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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, October 30, 1941, Image 1

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BLUFFTON NEWS
The Advertising Medium for
Bluffton Trade Territory
VOLUME NO. LXVI
LITTLE INTEREST
IN POLITICS AS
ELECTION NEAR
Campaign in Closing Stag
This Week One of Quietest
In Years
Race for Township Trustees
Supplies Principal Activity
Vote Tuesday
PRECINCT VOTING PLACES
Precinct A—Mrs. Zoe Zehrbach
Building above Lewis Barber shop.
Precinct B—Bluffton High school
library.
Precinct C—Carmack room former
ly occupied by Western Auto Supply
store.
Precinct I)—Mayor’s Office.
Richland N—Township Room.
Richland S—Beaverdam Townhouse.
With less than a week to go until
next Tuesday’s election, politics has
shown little indication of activity, and
unless the situation changes over the
week end the campaign—or lack
it—will be one of the quietest
years.
Included in the fieneral pre-elec
tion apathy is the proposal for a bond
issue for modernizing of the tow’n’s
fire figthing apparatus which has
evoked practically no discussion.
Four Ballots
Bluffton voters will receive four
ballots at the various polling places
at the Tuesday election. Separate
ballots will be given the voters of the
town, township and schoolboard tick
ets and the proposal to issue 8,000 in
bonds for the purchase of fire fighting
equipment.
Richland township voters will re
ceive two ballots, the township and
school board tickets. Whether
voter will receive the Beaverdam or
Bluffton school board ballot will de
pend on the district within the town
ship in which he lives.
Four Voting Places
Bluffton voters will mark their bal
lots for the first time since 1928 at
four voting places in precincts which
were established from territory form
erly served by three precincts.
The new precinct
are as-follows:
Precinct A—West
between Washington
streets.
DEMOCRAT
Samuel Bixel
of
in
Marshall Jennings
is
Principal indication of activity
supplied on the township ticket where
the race for the two berths on the
board of trustees has stirred up some
interest.
Charles Lora
boundary lines
of Main street
and Franklin
of Main and
Precinct B—West
South of Franklin streets.
Precinct C—East of Main and South
of Cherry streets.
Precinct D—East of Main and
North of Cherry street, and West of
Main and North of Washington street.
Procedure Changed
Another change in election proced
his year will be the use by elec
•fficials of a poll list and a jury
ure
In addition to the poll book the
elector will list his name and address
in the two other lists.
With no state or national issues at
stake, the election this fall is of pure
ly local importance. Despite this in
terest in the campaign has been main
tained and voting may be heavier than
usual in the “off year.” House to
house canvassing is being done by lo
cal candidates.
The municipal ticket will carry the
names of Democrat and Republican
nominees for mayor, clerk, six coun
cil posts, treasurer and three places
on the board of public affairs.
A separate non-partisan ballot lists
the six candidates for the board of
education, three to be elected.
Candidates for Richland township
offices will be listed on the township
ballot. In the township two trustees
are to be elected. Two justices of the
peace and two constables are also
be named.
The polls will be opened at 6:30
m. and closed at 6:30 p. m.
to
a.
Dr. Garry Myers To
Speak Wednesday
Dr. Garry Cleveland Myers, noted
newspaper columnist and expert on
child problems, will address a public
meeting to be held at the Bluffton
High school auditorium this Wed
nesday night at 8:00 o’clock.
His appearance here is being
sponsored by the Bluffton Federation
of Women’s clubs. Dr. Myers has
had years of experience as a psycho
logical consultant and lecturer in the
field of children’s problems.
Dr. Myers will lecture to the
Bluffton audience following which
he will conduct a forum in which he
will answer questions concerning
child problems. The public is invit
ed to attend this meeting.
