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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, September 07, 1939, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR
EBENEZER CHURCH
P. A. Kliewer, Pastor
Thursday:
Teachers Meeting, 8 p. m.
Gospel Team, Bible study (Acts
19) and prayer service, 8 p. m.
Sunday:
Sunday school, 9:30 a. m.
Sermon, 10:30 a. m. Text: “The
Epistle of James.”
No Christian Endeavors—Grace
Mennonite choir of Pandora will be
guest in church at 8 p. m.
Tuesday:
Mixed Chorus rehearsal: “Ruth”
8 p. m.
“A tubercular patient needs a San
itarium, a sinner needs a Savior.”
And that Savior is the Lord Jesus
Christ. Is He yours?
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
(Above Postoffice)
Sunday services at 10:30 a. m.,
subject: “Substance.”
Testimonial meeting at 7:30 Wed
nesday evening.
The reading room at the church is
open every Wednesday from 2:00
to 4:00 p. m. The public is invited
to all services and to visit the read-
ing room.
This society is a branch of the
Mother Church, the First Church of
Christ Scientist, Boston, Mass.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
L. B. Remaley, Pastor
Sunday—9 a. in. Morning worship.
9:45 a. m. Communion service.
10:00 a. m. Sunday school.
6:30 p. m. Christian Endeavor. The
topic: “What Jesus Said About
Right Living,” Marcene Stonhille,
leader.
MISSIONARY CHURCH
Arthur Albro, Pastor
Sunday school 9:30 a. m.
Preaching 10:30 a. m.
Prayer service 6 p. m.
Young Peoples service 6:45 p. m.
Wednesday prayer meet at 8 p. m.
Fishing League, Friday 7:30 p. m.
Beginning Thursday evening Sept.
14 and continuing over Sunday, Sept.
17 each evening at 8 o’clock a Mis
sionary convention will be held. The
public is cordially invited to attend
these services.
EVANGELICAL REFORMED
CHURCHES
Emil Burrichter, Pastor
Emmanuel’s:
Sunday school 9:30 a. m.
Public worship 10:30 a. m.
Consistory meeting Monday at
8:00 p. m.
St. John’s:
Public worship 9:15 a. m.
Sunday school 10:15 a. m.
Jr. C. E. Sunday 6:30 p. m.
The G. M. G. meets Monday even
ing at the C. A. Stauffer home at
7:00 o’clock, with a Weiner Roast
after the meeting.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES
Charles M. Armentrout, Pastor
Rockport:
9:30 a. m. Morning worship.
10:30 a. m. Sunday school.
7:30 p. m. Christian Endeavor.
Here it is
•!&
This Sunday in Ae
hurchesH
HEATROLA
The Women’s Missionary society
will meet Wednesday, Sept. 13, at
the home of Miss Elnora Marshall.
Bluffton:
9:30 a. m. Sunday school, Mrs. W.
E. Diller, Supt.
10:50 a. m. Morning worship.
The subject of the morning medi
tation will be “But if Not”. A cor
dial invitation is extended to the
public to come and worship with us.
“I love them that love me and
those that seek me early shall find
me.” Prov. 8:17.
Pleasant Hill
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. P. Huber and
daughter of Elgin, Ill., Mr. and Mrs.
W. B. Huber of Mansfield and Mr.
and Mrs. Glen Huber of Rockport
were Thursday and Friday visitors of
Mr. and Mrs. George Huber and son.
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Zimmerman
were Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Cal Herr and family.
Norval Scoles and daughter Rhea
and Walter Booth were Sunday din
ner guests of Mr.'and Mrs. Clate
Scoles and daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hess and fam
ily spent Sunday and Monday with
Mrs. Lily Fett and Nellie Huber.
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wenger and
family called Monday evening on Mr.
and Mrs. Dennis Brauen and family.
Miss Dorothy Lugibihl spent sever
al days last week with Mr. and Mrs.
