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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, August 07, 1941, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
With Monday marking the 27th an
niversary of the beginning of Ger
man-English hostilities in orld ar
No.l, attention was centered in Bluff
ton on the difference of the local re
action to the European struggle as
compared to the present response.
Twenty-seventh Anniversary Of
Start Of First World War Monday
World War No. 1 was greeted with
comparative calm and taken largely
for granted as just another of the
constantly recurring Continental
struggles. It was given second place
in the newspapers of the country to
local news. There was nothing of
the hysteria of the present wave of
feeling.
Price Rises
A few advertisements appearing in
the Bluffton News during the sum
mer of 1914 did speak of the war
causing a boost in prices but for the
most part the ads spoke of pos
sible future rises in prices.
Weather in Florida has been quite
a bit cooler than that in the Bluff
ton area, it was disclosed in a letter
received here this week from C. C.
Amstutz, former Bluffton resident
now living in Eustis, Florida.
A clipping from a Eustis news
paper, sent by Amstutz, shows that
during the time this district was
sweltering in a 12-day heat wave,
maximum temperatures in Florida
were in the eighties.
Concern was shown in Bluffton for
the safety of Dr. and Mrs. Thomas
Chalmers, missionaries and former
Bluffton residents who happened to
be touring Germany at the outbreak
of hostilities. Mrs. Chalmers was
formerly Miss Anna Van Gunten,
daughter of John Von Gunten of this
place.
Weather In Florida Cooler Than Here,
C. C. Amstutz Writs From Eustis
Amstutz continued in his letter:
“During the last week in May and
the first week in June we have it
about the hottest here. We had a
few days up to 100.
“After that we get the rains from
about the 12th of June until the first
of August, and during that period
this year it rained every afternoon
except two days. It rarely rains in
the forenoon and hardly ever at
night.
“People here like to see plenty of
rain in the summer. The more water
we get in the lakes, the warmer the
winter will be. There are 1400 lakes
in Eustis county and many more
small bodies ofwa ter which are not
called lakes.
“Farmers don’t do much here in
the summer. All the work is done
in the winter, with the exception of
fruit tree spraying and some prun
ing and repair work required during
the summer months.
“Some silage is put up in June by
dairymen, but the bulk of the dry
feed for cattle is shipped in from the
north. Eggs are selling now in the
stores at 45 cents a dozen and milk
is delivered to you at 17 cents a
quart.
FREE
SATURDAY, AUGUST 9
Both Mr. and Mrs. Chalmers spoke
German and everywhere the Ger
mans would ask them of the possi
bility of the United States coming to
their aid, according to a letter from
Dr. Chalmers published in the News
of September, 1941. Their safe pas
sage in the country was arranged
by the American consul in Berlin.
Otherwise the town showed only
slight interest in the European
struggle, which followed a pattern
somewhat similar to that of pre
vious engagements in European his
I tory. _________________
“Casco”
CIGARETTE HOLDER
RETAIL VALUE 19c
A concealed cigarette filters nicotine, removes sticky,
gummy, irritating tar!
“Most northern people do not know
that in a year’s time this region
does not have one-tenth the strong
winds and storms experienced in
Ohio. No one has lightning rods on
buildings because thunderstorms are
practically unknown.
“We have a good crop of oranges
for next winter but grape fruit will
be considerably shorter all over Flor
ida. I almost fobgot to say we have
no flies here and very few mosqui
toes.
“Eustis is our home town, but we
get out mail thru the Leesburg post
office address. When you come to
Florida you don’t want to miss Eus
tis. It is made up of 60 per cent
Ohio and Michigan people.
“We always look forward to get
ting the Bluffton News. We always
enjoy it very much, and we watch
particularly for your reports on farm
crops and the weather.”
EXCEPTIONAL OFFER!
Given away with the purchase of six gallons—
ibrilliani
bronze
The two summer meetings of the
Ohio Horticultural Society are sched
uled at the Southern Ohio Orchards
two miles south of Jackson, Friday,
August 8, and at the S. N. Liann
orchards, two miles southwest of
Port Clinton, Thursday, August 14.
Ohio Orchard Day will be at the
Wooster Experiment Station, Friday,
August 15.
