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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, November 20, 1941, Image 6

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PAGE SIX
Following is the premium list for Bluff
ton’s 26th Annual Agricultural Fair to be
held Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,
December 3, 4 and 5. Entries will close
Monday, December 1 at 9 P. M.
ENTRY RULES
1. Entries will close at 9 p. m. Monday, Dec.
1st, except for Agricultural Products and Domestic
Art, which close at noon Wednesday, Dec. 3rd.
Read Rule 5 below for Domestic Art entries. All
mail entries must be accompanied by check or
money order to cover entry and membership fees.
Entries by mail shall give age of animal, breed,
sex, and the class it is desired to enter.
2. All livestock exhibitors will be charged the
regular membership fee of 50c and become mem
bers of the Bluffton Agricultural Society. This
fee to be paid with the entry fees at time of entry.
4. All livestock, poultry, corn and grain entered
shall be charged an entry fee. Entry fees are
stated under each department.
5. Domestic Art entries are free and are to be
made direct to the Domestic Art Superintendent
and not to the fair secretary. Please note rules
under Domestic Art Department. Domestic Art
entries open at 10 o’clock Tuesday and close at
noon Wednesday.
6. Entry books will be at the Bluffton News
office Monday, December 1st, 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.,
previous to the opening of the fair.
7. All exhibits must be in place by Wednesday
noon, December 3rd and stay in place until after
the parade on Friday, the last day of the fair.
GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS
1. This Fair is conducted in compliance with
the rules and regulations of the Ohio State Board
of Agriculture.
2. In case funds are not sufficient, premiums
will be prorated.
3. Any premium obtained thru fraud, or viola
tion of the rules or misrepresentation will be
forfeited.
4. All disputes shall be settled by the President,
the Secretary and the Superintendent of the de
partment in which the disputes occur.
5. All livestock, etc., will be housed in com
fortable quarters and will be looked after at night
by special police, but the Fair Board will not be
responsible for any loss or damage or accident
that may occur during the fair.
6. All animals entered for premiums must be
owned by the exhibitor and evidence of ownership
must be furnished if required. Exhibitors of
teams must be bona fide owners of both horses
shown together.
7. No animal or team may enter more than one
class except in sweepstakes or as one of a pair,
team or herd where they have been entered singly.
All animals must be entered singly to show in
sweepstakes. No exhibitor may enter more than
one herd as exhibitor herd in each class.
8. Where three premiums are offered one ex
hibitor cannot win more than two premiums.
9. Purity of livestock must be established by
pedigree.
10. Evidence will be required that animals ex
hibited as breeders are not barren.
11. All exhibitors of livestock must come pre
pared to prove ages of same by affidavit if re
quired.
12. All animals or poultry known to be affected
with any contagious disease will be excluded.
13. Each exhibitor must furnish his own feed.
The Fair Board will furnish a reasonable amount
of straw for the first bedding, any more straw
needed must be furnished by the exhibitor. Straw
and feed may be purchased locally or brought
from home.
14. All pens and stalls must be kept clean
each day.
15. No interference or communication with the
judges will be allowed and any person who by
letter or otherwise, attempts to influence the de
cision of any judge shall forfeit any or all pre
miums which may have been awarded and ruled
out of competition.
16. No classes will be added and judges are to
make awards according to the printed premium
list.
17. No ribbons or cards of other fairs are to
be displayed until after awards are made by the
judges.
18. When animals, articles or exhibits of any
kind are not deemed worthy of a premium, the
judge will make no award.
PARADE
All livestock that can be led or controlled must
be shown in parade on Friday afternoon, December
5th, at 2:30 P. M. Failure to participate in the
parade will be grounds for forfeiting all premiums
awarded.
JUNIOR FAIR
Open to Boys and Girls of Allen County. See
rules under Junior Fair Department.
SPECIAL FEATURES
LOG SAWING CONTEST
Entries free. Entries will be received up to
time of contest. Open to any residents of Allen,
Hancock, Putnam or Hardin Counties.
The contest will be held Friday afternoon, Dec.
5th, at 1 o’clock.
Each contesting team shall furnish their own
saw. Each team will draw numbers and saw in
order drawn. A uniform log will be furnished.
The decision of judges will be final. Place of
holding contest will be announced later.
Prizes $4.00 ..... $3.00..,. $2.00 $1.00
MILKING CONTEST
Entries free. Entries will be received up to
time of contest.
