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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, January 18, 1940, Image 8

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PAGE EIGHT
Faltering before the superior
strength of Findlay college eagers
after a game first-half performance,
the Bluffton college five went down
to a 35 to 20 defeat, last Thursday
night at Findlay.
During the first half of the con
test, Bluffton battled the crack Find
lay outfit to a 12-12 tie score, and
there was hope that the Beavers
might break their disastrous losing
streak.
It was all Findlay after the half
time intermission, however, as the
Orangement sank difficult shots from
all angles. In the face of the “hot”
streak of the Oilers, Bluffton’s of
fense and defense bogged down and
the home team coasted to an easy
victory.
Bluffton’s scrappy cagers led most
of the way in the first half, with
Findlay pulling up to tie the score,
only shortly before the gun brought
the period to a close. Findlay had
knotted the count on two other occa
sions, but each time the Burckymen
had what it took to go out in front
again.
College Cagers Falter In Second
Half Lose To Findlay Five, 3o-20
At one time in the opening period
Two games, one at home and the
other on a foreign court, will be
played within the next week by
Bluffton college’s improving cage
outfit.
Cedarville’s crack five will oppose
the Beavers this Thursday night on
the Bluffton court, and on Tuesday
night of next week the Burckymen
will play at Ohio Northern.
College Five To Play Cedarville
Here Thursday At Ada Tuesday
With George Radulovich’s injured
leg nearly healed, Coach A. C.
Burcky is hoping to have his team
at full strength for the Cedarville
assignment. If he returns to the
lineup it will be the first time since
the first week in December that the
Beavers have not been hit by in
juries.
Cedarville has five veterans from
Bluffton High cagers will play two
games at home in the next week,
meeting North Baltimore here this
Friday night, and opposing Colum
bus Grove next Tuesday.
Since the first of the year the
Pirates have not been defeated at
home, and in four starts on the local
floor during the season the Diller
men have lost but one.
Backers of the Bluffton crew are
hopeful that the Pirates will con
tinue their winning streak at home,
SUGAR
MILK
YOUR CITY MARKET
STOP SHOP SAVE
CITY MARKET
COFFEE
BOLOGNA, Large...................................................... 2 lbs. 25c
CHEESE, Cream.............................................................. lb. 19c
CLEO, Fresh...................................................................... lb. 9c
Temple Oranges
OXYDOL.....................................................................large 19c
RINSO......................................................................... large 19c
& SOAP................................................................ 3 for 10c
Sunrise
OYSTER CRACKERS.....................................................lb. 10c
CRACKERS, Soda.................................................... 2 lbs. 15c
PAR-T-JELL, All Flavors...........................................3 for 10c
PEAS-CORN-TOMATOES 8c
PEACHES, Freestones...................................2 large cans 25c
PINEAPPLE........................................................ large can 19c
PEANUT BUTTER, Bulk...............................................lb. 10c
KRAUT HOMINY 3 & Z5c
Bluffton had a 9 to 6 advantage,
their widest of the game.
At the start of the last half, Find
lay ran the count to 16 ot 12 before
Bluffton could break the scoring ice.
The Beavers then pulled up to trail
by only two points, 18 to 16, but
from that time Findlay literally ran
away with the game and Bluffton’s
hopes were gone.
Findlay’s conquest over Bluffton
was the team’s sixth victory in
eight starts.
Bluffton
West, f. 3 0 6
Holcomb, f.................... 10 2
Reichenbach, c.................2 2 6
Backensto, g. 0 3 3
Yoder, g. 0 0 0
Heiks, f------------------- 0 0 0
Lehman, f. 0 0 0
Thutt, c---- 0 0 0
King, g....... 0 0 0
McLaughlin, g----------- 0 2 2
Truax, c. 0 0 0
Warren, g.------------- 0 1
Sommers, g.-------- 0 0 0
Totals--------- 6 8 20
Findlay------------------- 14 7 35
High School To Play North Baltimore,
Columbus Grove In Home Cage Tilts
last year’s outfit, which twice de
feated Bluffton, but the Beavers
have been showing constant improve
ment and the Bluffton mentor be
lieves his crew will have a good
chance to capture their first victory
of the season in Thursday's game
here.
