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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, July 24, 1941, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1941-07-24/ed-1/seq-4/

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PAGE FOUR
CHURCH OF CHRIST
G. Bright, Pastor
Bluffton:—
9:15 a. m. Bible school. F. Mumma,
Supt.
Instrumental Trio.
10:15 worship.
Lord’s Supper.
Sermon: “Awake, Arise”.
6:30 Christian Endeavor.
Our Ladies Aid meets this Thursday
in the home of Mrs. G. Corson at 7:30
p. m.
Important board meeting immediat
ely following the services this Sun
day
NOTE: Proportionate giving is
meaningless without a worthwhile
proportion. One cent for God out of
each one hundred dollars earned
would be proportionate, but on that
basis, God’s share of a $3,000.00 sal
ary would look like thirty cents.”
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES
C. .Armentrout, Pastor
Rockport—
9:30 a. m. Morning worship.
10:30 a. m. Sunday school.
Bluffton—
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
10:50 a. m. Morning worship.
The subject of the morning ser
mon is “Thy Kingdom Come.”
The public is cordially invited
attend the services of the church.
LUTHERAN CHURCH
W. L. Harmony, Pastor
Because of remodeling of
■MW
to
EBENEZER MENNONITE
A. C. Schultz. Pastor
Thursday: 8:30 Teachers’ meeting
and prayer service. Choir rehearsal.
SUNDAY:
9:30 Sunday school.
10:30 Morning worship.
Rev.
Peter Boehr will bring the message
of the morning.
Because of the music program in
the First Mennonite church there
will be no evening service.
to
The public is cordially invited
attend the services of the church.
the
church, services will be discontinued
until further notice.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH
H. T. Unruh, Pastor
Thursday 7:15 p. m. Choir
hearsal.
SUNDAY:
9:00 a. m. Church school.
10:00 a. m. Church worship. There
will be a pulpit exchange of the
four Mennonite churches. Grace
church and First Mennonite will ex-
re
GflUZB-OriD
ro* All SPORTS
MBRCURY
KKIKOLEATE
Given Away With The Purchase Of Six Gallons—
——~~fl World Speeds
This Sunday in me ......
hurcbesH I
change this year. Rev. Forrest
Musser will bring the message.
6:00 p. m. Intermediate C. E.
7:30 p. m. A song service will be
held in this church. The four
churches will unite in this service.
The public is invited.
MISSIONARY CHURCH
A. F. Albro, Pastor
SUNDAY:
9:30 Morning worship.
7:00 p. m. Children’s meetings.
7:00 p. m. Young People’s society.
7:30 p. m. Evangelistic service.
WEDNESDAY:
8:00 p.
9:00 p.
m. Prayer meeting.
m. Street senice.
FIRST
METHODIST CHURCH
A. Weed. Minister
SUNDAY:
9:00 a. m. Church school.
10:00 a. m. Morning worship. Ser
mon topic—“The Christian’s Goal.
11:15 a. m. Y’oung People’s Choir
rehearsal.
7:30 p. m. Union service at First
Mennonite church. A program of
music.
An important meeting of Official
Board will be held at close of
morning service.
EVANGELICAL REFORMED
CHURCHES
Emil Burrichter, Pastor
Emmanuel’s—
Public Worship at 9:30 a. m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a. m.
The Men’s Brotherhood will meet
at St. John’s church on
evening at 8:00 o’clock.
Testimonial meeting at 7:30 Wed
nesday evening.
The reading room at the church is
open every Wednesday from 2:00
to 4:00 p. m. The public is invited
to all services and to visit the read
ing room.
Saturday, July 2
ibrilliani
bronze
This society is a branch of the
Mother Church, the First Church of
Christ Scientist, Boston, Mass.
POLYMERIZED LEADED REGULAR or
ETHYL GASOLENE
FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST
SAVE
LOW ERICE HIGH QUALITY!
BRILLIANT BRONZE STATIONS
Ralph Diller Service Station
South Main Street & Bentley Road, Bluffton, Ohio
Phone 455-Y for Tank Truck deliveries.
Third Grade (CHEAP) Gasolene is NOT sold at—
BRILLIANT BRONZE STATIONS
Its Messages
I. Voices to Foil the
I Eavesdroppers
Prepared by National Geographic Society,
Washington. D. C.—WNU Service.
A
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY I soapsuds on a section of telephone
Sunday services at 10:30 a. m.,| cable it means he is meticulous, not
subject: “Truth.”
