OCR Interpretation


The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, March 04, 1943, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio History Connection, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1943-03-04/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1945
The regular monthly meeting of
the Bluffton Community Sportsmen’s
club will be held at the town hall
club rooms next Tuesday night at
8:00. Eugene Benroth, club presi
dent, urges all members to attend
as this will be an important meeting.
The committee on Quail Management
will present a proposal for the con
trol of quail in Ohio at this meeting.
A prospectus of opinion will be
formed at the meeting and copies
are to be sent to the legislature,
conservation officials, and conserva
tion clubs. Open discussion of the
problem will follow reports of the
members of the committee on man
agement of this game bird in other
states. The committee consists of
Wm. Edwards, chairman Silas Dil
ler Jesse Mangus and Elmer
Romey. The public is urged to at
tend and bring their friends to these
public meetings.
An interesting movie on Quail
Hunting will be shown preceding
the discussion on this game bird.
The Remington Arms Co. is also
sending for the meeting motion pic
tures entitled “The Buck”, and
“African Big Game”. South Bend
Bait Co. is sending a reel on “Sal
mon Angling in the Restigouche”,
and a reel on “Tenderfoot Trails”.
Ladies and sportsmen are both in
vited to attend this meeting. Pic
tures will start promptly at 8:00.
William Kellogg is one of the few
fortunate sportsmen to have had a
trout stream on his own land. Back
in New York State where he lived
for many years, a clear cold moun
tain stream flowed through a section
of their farm. Needing a supply of
ice for use in the hotels operated by
his family, he and his father con
structed a stone and timber dam
across the fast flowing stream and
formed a pool ten acres in size and
8 feet deep in places. Kellogg states
the stream contained only brook
trout, but there were plenty of them!
Many a morning he has been able
to catch a mess of these tasty fish
in short order—in time for their
breakfast. Photographs shown by
Kellogg contained pictures of the
trout from the stream. Some of
these fish weighed up to 2—2% lbs.
each!
From the dam to the valley below
there was a succession of small
’pools, all furnishing plenty ff sport
for the angler. The winters were
plenty cold and ice formed at times
feet thick. The ice was harvest
ed from the pond for use in their
hotels in the summer months. It
was exceptionally clear and the large
print of a newspaper headline could
be read thru the thickness.
Kellogg enjoys the hunting afford
ed by the Bluffton area and is very
much interested in the restocking ac
complished by sportsmen organiza
tions. Like many other sportsmen
of the community he believes in an
FARM BUREAU
INSURANCE
Auto—Fire—Life—Liability
P^ul E. Whitmer, Agent
245 W. Grove St.—Phone 350-W
Bluffton, Ohio
LOCAL AND LONG
DISTANCE HAULING
Every Load Insured
STAGER BROS.
Bluffton, Ohio
Francis Basinger, D. D. S.
Evan Basinger, D.D.S.
Telephone 271-W
Bluffton, Ohio
MUNSON R. BIXEL, M.D.
Office Hours: 8:30-10 A. M.
1-3 P. M. 7-8 P. M.
Office, 118 Cherry St.
Phone 120-F Bluffton. O.
D. C. BIXEL, O. D.
GORDON BIXEL, O.D.
Citizen* Bank Bldg., Bluffton
EYESIGHT SPECIALISTS
Office Hours: 8:3U A. M—5:30 P. M.
Evenings: Mon.. Wed., Fri., Sat. 7:30 to
8:30 P. M. Closed Thursday Afternoon.
For Vigor and Health—
include meat in your menu.
Always ready to serve you.
Bigler Bros.
Fresh and Salt Meats
WITH THE
SPORTSMEN’S CLUB
By Paul Sauder
organized plan for replenishing the
supply of game and fish. His active
interest is the result of promoting
such work in New York State near
his home town of Elizabethton.
With the local fishing season open
ing a week early this year, we find
that the boys have been knocking
a few chips into the frying pan and
why not, meat is meat now days,
and the wife can’t keep you from
catching fish or she isn’t ^patriotic.
