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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, September 07, 1939, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1939-09-07/ed-1/seq-8/

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PAGE EIGHT
$80,000 Sewer Bond Is
sue Up To Voters
(Continued from page 1)
all materials, machinery’ for the plant
and other non-labor items.
Proportionate Share Higher
As a result, in the construction of
the intercepting sewers, Bluffton’s
share of the total expenditure would
be approximately 33-1/3 per cent, as
compared with the minimum WPA
sponsor requirement of 25 per cent.
Completely’ sewering the town and
building a disposal plant would cost
$400,000, the council was told. The
sponsor’s share of 25 per cent would
cover the cost of materials and non
labor items, it was pointed out, and
a bond issue for $100,000 would give
the town a completely new system,
modern in every detail.
Should the project be entirely hand
labor thruout, the cost would be $440,
000, with Bluffton’s share amounting
to $110,000. This figure was shaved
to $400,000, however, by specifying
that a trenching machine be used.
Trenching operations would cost $3,
000, but the total cost would be re
duced by $40,000.
Council Vote Unanimous
With estimates showing that a com
pletely new system for the town can
be obtained for $20,000 more than
the cost of intercepting sew’ers along
the stream banks, councilmen voted
to submit the larger project to the
voters in the November election.
Vote at Tuesday’s meeting was
unanimous, with five members agree
ing to have the $100,000 bond issue
included on the ballot. Elmer Romey,
the sixth councilman, is on a vacation
trip and did not vote.
Should the proposal be approved,
$80,000 in general obligation municip
al bonds w’ill be issued, and the re
maining $20,000 W’ould be obtained
from special assessment revenue
bonds. The bonds would run for 25
years and would require an average
tax levy of 2.3 mills during that
period for their retirment, according
to estimates presented to the council.
Bonds cannot regularly be issued in
excess of five per cent of the valua
tion of the towm. Bluffton’s five per
cent maximum is $113,333.75, but the
municipality now has $29,333.75 in
outstanding bonds. Consequently a
maximum of $84,000 in additional
bonds can be issued.
Special Assessment
The $20,000 special assessment
W’hich would be required would be
levied only on property owners who
have sewers emptying into the muni
cipal system, and each w’ould pay a
flat rate rather than payments being
made on the basis of property valu
ation.
Estimates on the cost of the system
were prepared by Champe, Finkbeiner
and Associates, Toledo engineers, and
wrere presented to the council at their
meeting last Friday by C. E. Pettis,
of the firm.
This will be the third time in recent
Sells For
35c
Per Quart
FREE
BRILLIANT ERONZE
POLYMERIZED—LEADED—REGULAR OR ...
ETHYL GASOLENE
years that the sewage disposal propo
sition has been presented to Bluffton
electors at the polls.
zslmevican
Heroines
Uy
LOUISE M. COMSTOCK
Antonia Ford
A
SOUTH EKN belle before the war,
daring spy for the Confederate
forces during it. bride of a Yankee
officer after it: that is the story of
Antonia Ford, heroine of the Civil war.
Antonia was a commissioned lieu
tenant in the Confederate army, an
honor very rarely accorded a woman.
Just how she first began to operate as
secret agent we shall perhaps never
know. Our first evidence that she was
serving the South in an official capac
ity is in a letter written to her by
Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, appointing her
his honorary aide in camp. This was
written in 18G1, when Antonia was
twenty-three.
It was not until the late summer of
1862 that Antonia’s work for the Con
federacy became a matter of record.
In August of that year North faced
South making ready for what was to
be the Second Battle of Bull Run.
Working unsuspected in Fairfax this
charming Southerner was able to pick
up information essential to the wait
ing Condererate army. Having no
other way to forward it, Antonia set
out on horseback, over picket guarded
roads, in a pouring rain, at length
reached General Stuart at Manassas,
twenty-odd miles away.
It was some time after this that
Antonia rendered her greatest service
to the South. In March, 1863, three
Union corps in charge of Brig. Gen.
