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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, July 09, 1942, Image 8

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PAGE EIGHT
The Bluffton Woman’s Club en
tertained their husbands and a few
friends at a parlor lecture at the
beautiful home of Mr. and Mrs.
Andrew Hauenstein on South Main
street Tuesday night. After a
piano solo by Mrs. Lou Eaton and
a vocal solo by Mrs. D. S. Flick,
Dr. C. C. Miller, president of Lima
college, presented a lecture on
Shakespeare. Following the lecture
a piand and violin selection was
played by Edgar and Sidney Hauen-
The Owens school closed last
Thursday with a large attendance
of friends and patrons. The regular
classes, taught by S. V. Fisher, were
heard in the forenoon and at 12
o'clock the school was dismissed for
the enjoying of the noon luncheon.
The lecture of the afternoon was de
livered by Uncle John Charles.
Clyde Waltz made a business
trip to Delaware, Saturday. Mr.
and Mrs. Waltz expect to attend the
summer session at the O.W.U.
there.
Alfred Keel of Findlay was in
town Monday. Mr. Keel recently
sold his property in Findlay and ex
pects to move to Bluffton again.
Mrs. Keel, who has been seriously
ill, is much improved.
Miss Hazel Gable and Miss
Blanche Urban, who have been em
ployed at Madame Gazelle’s sewing
shop at Findlay are the guests of
the former’s parents, Mr. and Mrs.
John Gable, north of town.
S. D. Romey, of Richmond, Ind.,
spent over Sunday with his par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Romey.
The Romey Bros, are doing an ex
tensive furniture business at that
city.
Peter Steiner of Chicago is the
guest of his sister, Mrs. A. Hauen
stein and family.
The Deutche Verein of the high
school was entertained at Hotel
1 Saturday evening by Miss
Gladys Zehrbach.
Edgar Root had the misfortune of
havii.g the third finger of his right
hand badly mashed Tuesday fore
noon while working on the L. E. &
W. railway tracks.
Adam Bame received a box con
taining about a bushel of very fine
luscious oranges from his daugh
ter, Miss Loa at Riverside, Calif.
Miss Loa is packing oranges in. the
above named city.
Among the recent new arrivals
are baby boys at the homes of Enos
Steiner and Walter Gallant and a
girl baby in the home of J. E.
Steiner.
Miss Mildred Marvin was tendered
a farewell reception at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Bender by her
Sabb .th school teacher and class­
News Our Grandfathers Read
From Issue Of April 23, 1908
&
kA
mates before leaving for her home
in Meadville, Pa.
Geo. Combs, the undertaker, is
now enjoying a new Maxwell auto
mobile.
Amos Hiltys welcomed a youngs
ter into their home recently.
After Wednesday evening Adam
Basinger will be a full fledged M.D.
from the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical
Institute.
Elmer Basinger will close another
successful school term in the Stager
district Thursday night. Supt. Ar
ganbright of Bluffton will give the
address.
New Committees At
Bluffton Hospital
The folloming committees have
been appointed by the executive
committee of the women’s auxiliary
of the Bluffton Community hospital
to serve for the coming year:
House committee—Mrs. Edwin Nis
wander, Mrs. Harry Bogart, Mrs.
John Fett, Mrs. Harvey Beidler,
Mrs. Wm. Edwards.
Ways and Means committee—Mrs.
Arthur Amstutz, Mrs. Paul Detwiler,
Mrs. Cal Deppler, Mrs. Quinten
Burkholder, Mrs. Armin Hauenstein,
Mrs. Ross Gottshall, Mrs. Francis
Basinger, Mrs. Albert Baumgartner.
Membership committee—Mrs. H. H.
Huser, Mrs. B. W. Travis, Mrs.
Walter Stratton, Mrs. Theodore
Schultz, Mrs. Iceland Diller, Mrs.
Charles Hankish, Mrs. F. L.
Buckland, Mrs. Wilford Steiner, Mrs.
Peter Boehr, Mrs. H. A. Niswander,
Mrs. Martha Suter, Mrs. Ed Lugi
bill.
Donation committee—Mrs. Lloyd
Van Meter, Mrs. George Rauenbuh
ler, Mrs. M. M. Kibler, Mrs. N. N.
Soldner, Mrs. Swan Stonehill, Mrs.
Glen Miller, Mrs. Ray Hilty, Mrs.
John Tosh, Mrs. Millen Geiger, Mrs.
Lewis Deerhake, Mrs. Gal Garmat
ter, Mrs. Ed Reagan.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank the neighbors and
friends who in any way assisted dur
ing the illness and burial of our hus
band and father. We also thank Rev.
