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THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1941
erne
SMOKY
WNU.5ER.VICE
(Continued from last week)
Bill glanced at Shoshone to make
sure that the man was at his el
bow then, his gun out, he flung
wide the door. The slab door re
sisted, w’edged in the ice of the sill
then shuddered open with a noisy
violence.
Roper stepped in with a sidewise
step that at once made room for
Shoshone and brought Roper within
the wall, clear of a possible shot
from behind him in the dark.
“Don’t anybody move!”
The uncertain and flickering light
of the little fire seemed to fill the
room with ample light, compared
to the heavy darkness without. A
man who sat upon a keg by the
fire sprang up, his clawed hand
reaching out to a gunbelt that lay
upon the crude table but the reach
ing hand rose empty in a continuous
motion as the man put up his hand.
Three crude bunks ranged along the
rear wall. From the first of these,
the one nearest the fire, a man
came out with his hands up one of
his arms was heavily bandaged, and
its upward motion carried its sling
with it.
Now Shoshone, whose heel had
kicked the door shut behind him as
he came in, made a headlong dive
into the second of the three bunks.
In that instant the thing happened
that Roper most dreaded, so that in
a single split fraction of a second
their chances were irrevocably hurt.
As Shoshone Wilce sprang, a gun
smashed out from within the shad
owy bunk. The blast of its explo
sion was magnified in the close quar
ters, leaving the ears ringing in the
instant of stunned silence that fol
lowed.
The barrel of Shoshone’s .45 had
crashed upon the skull of the man in
the bunk almost in the same in
stant that the shot was fired. A
lean hand, gripping a six-gun,
dropped out over the side of the
bunk, relaxed slowly, and the six
gun slid to the floor from long, dan
gling fingers. Shoshone Wilce held
absolutely motionless for a moment,
half crouched, then straightened
slowly.
“Shoshone—you hit?”
“It’s only—” Shoshone began. His
face was ghastly and his voice qua
vered but when he had fully
straightened it steadied again into
the same dead flatness as before.
“It’s only—a kind of scratch along
the ribs. I’m all right.”
“Jody! Jody, is it you?”
Jody Gordon had been curled up
in the corner of deepest shadows.
She stood up now, white-faced, her
movements uncertain. Then sud
denly the firelight caught the glint
of the instant tears which over
brimmed her eyes.
“Bill! I thought they’d kill you!”
She flung her arms about his neck
and with the swift impulse of a child,
kissed his mouth.
The man nearest the table made
a sidelong movement toward the bol
stered gun that lay there Bill Roper
smashed a shot into the wall beside
him, and the man jerked backward.
“Shoshone, can you ride?”
There was a curious strain in the
flatness of Shoshone’s voice. “I’m
okay, I tell you.”
Bill Roper caught up a sheepskin
coat with his free hand, and flung
it ovelr Jody’s shoulders. “Get
gone!” he snapped. “Shoot free the
ponies’ tie-ropes, and ride like hell!
Here—take this!” He thrust the gun
belt from the table into Jody’s un
ready hands. “I’ll see you—where
I said.”
“Bill,” said Shoshone, “if it’s the
same to you, I’d rather hold them
here while you ride with her.”
“Get gorie, I said! You—”
“Bill, I tell you, I—”
Bill Roper bellowed at him, “You
want to die?”
“Okay,” Shoshone said, in that
same strained, lifeless tone. He
seized Jody’s wrist, tore open the
door with the hand that still held his
gun, and was gene into the dark.
When they were gone Bill Roper
stood listening. Outside two shots
rang, a moment apart, as Shoshone
shot the tied ponies free then sound
ed a swift crackle of the ice crust
under their hoofs as two horses gal
loped down-valley, and Roper knew
that Shoshone and Jody Gordon were
on their way.
Bill Roper estimated that he had
a few seconds left. Unhurriedly, al
most leisurely, he picked Up the
gun dropped by the man in ^he
bunk, and thrust it in his own belt.