The contest will be held Friday afternoon, Dec.
6th, at 1:30. Place will be announced later.
The contest is open to any resident of Allen,
Hancock, Putnam or Hardin Counties.
Each contestant will furnish own cow, leader,
pails and other equipment. The cow may be
brought from home or may be from the exhibits.
The contestant milking the most milk in three
minutes will be the winner. The decision of the
judges will be final.
Prizes $4.00 $3.00 $2.00 $1.00
PET PARADE
Sponsored by the Bluffton Lions Club
The pet parade will be a special feature again
this year. It will be held the last afternoon of
the fair, Dec. 5th, in connection with the livestock
parade. The pet parade will form in front of the
Bluffton grade school building and march through
town.
The pet parade is open to all pupils of grade
and high school age. Individual prizes will be
awarded by grades on the basis of condition and
originality in display.
Watch the Bluffton News for further information
regarding these special contests and any other
special contests that mav be added.
FIRST DEPARTMENT
HORSES
Dwight Frantz and Joe Powell, Sup’ts.
1. Entry fees for horses per head are: 2 years
and over, 75c all under 2 years, 50c.
2. Entries close at 9 p. m. Monday, Dec. 1st.
3. One exhibitor cannot win more than two
premiums where three premiums are offered.
Class 1—BELGIAN and PURCHERON (Purebred)
STALLIONS
1—Stallion 4 years and over $6.00 $3.00 $1.00
2—Stallion 3 years and under 4 6.00 3.00 1.00
3—Stallion 2 years and under 3 5.00 3.00 1.00
4—Stallion 1 year and under 2 4.00 2.00 1.00
5—Stud Colt 4.00 2.00 1.00
6—Champion Stallion Ribbon
MARES
7—Mare 4 years and over 6.00 3.00 1.00
8—Mare 3 years and under 4 6.00 3.00 1.00
9_ Mare 2 years and under 3 5.00 3.00 1.00
10—Mare 1 year and under 2 4.00 2.00 1.00
11—Mare Colt 4.00 2.00 1.00
12—Champion Mare Ribbon
Premium List for Bluffton's 26th Annual
Agricultural Fair December 3, 4 and 5
Class 2—GRADE (Draft)
GELDINGS
1—Gelding 4 years and over $5.00 $3.00 $1.00
2—Gelding 3 years and under 4 5.00 3.00 1.00
3—Gelding 2 years and under 3 4.00 2.00 1.00
4—Gelding 1 year and under 2
5—Horse Colt
6—Champion Gelding
MARES
7—Mare 4 years and over
8—Mare 3 years and under 4
9—Mare 2 years and under 3
10—Mare 1 year and under 2
11—Mare Colt
12—Champion Mare
Class 3—MULES
1—Mule 3 years and over
2—Mule 2 years and under 3
3—Mule 1 year and under 2
4—Mule Colt
5—Mule team in harness
Class 4—SWEEPSTAKES
1—Get of Sire, 3 or more
animals (without sire)
2—Produce of Purebred Dam, 2
more animals, (without dam)
4.00 2.00
4.00 2.00
Ribbon
SECOND DEPARTMENT
CATTLE
Clyde Klingler and Clyde Warren, Sup’ts.
1. Entry Fees for cattle per head are: 2 years
and over, 75c 1 year and under 2 years, 50c
under 1 year, 25c.
2. Entries close at 9 p. m. Monday, Dec. 1st.
3. All cattle must be T. B. tested.
4. One exhibitor cannot win more than two
premiums where three premiums are offered.