Metal Phone Poles
Metal telephone poles are used in
South Africa because the white ants
eat wooden ones.
NETWORK of through
telephone circuits be
tween cities and sections of
the country makes it as easy
now to telephone a relative
across the continent as to
telephone your local grocer
to send up a peck of potatoes.
Today 92 per cent of all long
distance calls are completed
while the person calling re
mains at the telephone, and the av
erage time taken for putting through
such calls is one and one-half min
utes.
In early telephone days, when
service was informal and lines were
few, it was not at all unusual for
an operator to receive a call from
a housewife and hear her say:
“Mary, please see if you can find
Charles and have him bring home
some hamburg steak for dinner.”
Today you seldom know your op
erator by name, but she still will
find people for you, across a state or
across a continent.
A subscriber said: “I want to talk
to a man down on Cape Cod. I
don’t know his name or town. But
he raises Bcdlington terriers and
has chin whiskers like Horace Gree
ley’s.” The operator found him.
Telephonic Posse.
A prominent business mati was
killed in an accident. His wife
was in California, but no one knew
just where. The chief long-distance
telephone operator in New York set
to work to locate her. Hotels in the
southern part of the state were tried
Thursdayl without success.
I
a. m.
a. m.
Public worship at 9:15
Sunday school at 10:15
Choir practice Thursday at 7:30 p.l utes after the hunt began.
In. I Queer things go into making Amer-
Men’s Brotherhood as announced I ^ca telephone service so efficient—
I from soapsuds to the lack of
atove' I scratches on a steer’s hide.
Finally she phoned the society ed
itor of a Pasadena newspaper, and
learned that the lady was visiting a
Pasadena family. Calling that fam
ily, the lady w’as found, just 22 min-
If you see a workman painting
ikw
A hopeless tangle to the layn
ground wires are the plaything Oj
Every wire goes somewhere—an
about cleanliness, but about leaks.
Even the tiniest pinhole may admit
moisture and cause trouble. So ni
trogen gas under pressure is
pumped into the cable, and if it
leaks at any point, a bubble of soap
suds will tell the tale.
Safety First in Safety Belts.
If ever you see a steer scratch
himself on a barbed-wire fence, be
assured that that portion cf his hide
never will go into the making of a
telephone lineman’s belt. Scratches
weaken leather, and linemen climb
ing poles trust their lives to their
belts.
The telephone works in very simi
lar fashion to the human ear. In
fact, the ear itself actually was the
first “telephone,” and an electrical
one at that.
To make a man hear, you push
and pull on his eardrum, causing it
to vibrate thousands of times a sec
ond. You do the pushing and pull
ing, not by grasping his ear, but by
using the energy of your voice.
When you speak, the tiny particles
or molecules that make up the sur
rounding air are set in motion. They
exert the push and pull on the man’s
eardrum. They press on it only as
heavily as a snip of hair l-1000th of
an inch long—but that is enough.
Behind the eardrum are tiny bones
and chambers of liquid which are
set to vibrating as the eardrum vi
brates. In the inner ear the vibra
tions are changed, scientists now be
lieve. to electrical impulses that
travel along nerves to the brain.
Has Electrical Ear.
A telephone works the same way.
It enables you to push and pull on
a man’s eardrum from a distance.
The telephone
electrical ear.
say and sends
trical impulses
of over nerves.
transmitter is an
It hears what you
the words by elec
over wiies instead
The air molecules set moving by
yr.ur speech strike against a thin,
diaphragm wh’ch acts Hke a
STOCK SALES
Service bulls
also male hogs,
phone Ada Red
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
one
I Ocean System ‘Scrambles’
fat
Wanted—Unlimited amount of
cattle connected with Eastern order
buyer. Call N.
phone 582-R.
P. Steiner, Bluffton
tf
delivered any time
C. N. Long & Son.
1360. tf
I
At London, Maj. George
human eardrum—it
hind the diaphragm,
bones and nerves,
roasted cqal, sm...
head, in a little chamber. Through
the grains an electric current is
flowing.
When the diaphragm bends in
ward, the grains are pushed tighter
together, and mere current flows.
When it bends outward, the pres
sure on the grains is released and
less current flow’s. So the flow of
an, intricate networks of under
telephone workers like this man.
I he knows where!
over the
The current coming
wifes, flown .rough the wire coil,
thus exerts and pull on the
receiver di gm. As it vibrates,
it imparts on to the molecules
of air in front of it. They in turn
vibrate ago the listener’s ear
drum. It v ttes, and he hears
the sounds it are being spoken at
the other end of the line.