After that he collected three or four
other weapons in a brief search that
seemed perfunctory, yet was effec
tive because of his own practiced
knowledge of where a range rider is
apt to put his gun. Thpse he kicked
into a little heap beside the door,
so that he would know where they
were.
The man with the wounded arm
spoke thickly. “You’ll never get out
of here alive,” he told Roper.
“I wouldn’t worry about that, was
I you,” Roper said. He slammed
another harmless shot over the
speaker’s head, interestingly close
to the man’s scalp. He needed a
continued sound of action at the
cabin to draw the outposts in, so
that Shoshone and Jody Gordon
would have their chance to get clear.
After that a full minute passed
and stretched to a minute and a
half. Evidently the outposts had
been farther away from the cabin
than Shoshone had calculated but
Roper heard none of them fire.
He thought, “If I can keep them in
terested just ten minutes more—”
Now a furiously ridden horse was
coming up. Roper flattened him
self against the wall beside the open
door, and waited until he heard the
Lemay
man urop from his pony just out
side. He stepped to the door, fired
once and a man crashed face down
ward upon the door sill itself to lie
utterly motionless.
With his boot Roper pushed the
inert heap off the door sill, so that
the door might be closed at need.
Because there were only two more
shots in his gun, he picked up one
of the weapons he had collected,
and checked its loading.
“I’d stand real still if I was you,”
he warned the two who stood with
their hands up. He fired one more
shot between them, for purposes of
general discipline. “I ought to kill
you maybe I will in a minute—
haven’t decided yet.”
Now another horse was coming in
fast in another second or two it
“I’d stand real still if I was you.
would string into view around the
corner of the cabin.
Roper cast a quick glance to see
that his captives were where he
thought they were. They had not
moved. He dropped to one knee
beside the door and fired twice
quickly as a shape, dark on dark
ness, whirled around the corner of
the cabin.
That was all—the end of the one
man war he had started to cover
the retreat of Shoshone. He never
remembered the shock of the blow
that downed him. All conscious
ness ended at once, as sharply as
if cut off with a knife.
He never knew which of the two
men behind him sprang forward to
smash him down but he knew as
soon as he knew anything at all,
that a long time had passed—more
time than he could afford to lose.
CHAPTER XXI
Nobody but an old range rider
could have located in the dark the
brush corral where Shoshone Wilce
and Jody Gordon were supposed to
wait for Bill Roper. What would
have been a simple problem by day
light, in darkness became a test of
scouting ability and cowman’s in
stinct. Yet somehow, by the throw
of the land, and by his deep knowl
edge of the habits of thought of cow
men, Shoshone Wilce nosed out that
circular corral of brush, in a dark
ness so thick that he was uncertain
he had found the landmark until he
had touched it with his hands.
A faint line of grey was already
appearing on the rim of the world,
and a whisky-jack was calling rauc
ously somewhere in the scrub pine.
“It’s almost daylight already,”
Jody Gordon said, fear in her voice.
“If he doesn’t come soon—if he
doesn’t come—”
She broke off, unable to go on.
“Half an hour,” Shoshone Wilce
haid. “We’ll wait hail an hour.”
“And then—?”
“We’ve got to go on.”
“I can’t! Not if he doesn’t come.
We’ll have to go back. We’ll have
to try—”
“He said go on. We have to do
like he said.” Shoshone’s voice
dropped to a curious fierce whisper.
“Whatever happens—you remember
that! You have to go on!”
They waited then, while five min
utes passed. Shoshone Wilce kept
his pony moving slowly up and down
to prevent its stiffening up by too
rapid a cooling after its run, and
Jody followed hi? example.
“Listen here,” Shoshone Wilce
said at last. He dropped his voice,
and sat motionless. For a moment
or two there was no sound there
except the rhythmic breathing of
the hard-run ponies. “I want to tell
you something,” Shoshone resumed,
his voice low, husky, and strangely
unsteady. “It looks like I run away
and left you when your pony was
shot down. I see now it looks like
that. But I want you to know I
didn’t go to do nothing like that,
Miss Gordon.”
