to the layers.
One method of cutting down the
cost of protein in poultry rations is
to give the flock bright green alfalfa
hay. The hay will contain 16 or
YOUR MUST CHECK
GIFTS INCLUDE
GF.NTS’ WRIST WATCHES
BRACELET & LOCKET
SETS
VEST CHAINS
WALDEMAR CHAINS
CROSSES & CHAINS
LOCKETS & CHAINS
PEARL NECKLACES
NECK CHAINS
EAR RINGS
—LODGE PINS—
PAST MATRON
EASTERN STAR
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
MASONIC
MASONIC SLIPPERS
RINGS
WEDDING
LADY’S CAMEO
EASTERN STAR
MASONIC
DISCHARGE
Many Others
E. E. WALTERS
JEWELER
CALDWELL, OHIO
more per cent of protein, and the
amount of protein will be even
greater if only alfalfa leaves are
fed. Feeding alfalfa hay also reduces
feather picking and cannibalism.
Lights in the poultry house should
be turned on if they have not al
ready been used. December brings
the shortest periods of natural day
light and the layers need more feed
ing time for high egg production.
Lights stimulate winter egg produc
tion but do not increase the total
number of eggs laid by a hen dur
ing a year.
Deep litter on the poultry house
floor will save trouble and work.
The litter should be six to 18 inches
deep and should be built up with
new material when needed to keep
it dry. Straw', ground corn cobs, or
shavings are excellent material for
litter.
Christmas Bonus
Offered By Stores
COLUMBUS, Dec. 13— An extra
Christmas bonus of one unit of
rationed whiskey was promised to
Ohio liquor store customers today
by the State Liquor Department.
The bonus will be effective during
the 53rd ration period,
Dec. 16. During the
ration card holder will
to buy two units. Each
a quart, a fifth or two pints of ra
tioned whiskey.
The cast includes: Betty Stasko,
Sylvia Powell, Sarah Findley, Wal
ter Grywalski, Betty Russell, John
Dudley, Joan Stottsberry, Leia Mae
Guiler, Wilma Mendenhall and Bob
Hopps.
Photo Developing—Gillespie’s
8
8
8
a
Army Hopes To
Discard Draft
which began
period each
be permitted
unit includes
During the same period 25 brands
of unrationed whiskeys such as corn
and cane and potato alcohol blends,
as well as a few brands of blended
whiskey with neutral grain spirits,
will be available.
Permit holders were allotted 100
percent of their 1942 total average
weekly bottle purchases, which is 40
percent more than the amount that
was granted during the last period.
The ration period will end Dec. 28.
JUNIOR CLASS PLAY
The Junior class of
high school will present
comedy, "The Groom
Thursday evening, Dec.
o’clock, in the high school auditor
ium. The comedy is under the di
rection of Ruth McGinnis.
Sarahsville
a three act
Said No!”,
19, at 7:30
WASHINGTON, Dec. 13 Maj.
Gen. W. S. Paul, war department
director of personnel, said today the
army will do everything in
power to avoid asking congresi
extend the draft.
Americans Still
Buying More Bonds
its
to
31,
be
get
The draft act expires March
1947, and the army must decide
fore that date whether it can
enough men through voluntary
listments to fill its needs. It expects
to decide by February 1.
Paul said the army didn’t want
draftees if it could do without them.
It believes the draftee is the
expensive soldier used.
WASHINGTON, D.' C., Dec.
In the five years since Pearl
bor wras attacked. Americans
bought $59,348,000,000 worth of U.
S. Savings Bonds, Series E. I* and
G. From Pearl Harbor through the
Victory Loan they bought more than
52 billion dollars worth to help fi
nance the global war. During this
peacetime year, so far, they have in
vested another 7 billion in these
bonds.
Today, fifteen months after the
end of the war, they own $46,500.
000,000 worth of E, and bonds
at current value, or 75 per cent of
the total amount ever issued. Of
these holdings, over 30.2 billions are
in E bonds.
In announcing these figures to
day, Vernon L. Clark, national di
rector of the U. S. Savings Bond
Division, Treasury Department,
commented that the E-bond re
demption rate, which has been de
clining since March, continued the
downward trend in November. Last
COCO
SUFFERERS!
666 STARTS RELIEF IN
JUST 6 SECONDS
Get famous, prescription-type
666. for super-speedy rebel W
from cold miseries. Try 66t
___ Cold Tablefs. or j.
666 Liquid Cold
Preparation today -i
WjAjAy Caution Use only •O
OF THE ANNUAL
Xmas Kiddies’ Treat!
COME ONE! COME ALL!
EVERY BOY AND GIRL IN NOBLE COUNTY
IS INVITED TO THIS FREE XMAS TREAT
MONDAY, DECEMBER 23
BEGINNING AT 2:00 O’CLOCK P. M.
NOBLE THEATRE—CALDWELL,
SPONSORED BY
NOBLE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Thursday, December 19, 1946
month the Treasury paid out $335,
700,000 in E
t^E^bondT then outstanding, he
E-bond redemptions, or
cent of the value of
said. Sales of E bonds came within
$41 799 000 of redemptions, the nar
rowest'margin Tannarv.
since January.
with Armistice Day
iving holidays, had only
reporting days, com
23 in October and an aver
a month this Both
November,
and Thanksg
19 Treasury
pared to 2.,
a -year.
ademption totals reflected
..ionth. Total savings bond
nted in the 19 days were
of which $293,901,000
$138,662,000 bond
00 bond sales. Total
sales in November ex
nntions of these bonds
sales and re
the short nn
$452,747
was E
most
E.
MAY OBTAIN SEALS
Har-
s Mildred Long, chairman of
Noble county Christmas Seal
stated today that those who
more seals or did not receive
through the mails, may obtain
from Gillespie’s drug store in
the
same
Caldwell.
Mrs
proxii
seals, have
Long inted out that ap
700 persons, receiving
contributed to the cam-
Comparison Proves
when you buy your
Monument
rom
ZANE
MONUMENT CO.
53 N. 4th Street
Zanesville
You Buy the Finest!
Phone Zanesville
5 5 0 8
And Reverse
The Charges.
OHIO
i

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