As a special contribution to the
national campaign against infantile
paralysis, five cents of each thirty
five cent admission ticket sold at the
Cedarville game will be turned over
to the Bluffton fund.
In the tilt against Ohio Northern,
the Beavers will be tackling their
sixth Ohio conference foe. Altho the
Bears have a fast-traveling outfit,
Bluffton is doped to keep in the
running all the way despite their
under- dog rating.
altho North Baltimore and Colum
bus Grove each have been playing a
good brand of ball.
Improvement has been in constant
evidence of Bluffton’s play since the
close of the Christmas vacation
period, however, and chances are
that the locals will end the season
with a balance on the winning side.
In nine games played thus far, the
Pirates have won four and lost five,
but held the edge in scoring, 281 to
their opponents’ 280.
Granulated E
SOUP BEANS...........................................................10 lbs. .39c
PANCAKE FLOUR............................................ 5 lb. sack 17c
KARO SYRUP................................................................ can 10c
$4.9®
& 55©
25C
Sweet Doz.
BANANAS, Golden Yellow...............................................lb. 6c
HEAD LETTUCE...................................................... 2 for 15c
LEAF LETTUCE............................................................ lb. 10c
Grapetruit LX 10FQR 29c
GRAPE NUTS.............................................. 2 large boxes 25c
CRISCO...........................lb. 19c...........................3 lb. can 51c
MARSHMALLOWS.................................................... 2 lbs. 25c
CHIPSO a X9c
5^-39c
THE BLUFFTON NE
Honor Bluffton
Lumber Dealer
(Continued from page 1)
position of its first vice president is
an old established and influential
trade organization, numbering in its
membership lumber dealers thruout
Ohio. A gathering of more than
2,000 is in attendance at the Dayton
convention this week.
Prominent in Association
Steinman is well known thruout
the state in the lumber trade and
has been active in the. work of the
association. During the past year
he was the association’s second vice
president. He is also president of
the Bluffton Board of Education,
past governor of District 13-A of the
Lions club, former president of the
Bluffton Lions club and also active
in Masonic circles, being past com
mander of the Findlay commandery
of Knight Templars.
National significance is attached to
the address of Thurman W. Arnold,
assistant United States attorney gen
eral who will address the convention,
Friday.
Others on the list of speakers in
clude Roy T. Wenzlick of St. Louis,
internationally known because of
past accurate predictions concerning
building costs and volume Walter
Scales of Washington, D. C., tech
nical engineer for the National Lum
ber Manufacturers association Don
Campbell of Lebanon, Ky., former
president of the National Retail
Lumber Dealers association W. J.
Cheyney of New York, vice president
of the National Retail Furniture as
sociation and Wm. Abernathy of
Atlanta, Ga., prominent southern
manufacturer.
In the announcement of Steinman’s
election as vice president the Dayton
convention also announced “Home
for the Money in 1940” as its theme
for the current meeting.
Turbine Arrives
At Light Plant
(Continued from page 1)
give the Bluffton plant its first turbo
generator. When the municipal plant
was first equipped it was impractical
to consider turbine generating equip
ment because the local load was not
heavy enough.
For economies in operation, a
turbo-generator should not be used
when the load is less than 500 K. W.
according to engineering opinion. It
has only been in very recent years
that output of the Bluffton plant has
passed that mark.
Installation of the turbine will
give the town improved service, and
in addition the guarantee under
which it is sold assures operating
economy of at least 40 per cent.
Economies in operation will be
represented principally in fuel sav
ings, it being estimated that ap
proximately $5,000 less will be spent
each year for coal when the unit is
put into use.
