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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, June 15, 1939, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
Will Caution Against
Combining Too Early
On Farm Night Radio Program
Of WOSU, Monday. June 19
Dial 570 Kylocicyles
8:00—Music.
8:05—Hardin County 4-H and Rural
Youth Program, Members di
rected by B. E. Bradford,
County Agricultural Agent,
Kenton.
8:30—The Food That Birds Eat, H.
E. Eswine, Naturalist.
8:40—Music.
8:50—Value of First Aid Informa
tion to My Family, Mrs. Albert
Francisco, Franklin County
Rural Homemaker.
9:00—Music.
9:05—Don’t Combine Too Early, G.
W. McCuen, Chmn., Agr. Eng.
Dept.
9:15—Ohio Agricultural Conserva
tion Progress Report, By Mem
ber State Agricultural Conser
vation Committee.
9:25—Why and How to Thin Out
Apples, F. H. Beach, Ext.
Orchard Specialist.
9:35—Music.
Farmers Want Method
To Stop Fire Blight
Ohio orchard owners call fire
blight by its nicknames blossom
blight, spur blight, twig blight, or
apple blight, but they want to be
come less familiar with this, ac
cording to C. C. Allison, specialist in
plant pathology, Ohio State Uni
versity.
Reports coming to the University
of the appearance of fire blight this
year in all sections of Ohio, except
the northeastern area, seem to be
more numerous than usual. Trans
parent, Jonathan, Stayman, and
Grimes trees appear to be affected
the most by the disease this season.
Dr. Allison tells farmers who in
quire about controls for fire blight
to remove water sprouts from the
trunks and limbs of trees to check
V
For Vigor and Health—
include meat in your menu.
Always ready to serve you.
Bigler Bros.
Fresh and Salt Meats
X..........- »i=..... .......... ■,7^-g
The 1939-model McCormick
Deering 6-foot combine is now
ready—with many important
improvements and a new low
price! At $695, J.o.b. factory*
it gives you the most dollar
for-dollar value you can get in
a small combine.
See the McCormick-Deering
No. 61 —the outstanding small
combine—at our store. Other
sizes, up to 16-foot cut. May be
purchased on convenient terms
under Income Purchase Plan.
$695
f. o. b. factory, complete for
JKwer.drive
choice of grain tank or bagging
pl arform. Machinecomplete with
auxiliary engine as shown, $855
f.o.b. factory.
Findlay Stove and Furnace Repair Co.
We repair cook stoves, heating stoves, heatrolas, and all
makes of furnaces.
We carry a complete line of new parts for every type of
stove. Send card or phone for free estimates.
1301 Washington Ave. Findlay, Ohio Phone 2076-R
FIRE BOWLS GRATES CASTINGS
HAVE YOUR FURNACE CLEANED NOW
GREATEST COMBINE VALUE
on the Market...the NEW
McCORMICK-DEERING No. 61
i'-i’
the spread of the disease. Pruning
out blighted wood during the grow
ing season is not recommended. A.
chemical solution described in exten
sion bulletin No. 128 is valuable in
eliminating active cankers in sum
mer. All county agents have this
bulletin.
Removal of the suckers while still
small and succulent tends to prevent
the formation of new fire blight
cankers and also eliminates some
insects which might otherwise help
spread the disease. The older wood
which is infected can be removed
in the fall, and this should be done
by making cuts an inch or two be
low the diseased portion.
In case of serious outbreaks of fire
blight in southern Ohio, the Univer
sity pathologist recommends the use
of preventive sprays during the
blossom period. Two applications of
Bordeaux mixture are used in con
trolling fire blight during the blos
som period.
The disease, unless checked,
spreads from the blossoms into the
spurs and then to other portions of
the tree. Aphids and leaf hoppers
may carry the infection from dis
eased wood to parts of the tree
which are healthy. The bacteria
which cause fire blight cause can
kers to appear on the trees, and
these cankers are centers from which
the bacteria spread.
Fire blight affects pears, and dis
eased pear trees often have more
cankers than infected apple trees.
The symptoms of fire blight are
sudden dying of whole branches or
portions of them. The diseased parts
turn brown or black as if scorched
by fire. Summer pruning of infected
wood on pear trees is recommended.
Carried Soil Up Hill
To Save Swiss Farm
Ohio has quite a large group of
farmers whose Swiss ancestors
learned soil conservation in a hard
school whose final lesson was that
workers in the field should have a
knapsack which could be used to
carry back up the hill soil that had
washed down to the lower end of
the fields.