POLYMERIZED LEADED REGULAR or
ETHYL GASOLENE
July 1 estimates on corn in the
United States indicate a harvest of
2,548,709,000 bushels, which will be
4 per cent more than the 1940 crop
and 10 per cent above the average
crop in the period 1930-39. This
production will be secured on the
smallest acreage planted in 47 years.
FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST^j
SAVE
LOW PRICE HIGH QUALITY
BRILLIANT BRONZE STATIONS
Ralph Diller Service Station
South Main Street & Bentley Road, Bluffton, Ohio
Phone 455-Y for Tank Truck deliveries.
Third Grade (CHEAP) Gasolene is NOT sold at—
BRILLIANT BRONZE STATIONS
Tax Payment
Notes Go On Sale
Tax pre-payment notes in antici
pation of next year’s record-breaking
income taxes were placed on sale last
Friday in banks of the nation.
Taxpayers do not yet know what
their 1941 income tax bill will
amount to, for congress still is work
ing on new rates. However, every
indication points to increases of from
three to six times as much as paid
last year on the same amount of
income.
It is to ease the burden of heavy
payments falling due next March
that the pre-payment notes are of
fered for sale.
Primary purpose was announced to
offer tax payers a convenient way of
setting aside regularly the funds
which will be required to meet taxes
they must pay next March on this
year’s income.
Purchasers will turn the notes into
the treasury next February and
March in payment of income or ex
cess profits taxes. None of the notes
will be accepted before that
date and no notes will be redeemed
until after they have been held three
months or more.
If anyone buys more than he needs
for this year’s taxes he can hold
them until the following year or turn
them in for cash. If held, interest
will be payable up to August 1, 1943.
When redeemed for cash no interest
will be paid.
Notes will bear the name of the
purchaser and will not be transfer
able or salable. They are subject to
all federal taxes and also state and
local estate tax, gift or excise taxes,
but not state or local income taxes.
Pre-apyment tax notes will be of
two types. The “A” series for small
tax payers will be sold in denomi
nations of $25, $50 and $100 and will
bear 16 cents interest for every $100
for every month from the time pur
chased until turned in for taxes.
In the “B” series, notes are sold
for $100, $500, $1000, $10,000 or
$100,000. Interest on these will be
four cents per $100 per month.
Fewer Pupils In
Hancock County
With 556 fewer school children in
Hancock county for the 1941 fall
term, the decrease has affected the
Mt. Cory and Rawson districts.
At Mt. Cory, enrollment this fall
is expected to be 304, as compared
with 312 last year. Rawson will
have a legistration of 371, a drop
from 407 in 1940-41.
For that part of Hancock county
included in the Bluffton school dis
trict, the school enumeration is six.
This is the same figure reported
last year.
In Hancock county, a total of 7,
921 pupils are shown in the 1941
enumeration. Last year there were
8,477 pupils.
Sunday Night To End
Toledo Opera Series
“New Moon”, Sigmund Romburg’s
glamorous and tuneful operetta, is
being presented this week as the
fourth and final production of the
Toledo Civic Opera Association’s
current season of musical attractions.
The opera series, presented in the
Zoo ampitheatre, have attracted an
increasing number of music and
theatre goers thruout Northwestern
Ohio, and “New Moon” an exception
ally outstanding season to a fitting
climax and conclusion.
Many of Romberg’s best known
songs are in this operetta which is
presented by a cast including Lucius
Metz, Broadway actor and singer
and supported by an orchestra from
membership of the Toledo Symphony.
The production is under direction
of Miss Edith Gordon, youthful con
ductress, whose dynamic personality
has contributed much toward the suc
cess of the opera series.
Performances of “New Moon” will
be given on Thursday, Friday, Satur
day and Sunday beginning at 8:30
p. m.
Tickets are on sale at the opera as
sociation’s downtown box office until
5 p. m. daily, and at the Zoo box
office beginning at 2 p. m. Sunday
and 7 p. m. week days.
Pleasant View
Rev. and Mrs. Paul Zimmerman of
Rawson were Sunday guests in the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Habeg
ger of Bluffton.
David Carr made a business trip to
Pennsylvania, Saturday returning on
Sunday evening.
A number of relatives and friends
for this community attended the
funeral of Mrs. Sarah Hummon at
the Methodist church in Bluffton, Sat
urday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Keller of
near Jenera spent Sunday with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Ha
begger and son Garnie.
Wayne Habegger has recently been
employed in Lima.