Here’s wishing you guys tight lines.
Neil Duffman made a nice catch
fishing with minnows and worms in
the Water Works Quarry here a few
days ago. Twenty-seven Blue Gills
and four Black Bass are enough to
cause anyone to come back for more.
Four of the blue gills were unusual
ly large.
Jesse Mangus hooked two nice
bass between thirteen and fourteen
inches long, using minnows for bait
also. As far as we know the Water
Works is the only Quarry which has
put out good fishing lately.
Morris Kohli and sons were down
to the Water Works Quarry and
they took six bass home with them
too—sounds as if there is fish in
themthar’ waters.
Just to refresh your memory as
to what we can legally do in the
line of fishin’, a few facts from the
Digest of Fish Laws are in order.
Rock Bass must be above five inches
in length, and daily bag twenty
Black Bass, ten inches in length,
daily bag limit six Crappie above
six inches in length, bag limit
twenty per day there are no length
limits on Sunfish, Bluegill or Cat
fish, but there is a daily bag limit
of twenty per day for the Sunfish
and Bluegill. Resident licenses cost
fifty cents and can be purchased
from any of the following dealers:
Sam Stepleton, Lloyd Hardwick, L.
J. Hauenstein, Chas. Dillman, and
Don Forche, Beaverdam.
The new licenses, placed on sale
some time ago, became effective
March 1. Anglers are warned that
they must not only have the new
license, but must wear it in the
metal badge in a conspicuous place
where it may be easily seen by game
protectors.
i
1
Does Conservation of our wildlife
have anything to do with helping the
food shortage? In this instance it
does—the Fish and Wildlife Service
has set the food value of the annual
waterfowl kill at “not less than
$5,250,000”, based on a total bag of
15,000,000 birds. It gives the con
tinental inventory of ducks and
geese as 100,000,000 birds, or more
that three and a half times the 1935
population.
“Conservation Please”
You will enjoy the “Conservation
Please” wildlife conservation quiz
every Monday 5:45 WHIZ Zanes
•ville every Wednesday 8:05 WMRN
Marion and every Saturday at 7:45
over WHKC Columbus, presented by
the Divisonn’s Public Relations Sec
tion. If you want to find out how
much you know about things in the
great-out-of-doors just tune in and
try an earful of those questions—
here’s betting you don’t know all the
answers.—Editor
The Shelby County Deer Hunters
Association of Sidney, Ohio, is prob
ably the oldest sportsmen’s organiza
tion in the state, organized in the
first place for wildlife conservation.
Its first meeting was held in Sidney
in 1858. Feb. 11th the members held
the 85th annual meeting and dinner.
Elk and bear were served.
Hines’
KTO BR/NG THE'X?
TFISH TO THE
FISHERMEN y
NO*CLOSED 3
FISHING* AREAS
WILL BE WITHIN
2OO YARDS
OF A
BRIDGE
THIS
Under onio Stites
As TOLD BY Tfe CONSERVATION DIVISION
Colored Singer Coming
’1*'•
Rosa Page Welch, colored mezzo
soprano from Chicago, who will sing
at Bluffton college Vesper service in
Ramseyer chapel Sunday afternoon
at 3 o’clock. The public is invited,
it was stated by Dr. L. L. Ramseyer,
president of the college.
Troop 56 By Malcolm Basinger
By way of explanation the scout
notes of last week were omitted be
cause the writer of this column was
attending the high school junior
play. Last week’s notes appear be
low:
February 22 Meeting
The main part of the meeting was
given to taking the troop picture by
Haydn Steiner, industrial arts teach
er at the high school. This was fol
lowed by the business in charge of
Ass’t Scoutmaster Paul Wingate.
These were followed by games led
by Robert Oberly, Ass’t Scoutmaster.
Merit Badges passed:
Robert Ramseyer, pioneering and
civics.
Tests passed: Malcolm Basinger,
Cooking and signalling.
March 1 Meeting
The scouts first had a short patrol
session in which they planned their
patrol stunts for Troop Charter
night which was postponed to March
8. TJie main part ^f the meeting
was spent in reviewing plans for
Troop Charter night.