Class 5—SHORTHORN
Class 6—HEREFORD
Class 7—ABERDEEN-ANGUS
Class 8—JERSEY
Class 9—GUERNSEY
Class 10—HOLSTEIN-FRIESIAN
Class 11—BROWN SWISS
Class 12—AYRSHIRE
Premiums for all cattle classes are:
BULLS
1—Bull 3 years and over $4.00 $3.00 $1.00
2—Bull 2 years and under 3 4.00 3.00 1.00
3—Bull 1 year and under 2 3.00 2.00 1.00
4—Bull Calf 2.50 1.50 1.00
5—Champion Bull
COWS
6—Cow 3 years and over
Premiums for all hog classes are:
BOARS
1—Boar 2 years and over $3.00 $2.00 $1.00
2—Boar 1 year and under 2 3.00 2.00 1.00
3—Boar 6 months and under 1 yr. 2.50 1.50 1.00
4—Boar pig under 6 months
5—Champion Boar
SOWS
Premiums for all sheep classes:
RAMS
1.00
1.00
5.00 3.00
5.00 3.00
4.00 2.00
4.00 2.00
4.00 2.00
Ribbon
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
$4.00 $2.00
3.00 2.00
3.00 2.00
3.00 2.00
2.00 1.00
$3.00 $2.00
or
3.00 2.00
3—Produce of Grade Dam, 2 or
more animals, (without dam) 3.00 2.00
4—Draft teams in harness (grade
and purebred) 3.00 2.00
Ribbon
4.00 3.00 1.00
7—Cow 2 years and under 3 4.00 3.00 1.00
8—Heifer 1 vear and under 2 3.00 2.00 1.00
9—Heifer Calf 2.50 1.50 1.00
10—Champion Cow Ribbon
11—Exhibitors Herd, bull over 1
year and 3 females over 1 year
of age 2.00 1.00
Class 13—SWEEPSTAKES
(All beef breeds show together—All Dairy breeds
show together)
1—Beef—Get of Sire, 3 or more
animals $2.00 $1.00
2—Beef—Produce of Dam, 2 or
more animals 2.00 1.00
3—Beef—Calf Herd, bull and 2
heifers all under 1 yr. of age 2.00 1.00
4—Dairy—Get of Sire, 3 or more
animals 2:00 1.00
5—Dairy—Produce of Dam, 2 or
more animals 2.00 1.00
6—Dairy—Calf Herd, bull and 2
heifers all under 1 yr. of age 2.00 1.00
THIRD DEPARTMENT
HOGS
Ben Amstutz and Carl McCafferty, Sup’ts.
1. Entry fees for hogs per head are: all 1 year
and over, 50c all under 1 year, 25c market hogs,
50c per pen.
2. Entries close at 9 p. m. Monday, Dec. 1st.
3. One exhibitor cannot win more than two
premiums where three premiums are offered.
Class 14—DUROC JERSEY
Class 15—POLAND CHINA
Class 16—SPOTTED POLAND CHINA
Class 17—CHESTER WHITE
Class 18—HAMPSHIRE
Class 19—BERKSHIRE
2.00 1.00
Ribbon
6—Sow 2 years and over 3.00 2.00 1.00
7—Sow 1 year and under 2 3.00 2.00 1.00
8—Sow 6 months and under 1 yr. 2.50 1.50 1.00
9—Sow pig under 6 months
10—Champion Sow
11—Exhibitors herd, boar and
sows any age
1—Ram 2 years and over $3.00 $2.00 $1.00
2—Ram 1 year and under 2 3.00 2.00 1.00
3—Ram Lamb
4—Champion Ram
EWES
5—Ewe 2 years and over
.50
2.00 1.50
Ribbon
.50
3
2.00 1.00
Class 20—SWEEPSTAKES (All breeds together)
1—Get of Sire, 4 or more animals $2.00 $1.00
2—Produce of Dam, 4 or more
animals 2.00 1.00
Class 21—MARKET HOGS
1—Pen of three market hogs, anv
breed $4.00 $3.00 $1.00
(Market hogs cannot show in any other class)
FOURTH DEPARTMENT
SHEEP
Harold Carr and Hiram Kohli, Sup’ts.
1. Entry fees for sheep per head are: All 1
year and over, 50c all under 1 year, 25c market
lambs, pen of three, 50c.
2. Entries close at 9 p. m. Monday, Dec. 1st.
3. One exhibitor cannot win more than two
premiums where three premiums are offered.
MUTTON BREEDS
Class 22—OXFORD and HAMPSHIRE
Class 23—SHROPSHIRE
Class 24—DORSET
Class 25—CHEVIOT
FINE WOOLS
Class 26—A TYPE MERINO
Class 27—MERINO and RAMBOULETT
and Type
2.00 1.00 .50
Ribbon
3.00 2.00 1.00
6—Ewe 1 year and under 2 3.00 2.00 1.00
7—Ewe Lamb
8—Champion Ewe
9—Exhibitors Herd, ram and 3
ewes, any age
Class 28—MARKET LAMBS
2.00 1.00 .50
Ribbon
2.00 1.00
1—Pen of three market lambs, any
breed $4.00 $3.00 $1.00
(Market lambs cannot show in any other class)
FIFTH DEPARTMENT
POULTRY
Albert inkler and Wm. B. Luginbuhl, Sup’ts.