“I know,” she said, “it was the
only—”
“I shouldn’t have done it,” Sho
shone said. “I wouldn’t do it if I was
doing it again. I figured I’d be more
use to you if I could keep my horse
on its feet. I figured I could best
handle it like an Indian would—
pick ’em off one at a time, and make
sure. But I’d do different if I had it
to do again.”
“What else could you have possi
bly done? There wasn’t any chance
for anything else.”
“I should havg stood and fought,”
Shoshone said. “Like he would
have done.”
“It was better this way,” Pody
told him. “Don’t you worry about it,
Shoshone.”
Shoshone said vaguely, “I want
you to tell him about it. I want
you to tell him I’d do different if I
had it to do again.”
“Why don’t you tell him your
self?”
“Maybe I will. But if anything
comes up—so’s I don’t get the
chance—”
“Of course I’ll tell him.”
They fell silent, and after that a
long time passed. Shoshone stopped
walking his horse, and sat perfectly
motionless close to the wall of the
brush corral. The grey light in
creased, while they waited for what
seemed an interminable time.
It seemed to Jody that in a few
minutes more they would have to
admit that daylight was upon them
it seemed to her that an hour, two
hours, had passed, instead of the
half hour which Shoshone had de
cided they could wait. But still Bill
Roper did not come.
“Do you suppose he could have
ridden past?” Jody asked.
“No,” Shoshone said, very low in
his throat.
When she could stand the suspense
no more, Jody Gordon dismounted
the inaction and the cold was stiff
ening her in the saddle, and now she
led her pony while she stamped and
swung her arms.
She thought, “I’ll lead my pony
five times around the outside of the
corral. He’ll be here by then he
must be here by then.”
She wondered, as she slowly led
her pony around the circle marked
by the walls of brush, what she
would do if Roper did not come—if
he never came. Perhaps go on?
Perhaps go back
Jody Gordon was fighting back an
overwhelming, impossible panic.
She knew the cool, hard sufficiency
of the men against whom Roper had
pitted himself. From the standpoint
of her father, who had turned against
him, she knew the unassuageable
bitterness, the vast sinister' male
volence which Roper had raised
against himself by the miracles of
the Texas Rustlers’ War. If he were
caught now in the grip of that malev
olence—
It took all her will power to restrain
herself from breaking into a run, or
from mounting her pony and racing
him—where? Any place, if only her
high-strung nerves could find expres
sion in action. But she forced her
self to lead her pony slowly, meas
uring her strides while the daylight
increased.
Then, as she completed the cir
cuit of the corral, and came again
to where Shoshone’s pony stood, she
saw that Shoshone Wilce no longer
sat the saddle. At first she thought
that he had tied his pony and walked
away but as she came nearer she
saw that the little man was down
in the snow, huddled against the
rough brush of the corral barrier.
Jody sprang forward, calling out
his name.
She sprang forward, calling out
his name, and there was a meaning
less, nightmarish quarter of a min
ute while her pony reared backward
from the sudden jerk upon its bridle
and had to be quieted before she
could advance again.
“Shoshone! What’s the matter?
Are you—are you—?”
Shoshone’s eyes were half open
he was not asleep, but he did not
answer. And now as she dropped
to her knees beside him in the snow
she saw that a bright trickle of red
had traced a line from the corner
of his mouth, crookedly across his
chin.
“Shoshone
In the ugly panic that swept her
it was many seconds before she
could fully comprehend that Sho
shone Wilce was dead.
CHAPTER XXII
We’re making a big mistake, not
to hang him and be done with it,”
Red Kane said.
They were two days from Fork
Creek now. This long and narrow
room, which Jim Leathers paced so
restlessly, was the kitchen of the
main house at Walk Lasham’s south
west camp—a convenient stop-over
on the way to Sundance, where Rop
er was to be turned over to Ben
Thorpe.
“The quicker we hang him, the
better we’ll be off,” Red Kane said
again.
Wearily, doggedly, Jim Leathers
rolled a cigarette. He took his time
about replying. “Seems like you al
ready said that once before.”
“I’m liable to keep on saying it,”
Red Kane told him. “Things is dif
ferent now.”