Stoughton were stationed at Fairfax
to protect the capital. At this time
Col. John S. Mosby, an Independent
scout, had roused high feelings by his
repeated raids against the Union
stronghold. Then suddenly, from Al
die, twenty miles south of Fairfax,
Mosby led his men against the town,
and with midnight and rain to aid
him, slipped through a gap in the
Union pickets and took calm posses
sion of Fairfax and General Stough
ton's troops! It was a spectacular vic
tory, and the information as to the
gap in the lines that made it possible
came from Antonia Ford!
As a result of this Antonia was ar
rested. But the Union officer sent to
conduct her to Washington proved to
be an old friend, Maj. Joseph C. Wil
lard, who promptly fell in love with
his fair captive. Through his efforts
Antonia was released within a few
months. Thereupon she smuggled the
major, bundled in rugs In the hack of a
buckboard, through the Union lines
and back to Fairfax, where she mar
ried him. Antonia died In 1871 and is
buried in Oak Hill cemetery, Wash
ington.
©, 1932. Western Newspaper Union.
“Please send $400 dollars at once
the school is bankrupt and each stu
dent has to pay double tuition.
Kindly make check out to me. Your
son, Bob, Jr.”
1OO*
A BRAND NEW BRAND
In order to acquaint all motorists with the top quality of
this new 100% Pure PENNsylvania Motor Oil, we will give
one quart, refinery sealed can “ABSOLUTELY FREE” on
Saturday, Sept. 9th
WITH THE PURCHASE OF SIX GALLONS OR MORE OF
FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BESF|
SAVE 2c
BRILLIANT BRONZE STATIONS
Ralph Diller
South Main Street and Bentley Road
Third Grade (CHEAP) Gasolene is NOT sold at—
BRILLIANT BRONZE STATIONS.
Sells For
35c
Per Quart
PER GALLON
under our normal
price every day—
AT ALL—
TO EARN ENOUGH 10 BUY A SWIFff WITH
ATTACHEP COLLAR, A 5WFPI5H WORKER
MUST WORK THREE T/MES AS LONG
AS AN AMERICAN, A F1WHCHMAH 5'/%
TtMEi AS ZCWG, A GERMAN 9 A
TIMES AS LONG.- ANO AN ITALIAN
IT TIMES At LONG!
Mrs. Deihm sent leaves from this
albuo throughout the country and
gained concessions from the express
companies to transport them free of
charge. She received an endorsement
of her idea from the chief justice of
the United States and other high offi
clals, who called upon all Americans
for co-operation In the plan. But for
some reason the idea was not received
as enthusiastically as Mrs. Deihm had
hoped. The safe was to have been
locked up and sealed on December 31,
1S76 but when the number of signa
tures in the albums was found to he
far short of the number she desired,
its closing was postponed time after
time.
The scheduled “closing for 100 years”
didn’t take place until 1879. Then it
was sent to Washington where she
hoped to have it placed in the rotunda
of the Capitol where its doors were
to be closed with great ceremony and
where it was to remain until 1976.
The authorities, however, would not per
mit its installation in the rotunda but
did allow it to be set up in one corner
of Statuary hall, formerly the cham
ber of the bouse of represen1 atives.
Then the closing of the doors “with
great ceremony" proved to he a dis
appointment. President Hayes, who
was expected to he present, sent his
secretary to represent him. Many oth
er notables also failed to appear.
A short time later congress decided
that tills big iron safe was out of place
in a hall devoted to statues of Amer
ican notables and ordered its removal.
So it was taken to the place where
it now stands—a secluded spot iiudei
the great steps in the center of the
east front of the Capitol. Thousands
of tourists have passed within a few
feet of it without ever seeing it or
knowing its history.
Since that time the front has rusted
and one of the two handles on the out
er doors has been broken off. But it
makes no difference, for no one re
members the combination to the safe,
anyway. Moreover the key to the in
ner doors of plate glass has disap
peared, no one knows where.
So that is why an “official safe
cracking” is due to take place in 1976.
It will be the only way to open this
treasure house of relics. Inside one
of the outer doors Is an inscription
which reads “It is the wish of Mrs.
Deihm that this safe may remain closed
until 1976, to be opened by the Chief
Magistrate of the United States.” One
wonders who that man will lie and if
he will fulfill her wish or disappoint
her as President Hayes did.
Western Newspaper Union.