VOTERS TO DECIDE
ON LEVY FOR NEW
FIRE EQUIPMENT
Auditor
.56
the
Proposal for $8,000 Bond Issue
To Be Decided at Polls
Tuesday
Candidates For Bluffton And
Richland Township Offices
For Mayor
John E. Steiner Wilbur A. Howe
For Clerk
Wilford O. Geiger James West
For Treasurer
For Members of Council
(Six to Elect)
Homer L. Bracy William Amstutz
Fred A. Hofer C. E. Aukerman
Frank McElroy Kermit Kibele
Gerald E. Swank
Frank L. Todd Cleon A. Triplett
Jesse W. Yoakam
For Board of Public Affairs
(Three to Elect)
A. C. Burcky
William Luginbuhl Peter Gratz
Oswin Luginbuhl
Delos Keel
For Bluffton Board of Education
(Three to Elect)
Oscar Lora Ralph Badertscher
W. M. Niswander Ralph Dunifon
Fred Wenger
For Richland Township Trustees
(Two to Elect)
Fred Badertscher Waldo H. Huber
Harvey Burkholder Walter E. Marshall
For Richland Township Justice of Peace
(Two to Elect)
A. D. Gratz
For Richland Township Constable
(Two to Elect)
Robert Neiswander R. E. Griffith
High Prices Drive Top Grade
Eggs Off Retail Markets Here
a
?enditure for fire equipment.
Purchase of the equipment
je in hands of the council
de
fer
Bluffton voters will make
cision on an $8,000 bond issue
fire fighting equipment when they
mark a separate ballot for the pro
posal at the regular November
elections next Tuesday.
If approved, slightly more than
one-half mill will be added to the
average levy of Bluffton taxpayers
for a period of eight years. A
jority vote will be required to
the measure. Proceeds from
bond issue, $8,000, would be
maximum amount authorized the
ma-
the
would
which
might spend less than the maximum
amount of the bond
fit.
issue if it saw
office of the
submitted at a
Figures from the
Allen county auditor
meeting of the town council indi
cated that an average annual levy
of .56 mills for eight years ‘will be
required
issue.
to retire the proposed bond
according to the auditor’s
would run from 1943 to
Bonds,
schedule
1950 with 81,000 of the principal be
ing paid annually.
.56 Average Levy
The tax levy, it is pointed out is
the average assessment, the cost to
the taxpayer when the bond issue
had run half its allotted period.
During the first half of this time
the cost would be more than the
average and less than that figure
for the last half.
The issue to be submitted at the
polls here Tuesday has been certi
fied to the Allen county board of
elections and that body took official
action the first part of September to
place the measure on the ballot.
Decision of the town council to
submit the matter to the voters was
made when it was found that fire
I insurance underwriters are expected
to raise insurance rates here as a
result of equipment that is described
as both inadequate and out-moded.
In addition to this factor there is
the hazard occasioned when the local
equipment is called outside the cor
poration limits should the fire truck
be needed within the municipality.
SPEAKS AT FINDLAY
Dr. M. R. DeHaan, radio minister
and Bible teacher is speaking at
Calvary church in Findlay this Wed
nesday and Thursday night at 7:30
o’clock. He will also speak on
Thursday afternoon at 2:30.
REPUBLICAN
brown.
Retail prices of 42
have sharply restricted
grades locally.
of
Estimates Average
Mill Required to
Finance Project
E. S. Lape
Clayton Bixel
John Tosh
Stanley Vertner
J. E. Emerick i
High prices commanded by extra
fancy eggs have driven these top
grades off the Bluffton market it
was indicated the first of the week
by local buyers. Market price for
these eggs received by producers the
first of the week was 38 cents a
dozen for whites and
36 cents for
to 46 cents
sales of these
by Bluffton
eggs of the
Volume of buying
housewives are fresh
medium size class
35 cents a dozen,
known to the trade as pewees retail
for 27 cents. For this latter grade
producers receive 23 cents a dozen.
retailing around
Small pullet eggs,
The egg market is reported gen
erally strong with increased domestic
demand together with export ship
ments of powdered eggs to Europe
creating a reaRy mat4e&‘Y6r aft that
are produced.
Current prices range from seven
to 10 cents above quotations at this
time last year.
Call For Women To
Sew For Red Cross
s issued the
Cross sewing
open at the
first of the week. Re
headquarters will be
home of Mrs. J. S.
Main street at any
day or evening, daily
urday. Because of the urgent need,
a large response of volunteer work
ers is hoped for.
me during the
excepting Sat-
Births
Announcement has been made of
the birth of a daughter to Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Newbrecht in Toledo,
Sunday. Mrs. Newbrecht, the form
er Dorothy Diller, is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Diller of To
ledo. Mr. Diller will be remembered
as a former Bluffton resident.
The following births at the Bluff
ton hospital:
Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Little, a
boy, Thursday.
Mrs. Gayion Parrett,
a boy, Friday.