In the doorway, behind the two
men who watched Bill Roper, a girl
now appeared, a slim, full-breasted
girl, whose dark, slanting eyes had
sometimes troubled Bill Roper be
fore now.
He had not been surprised to find
Marquita here in Walk Lasham’s
southwest cow camp, to which his
captors had brought him. He had
guessed, when he had last talked to
her in Miles City, that she was Walk
Lasham’s girl and in spite of her
expressed eagerness to leave Lash
am and ride with Roper, he real
ized that Marquita still had to live
in some way.
Girls of her stamp could not af
ford to throw down such a man as
Lasham, until more interesting op
portunities offered.
Her face was impassive now, but
one of the slanting dark eyes nar
rowed in a definite signal to Roper.
The combination of Spanish and In
dian blood in this girl from the Texas
border gave her a lithe, lazy grace,
and a haunting depth of dark eyes
and the same blood made her un
accountable—sometimes stoic and
smouldering, sometimes livened by
the lightning flashes of an inner fire.
Undoubtedly she was capable of a
passionate devotion, and an equally
passionate cruelty. Anything could
happen in a situation which included
Marquita—with Marquita in love.
For a moment Bill Roper resented
the fact that he couldn’t be interest
ed ia any gill except Jody Gordon—
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
a girl who didn’t want him or need
him. All the worst aspects of his
own situation were apparent to him.
then. He was an outlaw wanted
the length of the Trail probably
would be an outlaw all the rest of
his life, which gave every promise
of being a short one. That even
Marquita wanted him, or had any
use for him, was a gift which he
should have been glad to accept.
What he had to think of now’, though,
was that Marquita was extremely
likely to precipitate a lot of imme
diate disturbance.
Troubled, he wished to shake his
head, or in some other way caution
her that she must make no attempt
to interfere. Roper had no inten
tion of ever coming into the hands
of Ben Thorpe alive. Somewhere
between this place and Sundance,
where Thorpe waited,he would make
his play, however slim the chance.
Yet he would rather take his
chances with some unforeseen op
portunity later, when they were
again on the trail, than to be plunged
into some helpfully intended situa
tion which the girl might devise—
with danger to herself and question
able advantage to him. She had
never brought him any luck.
He was unable, however, with the
eyes of his two enemies upon him,
to signal her in any way.
“Ben wanted him alive, if I could
get him,” Jim Leathers said stub
bornly. “Well, I got him alive, and
I aim to keep him that way. You
bums ain’t going to talk me into
anything different just because you
figure a dead man is easier to
pack.”
Bill Roper listened sardonically.
In the two days spent in traveling
from Fork Creek rendezvous, the
scalp wound which had brought him
down had nearly healed but when
he laced his fingers behind his head
he winced and dropped his hands
again.
It was typical of the quality of his
captors that his hands were not tied
or manacled. They told him where
to sit and they made him stay put,
and they were careful that no op
portunity wras given him to snatch a
gun from an unwary holster but
these were merely the routine pre
cautions of sensible men. For these
riders were the picked gunfighters
of Ben Thorpe’s scores of outfits.
They did not fear Roper, would not
have feared him had he been armed.
Bill Roper had no doubt that Red
Kane and perhaps one or two of
the others would kill a doomed pris
oner for no more reason than Jim
Leathers had suggested.
The Lasham camp had been boil
ing with news as Jim Leathers’ men
had ridden in at dusk with their
prisoner. Much had happened on
the range while Leathers had waited
out Bill Roper at the Fork Creek
camp. The news that had reached
Lasham’s southwest camp was bro
ken, and seemed to have been little
understood by the men who had
brought it but Roper, with his in
side knowledge of the force he had
turned loose against Lasham, could
piece together its meaning well
enough. Lasham’s southwest out
post, with its big herds of picked
cattle wintering in this deepest and
richest of the Montana grass, had
been more powerfully manned than
any other Lasham camp. But twice
in the past week frantic calls for
reinforcements from the outfits to
the east had drained most of this
man power away—first five picked
gunfighters, then a dozen cowboys
more, until only five men had been
left.