1. Entry fees for poultry are: each bird 10c
per single entry and 25c per pen. All birds must
be entered single before they can be entered in
pen. Entry fees for Turkeys, Geese and Ducks,
25c per pair and for Bantams, 10c per pair.
2. Entries close at 9 p. m. Monday, Dec. 1st.
3. One male and three females constitute a pen.
4. All birds must be entered in the name of the
actual owner.
5. Poultry showing signs of disease will be ex
cluded from the show.
6. Birds will be judged on a utility basis but no
bird will be awarded a premium which has any
standard disqualification.
7. Standard show pens and straw will be fur
nished. Exhibitors are to furnish own feed.
8. Cards showing ownership and price may be
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
attached to any pen after ]premiums are awarded.
9. One exhibitor cannot win more than two
premiums where three preiniums are offered.
Premiums for all poultry classes are:
1—Cock .60 $ .40 $ .25
2—Cockerel 60 .40 .25
3—Hen .60 .40 .25
4—Pullet ,60 .40 .25
5—Breeding Pen 00 .50 .25
Class 29—ENGLISH WHIT E LEGHORNS
Class 30—AMERICAN WillITE LEGHORN
Ciass 31—BROWN LEGHORNS
Class 32—BARRED ROCKS
Class 33—WHITE ROCKS
Class 34—BUFF ROCKS
Class 35—S. C. R. I. REDS
Class 36—WHITE WYANDOTTES
Class 37—SILVER LACED WYANDOTTES
Class 38—GOLDEN LACED WYANDOTTES
Class 39—BUFF ORPINGTONS
Class 40—WHITE ORPINGTONS
Class 41—JERSEY BLACK GIANTS
Class 42—LIGHT BRAHMAS
43—NEW HAMPSHIRES
Class
Class
Class
Class
1—Champion Male in the Show
2—Champion Female in the Show
3—Champion Breeding Pen in the Show
Class 47—TURKEYS, GEESE, DUCKS, BANTAMS
1—Best
2—Best
3—Best
4—Best
aa__
ANCON A9
Pair Turkeys, any variety $1.00 $
Pair Geese, any variety
Pair Ducks, any variety
Pair Bantams, any variety
SIXTH DEPARTMENT
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
Edgar Herr and Quinten Burkholder, Sup’ts.
1. Entry fee for corn and grain is 10c for each
sample. No entry fee for potatoes, vegetables and
fruits.
2. Entries clase at 12 o’clock noon, Wednesday,
December 3rd.
3. All agricultural and horticultural products
must be grown by the exhibitor and must be the
product of the current year.
4. One exhibitor cannot win more than two
premiums where three premiums are offered.
Class 48—CORN (Ten ears)
1—Ten ears any open pollinated
variety of Field Corn $1.00 $ .75 $ .50
2— Ten ears Pop Corn, any variety .60 .40 .25
3—Ten ears any Hybrid Field Corn 1.00 .75 .50
Hybrids—(Products of hybrids, not seed com)
If there are enough entries, the hybrids will be
divided according to their maturity into three
groupings for showing, as follows—Early Hybrids,
Medium Hybrids and Late Hybrids.
All hybrids must have hybrid number given at
time of entry.
4—Single Ear, any variety (separate
entry) .60 .40 .25
5—Shelled Corn, any variety, two
quarts in glass container. All
entries must have name or number
of hybrid given at time of entry 1.00 .75 .50
6—Champion Ten Ears of Corn in the show—Ribbon
Class 49—GRAIN AND SEEDS (Peck samples)
1 —Wheat ................... ...... $ .75 $ .50 $ .25
2—Rye ........................ ..............75 .50 .25
3—Barley .................. ..... .75 .50 .25
........ .75 .50 .25
5—Buckwheat -...... ........ .75 .50 .25
6—Timothy ............... ____ .75 .50 .25
7—Red Clover ........ ............ 75 .50 .25
8—Alsike Clover ... .75 .50 .25
9—Alfalfa ................ .75 .50 .25
10—Sweet Clover ....... ...7.........75 .50 .25
11—Soy Beans .75 .50 .25
Class 50—POTATOES (Twelve potatoes)
1—Early Ohio
2—Irish Cobbler
3—Chippewa
4—Kathahdin
5—Rural White
6—Rural Russet
7—Sweet Potatoes
8—Red and White Yams
Class 51—VEGETABLES
1—Six
2—Six
3—Jix
Red Beets
Turnips
Carrots
Parsnips
Salsify
Quart Lima Beans
Quart Navy Beans
Quart Kidney Beans
Heads Cabbage
Winter Squash .........