Stark necessity dictated those
backbreaking methods because many
Swiss farms were steep slopes of
infertile soil. Poor as the soil was,
it had to be saved or half of the
Swiss population had to seek some
new way to make a living. The
struggle for existence was one of
the reasons why a large group of
Swiss left their homes and came to
Ohio.
Ohio then was just getting out of
the woods and had areas of level,
black soils, but those areas were not
chosen by the Swiss emigrants. Most
of those new citizens bought farms
in northeastern Ohio where the hills
formed a skyline that at least would
carry the eyes upward when the
ONLY THE McCORMICK.DEERfNG
No. 61 GIVES YOU ALL OF THESE
MATURES IN A 6-FOOT COMBINE
O Patented open-end auger.
O Rub-bar cylinder. Doesnofch
straw. SimphF.es separation end
•s easily adjusted.
Straight-line threshing. No right-
angle turns or bottlenecks t0 tut
capacity.
O Extra-value construction.
as well as power drive.
Simpl. and odju|,
.11 ani(
eed
operation, with
crops.
,$: -x.
4
pl
..........
C. F. Niswander
McCormick-Deering Dealer Bluffton, Ohio
TAKES PAID CAST VEAR.
BY THE RAIUROAO5 WOULD HAVE
BEEN SUFFICIENT TO PAY A
/EAR'S WAGES FOR
RAILROAD EMPLOYEES.
A
POu^O OF
Cf HTf IN THE
U.G„ WOULD COST
IN GERMANY AND ABOUT
*12 IN RUSSIA.
customs of a strange land depressed
I the spirits.
To the Swiss, the Ohio farms ap
peared to have inexhaustibly rich
soil. The slopes were gentle to
eyes which were accustomed to al
most vertical walls of rock around
valley farms. Farming ought to be
an easy venture in Ohio.
Today, the third and fourth gener
ations of these Swiss people operate
the farms their ancestors bought.
They have found that soil moves
more slowly down Ohio slopes, but
that the movement is certain unless
some means are taken to defeat the
forces of erosion.
Gottleib Studer purchased a farm
near Wooster that quickly became
slashed with gullies under ordinary
tillage methods. Mr. Studer con
cluded that, if the farm was to be
saved, some drastic changes in farm
ing practices would have to be
adopted. The gullies were plowed in
until farm tools could be driven
across them.
To prevent further erosion, strip
cropping and terracing recommended
by the soils conservation service was
used. Mr. Studer did not stop with
the land used for field crops in
planning to work his farm on the
I contour. An orchard on the farm
is located on terraces which holds
the soil in place.
With the soil erosion stopped by
strip cropping and terraces, Mr.
Studer took another step in good
land use by improving his pasture
fields. Lime has been applied on all
the crop and pasture land, and 400
pounds to the acre of 20 per cent
superphosphate was applied on the
old pasture. Some of the steeper
slopes were added to the pasture
land after being seeded with a mix
ture of timothy, bluegrass, redtop,
and alsike clover.
Travelers over the Three-C high
way pass Mr. Studer’s farm, and it
is worth while to stop and compare
the appearance of the crops on this
place with those on similar land
where no erosion control is being
practiced. Mr. Studer expects his
soil will support as many genera
tions of farmers as will continue the
system of land use which he now
practices.
A pedestrian is a man whose wife
is using the car.
There are three separate and
distinct ways that LOWE
BROTHERS HIGH STANDARD
HOUSE PAINT saves you money
1. It covers more square feet of
surface per gallon. 2. It spreads
easier and evenly and saves labor
cost. 3. It gives you beauty and
protection much longer than
“cheap” paint possibly can. These
are facts which mean lower cost
for you. Come in and let us prove
them before you paint.
Echo Feed Store
123 S. Main Bluffton, O.
Phone 263-W
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON
THE POCKETBOOK
of
KNOWLEDGE
The
/93,OOO
BEAUTIFUL ‘ATL YOTA
NATIVF TO (NPlA JAVA.
AND CHINA, oirrEN MA*
WINGS A FOOT LONG
PATEMTS
««T
SBANTeO 8V
THE ANCIENT
NEW DISHES
8V
aewARONG
THEM PO«
rueiQ
CONCOCTIONS.
»Y LAW. on THE
ISLE OF MADEIRA.
EVERYONE WHO CUTS
DOWN A TREE
MUST pLA^TONF
IN ITS ’LACE
Beaverdam
Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Youngberg
and daughter of Lima were Satur
day afternoon visitors of John Pat
terson.
Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Cowl yer of
Rockingham, Virginia are spending
several weeks with Mr. and Mrs. Ed
Carroll and other relatives.