FIFTY FAMOUS
FRONTIERSMEN
By ELMO SCOTT WATSON
“The Father of Oklahoma”
CONSIDER
THE BLUFFTON NEW!
THE POCKE
of
KNOWLEDGE
CLAMS
TANGERINES
ARE NAMFP
FOR THE
Crry OF
TANGIER, in MOROCCO
Birr /N TANGIER. THEY
ARE CAL1EP A •MANPAR/NE
CORPOROy IS TRULY
ROYAL FABRIC------ FT WAS FIRST l/SEP TP MAPP
HUNTING GARMENT* FOR FRENCH RlNtS TNEy
NAMED CT CORDE-DU-RO1*. WHICH MEANS
COPP OF THE NIN6
vuriosa
Americana
By Elmo Scott Watson
Official Safecracking
FORTY
years from now there’s going
to be an “official safecracking” in
the United States Capitol at Washing
ton. Thereby hangs the tale of a wom
an’s dream of doing something for pos
terity and how it didn't work out as
she had planned.
She was Mrs. C. F. Deihm and In
1876, when other Americans were look
ing back over 100 years of American
history, she was looking forward a
century. Her Idea was to Install a
"centennial safe" In Memorial hall at
the Philadelphia Centennial exposition
to be filled with articles which would
be Interesting to Americans of 1976
when the safe would be officially
opened. But chiefly her idea was to
put in it great albums containing pho
tographs and autographs of celebrities
of the day. Also there was one large
album with a blank space below the
name of each person who wrote his
name in it so that the direct lineal
descendant of the signer might record
his name below his ancestor’s, when
the safe was opened In 1976.
the paradox of Capt.
David I.. Payne. He was the “fa
ther of Oklahoma,” yet he was a na
tive of Indiana be was given his first
name because of an event which took
BLUFFTON. OHIO
OOK
THAT MEASURE
AND 6 FEET ACROSS
ANO WEIGH HALF A TON *RE
FOUNp IN THE WATERS 0rF
AUSTRALIAN COAST AMP THE EAST
INDIES
CHINA,8*1TWH INPIA ANP
RUSSIA,WHICH TOGETHER
HAVE HALF THF EAPTtf*
POPULATION. HAVE ONiy
^^VNREE-FCN/RTNS
AS MAN/ TELEPHONES
as new
yoPKCtry,
WHICH HA« APPROXIMATELY
1,569.000
place in far-awat
is buried in Kai.si
steadfastly resist*
move his body to 1
latter state has
recognition beyond
original counties after
is he died and
which state has
attempts to re
ihoma and the
von him no official
naming one of its
him.
nt. Ind., December
r. who was a first
•ockett, named him
the frontier-rela­
Born tn Falruo
30, 1836, his moth*
cousin of Davy 'r
David in honor
tive who had di 1 gloriously at the
fall of the Alamo a few months be
fore. At the age *’r twenty-one Payne
moved to Kansa- and took up a claim
near Atchison. He served in the Civil
war in the Fourth Kansas regiment
until 1863 when he was discharged.
Then he became a member of the
state legislature and postmaster at
Fort Leavenworth.
In 18G7 he was elected captain of
a Kansas cavalry troop formed to
fight the Indians and campaigned
actively in the western part of the
state. During the next two years he
served with Gen. George A. Custer
and his Seventh cavalry and, as the
boon companion of the famous Cali
fornia Joe and actor in many a hair
breadth escape from death, won great
renown as the "Scout of the Cimar
ron.”
The year 1870 found him back In
politics again, as a member of tha
state legislature of Kansas, as an un
successful candidate for the state sen
ate in 1872 and finally as doorkeeper
of the house of representatives in
Washington where he remained until
1879. During his service as a scout
for Custer, Payne had seen for him
self the richness of the land in Okla
homa and in Washington he macle the
discovery, as he believed, that the
lands in the western part of Indian
territory, which had been ceded by
the Creek Indians to the government
for occupation by the other Civilized
Tribes and by freedmen, in reality be
longed to the public lands of the
United States.