Field Pumpkins ___.40
Sweet Pumpkins
Buff.)
&
45—MINORCAS, (Black, White
46—SPECIAL AWARDS
Ribbon
Ribbon
Ribbon
$
.50
.50
.50
.25
.75
.75
.40
1.00
1.00
.60
...$ .60 $ .40 $ .25
... .60 .40 .25
........60 .40 .25
........60 .40 .25
....... 60 .40 .25
........60 .40 .25
........60 .40 .25
....... 60 .40 .25
$
•$
5—Six
6—Three Sugar Beets
7—Three Mangel Wurtzel Beets
8—Six Yellow Onions
0—Six White Onions
10—Six Radishes
11—One
12 One
13—One
14—Two
15—Two
16—Two
17—Two
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.40
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.40
.40
.40
.40
18—Display Six Gourds .....
19—Largest Squash .........
20—Largest Pumpkin
Class 52—FRUIT (Five to a plate)
All varieties must be properly
correct variety name.
APPLES
and
All Premiums 40c
1—Wealthy
2—Snow
3— Wolf River
4—Baldwin
5—Grimes Golden
6—Jonathan
7—Red Delicious
8—Golden Delicious
9—Ben Davis
10—Gano, Black Ben
11—McIntosh
12—Rome Beauty
13—Stayman
14—Winter Banana
15—Northern Spy
16—York Imperial
33—Pears,
Class 53—DISPLAY by FARM ORGANIZATIONS
1—Best Display $6.00 $4.00
Open to any Farm Organization, such as Grange,
Farm Bureau, etc.
This display should be educational showing the
work of the organization. Farm products used
for decorative purposes must have been grown by
members of the organization making the exhibit.
Entries to be made not later than 9 P. M. Mon
day, December 1st, so space can be allotted.
SEVENTH DEPARTMENT
LADIES DOMESTIC ART
Mrs. Joe Powell, Mrs. H. F. Barnes and
Mrs. Harry Patterson, Sup’ts.
1. All entries are free and are to be made
direct to the superintendents in charge and not to
the fair secretary.
2. Place of exhibit and entry will be in room
above Todd’s grocery and the Gas Co. office.
3. Entries open at 10 o’clock Tuesday, December
2nd and close at noon Wednesday, December 3rd.
All entries are to be in place by Wednesday noon.
4. All work must be finished and named by
the exhibitor when entered.
5. Cards showing ownership may be attached
to any article after awards have been made.
6. Exhibits will be judged Thursday, December
4th.
Class 54—DOMESTIC ART (White and Colors)
1—Bed Spread, applique $ .75 $ .50
2— Bed Spread, embroidered .75 .50
3—Bed Spread, yo yo .75 .50
4—Bed Spread, tufted .75 .50
5—Bed Spread, crochet -75 .50
6—Bed Spread, knit _____75 .50
7—Quilt, patchwork, hand .75 .50
8—Quilt, patchwork, machine ...........75 .50
9—Quilt, applique 75 .50
10—Quilt, embroidered applique ____ .75 .50
11—Quilt, embroidered .75 .50
12—Quilt, flower garden .75 .50
13—Best Quilting 75 .50
14—Oldest Quilt .50 .25
15—Oldest Coverlet .50 .25
16—Afghan Cover, woven .50 .25
17—Afghan Cover, crochet 50 .25
18—Fancy Comfort .50 .25
19—Sheet, crochet .50 .25
20—Sheet, cutwork ..................... .50 .25
labeled with
25c.