All families of scouts and troop
committeemen are invited to the pot
luck at 6 o’clock and the public is in
vited to the main program at 8
o’clock.
Committees in charge of Charter
night are:
Ushers—Paul Don Bixel, Robert
Fisher, Ted and Maurice Kohli.
Tables—Richard Oberly, Robert
Stratton, Ronald Diller.
Display—Richard Oberly, John
Schmidt, Robert Oberly and Robert
Ramseyer.
Color Guard Gene Patterson,
Ronald Diller and James Harmon.
A troop band is practicing regular
ly for charter night under the lead
ership of Bill Amstutz.
Scout Bill Amstutz is correspond
ing with an English scout. Ad
ditional information will be printed
in this column in the future.
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT
The State of Ohio,
Alien County, sa.
Entate of Thomas Daniel McKee, Deceased.
Mary Sophia Martin of 30 Wyoming Street.
Newark. Ohio, has been appointed and qual
ified as Administratrix of the estate of Thom
as Daniel McKee, late of Allen County, Ohio,
deceased
Dated this 11th day of February. 1943.
RAYMOND P. SMITH.
45 Probate Judge
FISHING EASEMENT
AREAS WILL BE
POSTED ^SHOWING WHERE
PUBLIC FISHING IS
PERMITTED ___
Many
THB NSW MARKERS
ARE WHITH ARE VISlOLH
FURTHER THAN THE OLD
RED SIGNS’
THE OLO METAL SIGNS
ARE BEING REMOVED AND
SAYED FOR THE SCRAP CTUYB
Teaching
tm
Teachers
sportsmen's groups-women's clubs and
GARDEN CLUBS ARE PLANNING TO SEND TEACHERS
to the
Conservation
22121
laboratory at tar
Hollow this summer* This is ths fourth year that
ACCREDITED COURSES ARE OFFERED-DEALING WITH
NATURAL RESOURCES AND THEIR BEARING ON OUR
ENTIRE LIVES’
THE PROGRAM HAS GAINED NATIONAL RECOGNITION*
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON. OHIO
1.
With Simplified Form 1040-A
No Difficult Figuring
__ IND ANNUITIES
ICQ
The Federal Treasury is offering
again this year to people whose 1942
income was $3,000 or less, a simpli
fied income tax form shown above,
which may be filled out in five min
utes or less. This is known as Form
1040-A. It may be used by any tax
payer whose $3,000-or-less income
came wholly from wages or salary,
dividends, interest or annuities.
Last year when this time saver was
first introduced, over 10,000,000 indi
vidual income tax returns were filed
on it.
This year, with an estimated twelve
million new’ taxpayers filing for the
first time, the Bureau of Internal
Revenue confidently expects that
Since the defeat of Upper San
dusky at the hands of the Pirates
Friday night, enthusiasm at the
school for the tourney has mounted.
Coach Swank, however, had some
more misfortune piled on to his dif
ficulties when the doctor informed
him that John Schmidt would not
be permitted to play because of a
bad knee. This is the fourth squad
member to be lost by ineligibilities
or injuries in the past several weeks.
Report cards will be handed out
Friday for the fourth six weeks’
Fifth anniversary of the granting
of the charter to Boy Scout Troop
No. 56 will be observed in a meeting
to be held at the First Mennonite
church Monday night at 8 o’clock.
Prior to the meeting a pot-luck
supper will be held for the scouts
and members of their families. From
7:30 to 8 o’clock the Troop Alpine
Band Will play.
Scouts of Troop 82 are invited as
well as all former members of the
troop, it was stated by Karl Gable,
scoutmaster.
The troop started with 12 scouts
five years ago and there are still six
of the original 12 scouts with the
troop at the present time.
The following program will be pre
sented
Bill Amstutz, Junior Ass’t Scout
master in charge.
Opening exercises, Otto Klassen.
Roll call, Paul Don Bixel.
Welcome speech, Malcolm Basinger.
Harmonica duet, John Schmidt and
Bill Amstutz.