Delmar Beery Jr., is spending the
week in Toledo with Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Davis and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Elem Stettler of
Findlay were Saturday guests of the
latter’s mother, Mrs. Mayme Yant.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Yarger and
Miss Marie McClain of Muncie, Ind.,
were Sunday visitors of Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. Yarger and family.
Mrs. C. D. Zellers spent the week
at Van Wert with relatives.
Mrs. Anna Van Meter spent Tues
day with Mrs. Catherine Ross.
Helen Burkholder of Bluffton is
visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Roy Beemer.
Mrs. Earl Bowers and daughter
Ruth of Bluffton were Tuesday din
ner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Pete
Bowers.
Herbert Augsburgfer is spending
the week with# hi brother Clyde
Augsburger and fa y at Canton.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Marquart re
turned last week from their trip
to California.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Bogart and Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. Burden are leaving
this week for a weeks’ vacation
at Indian River, Michigan.
Mrs. T. V. Stirn attended a Dis
trict Past Matron's 0. E. S. meeting
at Continental, Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Herron and
family spent the ■■■., end at Cleve
land and Elyria with relatives.
Mrs. Carl Weav nd son Gary of
Fremont are spei the week with
Mrs. Lillie Anderson, *3
Max Religo ai chael Bermuda,
Philipino boys n God’s Bible
School at Cincim were guests of
Rev. and Mrs. E. J. Williams, Wed
nesday.
Rev. and Mrs. I. Davis of Van
Uert were Sunda ternoon visitors
of Mrs. Emma Barber,
Herbert Bower- of Connecticut
visited at the home Mr. and Mrs.
Ed Bogart the pat week.
The Epworth League of the M. E.
church had a weiner roast Wednes
day evening.
Mrs. Daniel Younkman was host
ess to the Leisure Hour club Mon
day evening.
Mrs. Mary Steele accompanied by
her son I. G. St e and wife of
Lima spent Sunday at Defiance.
Mrs. Fred Hofer, Miss Theresa
Slusser of Bluffton and Miss Ruth
Durkee attended an Eastern Star
meeting at Ottawa. Thursday even
ing.
Ruth Jennings of Dola is spend
ing the week with her grandparents
Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Jennings.
Doris Binkley of Lafayette is a
guest of Mrs. Emu a Bassett.
Mr. and Mrs. Adam Bixler of
Pandora were Sunday afternoon vis
itors of Mr. and Mrs. Gideon Leh
man.
Don Bryan left Monday for Cali
fornia where he has a steady posi
tion.
Ohio farmers who make grass
silage for the first time should check
the strength of their silos. Agri
cultural engineers claim that grass
silage exert* more pressure than
corn silage so the base of the silo
may need some reinforcement to
meet the added strain.
Lumber dealer claim that the
present rate of gain in residential
building will cause such an increased
demand for lumber that the total
used in the next decade will be 78
billion board feet, as compared to 46
billion board feet used for home
building in the period 1930-39.
OHIO
May Acquire Wealth
By Ignoring Riches
Choosing ideals which will permit
their owners to become useful mem
bers of -society rather than a des
perate striving for wealth, fame, or
power is recommended to Ohio high
school graduates by Dean John F.
unningham, College of Agriculture
a I’d Home Economics, Ohio State
University.
Dean Cunningham quotes the
Oriental proverb, “He who has
money but no friends is not rich he
who has friends but no money is not
poor." The dean does not discourage
the ambitions of the graduates to
secure just rewards for their ser
vices but he believes their lives will
be richer if they realize early that
neither wealth, fame, nor power is
a guarantee of happiness.
Many of the graduates will con
tinue studies in colleges or univers
ities, but education alone will not
make a useful citizen. Whether or
not high school graduates continue
their education, Dean Cunningham
reminds them that a useful citizen
takes an interest in government, not
by seeking office but by being a
supporter of sane and sensible gov
ernment.
In relations with other people, a
habit of always agreeing with their
actions and opinions often is costly
to all cncerned. A “yes man” loses
his self respect by agreement with
policies which he believes are wrong
and the other person may be en
couraged to continue a course which
will meet merited opposition later.
The chronic objector also is a
thorn in business and friendships.
The person who must disagree with
everything and everybody is as bad
ly twisted mentally as the one who
says “Yes” automatically. A proper
balance between the two habits will
make both social and business life
more pleasant and more profitable to
high school graduates and to their
associates.
The graduate’s acceptance of the
fact that everyone can not hold the
highest position nor pile up the
largest amount of wealth, should
not make him adopt an attitude of
defeat. Every worker can find sat
isfaction in his work if he can see
that it is a necessary part of a
system which brings greater rewards
to more people than any other na
tion has ever experienced.