17—Winter Rambo
18— R. I. Greening
19—Winesap
20—Belleflower
21—Newton Pippin
22—Russet
23— Thompkins King
24—Stark
25—Wagoner
26— Talpahalkin
27—Mann
28—Pewaukee
29—Canada Red
30—Spitzenberg
31—Belmont
32—Any other variety
any variety
21—Pair Pillow Cases, crochet .50 .25
22— Pair Pillow Cases, white embroid 50 .25
23—Pair Pillow Cases, colored embroid. .50 .25
24—Pair Pillow Cases, cutwork 50 .25
25—Pair Pillow Cases, applique 50 .25
27—Pair Pillow Cases, cross stitch 50 .25
27—Table Cloth, crochet 75 .50
28— Table Cloth, cutwork .75 .50
29—Dresser or Buffet Scarf, embroidered .50 .25
30—Dresser or Buffet Scarf, crochet 50 .25
31—Dresser or Buffet Scarf, cutwork .50 .25
32—Dresser or Buffet Set, embd. 3 pieces .50 .25
33— Dresser or Buffet Set, crochet, 3 pcs. .50 .25
34—Dresser or Buffet Set, cutwork, 3 pcs. .50 .25
35—Dresser or Buffet Set, applique. 3 pcs. .50 .25
36—Dresser or Buffet Set, cross
stitch, 3 pieces 50 i .25
37— Center Piece, embroidered .... 50 .25
38—Center Piece, crochet 50 .25
39— Center Piece, cutwork 50 .25
40—Center Piece, applique 50 .25
41—Center Piece, cross stitch .50 .25
42—Luncheon Set, embroidered _______ .50 .25
43— Luncheon Set, cutwork 50 .25
44— Luncheon Set, applique ____________ 50.25
45—Luncheon Set, crochet ......................... 50 .25
46—Chair Set, crochet ______________ 50 .25IV
47— Chair Set, cutwork .................................. 50 .25
48—Chair Set, cross stitch ______________ 50 .252.
49—Cross Stitch Sampler _____________ 50 .25
50—Embroidered Picture, framed 50 .25
51—Embroidered Wall Hanging ____ 50 .25
52—Pillow, afghan 50 .25
53—Pillow, fancy _______________ .50 .25
54—Needlepoint ________________ 50 .25
55—Rug, woven .50 .25
56—Rug, braided .50 .25
57—Rug, crochet .50 .25
58—Rug, hooked yarn 50 .25
59—Rug, hooked rag __________________ 50 .25
60—Rug, hooked string .50 .25
61—Dress, wool .75 .50
62— Dress, silk or rayon .75 .50
63—Dress, cotton .50 .25
64—Child’s Dress .50 .25
65—Fancy Apron 35 .20
66—Kitchen Apron __________________ .25 .15
67—Towel, crochet .25 .15
68—Towel, embroidered .25 .15
69—Towel, cross stitch 25 .15
70—Towel, cutwork .25 .15
71—Best Novelty .35 .20
72— Best Unusual Antique 50 .25
ART (Adults)
73—Flowers, water color 50 .25
74—Flowers, pastel .50 .25
75—Flowers, oil .50 .25
76—Landscape, water color .......... .50 .25
77—Landscape, charcoal ........... .50 .25
78—Landscape, pastel _________________ 50 .25
79—Landscape, oil .. 50 .25
80—Portrait, water color ....................... 50 .25
81—Portrait, pastel 50 .25
82—Portrait, charcoal 50 .25
83—Portrait, oil .50 .25
FLOWERS
84—Best Potted Plant .......... ........... 50 .25
85— Best Display of 3 Potted Plants ........75 .50
JUNIOR FAIR
1. The Junior Fair is open to boys and girls
enrolled in the schools of Allen county.
2. Entries are free. No membership will be
charged Junior Fair exhibitors.
3. In case funds are not sufficient, premiums
will be prorated.
VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE AND 4-H CLUB
Harry F. Barnes, Sup’t.
1. Open to boys enrolled in Vocational Agricul
ture Departments or 4-H Clubs in Allen county.
2. Esc1' Exhibitor is limited to two entries per
class Xvept poultry and dairy cattle where the
exhibitor is limited to one entry per class.
3. Exhibitors of livestock and poultry may com
pete in open class by paying regular entry fee.
4. Livestock and poultry entries close at 9 P. M.
Monday, December 1st. All other entries close at
noon Wednesday, December 3rd. Ail exhibits are
to be in place by noon Wednesday and stay in
place until after the parade on Friday unless ex
cused by superintendent in charge.
5. All exhibits must come from the farm of the
exhibitor. No exhibits purchased or borrowed for
the fair will be eligible for awards.
6. Livestock need not be registered but should
meet the requirements of its class and be worthy
of an award. Any exhibit deemed unworthy of
an award by the judge will receive no award and
be ruled out of competition.
7. All exhibits placing lower than third will be
paid fourth place money.
8. Straw and pens to show poultry will be
furnished. All feed to be furnished by exhibitor.
Exhibitor will furnish straw for livestock after
the first bedding.
