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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, October 16, 1941, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
ALLEN COUNTY
Honest Man Finally
Found
Diogenes blew out his lamp last
week as 6,108 unexpected dollars
dropped smack into the laps of de
positors in the bankrupt Lima First
American Trust Co.
The cash came from Theodore G.
Harris, of Connersville, Ind., who
vowed eight years ago that if it
ever became possible he would repay
in full a bank loan only partly
erased when the institution entered
liquidation during the 1933 financial
holiday.
State Banking Supt. Rodney P.
Lien said Harris’ legal obligation
was completely satisfied when the
courts approved acceptance of all
but $4,570 on a $10,000 note. The
sum represented all Harris could
raise through sale of his property.
But Harris kept track of the debt,
and he prospered in Indiana. Then
a few days ago he read that a final
liquidating dividend was to be paid
to the bank’s depositors. He com
municated with Lien at once and
asked that the remainder of his
debt, plus interest at six per cent,
be added to the final disbursement.
27 Traffic Fatalities In
County
Traffic deaths in Allen County
stood at 27 for the year last Satur
day following the death of Mrs.
Maude Winegardner, 35, in a colli
sion at an intersection of two rural
roads near Spencerville.
Mrs. Winegardner, wife of Arris
Winegardner of near Spencerville,
was injured fatally when her car
collided with one driven by Mrs.
Everett Miller, Spencerville. Both
women were alone in their cars.
Only One Medical
Exam For Draftees
Allen county district draftees will
be required to take only one physical
examination under a plan expected
to go into effect about Nov. 1, Col.
INSURANCE
Insure your car with
AETNA
and know that you are
SAFE
Also Fire and Windstorm
Insurance.
Notary Public
F. S. IIE11R
AGENT
Phone 363-W
LOCAL AND LONG
1 DISTANCE HAULING
Every Load Insured
STAGER BROS.
I
Bluffton, Ohio
d)....................................................gj
NEWS NOTES FROM FOUR COUNTIES
H. E. Boucher, chief selective serv
ice medical officer at Columbus said
Thursday.
Eight examining stations have been
established and regular U. S. army
physicians will be assisted by civil
ian specialists to assure thoro exam
inations, he said.
The stations are at Cleveland, To
ledo, Columbus, Zanesville, Canton,
Dayton, Fort Thomas, Ky., and
Huntington, W. V.
Break Up Youthful
Band Of Auto Thieves
A youthful band of auto and bike
thieves was in the hands of Allen
county juvenile authorities Thursday.
Inspector Ross Landfair said the
boys, ranging in age from 10 to 14
years, had been stealing vehicles for
more than a month and a half. Four
were nabbed for stealing autos while
two are wanted for thefts of bi
cycles.
Puts Out Fire With
Bare Hands
Quick thinking on the part of
Merchant Police Arthur Kohn, Tues
day night prevented what might
have proved a disastrous blaze in the
Jettinghoff and Beckman furniture
store, in Delphos. Kohn was burned
about the hands in extinguishing a
blaze which flared in the front win
dow. He was given first aid by
firemen.
Scouts Gather Paper
For Defense
Local Boy Scouts will enlist in the
national defense waste paper cam
paign this week at the request of
Leon Henderson, administrator of
the Office of Price Administration.
Dr. James E. West, chief scout ex
ecutive, in bulletins mailed to 20,
000 scout leaders, called for waste
paper collection drives in every com
munity that has a scout troop.
County Relief Cost
Is $450
Having sold my farm will offer at Public Auction 2 Vo
miles north of Bluffton, 5 miles southeast of Pandora,
Wednesday, Cct. 22
The following property:
Cost of direct relief in the Allen
county area during September was
$450.48, County Director Harry Cor
win reported to the board of com
missioners Friday. Anticipated ex
penditures totaling $455 were listed
for October.
4 CATTLE—Jersey cow, fresh last of Nov. Holstein
cow, fresh first of Dec. Holstein cow and Brown Swiss
cow, both giving good flow of milk. All T. B. and Bang
tested.
7 HOGS—4 purebred Duroc sows, with pigs by side
2 Spotted sows, with pigs by side 1 purebred Duroc male
hog.
Last month’s disbursements, ex
clusive of administrative costs of the
direct relief and federal food stamp
plan, included food $225.50 medical
attention $202 clothing $7.98 shel
ter $10 and household necessities
$5, Corwin reported.
