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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, June 27, 1940, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
Early Combining
Takes Largest
Toll Of Grain
Ohio farmers are becoming more
efficient in the operation of combine
harvesters, but a lot of grain still is
wasted by too early harvesting and
by operating the combines with ad
justments and at speeds not recom
mended by the manufacturer of the
equipment.
Professor G. W. McCuen, agricul
tural engineer, Ohio State Univer
sity, believes that beginning harvest
too early is the worst fault of com
bine operation in this state. The
only sure way to check the time to
cut wheat is to make a moisture
test of the grain itself.
Professor McCuen suggests that
farmers shell out a pint of wheat
from the field about 10 days after
they would have started a binder
and have the sample tested for mois
ture at the elevator. Wheat that
tests about 14 per cent moisture can
be comoined safely.
Worries about the amount of
wheat lost by shattering when it is
permitted to stand until dead ripe
are unwarranted because very little
wheat is lost in that way. Several
other types of harvesting losses take
much more grain than ever was lost
in Ohio by shattering.
Too little clearance between the
concaves and cylinder of the com
bine will increase the difficulty of
separating the grain from the finely
chopped straw. It is better to leave
an occasional grain of wheat in the
heads than to grind the straw so
finely that much more grain is lost
through failure to separate.
One farmer who found some un
threshed grains asked the combine
operator to set up the concaves.
This was done and the loss at the
cylinder was reduced but more than
six bushels of wheat per acre came
through without separation. Read
justment of the concaves reduced
this waste more than five bushels
per acre without increasing the loss
at the cylinder appreciably.
The rate of speed at w’hich to
operate the combine most efficiently
is stated by the manufacturer. The
rate also is influenced by the con
dition of the crop and by the height
of cutting. Adjustments should be
made in the first round or tw’o, not
after the field is half cut.
Farmers producing both oats and
wheat will find it profitable to let
wheat stand a few' extra days if the
oats become dead ripe before the
wheat harvest is finished. Oats
lodge and shatter badly when dead
ripe and the liability of loss is much
greater than from ripe wheat.
Corn Borers Resent
Bad Farming Methods
Corn borers get disgusted with
homes in Ohio fields where com is
raised continuously, and their dis
gust is based on the difficulty of
obtaining an easy living under such
conditions.
D. C. Foster, agricultural agent
in Paulding county, quotes reports of
work done at the county experimen
tal farm to prove this statement.
There were borers in 87 per cent of
the stalks where corn averaged 110
bushels per acre, 88 per cent of the
stalks where corn averaged 110
bushels per acre, 88 per cent in corn
yielding 98 bushels, and 21 per cent
where the com yields were very low.
The different yields were obtained
in tests of the influence of different
rotations on corn production. Four
year rotations produced 98 bushels
per acre, three-year rotations with
mature sweet clover plowed down
produced 110 bushels, and corn
grown continuously produced the low
yields.
The residues of the corn crops
were disposed of in ways supposed
to be effective in controlling corn
borer but the method of disposal ap
peared to have less influence on the
borers than the condition of the
growing crop. A two-year rotation
of corn and oats produced 55 bushels
of com per acre with borers in 45
per cent of the stalks.
Mr. Foster is no friend of the
corn borers and is not interested in
providing them with comfortable
homes, but he declares that Paulding
county farmers will have as much
difficulty in deriving a living from
low' corn yields as the borers do.
He suggests that it is better to give
the borers a few’ extra bites once in
three or four years with corn pro
duced once in the rotation than to
ruin the land and partially starve
the borers by growing corn con
tinuously.
SPENCER
wspaper Union.
Ordering From French Menus
YOU may belong to that great
army of people like myself who
can’t make heads or tails out of
fancy hotel menus. Words like pate
de foi gras and hors d’ oevres, al
ways make me feel dumb. Even
when the waiter asks me whether
I am ordering a la carte or table
d’ hote, I never knew what he was
talking about until I looked it up
recently.
Table d’ hote is a French phrase
literally meaning table of the host
or landlord. Up until the middle of
the Eighteenth century, restaurants
and hotels as we know them now
did not exist in Europe. The old
inns were run on sort of a family
plan, whereby everyone sat at the
table of the host and took whatever
was put before him.
There were no menus from which
one could order a la carte, which
means according to the bill of fare.