So Payne became the first “Okla
homa boomer” and the leader of no
less than six of the eight expeditions
of homeseekers, all of which tried to
settle there and were expelled from
the disputed territory by federal
troops. Payne died sudenly In Well
ington, Kan., November 27, 1884—
“poisoned by his enemies,” so his
friends declare—five years too soon
to enjoy the realization of his dream.
©. 1933. Wesw» Newwpaper Union.
mencan
dventurers
By Saw Scott Watson
Immortalized by a Dam
DONNE VILLE dam in the Colum
bia river perpetuates the mem
ory of an adventurous explorer who
was both a great success and a
great failure. In 1832 French-born
Capt. Benjamin Bonneville of the
United States army obtained a leave
of absence to engage in a fur trading
expedition on condition that he ex
plore the trans-Missouri West and
obtain information concerning the
Indians, the topography of the coun
try and its economic possibilities.
Two years later he set out at the
head of a party of 110 men.
Commercially his venture was a
complete failure. He built forts in
such poor locations that the fron
tiersmen called them “Fort Non
sense.’’ Some were so high in the
mountains that they were cut off
from the outside by the first snows
of winter. But his expedition was
successful in that he explored the
route through South Pass for wagon
trains and mapped the passage of
the Columbia river through the Cas
cade mountains.
After his return to the East he
met Washington Irving. The result
was the book “The Adventures of
Captain Bonneville.” It became a
“best seller,” but it did not help
Bonneville’s reputation greatly. He
had long overstayed his leave and
when President Jackson reinstated
him many people protested that he
should have been dismissed from
the service instead.
Bonneville proved them wrong by
his conduct during the Mexican war.
In 1852 he became commandant at
Fort Vancouver, 30 miles down the
river from* the dam that now bears
his name. He was brevetted a brig
adier general in 1869 and died in St.
Louis in 1878.
NC-4 Stopped There 20
Years Ago During
Pioneer Flight.
Prepared by National Geographic Society,
Washington. D. C.—WNU Service.
Welcoming the Yankee Clip
per on its transatlantic flights
at Horta, Azores islands, is not
a new thrill for citizens of the
city.
The navy plane, NC-4, which
took off from Newfoundland
on the first transatlantic flight
in 1919, landed at Horta on May 17.
Commanded by Lieutenant-Com
mander Albert C. Reid, the NC-4 was
one of three planes that made the
“hop.’’ Two planes failed 200 miles
short of the Azores. One was forced
down and abandoned by its crew and
the other was lost in fog, landed on
the sea, and taxied to Ponta Del
gado, the metropolis of the islands.
Lindbergh Stopped There.
Again the citizens of Horta peered
into the skies on November 21, 1933,
and greeted Col. and Mrs. Charles
A. Lindbergh as they descended
into the harbor from Lisbon on
their epochal flight around the north
Atlantic.
The Azores port, since then, has
frequently been visited by transat
lantic flyers, especially during 1938,
which was a boom year in transat
lantic flying. Among the planes
alighting on the harbor were the
German Nordmeer and British Mer
cury, the latter the famous picka
back plane. The city was also host
to the crew of the German Branden
burg and the French Lieutenant de
Vaisseau Paris.
It took 17 hours and 33 minutes
for the Yankee Clipper to reach
World Eyes
New Bolivia
Tin Coveted
Dictator Busch Can Sway
Market of Important
Raw Metal.
Prepared by National Geographic Society.
Washington, D. C.—WNU Service.
Bolivia’s newly established dicta
torship can affect foreign countries
more than would changes in many
other parts of South America, be
cause Bolivia’s government is
financed mainly by the revenue
from its exports, and its exports—
particularly tin—are in strong de
mand.
Tin, one of the strategic metals
highest on the United States’ want
list, is Bolivia’s number one product
and is responsible for its biggest
business. As the third greatest tin
producing country of the world, Bo
livia is the nearest source for that
metal to all countries of the New
World, since its chief competitors
are the Federated Malay States and
the Netherlands Indies in Asia.
Transatlantic Air, Cable Lines
Focus on Tiny Azores Islands
Most of Bolivia’s tin ore exports,
however, go to Great Britain, since
there are no tin smelters in Bolivia
or the United States. Bolivian tin
returns to the Americas from Brit
ish smelters.