Class 1—HOGS—Farrowed on or after Feb. 1, 1941
A—Berkshire Gilt $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $
B—Breeding Gilt, anv other
breed 3.00 2.00 1.00
C—Boar Pig, any breed 3.00 2.00 1.00
D—Sow, any breed —... 3.00 2.00 1.00
Class 2—SHEEP (All breeds together)
A—Mature Breeding Ewe $2.50 $1.50 $ .50 $ .25
B—Ewe Lamb ............ 2.50 1.50 .50 .25
C—Ram Lamb 2.50 1.50 .50 .25
Class 3—BEEF CATTLE (All breeds together)
A—Beef Heifer Calf, under
one year of age $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $ .50
B—Beef Heifer, one year and
under 2 years of age 3.00 2.00 1.00 .50
C—Feeder Steers 3.00 2.00 1.00 .50
Class 4—DAIRY CATTLE
A—Dairy Heifer Calf, under
one year of age ....... $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $ .50
B—Dairy Heifer, one year
& under 2 yrs. of age 3.00 2.00 1.00 .50
C—Dairy Cow, over 2 years
of age 3.00 2.00 1.00 .50
D—Dairy Bull, under 2 years
of age 3.00 2.00 1.00 .50
Class 5—HORSES
A—Colts, under 2 years of
age .... _.„..$3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $ .50
Class 6—POULTRY
(Pen to consist of 3 pullets or 3 hens)
A—Young Pen, egg breeds $1.00 $ .75 $ .50 $ .25
B—Old Pen, egg breeds
C—Young Pen, general
___ 1.00
pur-
pose breeds ______
D—Old Pen, general
i
3.
.50
.50
.50
.50
.75 .50 .25
___ 1.00
pur-
.75 .50 .25
pose breeds ......._... ___ 1.00 .75 .50 .25
E—Cockerel, egg breeds
F—Cockerel, general
__ .75
pur-
.50 .25 .25
pose breeds ___ .75 .50 .25 .25
Class 7—AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
Exhibitors in this class cannot use same entry
in open class. All agricultural products to be
grown on the farm of the exhibitor and be of
the 1941 crop.
A—CORN—Ten Ears
1—Open Pollinated $1.00 $ .75 $
2—Hybrid __ __________ 1.00 .75
3—Pop Corn, any variety .75 .50
B—SEEDS—Peck samples
1—Wheat, any variety —...$ .75 $ .50 $
2—Oats, any variety .75 .50
3—Soybeans, any variety 75 .50
C—POTATOES—Twelve in entry
1—Early Potatoes $ .75 $ .50 $
2—Late Potatoes .75 .50
Class 8—FARM SHOP
1—Nail Box or Tool Box ....$ .40 $
2— Milk Stool ______ .30
3—Poultry Mash Feeder .50
4—Feed Scoop .20
5—Hurdle .40
6—Other appliances .40
7—Lawn Chair 50
SCHOOL DISPLAY
The School Displays will be located in the high
school gymnasium. The displays will represent
the regular school work done during the year.
HOME ECONOMICS
Miss Edythe Cupp, Sup’t.
I—CLASS EXHIBITS
1. Open to home economics classes in Allen
county.
2. Exhibits to be worked out by girls in home
.50 $ .25
.50
.25
.25
25
.25 $ .25
.25 .25
.25 .25
.25 $ .25
.25 25
.25 $ .15
.20 .10
.35 .25
.15 .10
.25 .15
.25 .15
.35 .25
THURSDAY, NOV. 20, 1941
economics classes representing work done in the
department.
3. Exhibits will be judged on general appear
ance, arrangement, labels, charts, educational value,
attractiveness and originality.
Classes:
A—Foods
B—Clothing
C—Home Furnishings
D—Child Development
E—Family and Social Relationships
F—Consumer Buying
G—Health and Home Nursing
H—Any Other Phase
II—SEVENTH
AND EIGHTH GRADE HOME
ECONOMICS (Any phase of class work)
III—INDIVIDUAL HOME PROJECTS
1—Cakes $ .—
2—Pies
3—Candy
4—Canned Goods _______
5—Clothing
6—Art Work .............. ..."
.50 $ .25 $ .15
.50 .25 .15
.50 .25 .15
.50 .25 .15
.50 .25 .15
.50 .25 .15
work of the
or borrowed
All individual exhibits must be 1the
exhibitor. No exhibits purchased _______ ___for
the fair will be eligible for awards.
