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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, August 31, 1939, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
Fair Market Prospects
For Quality Potatoes
Fair market prospects for Ohio po
tatoes emphasize the need for care
ful harvesting and packaging so the
growth can obtain the maximum
amount for his crop, according to E.
B. Tussing, specialist in vegetable
gardening, Ohio State University.
Several factors are responsible for
loss of money on potatoes after the
crop has been produced. Immature
potatoes have thin skins which are
easily broken or the potato may be
damaged by lying in the sun after
digging. Broken skins on such po
tatoes detract from their appearance,
and the developments after sunscald
may ruin potatoes for cooking.
Good potatoes can be made into
culls by injuries in digging or
handling. Mechanical diggers should
be operated so the blade passes be
neath the potatoes. Enough dirt
should be lifted with the tubers to
protect them from bruising while
going through the machine.
Ohio potato growers have sold
most of their potatoes in nearby
markets so have not been greatly in
teresting in grading or packaging
the crop. Most women buyers now
adays do not buy potatoes in 100
pound sacks, and they watch the po
tatoes as the seller puts them in
small containers.
Buyers who see small potatoes,
ill-shaped tubers, or any other un
desirable ones usually prefer to pay
a few cents more for a
out-of-state stock which
in size and appearance,
annually are markets
thousands of bushels of potatoes pro
duced in states which have acquired
a reputation for marketing good
stock.
Ohio marketing laws require that
potatoes sold in packages be labeled
according to Ohio grades which are
the same as federal grades, except
that packages of potatoes can be sold
ungraded if they are labeled un
graded or grower’s grade. The
Bureau of Markets will inspect and
02020
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Tart
W.lght
par Bu.
W-
jw'-Ww
toww
B-'/v
71
.^A
29.2 Bu»
pat Acre)
Clear, unobstructed vision
always has been a feature of
John Deere tractors.
There are no rigs or brace
bars to obstruct your vision.
And you don’t have to look
behind to see the quality of
the work you’re doing—
you’re always looking ahead.
potatoes at a
certify the grades of
minimum charge.
Mr. Tussing says
bags have proved to
size of package for the retail trade
in potatoes. Roadside stands have
been successful in disposing of 60
pound bags of tubers. However, the
potatoes in the sack rather than the
container itself will determine wheth
er the buyer will give a repeat order.
that 15-pound
be a popular
Mt Cory
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Kinstle and
family returned home to their home
near Junction, Texas, after a two
weeks’ visit in the home of their
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Kinstle.
Arlo Kinstle returned to Bremerton,
Washington on Sunday.
Mr. and S. E. McClure and Mr.
Ralph McClure of Lima called on
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Shifferley, Sun
day afternoon.
Mrs. Evans and Mr. and Mrs. Ken
neth Brenner of Jackson, Mich. Mr.
and Mrs. Kenneth Woodward and
daughter Shelvia of North Baltimore
and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Shaeffer
and family were Sunday
guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Brenner.
Mrs. F. S. Woolfrom
spent the week end at
son and attended the
Fair.
package of
is uniform
Ohio cities
for many
dinner
Charles
children
and
West Jeffer
Ohio State
Sowell, Miss
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Pearl Goldsberg and Mr. and Mrs.
Lee Naylor of Flint, Mich., were
week end guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.
A. Naylor.
Mr. Jay Steiner of New Orleans,
La., Mrs. Henry Stauffer and daugh
ter Florence of Continental called on
Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Green and Mrs.
Joyce Rosenfelder on Friday after
noon.
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Garlinger,
daughter Helen, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Garlinger, Mrs. Buchanon and grand
son and Mrs. Julia Moyer of Find
lay called on Mr. and Mrs. John
Garlinger, Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Lewie Nusbaum of
Findlay Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hoch and
son Billie Joe of Rawson and Arlo
Ml
ain
•aV*'M®2 ***J: v
AM
i- /./?
V 'I*'"'
-J,. 'Vz
yVjl V
Wv
FBITILIZER
17.6 Bus
per Acre
49 U»
Tert
Weight
per Bu
4
John Deere Tractor—easy to see—easy to operate—easy to own.