In Bolivia “the tin standard’’ sub
stitutes for the gold standard. This
metal constitutes from two-thirds to
nine-tenths of the country’s exports
and export duties in this land of
impoverished agriculture and limit
ed industry are the chief sources of
the government’s income. During
1937 the nation produced 12 per cent
of the world’s tin output.
But Bolivia is by no means a one
metal land. Some 98 per cent of her
exports are minerals, tin being fol
lowed in value by silver, lead, anti
mony, zinc, tungsten, copper, and
bismuth. In antimony, too, the
country ranks third on the list of
producing nations. Its position is
now of added importance because
China has previously been the lead
ing source of supply but is no longer
a factor in the world market.
In addition to utilitarian tin and
I he Spanish silver of such romantic
ore. exports of rubber, quinine, and
vot!_ chmrhiHa fur help to make
Grace Choir To Be
At Ebenezer Church
Choir of the Grace Mennonite
church of aPndora will be heard in
a guest program at the Ebenezer
Mennonite church w^st of Bluffton
Sunday night at 8 o’clock. The
choir is under direction of Miss
Hilda Amstutz with Misses Eulalia
L/i
OLD AND NEW—Aviation his
tory is made twice at the Azores.
Upper photo shows the NC-4 rid
ing at her moorings there during
the epoch-making transatlantic
flight of 1919. Twenty years later,
in lower photo, the Yankee Clip
per stops at Horta.
Horta but the NC-4, two decades ago,
was in the air only 15 hours and 17
minutes. A glance at a map of
the Atlantic shows that the differ
ence in time is explained by the dis
tances flown. The Yankee Clipper
took off from Baltimore, Maryland,
about 2,800 miles west of Horta the
NC-4 started from Newfoundland to
the northwest, which is about half
the distance.
Transatlantic Cable Station.
Horta is the principal port and
largest city on Fayal island. Near
ly one-third of the island’s 20,000
inhabitants live in the city whose
white, red-roofed buildings sprawl
along the shore of one of the finest
harbors in the Azores.
Situated on the southeast shore of
the island, the harbor is subject to
heavy winds, but a half-mile-long
jetty makes it a sought-for haven
during stormy weather. Fifteen to
twenty large vessels may safely an
chor in the harbor at a time.
Horta was significant as a trans
oceanic communications center
even before transatlantic flights
were made. It is the most important
junction point of transatlantic ca
bles. In one of its buildings six com
panies—British, German, Italian,
French, and two American—are
housed. They handle messages for
stations in North America, Europe,
and South Africa, and by intercon
nection for stations in every part of
the world.
i
I
1
DICTATOR Col. German
Busch, youthful president of Bo
livia who dismissed his congress
and set himself up as dictator,
promising to give his people an
election in a few months.
Bolivia known to the outside world.
Some estimates rank Bolivian for
ests second to those of Brazil for
production of South American rub
ber since much of the smaller
country’s forest products float down
the headwaters of the Amazon to
Brazilian ports, their origin is ob
scure.
In an area more than twice as
large as Texas, Bolivia supports
only 55 per cent as many people as
the Lone Star state. This is the
only South American nation without
access to the sea directly from its
own ports Bolivia lost her coastal
territory to Chile after the War of
the Pacific nearly 60 years ago. The
land-locked Andean plateau, cradled
12,000 feet above sea level between
two snow-capped ranges with peaks
exceeding 21,000 feet, has so im
pressed popular imagination—with
its “world’s highest capital, La
Paz,” and its “world’s highest
steamer service” on Lake Titicaca
—that the low tropical plains to the
east of the mountains are frequent
ly forgotten. Yet these extensive
lowlands constitute about 70 per
cent of the nation’s 537,792 square
miles. On the south they merge
into the Gran Chaco, scene of the
most recent war in the Western
Hemisphere.
Steiner organist and Wanda Suter
pianist.
Except for the period 1931-34,
July farm prices in Ohio averaged
the lowest in any year since 1911.
Except for 1931-32, Ohio July prices
for wheat and corn were the lowest
for that month of any July since
records were begun in 1908.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 7, 1939
SS"-1..............