The intangible things which are
called virtues must be considered by
those leaving high school for college
or for business. The finger tip of
circumstance points to those who
obey and those who disobey the
principles of morality. Morals are
simply a code of rules to permit the
close association of a group of
people with the fewest possible vio
lations of the rights and privileges
of each individual in the group.
Liars are not menaces to society
because their exaggerations reflect
undue importance upon themselves,
but because their lies impair confi
dence in the statements of all people.
Stealing is not a sin because it is
wrong to acquire property, but be
cause it violates the right of others
to enjoy the fruits of their own
efforts.
Graduates will find competition in
any phase of life they choose. Com
petition should not be feared it is
a stimulus to progress. Geniuses
are people who are not content to
copy the efforts of others but who
perfect ways or means of doing
something better than it has been
done before.
There are 65,000 high school grad
uates in Ohio this year. Out of this
group about 15,000 will enter col
lege but, whether the graduate
leaves home for work or for further
education, the rules of society apply
equally. Flach individual must travel
on his own steam or be a burden
upon others. Every one of these
useless burdens is a handicap to the
progress of the human race.
Milk profits next winter may be
affected by the time when the hay
is cut this summer. Early-cut hay
has the highest feeding value, and
feed costs are reduced if the herd
gets a good portion of their proteins
from forage instead of from more
costly concentrates.
SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
General Code. Sec. 116S1
The State of Ohio, Allen County.
Amos Gratz, et al. Plaintiff
vs.
Ellen Duffman, et al., Defendants
Case No. 32 529
In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the
above entitled action, I will offer for sale at
public auction, at the door of the Court House
in Lima, Onio, in the above named County,
on Saturday the 17th day of June. 1939 at
10 o’clock, A. M., the following described
real estate, situate in the County of Allen and
State of Ohio, and in the Village of Bluff
ton tow it:
Inlot Thirty-three (33) in the Village of
Bluffton, Allen County, Ohio.
Also a strip Two (2) feet wide along the
Northeast side of Inlot Thirty-two (32). be
ing a part of lot Twenty (20) in the origin
al plat of Shannon, now Bluffton, Ohio.
Also a strip twenty-five (25) feet wide along
the Southwest side of Inlot Thirty-four (34)
in Bluffton, Ohio.
Said premises located at 410 No. Main
Street. Bluffton. Ohio.
Said Premises Appraised nl $1035.00, and
cannot be sold fox- less than two-thirds of
that amount.
TERMS OF SALE—Cash.
WM. V. DALEY.
Sheriff of Allen County, Ohio.
Lippincott and Lippincott. Attorneys,
May 17, 24. 31 June 7. 14.
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT
Estate of Das id G. Neiswander, Deceased
Notice is hereby given that Robert M. Nels
wander whose Post Office address is Bluffton,
Ohio, has been duly appointed and qualified
as administrator of the Estate of David G.
Neiswander late of Allen County, Ohio, de
cea ed,
Dated this 24th day of May. 1939.
RAYMOND P. SMITH
Judge of the Probate Court.
Allen County, Ohio 7
Rockport.
Mr. and Mrs. Loren Van Meter and
daughter Ann of Lima were week end
guests of relatives in this vicinity and
took Sunday dinner with Mr. and Mrs.
Edgar Begg.
Herbert Marshall, Jr. who has at
tended the Spring quarter at Ohio
State university in Columbus, return
ed home Monday to spend the sum
mer with his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Marshall, Sr.
Walter Cupp and daughter Margery
went to Cleveland last Wednesday and
Mrs. Cupp, who had been in Fairview
Park hospital for treatment, returned
home with them Friday, all having
spent Thursday night with Mr. and
Mrs. Jesse Lehman and family in New
London.
Glen Price who is a member of the
C. C. C. camp near Findlay, returned
to camp after spending an eight day
vacation with his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Price.
Mrs. W. E. Marshall and Mrs. Guy
Mayberry attended the Big Sister
party in Ottawa last Thursday even
ing when members of Putnam Chap
ter O. E. S. entertained the Bluffton
Chapter, O. E. S.
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Campbell and
daughter Elizabeth were in Wooster,
Sunday and Monday for the Com
mencement festivities on the campus,
Miss La Donna Campbell was a mem
ber of the class and returned home
with her parents, Monday.
Miss Edythe Cupp was in Colum
bus for the week end where she at
tended her class reunion at O. S. U.
and other activities connected with
Commencement week.
The Misses Nancy Anne and Mary
Jane Mayberry left Sunday evening
with a high school group via the B.
& O. for a five day visit to points of
interest in Washington, D. C.
