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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, July 06, 1939, Image 3

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THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1939
ALLEN COUNTY
Released From Jail,
Commits Suicide
Three hours after he had been re
leased from Lima city jail, where he
had been held on a charge of in
vestigation, the body of Rudolph
Metz, about 48, of Wausau, Wis.,
was found at noon Thursday in a
dense woods at the end of S. Sugar
street with his neck slit from ear
to ear.
Coroner Burt Hibbard stated the
man h^d committed suicide by cut
ting his threat with a razor blade
found near the body.
51-Year-Old Skater
Enroute To Fair
Asa Hall, 51, skated into Lima
Monday on another leg of his Mex
ico, Mo., to New York “trip on
wheels”. It was his 19th day since
leaving Missouri on the junket which
will see him finishing up with an ex
hibition at the Gotham fair and a
probable appearance on Major
Bowes’ Amateur Hour.
Hall, tanned and bubbling over in
spirits, said he expects the trip to
require about 47 days. “But I’m in
no hurry,” he said, explaining he
averages about 50 miles in an eight
hour day.
Buys Casket For Hus
band, Drops Dead
Mrs. James H. Patterson died of a
heart attack last week just as she
reached home after selecting a
casket for her husband, who died
the preceding night. Their deaths
were 17 hours apart.
42 Combines, One
Binder Sold
Since January 1, 1939, the farm
ers of the Spencerville community
have purchased 70 new tractors.
The selling price of these tractors
was $54,000. Spot cash to the
amount of $23,000 was laid down
for these tractors, leaving $31,000 to
be paid in time payments.
Since January 1, 1939, the farmers
of the Spencerville community have
purchased 42 new combines. The
selling price of these combines was
$26,900. Spot cash to the amount
of $9,000 was laid down for these
combines, leaving $17,900 to be
paid in time payments.
Sin*:e aJnuary 1, 1939, only one
new binder has been purchased by
all the farmers in the Spencerville
community. The binder, not yet de
livered, will cost $225.
County Asked To Take
Over Lima’s Relief
Allen county commissioners were
asked Friday to take over relief
authority in Lima under the new
state relief law going into effect Sat
urday, under a resolution passed by
city council in special session Thurs
day evening.
Altho the commissioners did not
receive the city resolution until noon
Friday, their expressed opinion, after
being informed of council’s auction,
was that “If we don’t have to take
over the entire relief problem for
Allen county, w’hy should we?”
Approximately 750 cases were list
ed on relief rolls for the entire
county on Friday, including more
than 500 in Lima and the balance in
the remaininder of the county, in
cluding Delphos, relief officials said.
Lima Store Changes
Hands
Ownership of Feldman’s, Inc.,
large Lima department store, has
been sold to a group of Lima men
represented by W. L. Rickman, pres
ent manager of the Lima’s New
berry’s store, it was announced by
Jonas Wohlgemuth, retiring presi
dent and treasurer of the firm. The
amount involved in the purchase was
not revealed.
Loses Thumb In
Hay Mow
Daniel Miller, of near Spencerville,
was unfortunate Saturday afternoon
when he caught his right thumb in
a pulley on a hay fork tearing off
the end. The thumb was found
later in the hay mow.
Have 58-Acre Field
Of Flax
A 58 acre field of flax, one of the
few flax fields in the state, is now
in full bloom on state route 117.
just east of the Spencerville corpor
ation line, on the south side of the
road.
The land is owned by Oliver Boy
er, and the large field was put out
by Mr. Boyer and his son, Stanley.
Flax bloom is blue in color. The
58 acre field, early in the morning
looks like a large rug representing
NEWS NOTES FROM FOUR COUNTIES
many shades of blue streaked with
gold as the early sunlight plays on
the blossoms.
Delphos Pushes Seces
sion Plan
Commissioners of Allen and Van
Wert counties were requested by the
Delphos city council to take “imme
diate action” on the petition under
which Delphos seeks to secede from
Washington and Marion townships.
City Auditor Frank Irick was re
quested to write to the two groups
and point out that councilmen want
ed action.