Lester Zerbe of Lima
Mr. and Mrs. Willard Jennings and
family called Sunday evening on Mr.
and Mrs. Earl Hilty and family.
Miss Phylis, Carolyn and Marilyn
Younkman of Beaverdam spent Sun
day and Monday with their grand
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lugibihl.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Flemmings and
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Flemmings call
ed Thursday evening on Mr. and Mrs.
Willard Jennings and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Traucht called
Monday morning on Mr and Mrs. Geo.
Huber and son.
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Hossafros
called Monday evening on Mrs. Lily
Fett and Nellie Huber.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Zimmerman
and son and Mr. and Mrs. Wayne
Zimmerman and daughter called Mon
day evening on Mr. and Mrs. Oscar
and H. 1'. Zimmerman.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hess and fam
ply and Mrs. Lily Fett and Nellie Hu
ber spent Sunday at Walker Lake
near Crestline.
Sunday evening visitors of Mr. and
Mrs. Glen Huber and family were:
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Huber and son,
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Roby and sons,
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Berryhill and
family and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Reich
enbach and family.
Mrs. Howard Turner and daughter
Marie of Cleveland and Mrs. Angie
Turner of Ada were week end visitors
of Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Barnes and
Jo Ann.
Mr. and Mrs. Joy Huber and Mr.
and Mrs. Fillhart of Jenera attended
the Indiana State fair held at Indian
apolis, Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Huber and son
called Friday evening on Mr. and Mrs.
Lyman Barnes and daughter Jo Ann.
the modern home heater—excels
in appearance and efficiency.
See Heatrola before you buy.
Bluffton Representative for Round Oak and Victor
Hot Air furnaces—estimates without obligation.
T. GREDING Hardware
WISCONSIN
By air around the state
whose sturdy pioneers
planned their future well
Prepared bv National Geographic Society,
Washington. D. C.—WNU Service.
Tmere
HERE are some things
that everybody knows
about Wisconsin. The
mention of the name
brings thoughts of cheese and
politics, woods-holiday s and
lakes. But what do its long
shores look like? Why is it
famous for the arts of gov
ernment? What is the char
acter of its many cities?
First, for a comprehensive
view, why not a swift air jour
ney around its borders?
The natural starting point
for this breezy excursion will
be Kenosha. Halfway between
Chicago and Milwaukee, this
city is squarely in the state’s
most accessible corner. Besides, it
was the first community in Wiscon
sin to establish a free public school,
and so is an appropriate place in
which to begin our learning.
Taking off from Kenoshts, then,
we go skimming like an inquisitive
sea gull up the shore of Lake Michi
gan. It is a long, straightish, sandy
shore. The beautiful patchwork of
green fields ends at a dark wood
land fringe—then a streak of pale
gold—then green water. Now and
again a river winds out from the
hinterland and empties into the
lake. In many cases the river
mouth has been made into a harbor,
and at each harbor is a city.
These cities follow one another
along the lake shore like a row of
buttons up the front of a green over
coat: Kenosha. Racine, Milwaukee,
Sheboygan, Manitowoc.
Now we must make a Jong hairpin
bend to follow the finger of Door
peninsula. What luck! The cherry
orchards are in blossom, white as
popcorn. And right through them
runs the glistening streak of the
Sturgeon bay and Lake Michigan
ship canal. At the finger’s tip the
beachy outer shore meets a rising
and often cliffy inner shore. Green
bowered Ephraim, with its white
gables and steeples nestled at the
foot of some of those first hills,
looks like a bit of New England—
though actually it was founded by
Moravian immigrants from Nor
way.
Sports Aplenty
Pleasure craft dash about like
waterbugs in the cove, and across
it, an incredibly green bald spot in
the dark woodland, is a cliff-top golf
course with people trudging about
in sweaters that bring specks of gay
color to the picture. This evidently
is a headquarters for holiday fun.