Bright for his consoling words, the
pallbearers and those sending flowers.
Mrs. Grace Ramer
Mrs. Pearl Frantz.
Recruiting Officer
Here
A naval recruiting officer will be
at the post office Thursday during
the noon hour to interview men in
terested in enlisting in the navy.
Physical requirements for naval en
listment recently have been modi
fied, it was stated the first of the
week.
THIS NEWSPAPER, 1 YEAH, AND
FIVE FAMOUS MAGAZINES
For both newspaper
and magazines .... Ab
GROUP A SELECT 1 MAGAZINE
True Story .............. 1 Yr.
Open Road (Boys),
(12 Iss.) ..............14 Mo.
Sports Afield_______ 1 Yr.
Screcnland ............ 1 Yr.
American Girl _____ 1 Yr.
Science and Discovery..!
GROUP SELECT 2 MAGAZINES
Fact Digest ..................1 Yr.
Parents’ Magazine ™.6 Mo.
Modem Screen ______ 1 Yr.
Outdoors (12 Iss.) ...14 Mo.
Hunting and Fishing..1 Yr.
GROUP SELECT 2 MAGAZINES
Household Magazine .1 Yr.
Pathfinder (Wkly.)....26 Iss.
Successful Farming ™.l Yr.
Amer. Emit Grower.,1 Yr.
Capper’s Farmer ___ 1 Yr.
PLEASE ALLOW 4 TO 6 WEEKS FOB
Amer. Poultry Jrnl._ I Yr.
Fami Journal and
Farmer’s Wife..... 2 Yr.
Mother’s Home Life.,1 Yr.
Poultry Tribune .......1 Yr.
Nat’l Livestock Prod.,,1 Yr.
FIRST MAGAZINES TO ARRIVE
THIS NEWSPAPER, 1 Yr., And Any Magezine Listed
BOTH FOR PRICE SHOWN ALL MAGAZINES ARE FOR ONE YEAR
American Fruit Grower.__ 2.50
American Girl ..................... 3.00
American Magazine ........... 3.50
American Poultry Journal ... 2.40
Better Cook’g & Homemak’g 3.75
Better Homes & Gardens. .. 3.00
Capper’s Farmer _________ 2.50
Christian Herald______ 8 25
Click ...................................... 0.75
Collier’s Weekly .................... 3.75
Country Gentleman, 5 Yrs... 2.75
Fact Digest.............................. 2.75
Fann Jml. & Farmer’s Wife 2.10
BOTH FOR PRICE SHOWN ALL MAGAZINES
COUPON
Flower Grower ................$3.25
Household Magazine __ 2.50
Hunting and Fishing...™ 2.75
Hygeia .............................._ 8.50
Liberty (Weekly) „......... 4.20
Look (Every other week) 3.50
Modern Romances _..... 2.75
Modern Screen ................ 2.75
Nature (10 Iss., 12 Mo.).. 3.75
Olhcial Detective Stories 3.25
Open Road (Bovs),
(12 Iss., Mo.)..... .. 3.00
forfeit/ i
SINCE I BOUGHT
Yr.
Silver Screen________1 Yr.
The Woman _____ 1 Y’r.
Modem Romances „..I Yr.
Flower Grower........6 Mo.
Christian Herald 6 Mo.
Pathfinder (Weekly)....! Yr.
True Romances...... „.l Yr.
0^8
THE
Farmers Resourceful
In Labor Shortage
(Continued from page 1)
manpower requirements.
Change Farming Practises
More acreage turned over to graz
ing and a pronounced swing to
dairying and poultry raising with
an accompanying elimination of sea
sonal labor peaks has been evident
in this section.
Other developments in the nature
of supplanting manpower with ma
chinery include addition of such
equipment as was available on the
restricted market and supplementing
this by pooling of the mechanical
resources of the neighborhood simi
lar to pooling of manpower in the
threshing ring.
These measures, together with em
plowment of custom work to a great
er degree has gone far toward meet
ing the situation.
Many Single Handed
With army requirements and de
fense industry draining off all sur
plus manpower, farmers thruout this
section are faced with the necessity
of handling harvests with their
normal labor supply and in many in
stances single handed.
Some farmers are receiving aid
from their families with younger
children working during the day in
the fields while those older employed
in industrial establishments help in
the morning and evening.
Because of the press of farm work
the greater part of the cherry crop
was let out for picking on the shares,
or remained unpicked on the trees.