Industrial Accidents
Are Fewer
The completed report for the first
five months of Allen County Indus
trial Safety campaign shows that
8,301 employes worked 6,782,412
man-hour with only .67 accidents in
cluding one fatality, for an accident
frequency of 9.87 and a severity of
.01577.
Operation of the competing firms
during May showed a substantial de
crease in the number of accidents
reported when compared with April.
Delphos Pays Old Bills
The city of Delphos sold bonds
totaling $6,059 and with the money
on hand, Frank Irick, city auditor
and Walter Remlinger, city treasur
er, immediately set to work making
out vouchers and checks and paid
out the entire sum.
Sale of the bonds was allowed by
the state tax commission and the
proceeds used to pay off old hospital
ization and medical bills. The pay
ments settle everything to Jan. 1,
1939. Some of the debts are years
old, incurred by relief clients, which
it was mandatory for the city to
care for in cases of distress.
HANCOCK COUNTY
Mt. Cory Girl Fatally
Hurt
Marline Wilkins, 10, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilkins, of
near Mt. Cory, died last week from
injuries received late Thursday
afternoon when the bicycle on which
she was riding was struck by an
auto in Main street at Second street
in Findlay.
Ann Thompson, 11, daughter of
Mrs. Marian Thompson, Findlay,
who w$s riding on the bicycle with
the Wilkins girl, is in Findlay hos
pital with little chance to recover.
Marline died in Findlay hospital
from a fractured skull shortly after
being admitted.
Hobby Develops Into
Profitable Occupation
Arrows made by a Findlay man
will soon fly ’round the world. At
least all indications point to this
for the Old English Archery shop
in the basement of Kingsley Brew
ster’s home, has developed from a
place to work out a hobby, to a shop
from which bows, arrows, archery
cases and all manner of orchery
equipment, are supplied.
Requests from Shanghai, Hawaii,
London, England and other foreign
ports, for Mr. Brewster’s catalogue,
which lists and pictures his stock,
have been received by Mr. Brewster
within the last year.
New Beet Dusting
Machines Bought
Ten new dusting machines were
received Monday by the Findlay fac
tory of the Great Lakes Sugar com
pany bringing to 12 the number now
owned by the company for use by
the farmers in beet fields.
Old Newspaper Is
Prized
E. G. Trout, of east of Arcadia,
prizes a copy of the Daily Sun, a
North Baltimore newspaper, pub
lished and edited by Charles W.
Mains, in 1889.
The copy now possessed by Mr.
PAUL SCKOENLEIN, Mgr.
Trout, was volume No. 4, and was a
four page paper with two columns
to the page, each being about six
inches wide and nine inches long.
Modern Pied Piper
In Findlay
E. L. Strawsburg, the modern Pied
Piper from Hagerstown. Md., arrived
in Findlay Thursday to stage an
other war on rats.
Strawsburg, known far and wide
as a rat exterminator, was here five
years ago on a similar mission and
reports at that time were he did a
good job.
For 20 years Strawsburg has been
traveling around the country rid
ding homes and other buildings of
rats. In 1925 during the Bubonic
plague, he worked for the federal
government in New Orleans, killing
1,000 rats a day.
Holtkamp Resigns
County Post
L. C. Toltkamp, assistant Han
cock county agent, has been assigned
as assistant agent in Champaign
county. After two months* duty as
assistant he will become acting
agent while the regular agent is on
leave of absence.
“Borrows” Car On
Long Trip
A Findlay automobile agency had
its car back in its garage Tuesday
after a “prospective buyer” had bor
rowed it and left it near Massillon.
The “buyer” stopped at the local
garage and asked if he might take
the car out to show his wife. Per
mission was granted.
Several hours later a telegram
was received from the man stating
he had left the automobile at the
“Torch Club”, a night club near
Massillon.
Unusual Year For
Corn Crop
Seldom have Hancock county farm
ers witnessed such an uneven corn
crops as the fields present this sea
son. In the same field one sees
corn knee high, some half as large
and other places the plants are just
coming through the ground. In fact
unless some fields are given up for
corn, the grain is yet to be planted.