■■■■■"■1
Fraud Charged In
School Case
(Continued from page 1)
the Bluffton-Richland school district
to which the territory sought to be
transferred, could be legally and
properly transferred, and that man
damus proceedings would be com
menced forthwith, if the respondent
failed and refused to make the prop
er transfer as, demanded, before the
election that was to be held the
following Tuesday, April 19, 1938.
“Respondent says that it had no
opportunity to make any’ investiga
tion as to the truth or falsity of the
aforesaid representations, so made by
relators as aforesaid, and that it did
not make any investigation as to the
truth or falsity of such statements
so made, as aforesaid by relators and
relief upon the statements so made
by’ relators and their counsel as be
ing true.
“That the respondent had at the
time, taken no poll of the district or
territory’ and had no information as
to the false and fraudulent represen
tations made by relators, other than
given to it by the relators.
Say Members Misled
“That certain members of the re
spondent board of education, fully re
lying upon such false and fraudulent
statements, and then believing them
to be true, were misled and coerced
into voting for the passing and
adopting a resolution to transfer said
territory’.
“Respondent says that immediately
after April 16, 1938, it investigated
the aforesaid statements, so made to
it by relators on April 16, 1938, and
learned of their falsity. There was
no such district in the State of Ohio,
as the Bluffton-Richland School Dic
trict to which such territory could
be transferred. A poll of the resi
dent electors of the territory’ sought
to be trasferred was taken which
showed that fewer than 75 per cent
of the resident electors thereof had
signed said paper writings.
“That thereafter, at the regular ad
journed meeting of April 16, 1938, to
wit, April 20, 1938, and being immed
iately after said false and fraudulent
statements, as aforesaid, had been
found to be untrue, and no steps hav
ing been taken upon such motions to
transfer, and there being no interven
ing rights, this respondent board of
education rescinded the action so er
roneously taken on April 16, 1938.
“This respondent says that on the
27th day of May, 1938, at a regular
meeting of the Hancock county board
of education, respondent herein, the
petition of relators was finally reject
ed.
“This respondent specially avers
that the paper writings referred to in
relators’ petition for mandamus, as
petitions to transfer have not and
never had the signatures of 75 per
cent of the qualified electors of the
territory sought to be transferred by
the relators.
“Wherefore, this respondent asks
that the petition for mandamus be
dismissed and for such other relief
to which respondent may be entitled.
The petition is signed by C. A.
Blackford, Findlay and Knepper,
White and Dempsey, Columbus attor
neys for the county board, and is
sworn to by Carl L. Davis, president
of the board.
Inspection Tuesday
At Richland Grange
Inspection night will be held at
Richland grange next Tuesday, with
County Deputy H. T. Morris, of
Lima, taking part in the program.
A varied program has been ar
ranged including an educational topic
by Mildred Fett and an agricultural
subject by Raymond Stratton. A
contest will be directed by Anna
Huber and special music will be pro
vided by the grange quartet. As a
cksing feature a playlette will be
presented.
Hold County Hybrid
Corn Day Friday
Allen county hybrid seed corn
growers will hold their annual hy
brid corn day at the state test plot
on the Dwight Capbell farm, seven
miles west of Bluffton, Friday after
noon.
Dr. G. H. Stringfield and Dr. L.
L. Huber of the Wooster Experiment
station will be in attendance to
speak on comparative advantages of
hybrids and also the effect of the
corn borer in relation to hybrid
varieties.
Hog And Wheat Prices
Soar On Market
(Continued from page 1)
now being inclined to hold their hogs
in anticipation of still higher prices.
Wheat
at
78 Cents
Wheat, likewise, skyrocketed to top
levels, being quoted at 78 cents a
bushel Wednesday morning, an ad
vance of ten cents over Saturday’s
market close.
Corn, likewise, went to higher
levels, 52 cents per bushel being
quoted Wednseday.
Dealers here were unwilling to
predict future course of the market.
With trading proceeding at a fever
ish pace almost anything can happen
now, it was pointed out. “A week
ago there was a surplus of grain,
lard and meat—with hardly any
sale for it—now there appears to be
a scarcity and everybody is crazy
to buy” was the way one dealer
summed up the situation.

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