No Bond Issue
Net cost of the modern Westing
house turbine, complete with a direct
coupled exciter and surface condens
er, is $14,000. This is being paid
from the plant’s cash balance, and no
bond issue will be required.
One of the light plant’s present
battery of three Skinner uniflow
engines is being traded on the gen
erator. This is a 150 K. W. unit,
for which a credit allowance of $1500
was made, reducing the purchase
price of $15,500, including freight, to
a net cost of $14,000.
After the turbine is set up and
checked the Skinner engine will be
dismantled and shipped to the Power
Plant Equipment Co., of New York
City, from whom the turbo-generator
was obtained.
Following its installation, the tur
bine with the two remaining Skinner
engines will give the local plant a
capacity of 1,350 K. W., which should
be sufficient for the town’s require
ments for years to come.
Bluffton Boosters
Win Over Bradfield
Bluffton Boosters emerged victor
ious in the opening tilt of the second
round of play in the Lima American
league last Thursday night by best
ing Bradfield Center in a tight game,
27 to 23.
Bluffton led all the way in van
quishing the negro outfit the second
time this season, but Bradfield stayed
within striking distance to keep the
final outcome uncertain.
Score at the quarters with the
Boosters out in front was: 8 to 5
17 to 11 and 23 to 17. Jim Morri
son, of Bluffton, and Jerry Brown,
Bradfield star, each had nine points
to their credit.
Morrison is tied with Bollinger,
house star, for the scoring lead in the
American league. Each has tallied
52 points in loop play. Morrison’s
vere made on 23 fielders and six free
throvns. Bollinger racked up 20
fielders and 12 charity tosses.
Bluffton
Swank f...................... 1 0 2
Fisher ........... ....... 1 0
9
Diller f............. ....... 2 2 6
Murray c........... 9 0 4
Morrison g....... ....... 3 3 9
Kindle g........... ....... 0 0 0
Miller g............. 2 0 4
Lora .............. ....... 0 0 0
Totals .... .... 11 5 27
Eradficld........... ....... 9 5 23
rruN. UtHU
FIFTY FAMOUS
FRONTIERSMEN
By ELMO SCOTT WATSON
The First Forty-Niner
ONE
spring day in the year 1848 a
horseman came galloping through
the streets of San Francisco, sprang
from his weary horse and rushed
through the plaz.a, hatless and travel
stained, waving aloft a little bottle
filled with
soidp
shining particles and
shouting “Gold! Gold! Gold from the
American river!”
Thus it was that Sam Brannan,
frontiersman and adventurer, won the
title of “the first Forty-Niner.** For
he was the first to bring to San Fran
cisco authentic news of the discovery
of gold by James W. Marshall near
Sutter’s Fort.
But this was not the only historic
‘first” in the career of Sam Brannan.
Back in the late thirties and early for
ties he had boon a Journeyman printer,
a free lance writer, an editor and “a
natural-horn promoter.” Also he was
a full fledged elder In the Church of
the Latter Day Saints until the Mor
mon leaders a little later had occasion,
and very good reason, to expel him.
In July. 1846. he brought to Califor
nia a colony of some 300 Mormons, the
first American colonists to reach Yerba
Buena, the little Spanish settlement on
San Francisco bay. Immediately he
began on the series of his historic
“firsts”—he preached the first English
sermon ever heard there, he solemn
ized the first American marriage on
California soil, he set up the first flour
mill and gave the settlement Its first
newspaper, the California Star.
After he was expelled from the Mor
mon church, he became the first Cali
fornia promoter by getting out a spe
cial edition of his Star and sending
2,000 copies of the paper overland to
the Mississippi valley and the eastern
states, extolling the virtues of the
country to prospective settlers.
Then came the discovery of gold and
Brannan’s role as “the first Forty-Nin
er.” His sensational announcement of
the gold discovery depopulated San
Francisco within a few days and re
sulted in Sutter’s little kingdom of
“New Helvetia” being overrun by a
swarm of goldseekers.