Bluff ton Implement & Harness Co.
Bluffton Distributors fo John Deere Implements
the
Kinstle were entertained at Sunday
dinner in the Kinstle home.
Dr. and Mrs. C. R. Green and
family of Kirksville, Mo., were over
Sunday night guests of Mr. and Mrs.
C. L. Green and Mrs. Joyce Rosen
felder.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Renninger were
Sunday dinner guests of their par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Renninger.
Mrs. Martha Spangler of Kinsman,
Ohio is visiting in the Renninger
home.
The Mt. Cory W. C. T. U. institute
was held at the home of Mrs. Hazel
Steininger on Tuesday.
Miss Ruth Bowersox spent her
vacation with Miss Bonita Bowersox
in Clyde, Ohio, and Mrs. Lloyd Foltz
in Findlay.
Mrs. Addie J. Welsh returned to
her home in Marion, Ind., after a
week’s visit with Mrs. J. J- White
and Mrs. C. W. Bailey.
Mrs. Katie Nonnamaker spent
Saturday night with Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Nonnamaker and family.
Rev. A. E. McVey returned from
the Evangelical conference Sunday
evening. He will be pastor of the
Mt. Cory circuit another year. This
will be his seventh year as pastor.
A program consisting of music
and readings was presented at the
Evangelical church Sunday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bowersox and
family, Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd Rother
and family and Mrs. Anna Keel at
tended the Bowersox reunion at
Meadow Brook park, near Bascom.
Mr. J. J. White is improving at
the Findlay hospital, and expects to
return to his home the last of the
week.
Whatever may be your moral code
you shall have, not what you really
want, but what you are negligently
willing to tolerate.
Barrels which are kept filled with
water, buckets conveniently placed
and left near the barrels, and acces
sible ladders will help reduce the
toll taken by farm fires which cost
3,000 lives and property valued at
$95,000,000 in 1938.
^ed POTASH
YOU are looking forward to a profitable
grain crop next year and good clover or al
falfa the year following, then use fertilizer high
potash when seeding this fall. Potash in
creases yield, stiffens straw, and keeps the grain
from lodging. It improves quality by plumping
out the kernels and increasing test weight.
To insure good growth of clover or alfalfa fol
lowing grain, plenty of potash must still be avail
able in the soil. A 2-ton yield of clover hay re
quires 3 times as much potash as is needed to
produce 25 bushels of wheat 4 tons of alfalfa
need more than 7 times as much.
Use 200-400 lbs. of 3-12-12,0-12-12,0-20-20, or
similar ratios per acre for fall seedings. Often
the increased hay yields more than pay for the
fertilizers used, leaving greater profit from the
increased grain yields.
Consult your county agent or experiment station
about the plant-food needs of your soil. See your
fertilizer dealer. You will be surprised how little
extra it costs to apply enough potash to insure
good yields and high quality.
AMERICAN POTASS
INSTITUTE, INC.
lnv.atm.nt Building Washington, D. C. W
Midrtit Office: Lit. Building, Lafayatta, Ind.
.... we’ve always insisted on it!
mpons
nioreProfit
The new Models “A” and
“B” in the John Deere line
have been designed to give
you even better vision than
before.
As for economy of opera
tion—the John Deere two
cylinder motor has always
been a leader in this feature.
It cuts costs every day you
operate it.
BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
OTHSM
THE UNITED STATES
CONSUMES 67
OF THE WORLD'S
RUBBER
production
■RUBBER HH$
WAGE EARNER? A«P
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ELECTRICAL power unit fl
IS THE NAME OF A Ji
MAH JAMES
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ENGINEER ^736 18/9)
WHO WAS F’RTT TO
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THE POCKETBOOK
o/KNOWLEDGE
RUBBER
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BZZT MfVFA MA.-f AV
FieCTMCAL PfSCCVFW ^^1
mu iite.