Extremes of wet and dry have pre
vailed for the past several months.
Yet, taken on the whole, crop pros
pects are favorable, the hay is a
good crop, early oats is in head,
wheat is ripening with a good show
ing, corn is up to the average.
Gets $34,106 In Auto
Tag Funds
Auto tag funds totaling $$34,106.40
were distributed by County Auditor
Frank H. Huffman Friday after the
amount had been received from the
state bureau.
Blight Hits County
Orchard
“Fire”, or “pear” blight affecting
numerous Hancock county apple or
chards, is presenting a serious prob
lem to farmers, according to Forest
G. Hall, Hancock county agricultural
agent, who said that he has received
several queries as to what can be
done to check the disease.
“There is no prescription for
checking the disease once the tree
has blossomed,” Mr. Hall said. “The
time to fight the burned or affected
areas, is in the spring before blos
soms have appeared.”
June Rainfall Breaks
Records
In June, 1939, it rained on 19
days for a total of 9.06 inches, the
greatest amount of rainfall in any
single month for as far back as rec
ords have been kept at the Findlay
government weather bureau.
The average for June during a
40-year period ending in December
1929, amounted to 3.88 inches of
rain. Since that period, up until
June 1939, when it rained nearly
ON TIME
A better deal for prompt payers,••
that's what the new City Loan
Customer-Reward system is called.
It means the biggest savings in City
Loan history for the man who makes
his payments promptly on schedule.
Find out how to profit and save
through a helpful loan here,
T1HIIE C1IVYLo JUJV
AND SAVINA* O A\ A N V
Phone 7351 Market & Elizabeth Sts.
Savings Bldg. Lima, Ohio
Loans made promptly throughout Allen County and vicinity.
BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
THE
10 inches, only one month has come
close to approaching last month’s
record rainfall.
That rain occurred in June, 1937,
during the gas and oil celebration
when it rained a total amount of
8.32 inches, giving Findlay a flood
that nearly reached 1913 proportions.
HARDIN COUNTY
Father Burned Saving
Seven Children
A father who stood in his burning
home and handed his seven children
out of a window to their mother, is
in a Kenton hospital fighting for his
life due to severe burns received
about the face forehead, ears and
head.
When fire broke out in their three
room home on Quickstep road near
McGuffey late last Tuesday, it was
discovered when members of the fam
ily were awakened by the smell of
smoke. The mother jumped out of
the window and the father, Green
Risner, a farm laborer in the Scioto
marsh, handed the seven children
out to safety.
Chaser Chased From
Own Patch
Ike M. Jones of Kenton complained
bitterly to police that some boys
raided his strawberry’ patch and
hurled stones at him when he at
tempted to chase them away. He
fled, leaving the youths in posses
sion, but returned with officers.
Burned When Gasoline
Explodes
Francis Drum, 33, employe of the
Silverstein Auto Wrecking company,
of Kenton, suffered severe burns on
his legs and arms when the gasoline
tank of an automobile exploded as
he. was burning inflammable mater
ial of the body.
Showered with flaming gasoline, he
was rescued by the prompt action
of Harvey Amweg, an employe of a
nearby coal company, who beat out
the flames.
Struck By Lightning
Four Times In
Nine Years
For the fourth time in nine years,
Charles Brown, Kenton onion job
ber, was struck by lightning and
survived the blast in an electrical
storm last week.
He was found unconscious with
his right side partly paralyzed in a
garage after being struck. He will
recover.
It all started nine years ago when
the Kenton man was bossing a group
of 100 laborers on a Scioto marsh
farm. He looked out the door of a
barn in which the men sought shel
ter, to determine if the storm was
breaking. Struck by a lightning
bolt, he was in bed for five days.
No other person in the group was
hurt.
Four years later he was similarly
struck, while in a group of men.
Last September the third bolt struck
him, as he was driving along a road
near McGuffey.