The official board met at the Pleas
ant View church, Tuesday evening.
The Ladies Harmony circle will
meet wits Mrs. Reva Doty next Thurs
day afternoon, Aug. 14. Mrs. L. M.
Wynkoop wil Ibe the program leader
wit “Friendship” as the theme.
News Want-Ads Bring Results.
THE BLUFFTON NEWS. BLUFFTON. OHIO
Following is the official program
of the Middle District Conference of
Mennonites which will convene at the
Program Of Middle District
Mennonite Conference Aug. 12-24
Fifty-Third Session
TUESDAY EVENING
Hathaway Reunion
The sixth annual Hathaway re
union was held last Sunday at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Glen Hath
away and children near Ada. Those
present were: Mr. and Mrs. Al Hath
away, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Errett
and children, Mr. and Mrs. Jay
Hathaway and children all of Gibson
burg Mr. and Mrs. Will Hathaway,
Mrs. Jurdon Smith and children, Mr.
and Mrs. Orville Hathaway and
children, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Fisher
Ebenezer Mennonite church west of
Bluffton from Tuesday to Thursday
of next week:
8:00 Worship Service Vice Pres. William Penner
Conference Sermon Pres. A. S. Rosenberger
WEDNESDAY MORNING
9:00 Worship Service Rev. Erwin Albrecht
9:15 Business
1. Presentation of Delegates
2. Reading of Minutes
3. Announcement of Committees
4. Report of Floor Privileges Committee
5. Report of Conference Trustees
10:00 6. Report of Education Committee
10:45 General and District Conference Relations
11:15 Foreign Missions Rev. P. P. Wedel
11:45 Adjournment
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
1:30 Worship Service Rev. E. Albrecht
1:45 Business
1. Report of Bluffton College
2. Report of Seminary
3:00 India Dr. P. A. Penner
3:30 Business Meeting of the Women’s Missionary Societies
Men’s Round Table
Civilian Public Service (C.P.S.) Camps Rev. R. L. Hartzler
WEDNESDAY EVENING
8:00 Program by the Women’s Missionary Societies
THURSDAY MORNING
9:00 Worship Service Rev. E. Albrecht
9:15 Work of the Mennonite Central Committee (M.C.C.)
Dr. H. A. Fast
9:45 Business
1. Report of the Home Mission Committee
2. Report of Women’s Work
3. Report of Young People’s Work
4. Report of Peace Committee
11:15 Home Missions Rev. J. M. Regier
THURSDAY AFTERNOON
1:30 Worship Service Rev. E. Albrecht
1:45 Business
1. Election of Officers and Committees
2. Choosing Place for Next Conference
3. Unfinished and New Business
4. Resolutions and Conference Problems Summarized
4:00 Business Session of the Young People
Devotionals.......................................................Wadsworth
6:00 Fellowship Supper
THURSDAY EVENING
8:00 Program by Young People’s Societies
Theme: To Know Christ and To Make Him Known
Prelude
Hymn
Call to Worship—“That we may know him, the power of
his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings. .”
“Then said Jesus unto them, again, Peace be unto you:
as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you.”
Hymn
Scripture and Prayer Trenton
Special Music St. John, Pandora
Offertory
To Know Christ
Why? Berne
How? Berne
Hymn
To Make Him Known
Evening,
Our Responsibility Dalton
How Can We Make Him Known? Bluffton
Special Music Sugarcreek
Our Program of Work Mr. Carl Lehman
Special Music Grace, Pandora
Close Consecration Service
CONFERENCE OFFICERS
President—Rev. A. S. Rosenberger, Dalton, O.
Vice President—Rev. Wm. Penner, Wayland, la.
Secretary—Rev. G. T. Soldner, Bluffton, O.
Treasurer—Mr. Eli Luginbill, Berne, Ind.
Dr. C. E. Krehbiel
Mrs. N. N. Soldner, Presiding
Devotionals Mrs. A. C. Schultz
Music Berne Choir
Missionary Address Mrs. S. F. Pannabecker
Music Combined Choirs of Bluffton & Pandora
Missionary Address Mrs. P. A. Penner
Music Combined Choirs of Bluffton & Pandora
Announcements and Offering
Music........................................................Berne Choir
Close Dr. P. A. Penner
all of Pemberville Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Bryan, Mr. and Mrs. Dean
Hathaway and children all of Toledo
and Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Badertsch
er and children.