And so down Green Bay, which
(finger-shaped, too) points to an up
land continuation of itself, huge
Lake Winnebago. The hills that be
gan at Ephraim run on southward
past this lake and to it, up the Fox
river, steams a barge fleet laden
with coal, no doubt headed for in
dustrial Appleton or Oshkosh. Strad
dling the river where it empties into
the bay is the checkerwork of roof
tops and tree-lined streets of Green
Bay, one of the Midwest’s oldest
cities.
There are lakes aplenty. Here is
big Lac Vieux Desert, key land
mark of the interstate boundary.
Here arc the Manitowish waters, 14
lakes in one chain—what a place
for a boat and a basket of lunch!
Ahead no*v is the pale cold blue
of the largest of all American lakes,
Superior. Ore trains from Hurley
and the Gogebic iron mines in Mich
igan snake along briskly below us,
on their way to the docks at Ash
land.
After circling Chequamegon bay,
here we are over Bayfield peninsula
and the Apostle islands. You would
expect the Apostles to be an even
12 in number, but these are unbib
lically numerous. Weatherbeaten
fishing villages protrude from the
green of cedar groves on some of
them.
And so away to Superior. Wiscon
sin’s lake-head cort. Near its har
bor entrance are the docks from
STOCK SALES
For sale—Stock calves at Locher
sale stable. N. P. Steiner. tf
Service bulls Shorthorns and
Brown Swiss $1.50 Guernseys, Jer
seys and Herefords $1.00, plus 5
cents per mile one way. All bulls
t. b. and Bang tested. Ten bulls in
!i
IF
A front view of Wisconsin
Now inland aga
ney done. Almost
a glimpse of Mum
in the state, draj in
fringes down the I
of Pattison state 1
ing the jack-pine
here divide the
Mississippi basins.
84
i
Wisconsin's forests make the state one of America’s leading paper
producers. Here is a view of a Wisconsin paper factory, showing
the wet, crushed fibers being rolled into sheets.
s
imposing state capital building at
Madison, also the home of the
University of Wisconsin.
which vast quantities of Minnesota s
Cuyuna iron ores are shipped to
the east. Superior is especially
noteworthy, too. as a busy receiving
point for water shipments of eastern
coal. And to its docks and towering
elevators, from west to south, curve
the railway tra ks that bring the
grains and produce of mid-America.
half the jour
once we catch
u Falls, highest
their long white
ne-shaggy rocks
trk. And cross
highlands that
•eat Lakes and
we swoop down
over the St. Croix.
Scenic Beauty
This famously beautiful river, at
St. Croix Falls, sinks into its most
famous reach, the Dalles, where the
water swirls in tholes in the ruddy
basaltic rock. The white squares of
picnic cloths spread on the grass
are a reminder that Minnesota and
Wisconsin, some 40 years ago, here
established Interstate park.
Below Hudson the deep valley of
the St. Croix sweeps into the deep
valley of the Mississippi, and soon
their joined waters widen into Lake
Pepin. Here the Father of Waters
is at his grandest. Like an old king
of a peaceable people, who has
grown fat and cheerful, he spreads
out between the ramparts of the
hills, and naps in the sunshine. This
nap ends where the Chippewa river
enters. In fact, that hurrying
stream brings down the gravel that
dams the greater valley, and so
causes the lake to be.
The hills, as a rule, march down
to the edge of the outermost skein
of w’ater. But La Crosse, Wiscon
sin’s western gate, is built on flat
ground. This was the Prairie de la
crosse of the old days, when the
Indians played their game of la
crosse on it, 300 men at one time
often participating in the good
natured rough-and-tumble contest.
Down from the hills behind La
Crosse wind the coulees Hamlin
Garland made famous in his Middle
Border books—small, fruitful, won
derfully pretty valleys.
Prairie du Chien, too, is built on
a riverside flat place. This is his
toric ground. It was a neutral trad
ing center in Indian times. A battle
of the War of 1812 was fought here.