The messengers who had killed
their ponies to come for help had
brought the camp a fragmentary
story which gave Roper the deep
est satisfaction.
In their tales of incredible losses,
of raiders w’ho struck night after
night at far separated points, driv
ing cattle unheard-of distances to
disappear weirdly in the northern
wastes, Roper read the success of
his Great RaicL.
(To be continued)
No ‘Soundproof Room’
Acoustical scientists report it’s im
possible to construct a soundproof
room in which a sensitive meter
would register zero. For one thing,
the earth’s own vibrations would
register from five to ten decibels
and when a person entered such a
room, just the life pulsations of his
body would lift the meter five deci
bels more—and that’s about the min
imum that can be achieved.
FIRST IN SALES because it’s
FIRST IN DESIGN
among all low-priced trucks
FIRST IN POWER
(WITH "LOAD-MASTER” ENGINE)
among all. low-priced trucks
FIRST IN FEATURES
among all low-priced trucks
FIRST IN STEERING EASE
among all low-priced trucks
FIRST IN VALUE
among all low-priced trucks
N0T1CE TO CONTRACTORS
STATE OF OHIO
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS
THE POCKETBOOK
of KNOWLEDGE
INCE TWE \URl6WT BROTHERS'TIME,
U-6- INDUSTRY HAS BUILT 60.000
PLANES OF ALL 51-----
PRESENT DEFENSE
THE
1___
CALLS FOR
¥0,000 WiTHlN Zg MONTHS!
I W7XANP CEWfMT
7 14 SO CAULK?
BECAUSE or ns
Similarity -ro
POftTLANP STONE
(tr VMS VN&iTEP y
BT AN EN6USN
Columbus. Ohio. June 16. 1941
Engineer of Sales Legal Copy No. 41 121.
UNIT PRICE CONTRACT
Sealed proposals will be received at the office
of the State Highway Director of Ohio, at
Columbus. Ohio, until ten o’clock A. M.,
Eastern Standard Time. Tuesday, July 8, 1941,
for improvements in:
Proposals Nos. 1 to 12 inclusive are offered
as one project and will be awarded as one
contract.
PROPOSAL NO. 1
Putnam County. Ohio, on Section G, and
of the Kalida-Lima Road, State Highway
No. 134, State Route No. 115, in Palmer,
Greensburg and Union Townships, by apply
ing a bituminous treatment, Item T-31.
Pavement: W’idth 18 feet.
Length 38,810 feet or 7.35 miles.
PROPOSAL NO 2
Putnam County, Ohio, on Sections G. H,
Kalida and Cloverdale of the Baldwin-Man
dale-Kalida Road, State Highway No. 517,
State Route 114, in the Villages of Kalida and
Cloverdale and Perry Jackson and Union
Townships, by applying a bituminous treat
ment, Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 16 feet. Length 44,616 feet.
Width 18 feet. Length 5,020 feet.
Total length 49,636 feet or 9.40 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 3
Putnam County. Ohio, on Section E of the
Kalida-Lima Road, State Highway No. 134,
State Route No. 115, in Sugar Creek Town
ship, by applying a bituminous treatment,
Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet
Length 7.128 feet or 1.35 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 4
.Mien County. Ohio, on Section of the
Kalida-Lima Road, State Highway No. 134,
State Route No. 115, in Sugar Creek Town
ship. by applying a bituminous treatment,
Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 10.560 feet or 2.00 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 5
Allen County, Ohio, on Sections and
Spencerville of the Van Wert-Spencerville
Road. State Highway No. 135, State Route
I No. 117 in the Village of Spencerville and
Spencer Township, by applying a bituminous
treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 20.5 feet. Length 10
613 feet.
Width 18 feet. Length 3.802 feet.
Total length 14,415 feet or 2.73 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 6
Van Wert County, Ohio, on Section of
the Van Wert-Spencerville Road. State High
way No. 135, State Route No. 117, and Sec
tion N of the Mercer.Northeastern Road.