Pandora
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hilty, daugh
ter Margaret and Mr. and Mrs. Irvin
Hilty are on a trip to Washington,
D. C., and New York, where they
will attend the World’s Fair.
the united states
the approaching marriage
daughter Emily Morgan
Iner Basinger son of Mr.
D. B. Basinger. The wed-
A guest program of the Grace
Mennonite church was given last
Sunday night at tihe church.
The annual Burry reunion was
held at the Pandora school Sunday.
School in Pandora will begin next
Tuesday.
Harry Cahill and son Robert were
in Columbus one day last week on
business.
Mr. and Mrs. Munson Thrapp will
move into the Amstutz apartments
formerly occuppied by Francis Nus
baums.
Miss Madeline Bixel, Mrs. Stella
Marshall and little Mary Lou Rust
left for Chicago, Monday morning
where they will visit Mrs. Lillian
Rust.
A. C. Coates, who has been
spending the summer in Michigan,
has returned to his home.
Howard Basinger has rented the
small home of Sidney Agner’s.
Mrs. Agnes Warkentin and child
ren have rented part of
Mrs. Karl Badertscher.
to move this week.
there are neara-v 300.000 jobs
IH -THE INDUSTRY.
have
Trout
Mr. and Mrs. Van
moved again into the Bixel apart
ment this week.
Mrs. H. M. Day and Mrs. Ger
trude Dow of Cleveland spent sev
eral days with Miss Harriet Krohn
and other friends and relatives here
the past week.
The annual Bible Conference of
the Inter-Church Prison Association
is now being held in Pandora. Many
outsiders are attending the confer
ence from a long distance.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller of
Parkersburg, West Virginia are an
nouncing
of their
Miller to
and Mrs.
ding is to take place in the United
Brethren church in Parkersburg next
Monday.
Fruchey are
baby boy
home last
Mr. and Mrs. Charles
the happy parents of
born to them at their
Thursday.
a
been hired
in the Old
Miss Margaret Hilty as
to teach Home Economics
Fort High schoo'i.
Mrs. David Wherly who has been
on the sick list is feeling some
at this writing.
better
Democratic Caucus
of the
Riley
At a meeting Monday night
Democrats of Pandora and
Township the fc flowing candidates
were nominated:
Mayor, Lennis Steiner.
Clerk, Cyril Hilty.
Treasurer, Adam Hilty.
Marshall, Ralph Basinger.
Council, James Sommers,
Basinger, Francis Kempf, Welter
Geiger, John Gerber, John Culp.
Joel
Reno Krohn who has been on the
council refused to run and Elmer
Burry who was on the council was
defeated.
For School Board, Aaron Hilty,
Ed. Schutz.
For Trustee, Hiram Schutz.
Township Clerk, Ray Hilty.
Constables, Barton Sutter
Adrian Eck.
The Republic ans will have
caucus Friday night.
and
their
Eggs marketed too infrequently to
preserve their quality tend to keep
down demand and prices for all eggs.
Southern farmers found their in
terests were tied in with those of
corn belt producers when the price
of lard began sliding downward in
1936. Huge supplies of lard have
brought its price and that for cotton
seed oil to the lowest levels since
1934. Recently, lard has sold for
less per pound than cottonseed oil.
AH INPUSTRlAt RESEARCH
LABORATORY KA* PROOUCFP
A METHOP FOR TREATING
WET HAY WHICH PERMITS
STORAGE WITHOUT DRYING
AND WITHOUT HAXARP OF FIRE
News Notes From
Four Counties
(Continued from page 3)
the $22,000 issue which will increase
the tax rate by 1.28417 mills.
The money will be used to pay the
village proportionate share of an esti
mated $81,000 expenditure to con
struct extensions of the village lateral
sanitary sewer system.
Films To Teach “Ohio
First”
Putnam county school children will
learn more of the geography of their
native state it was decided recently
by the Putnam county visual educa
tion committee when films for the cur
rent school year were selected.
A total of 21 Ohio travelogue films
will be shown throughout the county
as well as a larger number of agri
cultural, science and health films.