Two Silos Levelled
By Wind
In a brief windstorm, silos on the
Alonzo Harvey and Carl Davis
farms, north of Mt. Victory, were
blown down.
O. N. U. Medical Head
Resigns
Dr. Harry Wain, Ohio Northern
university physician in charge of
health service and instructor in
pharmacology for the last two years,
has resigned his position to accept
the office of health commissioner of
Shelby county. His duties commence
July 1.
County Benefits From
New State Program
With the settlement of the ques
tion of payments by counties for
patients in the feeble-minded insti
tutions of the state now a matter of
opinion of the attorney general,
Hardin county will benefit to the
extent of some $16,000, W. B. Wil
son, county auditor, said.
The matter was worked out by
various prosecuting attorneys over
the state, who, upon examination
found that the rate which should be
paid would be $3.50 per week per
patient instead of the $5.50 which
has been paid. The new setup would
save each county $2 per week on
each patient in the institutions.
Sees World Fair On
$4.85
Don Downing was back home in
Kenton with 15 cents in his pocket
—after a trip to the Golden Gate
Exposition in San Francisco. He
left with $4.85, took turns driving
day and night with a salesman who
gave him his first and only hitch
hike ride, and, upon arrival at the
fair, was presented with a $20 bill
by the motorist. He saw the
sightsv worked a few days and pur
chased a ticket back home.
Kenton Finally Free
Of Contagion
With the removal of the last quar
antine sign, there is no contagion in
Kenton, Miss Wilhelmina Machetanz,
Kenton city health commissioner an
nounced. It is the first that no con
tagion existed in this city since last
fall.
State Buys Cattle From
Hardin Breeders
A herd of 19 young Angus heif
ers were purchased in Hardin coun
ty by Paul Gerlaugh, chief of the
animal husbandry division of the
Ohio agricultural experiment sta
tion at Wooster, and Fred Graber,
head herdsman. The cattle bought
locally will be added to the station
herd.
Four head were purchased from
Marion Littleton, the man who has
bred Angus cattle longer than any
other in Ohio six head from Dwight
Heckathorn and sons and nine head
from W. A. Martin and sons.
Job Survey Completed
In Kenton
Statistics compiled during a Ken
ton occupational survey of employ
ment, were announced by John
Doughman, local Vocational trades
coordinator.
In the survey a total of 238 Ken
ton business places were surveyed
and show a total of 2,011 persons—
1,593 male and 418 female, employed.
Of that number 110 are WPA work
ers.
In all retail employment there are
455 while in government, city and
county officials there are 103. A to
tal of 158 professional men are in
cluded while 151 are employed in
automotive service. Under machine
industry are 981 while in a total of
machine, automobile sales and serv
ices are 1,050.
Law Hampers Trade
Courses
One of the chief obstacles to suc
cessful operation of a vocational
trades course in Kenton, with full
cooperation of local industries, is the
fact that under the minimum wage
law, factories are unable to pay the
The
a****
required wages to inexperienced
boys, John Doughman, coordinator of
the Kenton High School trades
course, explained last week.
Thus, all actual shop training will
be done in the school trade rooms
after the new school building is com
pleted this fall, school leaders said.
At least 165 boys will take part in
daily activities in the new shop
rooms, including members of the vo
cational agriculture classes, it was
stated.
Federal Jobs Are
Combined
Announcement was made last week
hy Paul Dickey, Hardin county su
pervisor of the Farm Security ad
ministration, that Miss Jeanette Mc
Coy, home management supervisor,
will spend Tuesday and Wednesday
of each week in Lima, beginning
July 1.
Miss McCoy will assume the duties
of the present supervisor of Allen
and Putnam counties, whose position
will be abolished the first of the
month, Dickey said.
Stops Runaway In
Western Style
Carson Fay, 31, nursed a badly
peeled left leg and sprained arm
this week but rejoiced that he still
was alive after a melodramatic ad
venture that left him unconscious
across the back of a runaway horse.