Priorities Keep Judge
From Office
A new suite of offices won’t be
occupied for a long time by Judge
Raymond P. Smith and his staff.
Priority regulations have him sty
mied, Judge Smith explained as he
looked at the rooms on the fourth
floor of the courthouse which com
missioners had installed this summer
at a cost of $17,000.
The factory has stopped acknowl
edging Judge Smith’s queries as to
Public Sale
3 SHEEP—2 wethers and 1 buck lamb.
FARMING IMPLEMENTS
Farmall Tractor, with cultivators John Deere tractor
plow, with two 12 inch bottoms tractor disc John Deere
corn planter Hoosier grain drill, 10 hoe McCormick 7 ft.
binder McCormick-Deering mower, 5 ft. cut Keystone
gearless hay loader hay tedder Oliver riding breaking
plow hay slings New Idea manure spreader spike tooth
harrow Studebaker wagon double work harness Crow
foot clod masher.
Some household goods.
Hay in mow corn in crib 200 bu. oats baled straw'.
200 CHICKENS—20 Barred Rock pullets, laying 100
White Leghorn pullets, laying 80 White Leghorn pullets,
4 months old.
Sale to begin at 12:30 P. M.
Terms—Cash.
Elam Welty
M. Thrapp, Auct.
L. S. Hatfield, Clerk.
Women of Living Links Class of St. John Mennonite Church
Will Serve Lunch
when necessary equipment will be
shipped.
HANCOCK COUNTY
Breeding Ducks Are
Saved
Fifteen breeding ducks placed by
the state this season on the waters
of Van Buren lake, will be sure of
protected existence for another year
at least.
The reason: They were captured
just before the season opened and
penned up under supervision of
Lloyd Ohl, game warden, till the
duck season closes 60 days in the
future.
Raised in captivity and not yet
long accustomed to their freedom,
plus the fact that their wings were
clipped to keep them at home at
least for the first few months, the
ducks were tame and the game
warden assisted by members of the
conservation club had little trouble
in recapturing them.
Squirrel Hunter, 82,
Good Marksman
He’s 82 years of age but R. H.
Treece, of Mt. Blanchard, can still
sight down the barrel of a gun.
The aged man no doubt made some
kind of record this year during the
squirrel season when he killed eight
of the bushy-tailed animals with
nine shots. And his ninth shot
wasn’t a miss entirely for he
wounded another.
And the shooting was done with
out the use of eyeglasses.
Legion Buys Hospital
Equipment
The Findlay hospital has formally
accepted the urological X-ray unit
presented by Ralph D. Cole post,
No. 3, American Legion, as a con
tribution to the general welfare of
the city, Commander M. E. Sorenson
announced.
In accepting the equipment for
the hospital, Miss Mabel Pittman,
superintendent, said the unit, to be
used for kidney and bladder exam
inations and treatment, is a valu
able addition to the facilities for
treating patients.
Neighbors Help Clear
Barn Debris
Thirty neighbors and friends of
Mr. and Mrs. Christian Bosse, of
near Jenera, assisted this week in
cleaning up the debris caused by
the burning of their barn Sept. 25
during the wind storm.
Mr. Bosse noticed a fire by the
straw stack but was unable to ex
tinguish it on account of the high
wind. The barn was soon afire and
the entire contents of wheat, oats,
hay, fertilizer and machinery were
lost.
Beet Plant Starts
Operations
First of the 1941 harvest of sugar
beets began arriving at the West
Park plant of the Great I^akes Su
gar company in Findlay Friday and
M. R. Allen, manager and plant
superintendent, said the plant would
start operations Tuesday morning.
Boy Held For Shooting
Trainman
A 14-year-old Findlay boy is be
ing held in custody for firing a small
calibre rifle at a New York Central
train and wounding the locomotive
fireman in the left arm.
The fireman, Delbert Truman, 40,
of Columbus, was not seriously hurt.
Snake Milks Cow
Emanuel Arnold, a brother of Rev.
Arnold, was told one of the dairy
cows gave scarcely any milk in the
evening but gave her full share in
the morning. One day, Emanuel
said, his father sent one of the boys
back to the pasture field to watch,
to ascertain who was guilty of pur
loining the milk from this individual.
The lad found the answer: A snake
reared his head by the side of the
cow and, like a mechanical milker,
drained the udder.