On the bank we can see the broad
beamed house where Jefferson
Davis woeed Zachary Taylor’s
daughter.
Variety Here!
At Shullsburg, among the rolling
hills, we catch a glimpse of zinc
and lead mines. Then mile on mile
of peaceful dairy country. The
brown of Brown Swiss, the black
and-white of Holsteins, taking an
evening browse in the pastures, tell
plainly that this is a land rich in
milk. Big white barns with twin
silos repeat the milky theme.
Now beneath us twinkle the lights
of Beloit, where weighing devices
are made by Fairbanks-Morse. And
above Lake Geneva, at Williams
bay, like an astronomer’s brow,
thoughtful in the starlight, the 90
foot dome of the Yerkes observa
tory makes a moony landmark
Finally, with its harbor lights danc
ing reflected, Kenosha again—and
welcome sleep in beds made here.
service. C. N. Long & Son. Phone
Ada Red 1360. tf
For sale—Registered Jersey cow,
3 years old, fresh. Lippincott Stock
Farms. Phone Beaverdam 451.
For sale—2 sows and 17 pigs. F.
C. Wilson, 7 miles east on Route
103.
News Want-Ads Bring Results.
Settlement
Leland Basinger and Miss Martha
Bucher were married last Friday.
The ceremony was solemnized by Rev.
P. A. Kliewer. Following the cere
mony the couple left for a few days
visit with relatives in Wayne county.
Mr. Basinger has been employed at
the Steiner Feed mill in Bluffton for
several years. Our best wishes go
with them.
Mr. and Mrs. Unruh, parents of
Rev. D. J. Unruh of Pandora arrived
here for an extended visit with their
son and family.
Rolland Burkhart entered the sheep
shearing contest which is being held
annually at the Ohio State fair and
copped high honors. He first won the
state championship and later in the
day he competed with two other
shearers who previously won state
campion honors and won in this event
also, thereby winning grand cham
pionship.
Many silos are being filled at pres
ent and some corn is being cut and
put into shocks. The crop is very
heavy.
Miss Rfith Bixel is not teaching this
year hut is continuing her work at
Ohio State university.
School days are here again. Many
a robust and playful chap resents the
idea of having books intefere with his
education.
Joel Basinger has purchased the in
terest of his brother Homer in the
Pandora Meat Market. Paul, Joel’s
son is assisting his father.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Schneck and
children were visitors in Berne, Ind.,
over Labor day.
Mr .and Mrs. John Stickel of Bowl
ing Green, Ohio, visited with members
of the David Wenger family over Sat
urday and Sunday.
E. E. Miller will soon operate his
cane press. Quite a large amount of
sugar cane has been raised this seas
on and a good run is anticipated.
Wilbert Schumacher, Melvin Zim
merly and Melvin Hilty exhibited
some of their Holstein cattle at the
Ohio State fair last week.
Mrs. Susie Boaz, daughter Ruth,
son Harold and Mr. E. D. Kohli spent
Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Clara R.
Green and family at their farm home
near La Fortune, Ind., where they
spent a part of their summer vaca
tion. They left for Kirkville, Mo. on
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Schutz and
family visited with Miss Gertrude
Hilty on Sunday afternoon. Miss
Hilty is at present at Memorial hos
pital in Lima.
Blanchard Amstutz of Royal Oak,
Mich., was an over Sunday guest of
Miss Lucile Geiger.
Miss Aneta, daughter of mission
aries, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Steiner, is
expecting to attend Wheaton college.
Her brother, Bradford graduated from
this school last spring.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Diller and
family returned from their western
trip several days ago.
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Niswander are
the proud parents of a baby girl born
to them on Aug. 29.
An invitation has come to Rev. D.
J. Unruh to conduct a week of evan
gelistic services at the First Mennon
ite church of Butterfield, Minn.