In the wild era that followed, Bran
nan prospered. He was gambler and
banker, merchant and hotel owner, im
porter and exporter, gold digger and
real estate speculator, shipowner ana
smuggler. As San Francisco grew he
loomed larger and larger on its hor!
zon, and at last was ruling It like a
Chinese mandarin. Then misfortune
overtook him. His later career was
one of "ups and downs" but he never
remained entirely down, and when he
died In 18S9 at the age of seventy, h»
was fairly prosperous, in contrast to
the poverty of Sutter and Marshall.
Uncommon
Americans
—..... By Elma Scott Watson----------
Yankee Saint
hundred years ago they
looked upon John Humphrey
Noyes as a madman, a crank, a
heretic and an immoralist. But to
day the historians speak of him
as “a Yankee saint,” a ‘‘true
genius” and ‘‘ore of the noblest
pioneers America has ever pro
duced.”
Born in Vermont, Noyes was edu
cated at Dartmouth and prepared
himself for a career in law. But
the religious fervor which swept the
country in the early 1830’s seized
him and he entered Andover theo
logical seminary to prepare himself
for the ministry. However, after ob
taining his license to preach, Noyes
began to rebel against dogmatic and
professional religion. Becoming
known for his heresies, his license
was taken away from him. Then
he announced he was going to es
tablish a kingdom of God on earth
and he founded the Putney com
munity in Vermont.
There he put into practice his phil
osophy of Christian Communism
which included the most intimate
relationships of living. Because of
these daring experiments, Noyes
was repeatedly persecuted y
groups of reformers and more than
once he narrowly escaped imprison
ment. Finally, he moved his colony
to Oneida, N. Y., where it became
famous for the successful industries
it started.
In 1869 Noyes inaugurated anoth
er experiment which brought down
upon him a fresh storm of protest
from the exponents of traditional
morality. He called it “stirpicul
ture” which was nothing more than
a program of scientific breeding for
the human race long before the
word “eugenics” had been coined.
The results of these experiments
are said by actuarial experts to
be unparalleled in the records of
modern vital statistics.
In 1881 his Oneida community was
changed to a corporation and by
tiie time of his death five years
later there was little left of the
original idea of the community but
its name. During the next half cen
tury the name of John Humphrey
Noyes sank into obscurity. Then his
biography was written by a modern
scholar who has declared: “How
ever obvious his defects remain,
John Noyes possessed the attribute.
of genius Such a life has
seemed far more worthy of cm
memoration than many of those mure
celebrated, more honored by tb?
nation and the -v-n’d, yet who no...
dared, as No' ?s did, to
ideals into tr i v
PRESIDENT
AT CONFERENCE
Dr. L. L. Ram seyer, president of
Bluffton college, has been attending
several college conferences in the
east as the official Bluffton represen
tative this week.
The conferences Dr. Ramseyer in
dicated he expected to attend upon
hl3 departure Tuesday included the
Bluffton High Loses
To Willshire, 25-21
After getting away to a 7 to 5
lead in the first quarter, Bluffton
High cagers were unable to keep
pace with Willshire in a contest at
that place last Saturday night and
finally lost out to the Van Wert
county outfit by a score of 25 to 21.
After leading at the quarter, the
Pirates had dropped six points be
hind at halftime, trailing 9 to 15,
and the third quarter mark found
them on the short end of a 13 to 21
count.
Bluffton’s attack revived in the
closing quarter when the Dillermen
counted eight points to four for
Willshire, but the advantage of the
opponents was too great to over
come.
Injuries hurt the Pirates in the
tilt at Willshire. Gratz was unable
to get into action because of a
wrenched ankle sustained on the pre
ceding night in a game with Celina.
Zuercher, who took Gratz’ place in
the lineup played a fine game, how
ever, and ended by being the leading
scorer of his team with eight points.
Bluffton’s loss to Willshire was the
first reversal the Pirates have suf
fered since the resumption of play
after the Christmas holiday recess.