Ohio Oil Buys New
Holdings
O. I. Donnell, president, announced
last week the Ohio Oil Company’s
purchase of the independent Weber
Oil Company, Bay City, Michigan,
and dissolution of the latter concern.
The transaction included 15 wells
in the newly discovered Reed City
field in Lake and Osceola counties,
125 wells in the old West Branch
and Clayton fields, 14 drilling wells,
2,000 acres of undrilled proven
leases and approximately 23,000
acres of wildcat leases, in addition
to drilling and operating equipment.
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
[HjiS GIN HAD
[Tn
Leoner Hernan
Baltimore, could
more than five d»
it a point to set
before October 1.
As it so ha
didn’t see Cryer,
er’s auto and wa
without an oper
Mr. Cryer, a d(
operator’s license
OUR DEMOCRACY—--
A FOUNDING FATHER
OF preparedness.
MADE COTTON
KI NG-BUT PAID
HIM NOTHING
TILL YEARS
LATER.,IN
1812.
v
HAVEN
jACK IN NEW
HE GOT SOME FRIEND5 TO
INVEST, AND BUILT A FACTORY
FOR ANOTHER PURPOSE. IT SEEMED A
FLAT FAILURE. BUT EVENTUALLY HIS INITIATIVE
PATIENCE AND ENTERPRISE PROVED OUT.
this factory mass production-
INTERCHANGEABLE FARTS-FOUNDATION STONES OF
MODERN INDUSTRY AND TODAYS NATIONAL DEFENSE
WERE BOTH DEVELOPED BY ELI WHITNEY.— BY 1806
HE PRODUCED 10,000 MUSKETS WITH EACH LOCK.
STOCK AND BARREL INTERCHANGEABLE.
Failure To See Reg
istrar Costly
•z, of near North
xvc saved himself
ars had he made
Walter E. Cryer
ened, Hernandez
umped into Cry
fined for driving
license.
registrar, sells
HARDIN COUNTY
Hardin Husking Con
test Saturday
The Hardin county corn husking
contest will held Saturday, Octo
ber 18, on thi Grover McElree farm
five miles southeast of Dunkirk in
Jackson township.
In addition to shock and standing
corn events a standing corn contest
for vo-ag students will be held. En
tries may be made with Lewis Rader,
Dunkirk vo-ag teacher, before Octo
ber 16.
Chester Collins, of south of Ken
ton, the 1940 cunty and state stand
ing corn champion, already has en
tered.
12 Defense Schools
Planned
Free instruction in engineering de
fense cours will be offered thru
Ohio Norther in 12 towns of north
western Ohio beginning this month.
Subjects v. ill include industrial
mathematics, reduction engineering,
advanced eng neering, drawing and
safety engirt -ring. Towns where
classes will be organized include
Lima, Bryan, Sidney, Van Wert,
Findlay, Kenton, Fostoria, Upper
Sandusky, Bellefontaine, St. Marys,
Urbana and Hicksville.
Sheep Claims Amount
To $225
Hardin county commissioners to
day had allowed $225.15 in sheep
claims for the third quarter of 1941.
Aged Educator Dies
In Crash
H. W. Bowersmith, 82, Ada, re
tired teacher and farmer and justice
of the peace of Liberty Township,
was killed when a westbound freight
train struck his automobile at the
Fredericks grade crossing five miles
west of Ada.
Mr. Bowersmith, a graduate of
Ohio Northern University, was a
teacher anft superintendent of schools
for 35 years, serving at McGuffey,
Beaverdam, Ridgeway, Forest and
Risingsun, Ohio, and Medina, Ill.
He also taught a year at Ohio
Northern University.
His Hubble Gum
“Blew Up”
Marvin Lamb of Ada didn’t re
ceive $5 last week when he ans
wered a question but he did get rid
of an inquisitive person.
Marvin is a member of the local
Boy Scout troop which was main
taining a first-aid tent at the Kenton
fair last week. He had consented to
by Mat
be thoroughly bandaged and exhibit
ed before the tent.
His condition not only attracted
considerable attention but also nu
merous questions such as, “Why
son, what in the world happened to
you?”
Marvin soon tired of answering
questions and finally replied to an
inquiring sympathizer, “My bubble
gum blew up.”