Miss Esther Hilty of Columbus
Grove is substituting for Miss Elvira
Niswander temporarily in the Pan
dora school.
The Pandora Women’s Christian
Temeperance Union held their meet
ing at the home of Mrs. D. J. Un
ruh on Tuesday evening.
A few changes are being made in
the Ben Niswander property which
has been purchased by the St. John
congregation for a parsonage. The
pastor and family are to occupy this
home by the first of October.
Word has been revceived of the
death of Daniel Diller of Phoenix,
Ariz.
The two year old son of Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Schutz is suffering from
tonsilitis since the first of the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Emory Diller and
son Dwain of Tiffin Mr. and Mrs.
F. P. Diller and daughter Winifred
of McComb Miss Barbara Diller of
Toledo Miss Susan Diller, Carol Nel
son and Kenneth Diller and Freda
Jane and David Yoder were enter
tained at the Menno Augsburger
home Sunday.
Miss Lena Augsburger, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Menno Augsburger
who spent a month’s vacation, re
sumed her studies at Moody Bible
institute at Chicago.
Choir of the Grace Mennonite
church will be heard in a program at
the Ebenezer church next Sunday
night at 8 o’clock.
Clement Suter, one of the well
known livestock breeders of the Set
tlement recently purchased a fine
registered Guernsey cow from Fred
Kandel of Urbana.
Orange Twp. Horses
Win Fair Ribbons
Two purebred horses entered in
the livestock department of the Ohio
State fair by Joe Powell, of Orange
township, won three ribbons and gave
Powell ninth place in the Belgian
division, last week.
Powell’s two-year-old mare was a
winner in two classes, and a stallion
took first place in one class. Plenty
of competition had to be overcome,
there being 27 entries in one class
and 40 in the other.
Powell has shown at the Ohio
State fair for the last five years.
Former Resident’s
Funeral Thursday
Funral srvics for Mrs. Noah
Thut, 65, formerly of this place will
be held Thursday afternoon at 3
o’clock at the South Union church,
one and one-fourth miles north of
West Liberty.
Mrs. Thut died at her home in
West Liberty, Monday night follow
ing an illness of several weeks.
Rev. E. S. Allguyre will officiate
at the funeral services Thursday
afternoon preeding which the body
will lie in state at the church from
2 to 3 o’clock. Interment will be
in the church cemetery.
Mrs Thut was born west of Bluff
ton on what is now the Amos Neu
enschwander farm, the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Eli Neuenschwander.
She was married to Noah Thut and
the couple moved to West Liberty
twenty-six years ago. She was a
member of Bethel Mennonite church
of that place.
Surviving are her husband of
West Liberty four sons John Thut
of Chicago, Ira of West Liberty,
Isac of Columbus and Harold of Orr
ville and two daughters Mrs. Edna
King and Miss Amelia Thut both of
Clevland.
Also survving are two brothers,
C. F. Niswander and Albert Niswan
der of Bluffton and three sisters
Mrs. Philip Hilty, Bluffton, Mrs.
Menno Bixel, Bellefontaine and Miss
Katherine Niswander, Philadelphia.
Rev. Gottshall To
Live In Cleveland
Rev. W. S. Gottshall, former
Bluffton Mennonite pastor is coming
to Cleveland this week to make his
home with his daughter, Mrs. Homer
Geiger, it was learned by friends
here.
Following his retirement from the
active ministry Rev. and Mrs. Gott
shall moved from Quakertown, Pa.,
to the Mennonite Home for the Aged
at Frederick, Pa.
Since the death of his wife early
last summer Rev. Gottshall has been
in failing health and will be cared
for at the home of his daughter.
His address is 1729 Allendale avenue,
East Cleveland.
News Want-Ads Bring Results.