Bluffton
Zuercher, f. -.... ____ 3 2 8
Beidler, f. _____ 2 0 4
Cooney, c........ .... _____ 0 2
0
Schmidt, c. ......... _____ 0 0 0
Fisher, g......... .......... 2 0 4
Burkholder, g. ... ____ 1 1 3
Short, g. ....... ........ 0 0 0
Totals _____ 7 5 21
Willshire ......-.... ...........11 3
25
Recreation Center
Men’s volleyball play in the high
school gymnasium will be held this
Wednesday night. During the winter,
dates for volleyball competition will
be shifted from week to week, to
adapt play to the schedule of other
events in the gymnasium. Notice of
play for the next week will be an
nounced in this column regularly.
Bluffton players will compete in an
Allen county ping pong tournament
at Lima this Saturday. Winners will
be eligible to compete in district play.
Bluffton’s entrants will be as fol
lows:
Youths, over 15—Robert Watkins
and Dick Backensto, singles Dale
Davidson and Robert Watkins, doub
les.
Boy’s division, 15 and under James
Clark and Fred Herrman, singles
Clark and Herrmann, doubles.
Girls, over 15—Geneveive Fett, de
fending Northwest Ohio champion,
and Betty Weinhold, singles.
Girls, 15 and under—Ruth Garmat
ter and Lavonne Wilch, singles.
Reserves Win Twice
By Identical Scores
Bluffton High reserves won two
cage assignments by identical scores
during the past week, trouncing Ce
lina seconds here on Friday night,
26 to 25, and winning over Willshire
understudies at Willshire on Satur
day by the same count.
Against Celina, the Bluffton sec
onds trailed at the quarter 6 to 8,
but tied up the count at halftime,
10-all. The Pirates were ahead 21
to 15 at the third quarter.
At Willshire, Fritchie paced the
Reserve attack with 11 points, and
Rich Gratz got eight.
Bluffton 2nds
.............. 7
12 26
Celina 2nds ........... 11 3 25
Bluffton 2nds 10 6 26
Willshire 2nds ....... .....10 5 25
Kansan Speaks
To Student Body
Dr. E. L. Harshbarger, professor of
history and international relations at
Bethel college, Bluffton sister institu
tion, spoke at college chapel services
Friday morning.
Dr. Harshbarger, former teacher at
Bluffton high school and college, gave
the students an insight on the Euro
pean situation as he saw it this sum
mer while traveling in Europe and as
a student at the Academy of Interna
tional Law at The Hague. He was
one of ten Americans awarded a fel
lowship by the Carnegie Endowment
for International Peace. Having re
turned from Europe as late as Aug.
26, Dr. Harshbarger gave a very vivid
picture of the European scene.
In the evening at 7:30 he spoke at
the First Mennonite church on the
topic, “Lights Out Over Europe.”
Dr. Harshbarger was on his way
back to Newton, Kansas after having
served as a member of a committee of
the three historic peace churches in a
conference with President Roosevelt
at Washington, D. C. This committee
interviewed the President together
with other cabinet officers on the sub
ject of service in time of war which
would be consistent with the philos
ophy of conscientious objector.-. The
Kansas educator said that the delega
tion was well received by the adminis
tration.
meeting of the Association of Ameri
part of this week in Philadelphia,
can colleges, the Association of
Church-Related colleges and the As
sociation of the Boards of Religious
Education, ail being held the latter
Taking a one-point lead in the
last two seconds of play, Bluffton
High cagers last Friday night best
ed Celina High’s Bull Dogs by a
score of 26 to 25,
It was the Pirates’ third victory
in a row', and also gave them a
clean record in the Western Buckeye
High school league, the tilt with
Celina being Bluffton’s first loop as
signment of the season.
It has been a long time since
Bluffton cage fans have seen as
thrilling a tilt as that played here
last Friday. Starting strong, the
Dillermen had a 10 to 3 lead at the
first quarter, principally because of
some fancy basket shooting by Beid
ler and Gratz, each of whom got
four points in the period.