Births Double Deaths
In County
During September there were 31
births and 15 deaths in Hardin
county, it was revealed by Betha
McKinley, keeper of vital statistics
in the county health department.
Deaths were due to cerebral hem
orrhage, cancer, coronary throm
bosis, intestinal hemorrhage and
edema of the lungs.
PUTNAM COUNTY
Two Hurt When Car
Hits Horse
Two persons are recovering in
their homes after being injured in
a freak accident last week on State
Route 65 between Ottawa and Leip
sic.
Mrs. Mary Overly of Leipsic and
Glenn Riggs of near Continental
suffered painful facial lacerations
and were removed to Memorial hos
pital in Lima for treatment before
being returned to theix* homes in the
Purnell ambulance of Leipsic.
They were riding with Mr. and
Mrs. Elton Butler of Leipsic when
the car, driven by Butler, struck a
horse in front of the Alva Finerock
farm, veered off and hit a tree. The
horse was killed by the impact.
Western Outlaw Once
At Putnam Fair
The 1941 Putnam county fair,
which ended October 4 marked the
40th anniversary of the appearance
of a noted character in the history
of this nation.
County Engineer John T. Maidlow,
Sr., in reminiscing over the fairs of
the past years recalled that Frank
James, one of the ames brothers of
post-mortem movie fame, was the
race starter during the 1901 fair.
The brother of Jesse James was
elderly when he started the horses
in Ottawa and became ill near the
end of the week, having to be treat
ed by a Leipsic physician before he
could proceed to his next assign
ment.
Putnam’s First Se
lectee A Lieutenant
Donald H. Martin, son of Editor
and Mrs. Harry E. Martin of the
Leipsic Free Press, has been gradu
ated from the Army Training School
at Fort Knox, Ky., and was ad
vanced to the rank of second lieu
tenant. After a nine-day furlough
he will be stationed at Pine Camp,
N. Y. He was Putnam County’s
first selectee.
Mrs. Roosevelt Con
gratulates Ottawa Girl
Signal honor came to Miss Cora
Alice Bennett, daughter of Mrs.
Florence Bennett, of Ottawa, during
the recent graduation exercises at
St. Elizabeth’s hospital school of
nursing at Washington, D. C.
Miss Bennett was graduated with
highest honors in the class of 26
nurses. She received the personal
congratulations of Mrs. Franklin D.
Roosevelt as she presented Miss Ben
nett with the first diploma and a
$10 award of the alumni association.
The former Ottaw'a girl will re
main in Washington to work at the
hospital from which she received
her degree.
Blimp Passes Over
Ottawa
The Goodyear blimp of Akron,
bent on the rescue of Daredevil Hop
kins from Devil’s Rock in the west,
passed over Ottawa about noon on
Monday of last w'eek. It was ac
companied by a ground crew in a
motor bus, but arrived at its des
tination too late to be of assistance.
The parachutist w’as liberated from
his lofty perch by a corps of trained
mountain climbers, w’hile the blimp
was enroute. However, the blimp
created lots of excitement, and was
good advertising for the Goodyear
company. ,-w
Girls To Sing For
Area Teachers
Approximately 170 girls who com
pose the all-county girls’ glee club
rehearsed in the auditorium-gymnas
ium at Ottawa, Tuesday evening,
under the direction of Donald Lusk,
of Leipsic.
This Putnam county musical or
ganization w’ill sing at Toledo, Octo
ber 24, during the meeting of the
Northw’estern Ohio Teacher’s Asso
ciation. On the same program, the
girl’s octette from the Pandora high
school will sing.
Free Lunches For
Putnam Pupils
Plans are being made for the serv
ing of free school lunches in th(
schools of Putnam county again this
w’inter, it w’as reported by Mrs. Bon
nie Corns, county relief director.
In preparation for the opening of
the 1941-42 school lunch program,
Mrs. Corns reviewed the activities
of the program last year and found
that the program expanded to a
point where about 300 children in
five county schools w’ere receiving
free lunches. She asserted that the
growth of the plan has been a nor
mal one based upon the needs of
children in the schools as determined
by the officials of the district.
i
THURSDAY, OCT. 16, 1941
AN ORDINANCE
FIXING SALARIES AND WAGES OF THE
EMPLOYES OF THE MUNICIPAL ELEC
TRIC ENERGY AND WATER WORKS
PLANT OF BLUFFTON, OHIO. AND RE
PEALING ALL PREVIOUS ORDINANCES
INCONSISTENT THEREWITH:
Be it ordained by the Council of the Vil
lage of Buffton. State of Ohio:
Section 1. That from and after the first
day of September, 1941, th salary of the first
engineer and superintendent of the Municipal
Electric Energy and Water Works plant of
the said village shall le one hundred and
seventy-five ($175.00) dollars per month, jtay
ble semi-monthly.