When his $400 team of horses ran
away Fay asked a motorist to head
them off. Fay rode along, got ahead
of the team and made a lunge for
one horse’s bridle. He missed, was
narrowly missed by flying feet, then
grabbed for the wagon rack. His
hand slipped along the bed, a wheel
went over his left leg, and—with
death under the wagon imminent—
his groping right hand clasped an
iron bolt. Painfully he dragged
himself onto the wagon and out on
the tongue to the horses’ heads. He
stopped them then collapsed. The
animals were unhurt.
PUTNAM COUNTY
Ottawa Cop Has Lost
Wedding Veil
Finders may be keepers and losers,
the weepers, but Traffic Officer J. L.
McKinney has an elegant white wed
ding veil which he is willing to sur
render without the least bit of weep
ing.
The veil was found by an Ottawa
motorist along Route 65, about three
miles south of Columbus Grove, and
given to McKinney.
Highway Blows Up
Under Car
A section of concrete pavement on
state route 115, five miles north of
Ottawa, expanded to such an extent
Sunday afternoon that it “blew up”
just as an unidentified Pennsylvania
motorist crossed the weakened area.
The bottom of the car was consid
erably damaged by the “blast” but
the occupants of the machine es
caped unhurt. Fortunately the driv
er of the machine kept the vehicle
under control. It is reported that
the two tires on the right of the
fllf^^^^tBuilder
JJS^o«r4eST
o^».- 'iX^^I
y/Ot’® n
A GENERAL
MOTORS VALUE
machine were blown nit, the bum]
was torn from the machine and 1
hub cap was blown over a hund
feet from the spot.
Land Bought For New
Highway
The state highway department has
filed in office of Recorder Henry
Kistler, five easements for property
along the hight-of-way of U. S.
Route 224, in Ottawa and Blanchard
townships, at a total cost of $2,386.
Two contractors are now engaged in
constructing a new road 10 miles
long from a point in Hancock county
to the D. T. and I. crossing on
Main street in Ottawa.
Egg Auction Program
Under Way
Francis Summers, Pandora, has
been hired by the directors of the
Northwest Ohio Poultry association
to transport eggs to Napoleon from
the area south of the Maumee river
including all of Hancock and Put
nam counties and parts of Paulding
and Henry counties.
The transportation of eggs will
start next Thursday, July 6, in pre
paration for the first auction on
Monday, July 10. s
Classified Tax Cam
paign Is On
Auditor Carl D. Frick has an
nounced his office is conducting an
intensive campaign to enforce the
classified tax law in Putnam county.
Deputy Charles Mootz is searching
the 1937 and 1938 classified tax re
turns for names of persons who then
filed returns but who did not make
one this year.
Ottawa Streets Being
Re-surfaced
Work of treating Ottawa’s streets
with a “hot mix” material was well
underway this week, under supervis
ion of the Ottawa Tar and Asphalt
company.
The gravel streets are being
scraped, treated first with an oil ma
terial, tho large holes filled with
“cold patch” then the “hot mix” ma
terial added. None of the streets
has yet been finished.
Pandora To Get
Library
Plans for an extension of service
to two other Putnam county villages
and improvements to its building,
was made by members of the Put
nam County Library association at
a recent meeting in Ottawa.
Branch libraries will be opened
soon in Vaughnsville and Pandora,
pursuant to requests. Several hund
red books will be placed in each of
the branches and they will be circu
lated in compliance with the regula
tions in effect at the main library
in Ottawa. There are branches now
in operation at Columbus Grove and
Continental.
One of the funniest things in the
world is to listen to a bachelor and
a married man giving advice to each
other.
ate
e
rruths
first‘n
$$ted ***c
Steiner Chevrolet Sales
Bluffton, Ohio
Important to every motor car buyer is the fact
that Chevrolet, first In passenger car sales, is
also first in motor truck sales, because truck
buyers select the trucks that pay the greatest
returns.
The same qualities that distinguish Chevrolet
trucks exist in equal degree in Chevrolet pas
senger cars. You may choose your Chevrolet
solely for its beauty, comfort, or performance
hut you will get in addition that all-important
extra value.

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