Celina’s offense was clicking in the
second quarter, however, and the
visitors rolled 13 points thru the
nets to trail by only two points. 18
to 16, at halftime.
It was still a neck to neck race
thru the third stanza, the score at
the quarter mark standing 23 to 21,
■with Bluffton still out in front.
Cooney was Bluffton’s principal
point-getter in the second and third
quarters by racking up nine points
in the two periods.
Bedlam broke loose in the fourth
period, as Celina took the lead, re
linquished it to Bluffton, then tied
the score and finally dropped behind
..........""
T. A. Kitchen went last week to
Marinette county, Wisconsin, accom
panying a number of prospective
land buyers. John Manges also was
one of the party.
High School Wins Over Celina In
Last Second By Score Of 26-25
—, 1 tw *tt, -1 dm im —tn 4M4«—H«—»!»■■■» __
NEWS OUR FATHERS READ
FROM ISSUE OF JULY 31, 1913
—. .... —_____
Next Tuesday, August 5, the town
of Bluffton will be in gala attire for
the big homecoming to which every
resident of Bluffton and vicinity,
former and past, is cordially and
urgently invited to come. The en
tire town is being cleaned up and
prepared for this celebration and the
authorities at the college, on the
campus of which the celebration is
to take place, are making extensive
preparations.
Ralph West, of Berne, Ind., was
an over-Sunday visitor with his par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Fletch West.
Miss Zanna Staater is home from
the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music.
Architect DeCurtins at his own
expense is replacing all outside doors
at the new high school building.
Mr. W. H. Michel, who taught in
Bluffton High school the last half
Team Standing
ream W Pts. Opts.
Bluffton High 4 5 281 280
Bluffton College 0 7 202 321
Coming Games
Thursday, Jan 18
College vs Cedarville, here
Friday, Jan. 19
High School vs North Baltimore, here
Tuesday, Pan. 23
High School vs Col. Grove, here
College vs Ohio Northern, there
Bluffton High Varsity and Reserve
cagers in four games last week really
turned in a freak scoring perform
ance.... Tn three of four games the
scores were identical, and in the
fourth one-half of the same count was
duplicated... .The Pirate seconds won
games from Celina and Willshire by
the same score, 26 to 25... .Bluffton’s
Varsity trimmed Celina 26 to 25, and
Willshire the next night also made
25 points against Bluffton but the lo
cals got only 21.
Bluffton High’s best performances
have been at home this season... .The
Dillermen have won three out of four
starts on the local floor.. .Away from
home they have dropped four games
in five starts.... Bluffton college’s
outlook is brightening, Coach A. C.
Burcky reports, despite seven straight
losses... .The Beavers looked much
improved in the Findlay contest last
week.
Next year’s cage team at the col
lege should be one of the best in sev
eral seasons, Coach Burcky said. .Sev
en tall freshman candidates are look
ng good .and if they return next year
they should team with returning vet
erans to good advantage.. .Some idea
of the headache in coaching these
days, hov-ever, is seen in the fact that
Findlav college has 40 freshman bas
ketball candidates.
In cooperation with the national
THURSDAY, JAN. 18, 1940
again just at the close of the con
test.
Meyers hoisted a free throw for
the Bull Dogs early in the fourth
quarter and Celina trailed by only
one point. He then added a field
goal, and the visitors were out in
front 24 to 23.
Clyde Fisher, who had made only
two points in the first stanzas,
broke loose for a fielder, but the
Pirates’ advantage was short-lived
as Hattry tossed a free throw to
knot the count at 25-all.
W ith barely two seconds remain
ing Fisher was fouled, and his toss
went squareiy thru the nets to give
the locals a well-earned 26 to 25
victory. Cooney scored nine points
for Bluffton and Gratz got six, to
set the Fixates’ scoring pace.
Bluffton has won three of foux*
home games this season.