Wheat Allotment Is
40,0Q0 Acres
Slightly more than 40,000 acres of
wheat can be sown in Putnam county
by farmers participating in the soil
conservation program of 4,000 acres
over last year, Arnold J. Shroder,
county chairman, announced last
w’eek. Notices to the 3,000 farmers
participating as to the size of their
allotment have been mailed, he said.
69th Teachers Institute
Opens
The
the house of
They expect
sixty-ninth annual Putnam
County Teachers’ Institute opened
Wednesday morning. Two sessions
were held each day thru Wednes
day, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
Wheat Insurance Is
Available
Putnam county AAA commit
ready to begin the sign-up of
growers who want to insure
The
tee is
wheat
their 1940 wheat crop, according to an
announcement by Arnold J. Schroeder
chairman.
“The yields that may be insured
and premium rates, have been deter
mined for all wheat farms in the
county,” Schroeder said, “and all the
forms are on hand for completing ap
plications. This year ,the insurance
is being written in one operation, and
all the growers has to do is to fill uot
the application, indicate the acreage
he intends to seed, and pay the prem
ium.”
Under the insurance program, the
growers can insure either 50 or 75
per cent of their average yields ,as
determined for the base period of
1926-38. The insurance is “all-risk”
and protects against all unavoidable
hazards which may reduce the yield.
Trading Post Gets New
Quarters
The Trading Post, established by
Mrs. Bonnie B. Corns, Putnam county
relief administrator, has been moved
from the Utrup building to the rooms
on South Hickory street formerly oc
cupied by the Knox and Gable gift
shop.
The new rooms are on the ground
floor and are larger. The trading
Post has become widely known thu
out Ohio through news articles and
moving pictures detaining it mode of
operation.
Route 224 Is Publisized
Plans to distribute 29,000 maps
which will advertise the Benjamin
Franklin Highway east from Omaha,
Neb., are under way according to
Dale Agner, Ottawa, chairman of the
Benjamin Franklin Highway Associa
tion. Mr. Agner said every effort is
being made to promote New York
World’s Fair traffic over Route 224,
as it is marked in Ohio next summer.
The maps will be placed in hotels,
service stations .garages, taverns and
other places frequented by tourists.
104 Laid Off WPA
WPA rolls in Putnam county were
greaty reduced Monday, August 28,
as a result of an order received by
county officials calling for the layoff
of 104 ■workers who have been on
WPA employment for 18 months or
more.
The layoff for this group of work
ers is for a 30-day period after which
they can be recertified and reassigned
providing there is work for them.
The dismissals are in keeping with
similar layoffs in other Ohio counties
made mandatory by congressional ac
tion.
Elrose
Miss Lillian Koontz is doing house
work for Mrs. Marvin Reigle of
Beaverdam.
M. J. Stratton, Miss Flo Stratton
and J. D. Clymer and Ortho Stratton
motored to Mansfield, Sunday and
met the Alfred Kloetzley family of
Salem, and Mrs. M. J. Stratton who
had spent the week at the Kloetzley
home. They enjoyed a picnic dinner
and Mrs. Stratton returned to her
home.
and Chas. Nonnamaker spent
at the Ami Nonnamaker
Edw.
Sunday
home.
Miss
spent last week at the C. W. Kling
ler home.
Doris Christman of Findlay
Mrs. Russell Stratton, son
West Jefferson. Mr. and
Stratton, daughter Elaine
Mr. and
Scottie of
Mrs. B. J.
and son Ortho, Mr. and Mrs. C. W.
Klingler, Gladys, Dorotha, Jeananne
Klingler, Doris Christman, Jimmy
Scott, Mrs. John Battles, Miss Mabel
Battles and Joan Battles spent Sun
day evening at the M. J. Stratton
home.
Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Williamson at
tended the Reigle reunion Sunday.
Mrs. T. J. Koontz of Walbridge
is spending the week at the home of
her parents,
Fisher.
Mr. and Mrs. J. R.
Klingler and daughter
spending the week at
Mrs. C. W.