Pool Resources
Adoption of farming practises re
quiring a minimum of peak labor
requirements together with pooling
of mechanical labor saving equip
ment are seen by farmers here as
the solution to the shortage of man
power which promises to become in
creasingly severe.
With these conditions becoming
more pronounced, it is expected that
the labor factor will become the
principal governing facor in plan
ning of farm operations, with other
considerations occupying a place of
secondary consideration.
Triplett Plays Lima
Robins Here Friday
Triplett softball team will play one
home game and one on a foreign dia
mond in the next week’s schedule.
Resuming play after a two-weeks’
layoff, the team will tangle with
Lima Robins at 7 p. m. Friday at
Harmon field. Timer Spaeth likely
will get the starting mound call for
the locals in the tilt.
In their second out-of-town game
of the season, the Triplett team will
journey to Leipsic next Monday.
Leipsic was defeated earlier in the
season in a game here by a score
1 of 7 to 1.
Coming home tilts include contests
with Tiffin Routh Packers, Lima
Westinghouse and Lima Loco.
re*,*
bit‘c*
10
Parents’ Magazine ................ $3.25
Pathfinder (Weekly) ............. 2.75
Popular Mechanics _............ 4.00
Redbook Magazine -............ 3.50
Screcnland ............................... 3.00
Silver Screen............................ 3.00
Sports Afield .......................... 3.00
Successful Farming „............ 2.50
True Romances .................... 2.75
True Story .............................. 2.75
The Woman .......................... 2.85
Check magazines desired and enclose nith coupon.
Gentlemen: I enclose $............................. I am enclosing the
oner desired with a year’s subscription to your paper.
NAME .. .................................................................
STREET OR R.F.D....................... ............ .....
POSTOFFICE.......................
BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
NEWS OUR FATHERS READ
|r()M
Officers of the Lutheran Ladies
Aid society elected recently are:
Mrs. George Rupright, president
Mrs. Frank Danner, vice-president
Mrs. E. C. Stultz, secretary Mrs.
J. E. Traucht, treasurer and Mrs.
H. B. Adams, organist. Officers of
the Missionary society are: Mrs.
H. B. Adams, president Mrs. Noah
Basinger, vice-president Mrs. Emil
Garau, secretary Mrs. M. M. Bo
gart, corresponding secretary Mrs.
John Fett, treasurer and Mrs. A. L.
Baumgartner, historian.
Clyde Dorsey and family recently
moved into the A. D. Gratz property
on Mound street.
Carl and Hazel Jordan of San
dusky, were Sunday guests at the
home of Lloyd Murray. Miss Hazel
will remain several days with Doro
thy and Ruth Murray.
Among the new concrete walks
being put down on Grove street this
week, are those of Mrs. A. C. Ew
ing, Mrs. Roethlisberger, Dr. S. K.
Mosiman and Fletch West.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm Amstutz,
both instructors in the Continental
high school, spent the week end at
the John Amstutz farm.
Mrs. Augusta Steiner, president
of the Allen county W.C.T.U. left
Tuesday morning to attend the state
convention at Newark. Mrs. Illia
Close will represent the local
W.C.T.U. at the same
convention.<p></p>SAVEYOUR
BREAD
Your Choice—5N hite
3 s 29c
MILK
Fresh Canned
29c
CANS
COFFEE
cuuin Packed—De Lux
CRACKERS
Fresh. Crisp
2 & 17c
PEAS
Extra Standard
11c
TcS
TEA
For Icing
& 23c
TOMATO SOUP
2 s. 15c
CHEESE
Pimento or American
2 a 51c
ISSUE OF OCT. 15, 1914
as
AD.<p></p>CITY
Edward, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Painter and Miss Elferna,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herrman
Wittkofski were cjuietly married in
Lima last Saturday by Justice
Holmes of that city. The young
couple returned in the evening and
will reside in Bluffton where the
groom is employed with the L. E.
& W. section force.
Menno Bixel is building an addi
tion to his home on Lawn avenue.
Ed Lugibihl and wife are feeling
proud over the arrival of a baby boy
born to them last Thursday.
The Richland singing class will
meet at the home of John Winkler
Tuesday night.
Levi Hochstettlers and Eli Stet
tlers returned Monday from a week’s
visit in Indiana.
Vance Shrider again had the mis
fortune of dislocating his shoulder.
While out driving his colt threw
him from the buggy dragging him
several feet.
Lafe Owens purchased the Badert
scher property on Geiger street. The
Owens family will move to their
new home from their farm south of
town in the near future.