Troop history, Robert Oberly.
Trumpet solo, Dean Niswander.
Troop report, Don Augsburger.
Patrol stunts, Cobra, Eagle, Ex
plorer.
COE YJLJ.E^DO£CQ'___ DgE
•GROSS INCOME LESS ALLOWANCE FOR DEPENDENTS
I. SHwy. “d ““xemtw Im penou! icrnce,__________________________
DivxlHMfa. mlrrert. .nd a.-muiUr, ________ _________________ .__________ jF W
3. TmU---------
4.
Bluffton High
Tournament time is here but for
the first time in many years there
will be no wholesale migrations of
students and other rooters to follow
the team. In previous years stu
dents piled in the buses and private
cars and saw practically every game
of the tournament. Indications at
the school were that some of the
students have been saving their
gasoline ration coupons to take at
least one trip to the tournament.
Fifth Anniversary Of Granting Of Charter
To Boy Scout Troop No. 56 Monday Night
First troop hike, John Schmidt.
Movie, Trail to Scout Citizenship.
Only 6 Things to Do b“\*
OPTIONAL
UNITED STATES
INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURN
THIS RETVKN MAI K FILED INSTEAD OF FORM IMO BT CITIIENS
(OR RESIDENT ALIENS) REPORTING ON THE CASH BASIS IF
CROSS INCOME IS NOT MORE THAN CM AND IS ONLY
FROM SALrtT, WAGES, DIVIDENDS, LNTOtLST
CALENDAR YEAR
1942
S22OO1
---------1 aj
L»: SMS ________ _________________
ft T*Y Mw. Um w abo LL W2*SMi
?O'Oj
nearly twenty million taxpayers will
benefit from this short-cut way, sav
ing in the aggregate millions of
hours of time and innumerable head
aches.
A glance at the picture shows how
quick and simple Form 1040-A makes
this income tax filing job. There are
only 6 things for Mr. and Mrs. Tax
payer to do write down their names,
address and occupation, the names of
their dependents, the amount of in
come received during the year, the
amount of deduction allowed on ac
count of dependents check the square
that shows their family status
(whether married or single, etc.).
Then they simply read from the form
exactly what their tax is, and write
it down on the return.
That’s all there is to it, and it is
School Notes
period of the school year. The fifth
six weeks’ school period began Mon
day morning.
Rehearsals have been completed
for the presentation of the junior
high school program at the audi
torium this Wednesday night at 7:30
o’clock. A musical adaptation of
Whitman’s “I Hear America Sing
ing,” music ensembles and a playlet,
“Mid Summer Magic” will be pre
sented.
Solicitations for Red Cross will be
made at the high school this week,
it was announced by Gerhard Buhler,
principal.
Members of the Hi-Y club have
concluded a magazine drive this
week under the direction of James
Gratz, club president.
High school clubs and organiza
tions met during school time at the
activity period Wednesday morning
at 9 o’clock.
Address, Thomas Bourqe, scout ex
ecutive.
Troop awards, Cards and pins.
Closing ceremonies, Richard Oberly.
The troop has 23 boys, two lead
ers and eight committeemen. In ad
dition to Scoutmaster Gable, Paul
Wingate serves as Assistant Scout
master.
Committeemen are: Gerhard Buhler,
W. M. Niswander, John Tosh, Mil
lard Oberly, Joe Fisher, J. N. Smuck
er, C. F. Niswander, E. W. Basinger.
The troop is the only one in the
Shawnee council having five Eagle
scouts. The troop has an Explorer
patrol for older boys, there benig
only one other in the Shawnee dis
trict.
Notice
The Trustees of Richland Town
ship serve notice to certain farmers
who have been in the habit of plow
ing right up to the road bed that
this practise will not be tolerated
and is hereby strictly prohibited.
Anyone persisting in this practise
will be liable to prosecution.
By order of the Trustees
of Richland Township.