Section 2. That from and after the first
day of September, 1941, the salary of the
second engineer and assistant suierintendent
of the Municipal Electric Energy and Water
Works plant of the said village shall be one
hundred and seventy ($170.00) dollars per
month, payable semi-monthly.
Section 3. That from and after the first
day of September, 1941, the salary of the
third, fourth and fifth engineers of the Mu
nicipal Electric Energy and Water Works
Plant of the said village shall be for each
of the engineers, one hundred and forty ($140.
00) dollars per month, payable semi-month
ly.
Section 4. That from and after the first
day of September, 1941, the salary of the
outside maintenance superintendent of the
Municipal Electric Energy and Water W’orks
Plant of the said village shall be one hun
dred and thirty-five ($135.00) dollars per
month payable semi-monthly.
Section 5. That from and after the first
day of September, 1941, the salary of the
clerk of the Municipal Electric Energy and
Water W'orks plant of the said village shall
be seventy-five $(75.00) dollars per month,
payable semi-monthly.
Section 6. That from and after the first
day of September. 1941, the wage scale for
linemen of the Municipal Electric Energy
and Water W'orks Plant of the said village
shall be sixty-two and one-half ($.62%) cents
per hour, payable semi-monthly.
Section 7. That from and after the first
day of September 1941 the wage scale for
other regular skilled labor of the Municipal
Elehctric Energy and Water Works Plant of
the said village shall be fifty-seven and one
half ($.57%) cents per hour payable semi
monthly.
Section 8. That from and after the fiirst
day of September, 1941. the wage scale of
common labor of the Municipal Electric En
ergy and W'ater W'orks Plant of the said vil
lage shall be fifty ($.50) cents per hour, pay
able semi-monthly.
"SCALED DOWN" for the Average Farm
McCORMICK-DEERING
No. 2 (2- Roll) Husher-Shredder
Section 9. That all ordinances or parts of
ordinances inconsistent herewith be and the
same are hereby repealed and this ordinance
shall take effect from and after the earliest
period allowed by law.
Passed this 15th day of September, 1941.
W. A. HOWE, Mayor.
Wilford Geiger. Clerk of Council. 25
Average yields for Ohio wheat w’ere
below 15 bushels per acre every’ de
cade from 1850 to 1910. Yields have
been more than 15 bushels per acre
in every decade since 1910.
Here's an ideal machine for the man who waijts to shred fodder economically
and at his own convenience without calling in a big neighborhood crew.
Capacity: 25-45 bushels of com an hour (stover, 1^£ to 2 tons). Can be
powered by any small tractor or 7|^-h.p. electric motor.
C. F. Niswcmder
McCormick-Deering Dealer Bluffton, Ohio
ATTENTION
FARMERS!
Exchange your wheat for Flour
Middlings.
We exchange 100 pounds Flour
Middlings for 110 pounds wheat.
Wheat contains 10 to 11% Protein
and 2% Fat.
Flour Middlings contains 16 to
17% Protein and 5% Fat.
The Bluffton Milling Co.
Adding common baking soda to
w’ater given to feeder cattle im
mediately after they are received
may avert losses from shipping
fever. If fever develops, a veter
inarian should be called immediately.
WANTED
LUNG SUFFERERS TO TRY
Lower’s Prescription
—for—
Bronchitis, Asthma, severe
Coughs and Colds
Especially wonderful for that
cough that causes worry.
Don’t delay. Sold by A.
Hauenstein & Son
Manufactured by C. Lower,
Chemist, Marion, Ohio.
WANTED—DEAD STOCK
WE PAY TOP CASH PRICES
Horses §4.00 Cows §2.00
Small Stock removed free of charge.
Quick Service
Telephone Findlay, MAIN 475, Reverse Charges
BUCKEYE REDUCTION COMPANY, Findlay, Ohio
_________________ "Branch, Fostoria Animal Product*. Inc.”_______
♦f ___ J*
__ J*

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