No one could pay for each dish
separately, depending on what he
wanted, but had to pay for the whole
meal whether or not he liked all the
courses. Thus table d’hote came
to mean a complete meal served in
courses at regular hours for a fixed
price.
A la carte and other such phrases
were added by chefs who wanted to
give an impressive air to their res
taurant. They can now buy books
with all the French and Italian
phrases written out, and often use
them without knowing what they
mean. But when you get in a tight
spot over one of them, you can al
ways tell the waiter to “Bring me an
order of bacon and eggs.” They
know what that means in any lan
guage. And then, as a final touch,
you might add, ‘’Sprinkled with par
sley.”
If you are leading “a dog’s life”,
be sure that it is the life of a St.
Bernard—those splendid watches of
the Alps
“KLING-TITE”
DOUBLE
VAC-U-HOOK
FOR AUTO—HOME—OF FICE—FACTORY—ETC.
Easy to applv—holds tight—cadmium plated
-FREE-
SATURDAY, JUNE 29th
with the purchase of six (6) gallons of either—
[LILLIAN! I KCNft
POLYMERIZED—LEADED-REGULAR OR
JOHNSON ETHYL GASOLENE
FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST
SAVE 2c
Per gallon under our normal price every day—at all_
BRILLIANT BRONZE STATIONS
RALPH DILLER
South Main Street and Bentley Road
Phone 455-Y for Tank Truck deliveries.
______Third Grade (CHEAP) Gasolene is NOT sold at Brilliant Bronze Stations.
ENGLAND CLAIMS HER *MOTU£R GOOSE'IN THE
PERSON OP AN OLD WOMAN NAMED MARTHA
GOOCH WHO LIVED IN SUSSEX, ENGLAND
ABOUT 1704. AS A NURSE, SHE OFTEN
crooned melodies
AND SOON GAIN ED THE
DERISIVE TITLE OF
"MOTHER GOOSE’A LATER
FWTRON WHOSE CHILD SHE
NURSED MS SO INTERESTED
N HER SONGS THAT HE
HADWI'PRIffWBYJOHN
WORWINGTON.INTHESW
IN 1712 UNDtR THE TTT1E0F
M&LOOE5 AND W/ME5 OF
MOTHER GOOft BUT THAT,
TOO. 15 UNSUPTOPTO aflDBd
THE FIRST aNM OF AN AMERICAN MOTHER GOOSE IS
TW MOTHER 5OQ5fc«*$ EU1AB0H GOOSE, WfflCW OF ONE
ISAAC VER5a»ORG005LA)MOW?INlAWOFOr«1HOMK
FLEEtA WELL KNOWN 0BTCN PRINTER WHO CAW THERE IN 1712
MOOED INI75& HE FWE£ W T?IJ THE FIRST COLLECTION OF
MOTHER GOOSE MEIDOiES? UNFORTUNATELY,THERE ARE NO
COPES OR OWCIAL RECORDS OF THEIR EXISUZCE. ITWAS
5A©TW!WS MOTHER GOOSE WAsWyOWWCLMDIN A
SHOETroRSHE MACSOrANYaANOQIILDRENTUATSHEMIO
50*»TO1WtM-^HE SC*« 0* MOTHfcR &OOS..
WNUSwno.
Catharine Hilty was born at Sou
boz, Canton Berne, Switzerland, on
Jan. 5, 1815, and departed this life
at the home of her daughter, Mrs.
Fred Geiger, on March 26, 1907. She
had reached the mature age of 92
years, two months and 21 days.
Saturday, W. E. Houck, of Find
lay, who was here in the interest of
the Boss Glove Mfg. Co., of Ke
wanee, Ill., posted a notice at the
Citizens Bank, stating that all girls
desiring employment in the new
glove factory should report for work
Monday noon.