State Highway No. 531, State Route No. 117,
in Jennings Township, by applying a bitum
inous treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 20.05 feet. Length 5.270
Wiuui 16 feet, Length 7,920 feet.
Total length 13.190 feet or 2.50 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 7
Van Wert County, Ohio, on Section of
the St. Marys-Ft. Wayne Road, State High
way No. 173. U. S. Route No. 33. in Will
shire Township, bj applying a bituminous
treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 13.570 feet or 2.57 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 8
Van Wert County. Ohio, on Sections Ff.
and bf the Ft. Recovery-Willshire-North
Road. State Highway No. 263, in Willshire
and Harrison Townships, and part of Sec
tion Willshire and part of Section A of the
Wilb-hire-Lima Road, State Highway No. 875,
in the Village of Willshire and Willshire
Township. State Route No. 49 81, by ap
plying a bituminous treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 20 feet, Length 2.131 feet.
Width 18 feet. Length 35.636 feet
Total length 37,767 feet or 7.15 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 9
Van Wert County. Ohio, on part of Sec
tion I of the Payne-Hicksvilie-Southern Road.
State Highway No. 427, State Route No. 49,
in Harrison Township, by applying bitumin
ous treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 18,480 feet or 3.50 miles.
PROPOSAL NO. 10
Van Wert County, Ohio, on part of Section
and part of Section of the Van Wert
Spencerville Road. State Highway No. 135,
I
A MONUMENT-to A aw—
ERECTEP IN ME»ORy OF
sesjs PieTFfw prospect a
V70RLPS CHAMPION
IN MONTHS SINCE 5we
PRESENT PtfENSE PROGRAM
S66AN, AMERICAN INPUSTRyS
OUTPUT INCREASEP
24
the largest increase w
physical output an?
SIMILAR PERIOD IN QUR
HISTO/ty.
5’UE U 5. WITM ONLY 6
OF THE WORLD'S POPULATION
VIAS NEARLY I9.SOO.OOO
'TELEPHONES. OR ABOUT HALF THE
WORLD TOTAL-----------93 OX
AU PHONES IN EXISTENCE CAN
BE REACHES? EROM ONE IN THIS
COUNTRy/ ______
State Route No. 116, in Ridge Townshi by
applying a bituminous treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 21.120 feet or 4:00 miles.
PROPOSAL NO 11
Van Wert County. Ohio, on part of Section
of the Lima-Delphos-Western Road. State
Highway No. 127. State Route No. 697, in
Washington Township, by applying a bitum
inous treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 18 feet.
Length 2,482 feet or 0.47 mile.
PROPOSAL NO. 12
Van Wert County, Ohio, on Section of
the Van Wert-S|»encerville Road State High
way No. 135. State Route No. 116. in Jen
nings Township, by applying a bituminous
treatment. Item T-31.
Pavement: Width 14 feet.
Length 10.600 feet or 2.00 miles.
Total estimated cost ...................... 183.812.55
Proposals Nos. 1 to 12 inclusive of this
project to be completed not later than Sep
tember 1, 1941.
The minimum wage to be paid to all labor
employed on this contract shall be in accord
ance with the "Schedule of Prevailing Hourly
Wage Rates Ascertained and Determined by
The Department of Industrial Relations ap
plicable to State Highway Department Im
provements in accordance with Sections 17-3.
17-4, 17-4a. 17-5 and 17-5a of the General
Code of Ohio."
The bidder must submit with his bid a
certified check in an amount equal to five per
cent of the estimated cost, but in no event
more than ten thousand dollars.
in the
of the
Plans and specifications are on file
department of highways and the office
resident deputy director.
The director reserves the right to
any and all bids.
9
STEINER CHEVROLET SALES
Bluffton, Ohio
reject
H. G. SOURS,
State Highway Director
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT
The State of Ohio
Allen County. s«.
Estate of Noah M. Neuenschwander, De
ceased.
Sarah Neuenschwander of Bluffton Ohio, R.