The short course in agriculture
and domestic science will begin at
the college on November 4 and will
continue for 18 weeks. In addition
to Prof. Ridge the college has also
secured the services of Francis
THIS
Sugar Wafers 23c
CHOP SUEY NOODLES
Marshall from Ohio Stato university
to serve as instructor. The domestic
science course will be in charge of
Miss Etta Lantz, a graduate of the
University of Illinois.
Martin Reigle, 73, the aged war
veteran so well known here, answer
ed the tinal summons at his late
home in Orange township, on Tues
day.
Hon. Cyrus Locher, of Cleveland,
and well known Settlement boy, will
speak to the people at the town hall
on Friday night.
Extensive Building
Improvement Takes
Place Of Construction
(Continued from page 1)
freezing restriction. When present
stocks are exhausted no lumber may
be purchased except for building
food storage facilities.
Lumber Stocks
Stocks of numerous lumber deal
ers in the area are already exhaust
ed but others have anticipated the
demand and have materials sufficient
to last several months. There are
no restrictions on the purchase of
building materials to be used in the
repair of storm damage, it was stat
ed.
Local dealers report that paint
sales are for the most part the
largest in the history of their busi
nesses. Although some types of
paint supplies have decreased in
quantity, there are no federal re
strictions as yet in paint, dealers
said.
Stop and Shop at your Bluffton City Market
Peaches s"
Most
Varietie:
Salmon “le
Sardines
Mustard
Salad Dressing 25c
Mason Jars
Prior to 1938 only a few houses
PATRONAGE APPRECIATED
33c 15cShipment
Jar Caps c. iw 23c
Kerr Lids
Jelly Glasses
Dog Food A »c- 3
rDCCU CDDC
Bananas Celery Hearts Spinach
Lemons Bch. Carrots Garlic
Grapefruit Bulk Turnips Pkg. Pecans
Oranges Parsley Cantaloupes
Potatoes Green Onions Honey Balls
Texas Onions. Cucumbers Watermelons
Spanish Onions Cauliflower Peaches
Head Lettuce Green Beans Apricots
Leaf Lettuce Peas Huckleberries
Pascal Tomatoes English Walnuts
Medium
rKtOn LUUO
Campbell’s Cigarettes
CREAM CHEESE S2L
BRICK CHEESE »..
Grade Doz.
KRAFT CHEESE & Gl£ 19c
MACARONI or SPAGHETTI
OLEO Krer 2
RINSO, CHIPSO, OXYDOL
MR. FARMER: SEE US BEFORE YOU SELL YOUR EGGS
Bob Hochstettler, Resident Mgiy
ON FOODS •Howe.Roger
-17
IOC
Can
55c
GJaSr
IOC
Doz.
39C
Dnz.
23c
Si
29c
27c
Lb.
27c
i.b.
25c
Lb».
90^
Large
ZZC
Boxes
GOOD
SATURDAY.<p></p>MARKET&FRIDAYTHURSDAY,FOR
THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1942
were built here in the previous
decade. The boom started in 1938
when eight new residences were
built. In 1939 five mqre K$re added
and kin 1940 an all time high in
building was reached when 14 new
residences were constructed. Last
year there were nine new houses
added to make a total of 36 in the
four year period.
War conditions and restrictions on
materials have caused a sudden ces
sation of new construction with
workers in the building trades find
ing themselves as busy as previously
but with their work mainly in re
pair and improvement rather than
new construction.
Tennis Tournament
To Start Saturday
The annual community tennis
tournament, sponsored by the Bluff
ton tennis club, will start on the
club courts on College avenue on
Sunday.
Entries for ladies’ and men’s sin
gles will be received until 12 o’clock
noon on Saturday. All first round
matches should be completed by
Thursday night, officials stated.
Entries may be sent to either
Roger Howe, Betty Weinhold or
Woodrow Little. Prizes will be
awarded to the winners.
Winners of last year’s singles
titles were Genevieve Fett and
Woodrow Little who will defend
their titles in play again this year.
A doubles tournament will be held
at a later date. Defending doubles
champs are Wilbur and
FLOUR
All Purpose
SACK
19c
5C
Can
TUNA
New Shipment
IS 29c
CHOP SUEY
SPROUTS
New
Glass
Jar
15C
Baked Beans
HEINZ
New Shipment
15c
Glass
Jar
WHEATIES
New Shipment
2
21
BOXES
APRICOTS
New Shipment—Sweetened
■ar 19c
Luckies, Camels, Chesterfields,
Old Golds and Phillip Morris.
Carton
Large
Box
HIRES
ROOT BEER
3 S 25c

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