John T. Bates, who w'ith his family
left here about 12 years ago, and
moved to Lima, died in that city,
THE BLUFFTON NEWS. BLUFFTON, OHIO
THE EARUI KNOWN COLLECTION
OF NURSERY RHYMES WAS PUBLISHED
ABOUT 1740 BY JOHN NEWBERRY OF
LONDON.THESE WERE MADE POPULAR BY THE
BOSTON EDITIONS OF MONROE FRANCIS
1824-1860.SINCE THAT TIME MH.UONS OF COPIES
have been published in all sizes. shapes
AND FORMS ENTITLED “MOTHER GOOSE*
CHARLES PERRAULT PUQLISMeO A QQtXOF
nursery Rhymes with a captton of
XONTES DE MA L’OYE” OR TALES OF
MOTHER GOOSE. “MOTHER GOOSE’S
ORIGIN IS SUPPOSED TQ DATE tyCKIO
•QUEEN GOOSE-FOOT* (REINS PCDANCE)
SAID TO BE THE MOTHER OF
Oo.f'tfht We.tern Newsuaoet Union
But It’s True_____________
Junius
Sots
ft
or orojrau
T*» JON OX Two inter
national spies. ms mother
WAS SHOT BT THE GERMANS
eoo espionage on rue paHT
Of TRANCE, AHO H'S FATHER
WAS SHOT SV THE FRENCH
FOR WORKING fog GERMANS
BOTH «U
®rtG!N
OARlEAWGNE
BE AN-BUSH
grown from seeo
to maturity in
U9 HOURS-AT THE
Cleveland. Ohio
AGRICULTURAL
EtPtRlMENTAT'ON
STATION!
JXK.V. /W¥..
MARY ELLEN
FARMER
Or 0*1 MOlHES. IOWA
IS A MAN
OF THE TERM tMXlE AS APPLIED To THE
southern part of rnt united states -New Orleans
Banks in THE eaRLN ipnr CENTURY printed TEN
DOLLAR BILLS IN ENGLISH ON ONtS'Pf ano in FRENCH
ON the OTHER. ‘OIX’IS THE FRENCH WORD FOR" TEN?
chaaid K-cwrm.)
Mr. Farmer was the seventh son born to Mr. and Mrs. Headrick
Farmer. The parents had wanted a girl. Finding it was a boy, they
decided to call him Mary Ellen anyway. He has tried to live down the
whole matter by being an outstanding athlete in school. Right now he is
captain and pitcher for the Des Moines Tigers, a semi-professional base
ball team.
News Our Grandfathers Read
From Issue Of March 28, 1907
Friday afternoon, of kidney trouble.
Merl S. Langan, son of the late
O. S. Langan, formerly a banker at
this place, died Monday at a sani
tarium in Battle Creek, Mich. Mr.
Langan was born while his parents
resided here, on Cherry street.
Amos A. Geiger and family, of
Bellefontaine, and Mrs. Kate Hilty,
of Chicago, Ill., are here attending
Grandma Hilty’s funeral.
W. D. Neiswander, of the Ada O.
N. U., spent Saturday and Sunday
at home.
John Blakely, of Toledo, visited
friends here the latter part of last
w’eek. Mr. Blakely went from here
to Lima and had the remains of his
daughter, Miss Nellie, who died in
that city three years ago, removed
to Toledo, to be laid beside the re
mains of his wife, W'ho died in
Toledo, the latter part of January.
Dow’ Scoles and Miss Ettie Henkle,
two of Jackson tow’nship’s young
people, were married at the M. E.
parsonage by Rev. E. D. Smith, Sat
urday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Singleton and
son, M. B. Singleton, Mrs. L. B. Til
bury, of Ft. Wayne, were guests at
the Len Miller home, the first of the
week.
Monday evening, the council pas
sed a curfew ordinance, prohibiting
children under 16 upon the streets
after nine o’clock from April 1st to
Oct. 1st, and after 8:30 the remain
der of the year.
Ira Troxel purchased from the
Bentley heirs a house and lot on
Riley street.
James Allison, who was assisting
in a barber shop in Delaware, came
home, Sunday evening.
John Bixel purchased the Mrs. A.
J. Kibler property on Main street,
near Dr. I. R. Wetherill’s residence,
last week. Mr. Bixel will move the
house to Jackson street, and will
build an up-to-date residence this
summer.
Mrs. I. G. Haw’k and little son
came here Friday evening from their
home in Belvidere, Ill., for an ex
tended visit with her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. John Blunk.
A few* degrees difference in
the rapidity with which bacteria may
multiply in milk. One test show’ed
no increase in bacteria in milk kept
at 40 degrees, but each bacteria be
came 3,000 in milk held 12 hours
at 80 degrees.
Frequent rains increase the prob
ability of sheep becoming infested
with internal parasites. Specialists
at Ohio State University recommend
a combination drench of copper
sulphate-nicotine sulfate administer
ed in June, July, September, and
October.
Elrose
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Fett spent
Sunday evening at the C. W. Kling
ler home.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Miller and Mrs.