Has Language of Own.
The telephone is a universal lin
guist, though some people don’t al
ways realize it. Once an enterpris
ing Arab merchant in the Near East
had a telephone installed, and the
first customer who called spoke
Greek. The Arab could not under
stand Greek, and in high dudgeon
went to the company and told them
they had given him an instrument
that spoke Greek whereas he want
ed one that spoke Arabian!
The telephone not only speaks all
languages, but it also has a lan
guage of its own, unlike any other
tongue on earth.
When your speech travels over a
telephone wire, it is as private as
if you were talking with someone in
the middle of the Sahara. But when
your speech goes out on the radio
waves of the transatlantic telephone,
anyone might listen in to one side
of the conversation simply by tun
ing his receiving set to the proper
wave length.
Therefore, when you telephone
across the ocean, your voice goes
through a device that translates all
your u’ords into sounds wholly unin
telligible. Your voice really is
turned upside down—the high tones
are turned into low ones, and the
low ones info high ones.
.Wanted—To buy some good dairy
cows to be fresh in about 90 days.
Wm. Amstutz, Beaverdam. Phone
361. tf
For sale—Five day old calf. A.
F. Albrc, 3 miles north on Dixie.
For sale—Four nice gilts avg. 160
Tbs., immuned. Wm. Badertscher, 1
mile north of town.
Read our Want Ads.
Funeral Services
For Edwin Schwab
Funeral services for Edw’in Schwab,
53, former Bluffton resident, residing
west of Benton Ridge, were held at
the Missionary church in Pandora
Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Schwab, the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Gottlieb Schwab
of Lawn avenue, died Sunday morn
ing at, 9:00 o’clock after an illness
of a year and a half.
A native of the Canton Berne,
Switzerland, he was born on July 27,
1887. As a boy he came to Ameriqj
with his parents.
Clement Tryon, postmaster £*’”"1 Burial was made in the St. John
eral, is seen inaugurating thc| cemetery.
world's first mobile telephone
exchange. The new system will
be used in plarcs where addi
tional telephonic
tions are needed.
communtca-
He was married on April 19, 1917,
to Anna Albrecht who survives with
three children, Eugene, Harriet and
Gordon all at home. Also surviving
are his parents two brothers, Rev.
Emil Schwab, who lives in Califor
nia and Rev. William Schwab, a resi
dent of Oregon and two sisters,
Mrs. Albert Klay of Bluffton and
Mrs. Herman Albrecht of Flint,
Michigan.
Rev. Armin Steiner, pastor of the
church, officiated at the services.
East Orange
I Rev. C. M. Harsh and mother of
vibrates. Be-1 Van Wert
instead of I guests of Mr. and
re tiny grains of Kimble and
sons.
th“ P,n'l Callers
past
the
Mrs.
Mr.
son
current1 is varied as the diaphragm I children Virginia and Donald spent
vibrates. The trai alter with its I Sunday in Toledo.
battery supply is an amplifier as I j^r and ^rs. Orrin Inbody and
well. It turns the energy of your I children Orrin, Jr., and Beverly
S ThSu:hlh°hJ E.eaine of Rome. Mieh., were over
wires current flows to the receiver, I night guests of the latter s parents,
on the other end of the line. The re- I Mr. and Mrs. Fred Boutwell.
ceiver is an electrical mouth which I gob carjs of Galion is spending a
utters human sounds. In it is an I wee^s -witbi his grandparents,
electromagnet.
I
through wire coiled around the core
were Sunday dinner
Mrs. Wayne
Will
were
Stager home
Rev. Harsh,
Helen Fisher,
Boutwell and
and Mrs.
in the
week
Fisher, Miss
Mrs. B. J.
Mae
and
Byron Leo, Mr.
Leo,
Harold
Howard Nonnamaker and
and Dean Nonnamaker.
Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Criblaz and
an{J Mrs john carjg
Another Duphragm Moyes gmith an) hters
The incoming current flows
I
I
u 1
Ann and Jane, Mrs. Mary Heldman,
of the electromagnet and the I and Ilo Agin called in the B. J.
strength of the magnet’s pull varies I Boutwell home, Monday.
with the strength of the current. I Mrs. Richard Caris of Sandusky
It pulls on a thin, flat disk of iron, I and Frances Cooney spent Monday
another diaphragm, which bends I .home.
evenmg n the Jobn cans
Mr. and Mrs. Daryl Caris, Edna
Marie, Bill and Bob spent Sunday
with Mr. and
Arlene Caris.