Bluffton
Gratz, f.________ ___ 3 0 6
Zuercher, f. _________ 0 0 0
Beidler, f.____________ 2 0 4
Cooney, c. 17 9
Schmidt, c.---------------10 2
Fisher, g.__________ 2 15
Herrmann, g._________0 0 0
Burkholder, g._________0 0 0
Howe, g.-------------------- 0 0 0
Totals-------------------- 9 8 26
Celina ----------------------io 5 25
Mackinac, Mich.
Rev. Thomas M. Chalmers, director
of the New Tork Evangelization
Society, Brooklyn, N. Y., who has
been visiting in this vicinity since
last Thursday, will leave next Sat
urday for a trip west. Rev. Chal
mers married one of the Van Gunten
girls, three miles south of Bluffton.
The annual Sunday school picnic
of the German Ev. Lutheran Trinity
congregation of Jenera, will be held
on Thursday, August 7, in Michael
Traucht’s grove, south of Jenera.
Mrs. S. W. Stratton is in Lakeside
hospital, Cleveland, and will take
treatment for several weeks. She
passed thru a successful operation
the first of last week.
Clair Fett and Lysle and Donavin
Baumgartner are visiting this week
in Toledo with Ralph Bixel and at­
tending the Perry Centennial cele
bration.
E. B. Betzner will return from
Berlin, Ontario, the last of the week.
He will greet his many friends on
many inenas on
of last year, will not return to BluffjHomecoming day.
ton next year. GERMAN SETTLEMENT
The population of Bluffton in 1910 Noah Thut purchased thirty-six
was 1,953, a gam of 170 over 1900,-acres of land in Logan county recent
Beaverdam 455 in 1910, a loss of 221y and expects to move to that place
since 1900 of Richland townshipin the near future.
1,806, outside of Bluffton and Bea- P. B. Hilty and wife will leave
verdam, a loss of 33 since 1900. today for a trip through the western
C. A. Arganbright is rattlingstates. They will visit their daugh
around in Editor Biery’s shoes thister, Mrs. Lizzie Gerber, in Oregon,
week, while the latter and son,They will be gone about three
Clarence, are on a vacation trip tomonths.
SHORT SPORTS
drive against infantile paralysis,
Bluffton college will contribute five
cents from each single admission tick
et sold at the Cedarville game Thurs
day night to the Bluffton fund.. .Only
Bluffton, Defiance and Cedarville re
main in the Northwest Ohio confer
ence and it is not likely that any tro
phies will be awarded this season....
Wilmington has dropped out to join
the Ohio conference.
Beaverdam defeated Columbus Grove
last week 25 to 20.... Then Beaver
dam dropped out of a tie for lead in
the Allen county league when topped
by Lafayette, 24 to 17....This gave
Spencerville undisputed posession of
first place... .Lima South topped Cen
tral last week 26 to 23.... Findlay
college’s clash with Kenyon at Find
lay this Thursday will be a relief per
formance for Findlay.. .Cridersville’s
Roger Phillips has scored 270 points
in 12 games, 11 of which have been
won by Cridersville....... Wapakoneta
topped St. Marys in a Western Buck
eye league game last week, 21 to 20..
Rawson, beaten by Bluffton High, is
tied with Van Buren and Arcadia for
the lead in the Hancock county league.
Jumping Beans
Most Mexican jumping beans
come from the province of Chihua
hua they are the seeds of various
members of a family of swamp
trees listed as euphorbiaceous
plants. When the plant is in blos
som a small moth (Carpocapsa sal
titans) lays an egg in one part of
the flower. The hatched larvae bore
into the growing beans but do not
attain full growth until the beans
are hard and ripe. The larva in
side the bean moves it by cniling
up and then suddenly extending it
self. Later in the season it cuts a
circular door through the bean and
changes to a pupa, and then, when
the pupa is transformed to a moth,
it escapes through this door. Close
examination of the bean will show
this means of exit.

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