Mr. and
Continental,
Is Stricken
Grocer
With Grave Ailment
Menno Badertscher, Bluffton gro
cer and member of the town council
is in the isolation ward of the Find
lay hospital suffering from spinal
meningitis. His condition is report
ed serious. Badertscher took ill sud
denly the first of the week and was
removed from his home on Poplar
street to Findlay, Tuesday.
New Scout Troop
To Hold Meeting
The American Legion Boy Scou"
troop will hold their weekly meeting
at the Legion hall Thursday night
at 7:30 o’clock, it was announced by
Woodrow Little, scoutmaster. Ac
tivities for the evening will be de
voted to practise of tenderfoot re
quirements.
rHE BLUFFTON NEWS
A NEWSPAPER DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF BLUFFTON AND VICINITY
BLUFFTON, OHIO, THURSDAY. O( T.
FOR FARM CROPS
IN ALLEN COUNTY
Increased Agricultural Produc
tion Urged by Federal
Government Board
Parity Levels Established
Potatoes, Milk, Eggs,
Hogs, Beef
Bluffton area farmers were cheer
ed this week by a bright outlook for
the prices of six farm commodities
on which government parity prices
have been established for. next year
in line with increased production ask
ed for certain crops.
To insure the necessary boost in
Allen county farm production, action
has been taken by the United States
Department of Agriculture to guar
antee not less than 85 per cent of
parity prices set for commodities in
which increased yield is needed be
cause of the defense program.
Covered in the parity price assur
ance setup are potatoes, milk, egg?
hogs, beef and soybeans, according to
an announcement made by Clair A.
Patterson, chairman of the Allen
County Agricultural Conservation as
sociation.
In Allen county increases asked for
next year are as follows: Soybeans
14% potatoes 10% all fresh vege
tables 23% cows 4% milk products
12% eggs 8% hogs 14% beef 12%
and a garden on every’ farm.
Fann parity prices guarantees un
der which farmers are sure of an in
come of at least 85 per cent of the
parity basis are:
Potatoes, 95.6 cents per bushel
milk, $2.25 per 100 lbs. eggs, 26.8
cents per dozen hogs, $10.39 per 100
pounds and beef $9.07 per 100
ponds.
No parity price has been establish
ed as yet for soybeans because the
present market is so extremely fluc
tuating.
In furthering increased Allen county
farm production, a USDA defense
board has
county.
of various agricultural and
agencies already existing
county.
been established in the
This consists of the heads
federal
in the
30, 1911
for
canvass
Under its direction a farm
will be made by AAA committeemen
this fall, and help ^ill be available
for every farmer up. a 1912
farm plan.
In the survey farmers will be asked
to include the number of cows, hogs,
chickens, egg production, milk pro
duction, acreages of corn, oats, wheat,
rye, vegetables and other commodities
produced in 1941, and the intended
production for 1942.
This information is voluntary’ but
essential for the county’s farm de
fense planning, according to Patter-
Richland township has 356 farms,
with an average farm acreage of 73A
acres, which must be contacted by
Township Committeemen Willard Jen
nings, S. E. Steiner and Wx
Schaublin.
In Jackson township there are
farms, with an average acreage
76.2. Township committeemen
Herman Young, Charles
Paul Craig.
Herr
288 farms,
of 78.8. Oli-
Monroe township has
with an average acreage
ver Basinger, C. A. Hetrick and A. R.
Wright are the committeemen.
Sugar Beet Expert
To Speak At Lions
Glen R. Larke, a representative of
the sugar beet industry and an edi
tor of one of the journals in the
trade, will be the speaker at the
next meeting of the Lions club to be
held at the Walnut Grill Tuesday
night at 6:15 o’clock.
Bible Lectures At
Reformed Church
C. A. Schmid, pastor of the
Evangelical and Reformed
of Berne, Ind., will be the
Rev.
Cross
church
speaker at the annual Bible lecture
series to be held at the St. John’s
Reformed church starting Sunday
night and continuing through Thurs
day night. All meetings start at 7:30
o’clock.
The general theme of the series
will be “The Power of God Unto
Salvation”. Subjects are as follows:
Sunday—“Faith and Unbelief.”
Monday—“A Backslider’s Confes
sion.”
Tuesday—“The Saving Christ”
Wednesday—“The Divine Archi
tect.”
Thursday—“The Gospel of God’s
Grace.”
The public is cordially invited.