Ada Cook of Burgettstowm, Pa., are
guests at the Emaline Nonnamaker
and Lendon Basinger home.
The R. B. Koontz family left Fri
day for their home at Hominy, Okla.
The young people of this communi
ty enjoyed a party at the Anna
Koontz and A. J. Nonnamaker home,
Tuesday evening of last week in hon
or of the house guests, Misses Helen.
Anna Jane and Jane Carol Koontz.
Mr. and Mrs. Rolland Koontz, dau
ghter Martha and Mrs. Anna Koontz
motored to Indian Lake, Sunday af
ternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Wade Marshall and
Mrs. Bertha Williamson spent the
week end w’ith friends in Detroit.
Union prayer services at Bethesda,
Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Nonnamaker,
Kaye and Rodie Nonnamaker w’ere
dinner guests at the Mrs. Emaline
Nonnamaker and Lendon Basinger
home.
R. B. Koontz, Miss Helen Koontz
and Mrs. Anna Koontz called on Mrs.
Jennie Fisher and Mrs. Lucinda
Koontz, Thursday afternoon.
The C. V. Klingler family of Ada
were dinner guests Sunday at the
Ami Nonnamaker home. Afternoon
callers were Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Nonnamaker and sons Harold and
Dean.
The R. B. Koontz family, A. J.
Nonnamaker family and Mrs. Anna
Koontz w’ere supper guests at the N.
B. Steinman home in Bluffton, Mon
day of last week.
The 4-H club held a picnic at River
side park, Thursday of last w’eek and
a social at Orange Center, Friday
evening.
Mrs. C. W. Klingler and Mrs. B. J.
Stratton entertained the following for
supper at the M. J. Stratton home on
Wednesday evening: Mr. and Mrs.
R. B. Koontz and family of Hominy,
Okla. Harold Bell of Tiffin T. J.
Bell, Mrs. Anna Koontz, Mr. and Mrs.
A. J. Nonnamaker and family, Mr.
and Mrs. N. B. Steinman, J. D. Clym
er, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Klingler and
family, Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Stratton
and family, Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Strat
ton and daughter Flo.
Recent callers on Mrs. M. J. Strat
ton w’ere N. R. Elzay, Rev. T. J.
Koonts of Walbridge Mr. and Mrs.
W. B. Kramer of Mt. Cory Mrs.
Robert Ewing of Bluffton and Miss
Joanne Battles.
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Klingler and
family spent Sunday afternoon with
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Bell and fam
ily of Columbus Grove.
She Modeled Lincoln
TN THE rotunda of the United
States Capitol at Washington
stands a statue of Abraham Lin
coln. Among all the sculptured like
nesses of the Great Emancipator
this one is unique. It is the only
one which was modeled from life
and it is the work of a young girl.
Vinnie Ream was her name and
she was born in Wisconsin in 1847.
As a girl she amused herself by
sketching the Indians whom she saw
when her father, a surveyor, took
her with him on his trips in the
West. They were crude sketches
but an old Italian who saw them
recognized her latent talent and en
couraged her.
When she was fourteen her father
secured a position for her as a copy
ist in the post office department
at $50 a month. She became ac
quainted with Clark Mills, the fa
mous sculptor, and while watching
him at W’ork, exclaimed, “Oh, I
could do that if I had some clay!”
Mills told her to help herself and
he was delighted wdth the progress
which she made.
Then Vinnie Ream conceived the
idea of modeling President Lincoln
from life. When this w’as first sug
gested to him he refused, but after
talking to the girl and becoming
impressed with her earnestness,
he gave his consent with the under
standing that she was to come lo
the White House every afternoon
during his rest period. She was nos
to talk and he was to sit, walk, or
lie down to take a nap, as his
mood dictated.
So for five months she spent part
of every afternoon in his study. As
he lay on the couch she took life
masks of his face and hands. As
he walked about or sat at his desk,
she sketched his figure again and
again.
After Lincoln’s assassination con
gress decided to erect a statue in
his memory and asked sculptors to
submit sketches. Many famous art
ists responded but the work of this
sixteen-year-old girl was the one se
lected. In 1869 congress advanced
her $5,000 and she went abroad to
study and complete the statue.
After nearly two years of steady
work she finished it and it was un
veiled in 1871.
Vinnie Ream later married Lieut.