IV GIRLS 4-H CLUBS
4-H leaders are to be in charge of exhibits.
Girls completing projects, including records,
are eligible to exhibit.
Awards are to be worked out by the leaders
so that each exhibitor will participate.
PUBLIC SCHOOL ART
Mrs. R. A. Lantz, Sup’t.
The public school art display is made up of
regular school art work done during the year in
grades one to twelve.
The work is divided into the following elements:
Paper Cutting, Design, Drawing, Lettering, Water
Color, Pastels, Crayon, Enamel, Clay Modeling,
and many applied arts, or crafts, including wood
work, basketry and metal work.
The exhibit is a display of school work. In
order to keep it non-competitive individual prizes
are not given. The reward lies in the honor of
having the articles exhibited and in having the
experience of producing them.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS DISPLAY
A. L. Daymon, Instructor
The Industrial Arts display is a non-competitive
type of exhibit, designed to present an objective
illustration of “Modern Industrial Arts”.
The display is arranged to show the variety of
activities which comprise the present-day program
of Industrial Arts in Bluffton High school.
The main sections of the displav are concerned
with:
1. IDEAS
2 PLANNING
3 METHODS
4. MATERIALS
5. EQUIPMENT
6 PROJECTS
The representative activities include:
1. Working Drawings
2. Woods
3. Metals
4. Practical Electricity
5. Letter-Press Printing
6. Photography
7. Leather-craft
8. Plastics
9. Home Mechanics
10 Finishes
A student will be present at the exhibit to ex
plain the various details and to welcome your
questions and comments. You are invited to visit
our laboratory-shop in Room 118 on the first floor.
We aim to study, to investigate, to explore, and
to experience the materials and crafts of the
modern world of work. “We learn by doing.”
Storage Pits Keep Vegetables
Safely
Most Ohio vegetables can be held over winter in
good condition by placing them in pits outdoors.
J. H. Boyd, specialist in vegetable gardening, Ohio
State University, says drainage and protection
against freezing are the important factors in this
storage method.
Pits should be six to eight inches deep in soil
that is sandy enough to drain naturally or that
has adequate drainage provided. The pit is filled
with straw, hay, or dried leaves and the vegetables
are placed on this material.
The pile of vegetables should not be more than
four feet deep, and varieties which must be kept
clean can be covered with burlap, carpeting, or
heavy paper. Six or eight inches of the same ma
terial used to line the pit should be placed over
the vegetables.
A layer of soil thick enough to shed water then
should be added. Ventilation can be provided by
placing a perforated wooden flue in the pit and
extending through the covering of soil.
When the temperature of the vegetables in the
pit drops to around 35 degrees, more soil should be
used to make the cover one foot thick. Another
layer of straw and more soil are placed on the pit
after the first soil layer has frozen.
Vegetables can be placed in boxes in the pit so
that a supply can be removed when needed with
out disturbing the rest of the pit. Apples keep
well in pits but should not be stored with vege
tables because apples readily absorb odors.
Rats Cost Farmers Money
And Trouble
Rats are real racketeers on farms, in the opinion
of T. H. Parks, extension specialist, Ohio State
University, who says these rodents cost the aver
age farmer $40 annually in damage done besides
being a carrier of diseases.
It is almost impossible for farmers to use the
best method of ridding premises of rats which is
to prevent the rats from gaining access to food.
Since this is impractical on most farms, some way
of killing the rats must be used to keep their
numbers within bounds.
Poison baits are the most practical method of
wholesale destruction. Red squill which kills rats
but does not affect other animals is difficult to ob
tain now. Arsenic and phosphorus are deadly to
rats but they are just as deadly to any other ani
mals which eat these baits containing the poisons.
Traps can be used to catch the few rats that
escape a poison bait campaign if the farmer re
members the rat’s habits. The rodents seldom
travel in the open if this can be avoided so traps
should be set near walls, preferably in a runway
between some object and a wall. Several traps
should be used and their location shifted fre
quently.
Cyanide gas or the exhaust from an automobile
will kill rats in burrows under concrete floors or
in other locations where the gases can be confined
to the holes. Both these gases are poisonous and
should not be used where they will escape into
places occupied by domestic animals or human
beings.
Community campaigns to rid premises of rats
are most effective because the rodents travel from
farm to farm. Poison baits can be prepared cheap
er per unit in large quantities than in smaller
amounts. County agricultural agents will give
directions on mixing and use of several types of
poison baits.

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