Mrs. John Caris and
Caris and daughter
Mrs. John Caris and
Mrs. Daryl
Edna Marie,
Arlene Caris spent Sunday with Mr.
and Mrs. Fred Cribley.
Addresses Of Men
In Service
Pvt. Robert F. West
Battery A, 1st Bn.
181st Field Artillery
Camp Forrest, Tennessee
George Moser
Battery A, 98 C. A. (A. A.)
Schofield Barracks,
Territory of Hawaii
Pvt. Francis J. Luginbuhl,
Co. B, 51st Tng. Bn., 4th Pit.
Camp Wolters, Texas.
just as you .n bend the bottom of a I News Want-Ads Bring Results,
tin pan.
I___
As the strength of the current in I
the wire coil des, the diaphragm I I
bends back and forth. This also
happens from a hundred
thousand times a second.
to several
A-P
tSTASHSHfb
'85’
FOOD STORES
MARVEL "ENRICHED'
BREAD
2LGE.
I’/z-LB.-gO
LOAVES JVC
IONA or P.L.
3 Xi 25c
Whitehouse Evaporated
MILK
4 Ss 30c
8 O'CLOCK
COFFEE
3 LB. BAG 47C
ANN PAGE
BEANS
TENDER-COOKED
4 25c
FANCY SUNNYFIELD
Bluffton is not far away from Key
West, Florida, so far as news is
concerned, Mrs. K. H. Dickerson, for
merly Miss Kathleen Stauffer, of this
place, wrote her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. C. A. Stauffer, this week.
Dickerson recently accepted a po
sition there as a steel construction
worker on a submarine base.
Upon their arrival at the Florida
city, the Dickerson’s purchased a Key
West newspaper and the first item
they noticed was an account under a
Bluffton dateline detailing the trou
bles of Earl Rupright who found
himself without the trousers to his
wedding suit a few minutes before
he was to be married to Miss Thelma
Marquart.
Key West is described by Mrs.
Dickerson as a quaint and beautiful
town, with lovely tropical flowering
trees and tall cocoanut palms.
Most of the houses in the city are
quite old and are put together with-
Settlement
Mrs. Leslie Geiger and sons of
Cleveland and Miss Marcella Geiger
of Dayton are spending the week
visiting at the Peter D. Geiger home.
Duff Payne is driving a truck for
Noah Bixel on an egg route.
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Schumacher
and family of Bogota, New Jersey
arrived in this locality the latter
part of last week to spend some
time among relatives and friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Peter E. Kohli were
visitors in the home of Mr.
family
and
in
Mrs. Ed Kiene and
Medina county.
Mr. and Mrs. G. T.
Mr. and Mrs. Milford
supper guests in the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Krohn and family
Monday evening. Later in the even
ing Mr. and Mrs. Krohn held a
shower in honor of the newly weds
when they entertained a number of
couples from both mixed classes of
the St. John Sunday school.
and
Soldner
Haas were
Edwin Schwab who for the past
year and a half has been in ill
health passed away last Sunday
forenoon at the age of 53 years.
Funeral services were conducted
from the Missionary church in
Pandora on Tuesday afternoon in
charge of Rev. Arinin C. Steiner.
The deeply bereaved family. ha^ the
heartfelt sympathy of their many
friends.
Mrs. Theo. R. Steiner is spending
a part of the summer at Ann Arbor,
Michigan in the home of her son,
Dr. Lloyd Steiner and family.
Evan Amstutz is assisting Albert
Lehman in operating the threshing
outfit in the Linwood Ring.
Word has been received from Mr.
and Mrs. Walter Schutz who are
missionaries in Africa that their re
turn home has been postponed until
some time
thig fall.
Mrs. Oliver Schumacher
Mr. and
and family of Findlay and Mr. and
Mrs. Homer Wenger and family took
Sunday dinner with Mr. and Mrs.
H. M. Kohli and family.* Frederick
Schumacher is spending the week
with Hiram Kohli, Jr.
The Ohio-Indiana Mennonite Young
People’s Conference is being held at
LARGE RIPE
SLICED BACON 15c WATERMELONS
THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1941
Life At Key West Described In
Letter From Former Local Woman
out nails or pegs, being cut and
locked fast by notches in the tim
bers. The apartment in which the
Dickersons reside, however, is a mod
ern concrete structure with 18-inch
walls.