Mr. Will Hathaway received the
honor of being the oldest member
present while little Ronald Ray Bad
ertscher, three-week-old son of Mr.
and Mrs. Wilmer Badertscher was
the youngest child.
The next reunion will be held at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jay Hath
away of Gibsonburg.
Beaverdam
Mr. and Mrs. Grant Barber and
daughter, Miss Joann Barber were
Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Daniel Younkman at Clyde.
Mrs. Lawrence Ludwig and family
of Dayton were week end guests of
Mrs. Mina Augsburger.
Miss Jennie Ramsey of Lima was
a Saturday visitor of Mr. and Mrs.
James Ramsey and daughter Linda.
Mr. and Mrs. Dana Greider of
Sturgis, Mich., were week end
visitors of the former’s mother, Mrs.
Mae Stewart.
Mrs. W. C. Lacock and children
returned Tuesday from an extended
visit with relatives at Cleveland and
Youngstown.
Phyllis, Marilyn and Carolyn
Younkman of Clyde spent the past
week with their grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. Younkman.
Thomas Stratton and son Tommy
of Kansas City, Mo., and Mrs.
Catherine Bassett of Findlay were
Wednesday over night guests of
Mrs. Cynthia Elliott.
Charles Stoodt has returned from
a fishing trip at Canada.
The Y. M. P. class of the Church
of Christ enjoyed a weiner roast at
Schoonover Park in Lima on Wed
nesday night.
Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Downey,
Clarence Downey and daughter Elia
Jean spent Sunday with relatives at
Toledo.
Royal Downey, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Harmon Downey left Thursday
for Toledo for induction into mili
tary training.
Mrs. Mary Holmes of Bluffton
was a Saturday visitor of her sister,
Mrs. John Huber.
Ninth Annual LAWN FETE
St. Mary’s Church, Bluffton
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Duismore of
Vandalia are announcing the ap
proaching marriage of their daugh
ter, Miss Naomi to Maynard R.
Ice Cream and Cake Chicken Sandwiches
Country Store Games
Cue/ufone. 9suited Welcome.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1941
Brackney, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.
R. Brackney. The couple are to be
married Saturday, August 23.
Mr. and Mrs. David Mayer and
daughter Marilyn and M. E. Fensler
of Lima were Sunday callers of Mrs.
Carrie Durkee and daughter Ruth.
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Amstutz
daughter Eileen, and son Wendell
returned Saturday after enjoying a
week’s motor trip in the New
England States and Canada. They
visited enroute Dr. E. M. Feingold
of Worcester, Mass., who was a
former physician of this place.
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Zimmerman
and son Dickie of Toledo were Tues
day supper guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Ray Zimmerman.
Mrs. G. T. Andrews spent the
week end at Leipsic the guest of her
son Earl Andrews.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Zimmerman and
family spent Thursday at Avondale.
John Patterson was a Sunday din
ner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Emil
Kemph and family at Lima.
Former 4-H club members make
up 36 per cent of the total enroll
ment in agriculture and home eco
nomics courses in Ohio State Uni
versity. This is 5 per cent higher
than the average number of former
members enrolled in such courses in
colleges and universities throughout
the nation.
Farmers can assign payments due
under the agricultural conservation
program to obtain funds for building
or repairing farm storages for 1941
grain crops. Transportation of these
crops may be delayed by traffic tie
ups that may hinder marketing. Pay
ment of 7 cents per bushel for stor
ing wheat under loan in approved
farm storage will be made under the
adjustment program.
News Want-Ads Bring Results.
New—Inside and Out!
FfiffitlaireSix’
Actually 6 9/10 cu. ft.—Biggest Six in Frigidaire History I
Here are some of Its SO great features:
Glass-topped Porcelain Hydrator
(Slides in and out like a drawer)
Double-Easy Quickube Trays
Big, Double-Width Tray for ice or
desserts—Has Instant Cube Release
Extra-Deep Cold Storage Tray
I Frozen Storage Compartment
.* Super-Powered Meter-Miser
Sensot°nal Pri‘.
$132.75
NOW1 Soo proof that rt pays to buy the favorite —to buy Frigidaire I
C. F. Niswander
Authorized Frigidaire Dealer Bluffton, Ohio
August 13
Easy Terms

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