Judge Raymond Smith, Lima,
Addresses College Mar
riage Course
New Marriage License Regula
tions Require Physician's
Certificate
With 10 grounds for divorce al
lowed by law in Ohio, this state is
one of the most liberal
States' on this matter,
Judge Raymond Smith of the juve
nile court in Lima, who addressed
members of-the Bluffton college mar
riage course at the college chapel
Monday night.
Ohio Is Easy State In Which To Get
Divorce, Jurist Says In Talk Here
in the United
according to
In considering divorce it is neces
sary to distinguish between grounds
and causes of divorce. Causes are
the actual reasons for divorce and
grounds
are the legal reasons.
has established age limits
contracting parties in mar-
Ohio
for the
riages.
males may marry at 18 years of age
and females at 16 years of age. To
marry at this ge it is necessary to
have
ing.
wait
With consent of parents
consent of both parents in writ
Otherwise young people must
until the age of 21 to marry,
(Continued on page 8)
A flock of wild geese which cir
cled over Bluffton shortly after mid
night, Monday, v
seeking the big
here where they frequently stop
rest on their flights south in
fall and back north in the sprii
lhe nock, apparently
awakened residents by th
long continued honking
circled over the town
hour.
Investigation at the
day morning failed to
of the birds and
that the geese, unable
quarry
southward flight.
eno
Bewildered Flock Of Wild Geese
Believed Seeking Quarry Here
■ved to be
al quarry
and
the
ig.
loud and
the
birds
an
Tue:
quarry
disclos
is believed
locate the
on their
it
to
finally continued
a 28-acre
a favorite
Sev-
The National quarry,
body of water has been
stopping place for the birds,
eral years ago a large flock remained
here for almost a week to rest
fore continuing their flight.
nurch here Sunday afi
zening.
297
of
are
ana
be
Presbyterial Youth
Rally Here Sunday
are
Upwards of 150 young people
expected to attend the annual
tunin rally of Youth of Lima Pres
Delegates from each of the 22
churches of the presbytery will be
in attendance at the rally which is
held every spring and fall.
Speaking at the afternoon meet
ing will be three Bluffton college stu
deents, Helen Harder from Montana,
Laurence Burkhalter from India and
Ernst Harder from Paraguay.
Paul Barrett, elder in the First
Presbyterian church, Findlay, will
address the evening session.
Richard Mumma of Bluffton is
president of the youth group of
Lima Presbytery which sponsors the
rally Miss Edythe Cupp of Bluffton
and Rev. Mark Andrews, Delphos,
are co-sponsors of the league.
FOR BETTER FIRE PROTECTION
An Editorial
The $8,000 involved in the bond issue
outlay for the fire department which safeguards over two
million dollars of property on Bluffton’s tax duplicate.
In the face of rising building costs which will make
more costly the replacing of fire losses, the added tax levy
averaging little more than half a mill for eight years
would appear to be cheap insurance.
The fact that Bluffton has been fortunate in the
matter of fire losses should not be permitted to bring
about an attitude of false security.
Urgent recommendations by Fire Chief Corson that
steps be taken to modernize Bluffton’s fire department
have resulted in the town council acting to place the issue
before the voters.
Bluffton needs modernized fire fighting equipment—
the fire department deserves a full measure of cooperation
from citizens of the town. The fire equipment bond issue
should pass by a large majority next Tuesday.
Pastor
■BP 7
RE'.
W. L. Harmony of the
Bluffton Lutheran -----u
street which
rededicatory
night,
services will
Grove
special
Sunday
The
church on
will hold
mark the
formal
which was closed for a time last
summer during which a number
of notable improvements were
made.
reopening of the church
BLUFFTON AREA
TO SEND FOUR TO
NOVEMBER DRAFT
List Announced to be Inducted
Into Military Training
November 11
Thirteen Selectees Summoned
For Physical Examinations
In Toledo
Names of four Bluffton area
youths to bo inducted into military
training service on November 14 and
13 selectees summoned to Toledo for
final physical examinations on Wed
nesday of next week were announced
Tuesday by Allen county draft
boards.
Jeavei
Bluffto:
ev. Em
formi
son
included i
The following Blufft
are summoned to go to
Wednesday of next week
cal examination:
Robert Piper, Claude Yarger,
Beaverdam Harry Burkholder,
Lima William Guthrie, Robert Dur
bin, Lafayette.