Richard L. Hoxie but continued her
work as a sculptor until her death
in 1914. She made many other stat
ues and modeled medallions and
busts of many notables, both here
and abroad. But she is best re
membered as the only sculptor who
ever modeled Lincoln from life and
the pioneer woman sculptor of
America.
Western Newspaper Union.
Our Want-ads bring results.
The announcement of the serious
illness and sudden death of William
Stager, Friday, came as a surprise
and caused much sadness among his
many friends. Although Mr. Stager
had been quietly ailing for some
time, yet he was attending to his
business affairs and was able to
circulate among his friends until a
week prior to his demise.
Mrs. Noah Basinger left Sunday
to visit her sister, Mrs. W. A. Stan
borough, at Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Very substantial improvements
are being made in the Hotel Russell
building. Landlord Ford and wife
are making every effort to give
Bluffton an up-to-date hostelry, and
they are succeeding most admirably.
Charles Miller, of Lafayette, Ind.,
purchased the R. A. Green farm in
Union township, consisting of 256
acres, for $150 per acre. He will
get possession of the farm next
March.
Relatives here received invitations
announcing the wedding of Miss
Harriet May, only daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Oscar Kibele, of Columbus,
Nop. 12, to Mr. L. O. Wolcutt. The
Kibele family formerly resided here.
Mrs. Eckles, who has been visiting
here for several months, leaves for
her home in Blytheville, Arkansas,
today.
Ben Geiger purchased the George
Brobeck property on Spring street,
adjacent to his home, for $380. Mr.
A nfaty sprint ttlMM
protects th. aower from
Mvoto shocks and break- I
ata. Whan the cutter bar
strikes an obetraction, the
release permits the bar to
pivot bodu
Here’s a smooth-working
mower that fits practically any
farm tractor. It's the quick
attachable McCormick Deer
ing No. 25—a high-lift machine
that gives you fast, even cutting
in all crop and field conditions.
It is in uneven ground, how
ever. that the No. 25 is at
THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 1940
NEWS OUR FATHERS READ
FROM ISSUE OF OCT. 30, 1913
FITS PRACTICALLY
ANY FARM TRACTOR
Brobeck purchased the Kibler prop
erty on Thurman street.
A. N. Goebel, of Washington, D.
C., formerly editor of The Bluffton
Times, called on Mrs. Ida Goebel
last Wednesday afternoon. “Andy"
will be remembered by old citizens
as the successor of Pete Bailey, the
first editor of The Times.
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Thut, well
known residents of the German
Settlement, residing north of Bluff
ton, transferred their 112-acre farm
to the trustees of Bluffton college,
last week.
Recent reports from Ohio orchards
indicate a better fruit crop than was
expected before the blooming period.
Peaches which were expected to be
an almost complete failure in the
state bloomed surprisingly well.
Sea’s Game Fish
King and silver salmon, the two
great species of game fish sought
in rivers and along the coast of the
Redwood Empire by fishermen from
all parts of the world, are known to
range from Monterey bay to Alaska.
Sweetheart’s Madonna
Twenty minutes’ walk from Pom
peii is little Valle di Pompeii, a
village unknown to most tourists but
which is visited by thousands of
Italians annually. There is found
the Sweetheart’s Madonna who an
swers prayers for those seeking
mates to love them.
Easy to attach and
detach
Sturdy construction
Safety break-away
Hinged-action
McCORMICK-DEERING
No. 25 MOWER
its very best. The A-frame
construction and caster wheel
enable the cutter bar to follow
the contour of the ground.
There's hinged action at point
of connection with the tractor.
The No. 25 is an easy mower
to use. Come in and find out
more about it.
C. L. Niswander
Bluffton, Ohio
We have adopted Ration-Ayd to sup
ply Vitamin and the benefits of milk’s
B-G Vitamins in all our Poultry Feeds.
Poultrymen know that the B-G Vita
mins of milk, and Vitamin from cod
liver and other fish liver sources are high
ly important in poultry feeds.
Feed your chicks our C-Ka-Gene Treat
ed Ration—builds immunity to Bloody
Coccidiosis and prevents heavy losses.
PRICE Cwt
Banner Egg Mash................................ $2.20
Banner Starter...................................... $2.30
Banner Starter with Ca-Ka-Gene.... $2.50
The Bluffton Milling Co.
WE
Horses $3.0
TOP CASH PRICES
Small Stock removed free
Quick Service
BUCKEYE COMPANY, Findlay, Ohio

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