D. No. 1, has been appointed and qualified as
executrix of the estate of Noah M. Neuen
sch wander, late of Allen County, Ohio, de
ceased.
Dated this 2nd day of June 1941.
RAYMOND P. SMITH.
8 Probate Judge.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that on the 28th
day of June, 1941 at 8:30 p. m,. a public
hearing will be held on the budget prepared
by the trustees of the Township of Richland,
Allen County. Ohio for the next succeeding
fiscal year ending December 31st, 1942.
Such hearing will be held at the office of
the trustees at the township room. Town hall
building, Bluffton, Ohio.
N. W. BASINGER Clerk.
STOCK AND POULTRY GROWERS
are being convinced daily that the New Gold Leaf Mineral has*
proven, “Best By All Tests”, in saving of feed and protein supple
ments. No other tonic or mineral can match it for results.
NECRO, FLU AND WORMS
It will remove and correct these ailments in a very short time
by giving your pigs or hogs the Gold Leaf 1-6-1-12 treatment. Ask
Clarence Grismore, Pandora, Walter Garmatter, Bluffton, what it
did for their hogs.
COCCIDIOSIS OR WORMS IN CHICKENS
The same treatment corrects these troubles from sun up till
dark. “Be convinced by trying”. Gold Leaf Mineral is sold by
your dealer on a positive money back guarantee. Get direction
sheet and follow correctly and full time. Our service is free, w
don’t hesitate to write or call on us for help and information. More
dependable and safer.
GOLD LEAF MINERAL CO.
Li ma, Ohio—Lima Phone Lake 7444
ION’S NO. 1
TRUCK
"THRIFT-CARRIERS FOR THE NATION”
PAGE SEVEN
Elrose
There was a lar°,e audience at the"
sendees held at Olive Branch, Thurs
day evening by Rev. Rotherick, the
blind evangelist.
The C. W. Klingler family spent
Sunday afternoon with Mrs. Anna
Koontz. Mrs. Ruth Steinman of
Bluffton was also a guest.
C. V. Klingler of Ada was a guest
at the Ami Nonnamaker home, Sun
day.
The Golda Battles family and Mrs,
Nora Stratton attended the Burna
reunion at Riverside park, Sunday.
Gene Bish, who is in camp in West
Virginia spent last week at the home
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. EverecT
Bish.
Mr. and Mrs. Lendon Basinger,.
Janet and Gareth Basinger, Mr. and
Mrs. A. J. Nonnamaker and daughter
Kaye and Mrs. Emaline Nonnamaker
spent Sunday afternoon in Toledo.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bish and son
Billie of Jackson, Mich and Mr. and
Mrs. Edwin Bish of Detroit were
guests at the Evered Bish home, Sun
day.
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Koontz, dau
ghter, Martha, were evening guests
at the A. J. Nonnamaker and Anna
Koontz home.
Miss Mary Koontz was a caller ire
the Nonnamaker and Konntz homer
Sunday evening.
Mrs. Goldie Battles and daughter
Mabel and Mrs. Nora Stratton called
on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Edinger of
Bowling Green, Sunday.
Callers at the M. J. Stratton home,.
Monday, were: Rev. Paul Zimmer-
man of Rawson Mrs. Goldie Battles
and daughter Mabel, Bernard Strat
ton and family, Mrs. Goldie Nonna
maker and daughter Kaye.
Spare the mower and spoil the
pasture.
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT
State of Ohio,
Allen County, as.
Estate of Lillie Mae Gratz.
Harvey J. Gratz. R- D. No. 2, Bluffton.
Ohio, has been appointed and qualified w
administrator of the estate of Lillie Mae
Grau, late of Allen County, Ohio, diri—rf.
Dated this 14th day of June. 1941.______
RAYMOND P. SMITH,.
10 Probata Judge-
The most beauti
ful asphalt roofing
shingle ever made
TIMBERGRAIN
A product of The RUBEROID
COMPANY.
A rare combination of
beauty and quality at a
moderate price.
FREE ESTIMATES
Bluffton and Lima Phone
NELSON TILE CO.
Beaverdam, Ohio

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