An experimental blackout was held
in Key West shortly after their ar
rival, and nu lights were permitted
for 20 minutes. Airplanes circled the
town during the blackout, and flares
dropped by one large bomber lighted
up the entire city.
One of the picturesque sights of
the waterfront is the lineup of negro
boys who dive for pennies thrown to
them by passengers on incoming
boats. They have mastered all sorts
of water stunts.
An important naval base, Key
West is full of sailors, and detach
ments of naval police patrol the
streets constantly to help maintain
order.
Goshen, Ind., on Saturday and Sun
day.
Ben Augsburger is in the hospital
at Bluffton where he is
an operation soon.
to submit to
been at a
for a couple
Edwin Amstutz has
clinic in Bluffton, Ind.,
of weeks. It is reported that he has
improved considerably.
The Geiger reunion is to be held
at the Pandora school building on
Sunday, August 10.
Mr. and Mrs*. Ambrose Basinger
spent last Saturday with friends in
Toledo.
Ulrich Steiner spent several weeks
at the home of his
Steiner and family
Ohio.
son, Rev. Paul
at Pettisville,
potato growers
Some of our local
are beginning to harvest their crop.
Good yields are predicted by many.
Present prices are near the $1.50
per cwt.
Sales Tax Man To
Be Here Thursday
Assistance to vendors in making
out their semi-annual sales tax re
ports for the period from Jan. 1 to
June 30 will be provided by a sales
tax examiner who will establish tem
porary quarters in the mayor’s office
Thursday afternoon from 1 to 4
p. m.
Semi-annual sales tax reports may
be filed by vendors at that time. All
reports must be made on or before
July 31, or be subject to penalty.
Chicle Diarr
FREE
SAMPLE N
At Our Store~i»Ii6BYd’
Every local poultry HSff
ia invited to Call
etore for fr^'d Mfi
^^^plo of Aviso
A.
SUNNYFIELD
CORN FLAKES
3^
OLEOMARGARINE, Sure Good.................................lb. 12c
BAKING POWDER, Clabber Girl................ 2-lb. can 23c
CALUMET BAKING POWDER..........................lb. can 19c
OXYDOL or RINSO..........................................Ige. pkg. 21c
TISSUE PAPER, Waldorf.....................................4 rolls 17c
POST TOASTIES or Kellogg's Corn Flakes Ige. pkg. 9c
COOKIES, Veltman...................................................pkg. 10c
BEVERAGES, Yukon.................................... 2 qt. bots. 15c
CHEESE, Wisconsin Mild Cheddar
BUTTER, Wildmere Roll..............
BUTTER, Silverbrook.....................
GAUZE TOILET TISSUE..............
CAKE FLOUR, Sunnyfield............
SUPER SUDS...................................
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE.....................
TUNA FISH, Sultana...................
SOAP CHIPS, White Sail............
NAVY BEANS................................
FLOUR, Sunnyfield Pastry............
CLEANSER, White Sail................
PET or CARNATION MILK ....
PEANUT BUTTER, Sultana.........
SPRY or CRISCO............................
MUSTARD, Packer's Label.........
TOMATOES, Iona..........................
DAILY DOG FOOD.......................
PINEAPPLE, Sultana.....................
CAMPBELL'S BEANS...................
WHITE CORN, Packer's Label
FINE SALT.....................................
BLEACH, White Sail.....................
GRAPE JUICE, AGP.....................
SCRATCH FEED, Daily Egg.........
LAYING MASH, Daily Egg.........
FLOUR, Iona...................................
PEACHES, Packer's Label............
dexo, Pure Vegetable Shortening
Hauenstein & Son
The Corner Drug Store
lb. 25c
37c
39c
15c
14c
33c
35c
15c
............... 1b.
..................... Ib.
........4 rolls
23A-lb. pkg.
2 Ige. pkgs.
2 46-oz. cans
...................can
......... 2 pkgs. 25c
..........4 lbs. 21c
241/2-lb. bag 67c
........6 cans 19c
4 tall cans 31c
.... 2-lb. jar 25c
.. 3-lb. can
..... qt.
cans
cans
cans
cans
cans
100 lbs.
2 qts.
... qt.
57c
11c
23c
19c
35c
29c
25c
89c
17c
20c
3 No. 2
... 4 tall
2 No.
4 16-oz.
3 No. 2
... 100 lbs. $2.06
... 100 lbs. $2.60
2414-lb. bag 67c
2 No. 2’/z cans 31c
......... 3-lb. can 54c
39c
EACH

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