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Lehman of New
London were callers in the Walter
Cupp home, Sunday and their daught
er Merriel who has been a guest for
the past week returned home with
them that evening.
Miss Edythe Cupp left Tuesday for
Cedar Point where she will spend sev
eral days at a meeting of the Home
Economics groups in connection with
the Ohio Educational meeting of the
State.
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Campbell and
daughter Elizabeth, Mr. and Mrs. J.
C. Begg, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Mayberry
and family, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Mar
shall, and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Begg attended the annual Strawberry’
festival of the Masonic order of Col
umbus Grove, held in the local high
school building last Friday evening.
Rev. Davidian of Lima was the speak
er and dinner music wras furnished by
a trio composed of the Misses Mary
Jane and Nancy Anne Mayberry and
Elizabeth Campbell.
Mr. and Mrs. Dallas Jacobs, Miss
Norah Hooker and Mr. and Mrs.
Stewart Berryhill and family were
Tuesday evening guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Glen Huber and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Algire and son
Virgil and Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Ber
ryhill and family attended the Algire
family reunion at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. William Algire near Ada.
Mr. and Mrs. Amos Tscheigg and
son Carol and Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Amstutz of near Pandora, spent Sun
day afternoon with Mrs. Eugene
Tscheigg.
Mr. and Mrs. George Huber and
son of Lafayette were Sunday dinner
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Glen Huber
and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Badertscher and
daughter Doris Jean, Mr. and Mrs. La
Verne Badertscher and Irene, Dorothy
THURSDAY, JUNE 15, 1939
and Eugene Augburger spent Friday
evening with Mr. and Mr. Eli Gar
motter near Rawson.
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Sylvester and
son Dwain of Ft. Wayne were week
end guests of relatives in this vicinity.
Mrs. Mary Sylvester returned home
with them for a week’s visit.
Arthur Trumbo of Muskgoee, Okla.,
in company with Mr. and Mrs. F. R.
Mason of Columbus Grove called on
friends in this vicinity, Wedneday.
Mr. and Mrs. Laverne Badertscher
took dinner Sunday with Mr. and
Mrs. Otto Badertscher and daughter
Doris Jean.
Jacob Tscheigg and children, Reva
and Marion and Mrs. Willis Weaver
all of Orrville spent a few days the
first of the week with relatives in this
vicinity.
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Cook of De
troit and Mrs. Mary Cook of Colum
bus Grove called on Mr. A. H. Mar
shall and Mr. and Mr. F. C. Marhall,
Sunday afternoon.
k
No man can succeed in business
when he uses a pair of shoes for a
paper weight on his desk.
Northern Ohio dairy club mem
bers, in addition to the instruction
from their regular dairy project,
also have a chance to win scholar
ships offered by dairy companies in
Cleveland, Akron, Youngstown, and
Findlay. The scholarships must be
used in a recognized college of
agriculture or home economics.
Local and Long
Distance Hauling
Every Load Insured
STAGER BROS.
Bluffton, Ohio
USED
Tractors Tracks
Farm Implements
Washing Machines
1 1931 Dodge school bus.
1 1935 Half-ton International
Pickup Truck.
1 1931 Dodge panel truck.
1 McCormick-Deering thresh
ing outfit consisting of 28 by
46 separator, No. 300 Power
unit l*/i ton truck drive
belt.
1 McCormick-Deering 10-20
Tractor.
1 Sampson Tractor.
2 McCormick-Deering Little
Wonder 14 in. tractor plows.
1 New 4 McCormick-Deering
single row cultivator.
1 McCormick-Deering No. 4
manure spreader.
1 Massey-Harris side delivery
hay rake.
1 McCormick-Deering 8 ft.
binder, used 1 year.
1 McCormick-Deering 7-ft.
binder.
1 Milwaukee wheat binder.
1 Double disc 6 ft.
1 Spring tooth harrow.
1 John Deere Beet Lifter.
1 Wardway copper tub washer
C. F. NISWANDER
McCormick-Deering Dealer
Bluffton, Ohio
ATTENTION 4-H
CLUB BOYS
Three cash prizes will be given by
The Bluffton Milling Co. to the boy
who makes the cheapest gain produc
ing pork.
'In order to participate in this con
test the pigs must be fed Old Fort
40% Hog Mix.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
The Bluffton Go.
WANTED—DEAD STOCK
WE PAY TOP CASH PRICES
Horses $3.00 Cows $2.00
Small Stock removed free of charge.
Quick Service
Telephone Findlay, MAIN 475, Reverse Charges
BUCKEYE REDUCTION COMPANY’, Findlay, Ohio
“Branch. Fostoria Animal Products, Inc.”
$3.00
$2.00
$1.00

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