Jean Ann are
the Russell Stratton home in West
Jefferson.
Union prayer services at Bethesda
Thursday evening.
Sandusky U. B. Conference con
vened at Bowling Green, Monday.
Mrs. Ami Nonnamaker, Mrs. Lu
cinda Koontz, Mrs. Henry Koontz,
sons Richard, Russell and Raymond
spent Friday with Edw. and Chas.
Nonnamaker.
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Johnson return
ed last w’eek after a week’s visit
with relatives in West Virginia.
Miss Merilyn Battles spent the
week end at the home of her aunt,
Mrs. Bertha Wetherill of Weston.
Mr. and Mrs. Rolland Koontz and
daughter Martha Ann, Mrs. Lendon
Basinger, daughter Janet and son
Horses $3.00
THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 1939
Gareth called at the A. J. Nonna
maker and Anna Koontz home Fri
day afternoon.
The L. A. S. of Olive Branch will
meet with Mrs. Golda Battles, Tues
day afternoon, Sept. 5.
Miss Violet Slusser spent last
week at the Purl Hartman home.
Bobbie Koontz is spending the
week with Roderick Nonnamaker.
The five-day course in the conser
vation of Ohio’s natural resources
attracted 129 club members from 54
counties to Camp Ohio in Licking
county.
NOTICE
Notice for application under the Uniform
Depository Act, (Sec. 331 G. C. Sec. 2296
7).
Applications will be received by the Board
of Education of Bluffton School District,
Bluffton, Allen County, Ohio, at the office of
the clerk until 7:30 p. m. on the 31st day
of August, 1939 from any Bank legally eligible
which may desire to submit a written appli
cation to be designated as a public depository
of active deposits of public moneys of said
Board of Education of Bluffton School Dis
trict as provided by the Uniform Depository
Act, G. C. Sec. 2296-7.
Applications should be sealed and endorsed
“Application for Deposit of Public Moneys.”
LELAND DILLER,
18 Clerk of Board.
NOTICE
The Amstutz Cannery
will operate every week
day excepting Saturday.
Watch for further an
nouncements.
Amstutz Cannery
North of Bluffton on College Rd.
Bluffton phone 635-Y
USED
Tractors—Trucks
Farm Implements
Washing Machines
2 McCormick-Deering Corn
Binders
1 John Deere Corn Binder
1 McCormick-Deering Double
Disc
1 McCormick-Deering 5 ft.
Mower
1 John Deere 6-ft. mower, with
tongue truck.
1 McCormick-Deering No. 1-P
power drive one row pull
type corn picker.
2 McCormick-Deering 10-20
Tractors
SAVE...
1 Hoosier 12-7 Fertilizer Grain
Drill
1 Thomas 16-7 Tractor Drill
1 No. 500 Blizzard Ensilage
Cutter
2 McCormick-Deering Manure
Spreaders
1 International */2 Ton C-l
Pickup Truck
1 Maytag Electric Washer
2 Sets Slightly Used Tractor
Tires
C. F. NISWANDER
McCormick-Deering Dealer
Bluffton, Ohio
1-3 Your Cost
1-2 Your Labor
Raise Pullets Easier by free
choice feeding with Old Fort 30%
Pullets Choice Price per bag $2.70
Hens Choice Price per bag $2.75
Bluffton Milling Co.
Findlay Stove and Farnace Repair Co.
We repair cook stoves, heating stoves, heatrolas, and all
makes of furnaces.
We carry a complete line of new parts for every type of
stove. Send card or phone for free estimates.
1301 Washington Ave. Findlay, Ohio Phone 2076-R
FIRE BOWLS GRATES CASTINGS
HAVE YOUR FURNACE CLEANED NOW
WANTED —DEAD STOCK
WE PAY TOP CASH PRICES
Small Stock removed free
Quick Service
Cows $2.00
of charge.
Telephone Findlay, MAIN 475, Reverse Charges
BUCKEYE REDUCTION COMPANY’, Findlay, Ohio
__________________ “Branch, Fo-taria Animal Products, Inc."

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