IBW
FOOD SiOSgS
LB. 15c
SHREDDED
WHEAT
BREAD 3
FREESTONE ELBERTA
PICNICS
I9c
THURSDAY, SEPT. 7, 1939
Bluffton Gridders
In Daily Workouts
Bluffton High gridders are drill
ing daily at Hannon field under the
direction of Coach Dwight Diller in
preparation for the opening of a
grueling season that will see the
Pirates in action against some of
the best teams in this section.
Bluffton’s opening game will be
played Friday night, Sept. 15, in a
tilt with Pandora, a traditional
enemy.
WINDOW EXHIBITS
Some fine second crop raspberries
exhibited by Chas. Oehrli of Poplar
street were attracting attention in
the News window the first of the
week.
Also a dwarf ear of sweet corn
raised by Mrs. Rilla Marshall, 82
year old gartiner at her home on
North Main street was included in
the window display.
HIRSI TONE
FOR THE
HAIR
EIGHT O’CLOCK
AP) COFFEE
BAG
2
TWO SIZES
*500-1.00
Hirsutone stimulates
hair growth—checks
dandruff and falling
hair. An excellent
tonic!
A. Hauenstein
& Son xicivie:
19C
PKGS.
YUKON CLUB GINGERALE, Plus deposit.........4 Qts. 29c
PURE LARD............................................................4 lb. pkg. 32c
CHERRIES, Red Sour Pitted..............................No. 2 can 10c
CORN FLAKES, Sunnyfield.............................2 Ige. pkgs. 15c
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE..,.................................... Giant can 15c
CHIPSO, Flakes or Granules..................................Ige. pkg. 19c
KELLOGG’S CORN FLAKES.........................2 Ige. pkgs. 19c
SPARKLE ICE CREAM MIX.......................... ...3 pkgs. 10c
FLAVOR-AID.................................................................4 pkgs. 15c
TUNA FLAKES, Sultana.............................................2 cans 21c
MARSHMALLOWS................................................ cello bag 10c
BUTTER, Silverbrook...........................................................lb. 27c
A & SOFT TWIST
25c
Loaves
PEANUT BUTTER, Sultana.................................. 2 lb. jar 25c
& SOAP or KIRK’S FLAKEWHITE............. 3 bars 10c
MUSTARD, Battleship...........................................................Quart10c
APPLE BUTTER.................................................. 7 »/2 lb. jar 39c
PILLSBURY’S BEST FLOUR................................................. bag 75c
VELVET or PRINCE ALBERT TOBACCO................ can 10c
SUPER SUDS, Concentrated...........................2 Ige. pkgs. 37c
CHEESE, Wisconsin Cream........................................................lb.17c
SURE GOOD OLEOMARGARINE.................................... lb. 9c
GROWER MASH, Daily Growth......................100 lbs. $1.85
SCRATCH FEED, Daily Egg............................ 100 lbs. $1.45
EGG MASH, Daily Egg.........................................100 lbs. $1.88
WHITEHOUSE
MILK 4 c^8 23c
PEACHES, Iona............................................. 2 No. 2*/2 cans 25c
GRAPEFRUIT, Florida.........................................No. 2 can 10c
IONA FLOUR......................................................24 «/2 lb. bag 51c
ANN PAGE SALAD DRESSING.................................... Qt. 25c
SOAP CHIPS, Balloon.............................................5 lb. box 24c
CR1SCO or SPRY......................................................3 lb. can 48c
BEECHNUT COFFEE..................................................... lb. 28c
PASTRY FLOUR, Sunnyfield....................... 24 /2 lb. bag 47c
GOLD MEDAL FLOUR...................................................bag 77c
OXYDOL or RINSO...........................................2 Ige. pkgs. 37c
CERTO..................................................................... 8 oz. bottle 21c
JAR CAPS..........................................................................dozen 21c
MASON JARS............. doz. pints 59c.............. doz. quarts 69c
TISSUE PAPER
WALDORF 4
15c
ROLLS
PEACHES $1,19
HOCKLESS SMOKED
SLAB
A & FOOD STOPES
BACON
19c

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