46 N. W. Basinger, Clerk
For Incomes of I3,OOO or^LESS^Receive8'from
Wages, Salaries, Divickrxls/lnto^^Amte
fS)
subtract your credit
dependents.
over in a few minutes. Then the
taxpayer just signs, makes his pay
ment, and the job is done. This year
the return does not even have to be
notarized, Congress having decided in
its tax-streamlining program that
people should be spared that bother
and expense.
This form has no entries for de
ductions ,since average deductions, in
cluding the earned income credit, have
been allowed for in figuring the taxes
in the table. It is to be noted that
people whose legal deductions are un
usually large would probably pay less
tax by using the longer Form 1(140.
But for most people in the $3,000-and
under bracket, Form 1040-A is not
only a time saver, but a money saver,
too.
In spite of the fact that during the
If people will exercise care and
moderation in their purchase of
clothing there will be no need for
rationing of this commodity, it was
indicated this week by Bluffton mer
chants.
A mild buying run is being exper
ienced, especially in the women’s
clothing line, and merchants here are
attributing it to fear of rationing.
They point out that there is plenty
of clothing—enough to go around—if
they will buy in moderation.
If the shoppers will give the man
ufacturers time to catch up with
their spring business all wil Ibe well.
They have only just finished with
the winter wear, it was pointed out.
Spring buying is two months
ahead of schedule and it is impos
sible to catch up with orders. Con
sequently it is difficult to serve cus
tomers well.
The clothing trade does not look
for rationing of clothing unless this
present buying wave continues. If it
does then mi-lady will know that she
has brought it on herself.
The salesmen have indicated that
there will be as much wool for fall
and winter things as last year. The
Handy
Indicate your'family status
Read your tax directly
__ from the table.
No Complicated’Cokulatioiio
are
of $100
are
couwi rw
AIM*
IM
292 U73
F77
2*2 IM*
303 K»
SI* 17«
a 1 4 IM
818 i.W 183
|W
UM
9.400 S.AtS
9.413
2.430 ’,47$
8*41 31$ iM
3 »O -X»7
344 811
MA 21S
343 S34 2-JO
*47 *24
Ml 842
SB®
•71
847
Ml
Senseless Buying Rush On Women’s
Apparel May Bring Restrictions
IM •41
«M *4.5
344 •M
Wl
374
284
95*
*01 379 IMS
4M 3M
11
Alt 3*4
49! .W 9*0
«O4
431 4MU
last two years the Inemal Revenue
Bureau has increased its personnel,
they will undoubtedly be rushed and
crowded, as March 15 approaches, by
the great increase in taxpayers ne
cessitated by war-time high employ
ment and wartime low tax exemp
tions. So people who file early will
be doing themselves a favor, as well
as making a real contribution to the
smooth working of the nation’s tax
machinery. Blanks are ready now
and may be obtained from all local
Interal Revenue offices, also at most
banks and at many places of employ
ment.
Deadline for filing returns is March
15, 1943, and returns coming in late
subject to tardy filer to a penalty.
So on every count, it’s smart to file
early and and avoid the rush.
manufacturers must have the time
for making the things, it was stated.
Many shoppers are trying to buy
various items of wearing apparel in
quantities. As a further impetus to
this trend is the fact that many
women have increased incomes /be
cause of war employment.
To counteract this it is important
that “we buy only what we need and
take care of that which we have”,
according to one of the merchants
here.
U. S. aviators need more shearling
skins for clothing.
QUICK SERVICE
FOR
DEAD STOCJC
Call
ALLEN COUNTY FERTILIZER
23221—LIMA, OHIO
Reverse Tel. Charge* E. G. Buchaieb, Inc.
FARMERS
of $200
“barnyard'
just list i
it). Sign
the you
$1000
Repay weekly, monthly, quarterly,
year if you wish. Repay fast or
income and budget permits.
Visit
City Loan any time. Talk matters o
without obligation. See for yourself
compared with the benefits
tit now. See how you can mt
easily pay for itself out of y
little a loan costa
having the cash rig
a handy cash loan
fall profits.
you
noney is watting
office below.
Ohio
73511
OHIO
Elizabeth

xml | txt