First Bank
The first savings bank was said
to have been instituted at Berne,
Switzerland, in 1787. It was for
servants only.
With municipal, school district and township tickets
the proposal
fire-fighting
which it de­
to be voted on at the election next Tuesday,
to issue bonds for modernizing Bluffton’s
apparatus may not receive the consideration
serves.
is a modest
Good Place to Live—
Try Bluffton First
tober 23, 1881
The service
NUMBER 27
LUTHERAN CHURCH
WILL REDEDICATE
BUILDING SUNDAY
Dr. George Miley, Synodical
President to Speak at
Evening Service
Occasion will Mark Sixtieth An
niversary of Original
Church Dedication
Bluffton Lutheran church on Grove
street which was closed during the
past summer for improvements to the
building and installation of new fur
nishings will be formally rededicated
at special services to be held Sunday
night at 7:30 o’clock.
Dr. George W. Miley, president of
the Lutheran Synod of Ohio, and one
of the outstanding leaders of that de
nomination will be the principal
speaker, it is announced by Rev. W.
L. Harmony, pastor of the church.
The rededicatory services will mark
almost 60 years to the day from the
date of the original dedication of the
present structure which was on Oc-
laying of new hardw
carpet uph
and
of Mrs.
Indiana,
marked
ors
provements.
Dr. Miley Speaker
The program will consist of an ad-
in-s
t’iciate
by Dr. Miley
at the rite
Sj ial music will
(Continued
re-dedication.
provided by a
Wedding Solemnized
In Early Morning
church
st Menn
•ning at 7
Miss Esther Irene Nilswander,
ghter of Dr. and Mrs.
ling y
W. M.
IT and Paul Emm
John Emmert, of
ert, son
Elkhart,
'his also
28th wedding anniver­
sary of the bride’s parents.
In the presence of relatives and
friends, the Rev. H. T. l/nruh, past
or of the First Mennonite church,
officiated at the single ring ceremony
low and bronze pom-poms tied with
white satin ribbon marked the bridal
aisle.
cille Ste
inducted Novemb
fton Wil
2 and
■e, Bluffton Iv
Weaver of neai
organ, inclu
DeKoven 1
Youmans “1
Bur
area men
Toledo on
for physi-
Bas
Robert Murray, Bryan
Laurence Burkhalter, Francis Snare,
Robert Deerhake, Dwight Worthing
ton, Robert Kohler and James Grif
fith all of Bluffton.
sremony, Miss Lu
ose friend of the
ptial music on the
Oh Promise Me”,
igh the
raum”, Lisa
“The
Excelling”. Miss Dorothy
Findlay, sang “At Dawn
Iman, and “I Love Thee”,
O Perfect Love” by Bur
played softly during the
ceremony.
The biidal
altar to the
Chorus from
on the arm of her father, the bride
was attired in the gown worn by
her mother 28 years ago. It was of
ivory charmeuse satin fashioned with
a yoke and a bolero of lace. Her
veil of bridal illusion was held in
place by pearled orange blossoms
and she carried a shower bouquet of
white chrysanthemums and pom
poms.
party appr
strains of
Lohengrin.
oached the
the Bridal
Entering
Leland Lehman, of Berne, Indiana,
a classmate of the groom, was the
best man.
The bride’s mother chose a dubon
net crepe dress with black accessor
ies and wore a corsage of gardenias.
The mother of the groom wore a
dress of blue crepe, with black ac
cessories, and a gardenia corsage.
Following the ceremony a recep
tion and breakfast was held in the
home of the bride’s parents.
Both the bride and the groom have
attended Bluffton college. During
the past year the bride has been em
ployed at the R. T. Gregg store in
Lima, while the groom is employed
with the Emmert Appliance com
pany, LaGrange, Indiana, where the
couple will reside.
the bride wore a
frock with black
corsage was of
For going away
military blue wool
accessories. Her
white chrysanthemums.
Out-of-town guests were Mr. and
Glenn Morgan, Sylvania Mr.
Mrs. Walter Meigs, Warren
Mrs.
and
Miss
Miss
Miss
John
and Mrs. Howard Emmert, Topeka,
Ind. and Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
Kingsley, Brighton, Ind.
Elvina Steiner, Wadsworth
Anna Ruth Steiner, Byhalia
Lois Steiner, Columbus Mrs.
Emmert, Elkhart, Ind. Mr.

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