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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, December 28, 1944, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1944-12-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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New Year’s Celebrated
At Different Times
Thruout History
(Continued from page 1)
solstice until the time of Julius Cae
sar, who in his reform of the cal
endar changed it to the first day of
January. The Jews began, and still
begin, their civil year with the first
of the month Tiser, which roughly
corresponds to our month of Sep
tember.
In England, December 25 was New
Year’s Day until the time of William
the Conqueror,
pened to occur
it was ordered
officially begin
His coronation hap
on January 1, hence
that the year should
on that day.
But the English later gradually
fell into conformity with the rest of
medieval Chistendom which started
the year with the spring equinox on
the 22nd of March. The Gregorian
calendar of 1582, however, restored
January 1 as the first day of the
year. Catholic countries adopted the
change immediately, and the Pro
testants followed suit later to adhere
to uniformity.
Roman God Janus
Among the Romans, after the ref
ormation of the calendar, the first
day of January as well as the entire
month, was dedicated to the epony
mic god, Janus. He was represented
with two faces, one looking forward,
the other backward, to indicate that
he stood between the old and the
new year, with regard to both.
other Latin writers of
empire allude to the
of all litigation and
reconciliation of differ-
Ovid and
the Roman
suspension
strife, the
ences between friends, the smoking
altars, and the white-robed proces
sions to the Capitol, the first day of
Janus, of New Year’s Day, as we
now call it.
Elaborate Feasts
In connection with the celebration,
elaborate feasts and orgiastic festivi
ties came into being. This fact
caused early Christians to look with
disfavor on the New Year’s celebra
tions and it was not until the day
assumed character did the
celebrate the beginning of
Year.
Christian
the New
developed
The celebration has
many traditional festivities and cus
toms, varying considerably in differ
ent parts of the world. The Old
World custom of sitting up on New
Year’s night to see the old year out
and the new year in his generally
died out throughout the whole world
with the exception of in the United
States.
In many large cities the New Year
is rung in from some famous belfry
—that of Independence hall, for ex
ample, in Philadelphia, and Trinity
church in New York, attracting huge
crowds which blow
and shout, the din
by whistles from
afloat and ashore.
horns, and roar
being increased
steam engines,
But the fact remains that either
New Year’s eve or New Year’s Day
is celebrated in various manners
throughout the entire civilized world.
CARD OF THANKS
to express our sincere
all the neighbors and
their aid and sympathy
illness and death of our
We wish
thanks to
friends for
during the
beloved father, Henry Koch also Rev.
Irwin Kauffman who officiated at the
funeral services, pallbearers, singers
and others who assisted in any way
and all those sending flowers.
John & Fern Koch
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Koch.
War Bonds make excellent Christ
mas Gifts.
For Vigor and Health
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Successfu
New Year
GREETINGS s
To Our Fightin Men
To Our Workin Men
and Wonw n
II
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0. 0. ALSPACH
& SON
Tailoring—Dry (leaning
include meat in your menu.
Always ready to serve you.
Bigler Bros.
Fresh and Salt Meats
TRACK 14
January 1st, 1920.
George Cone who enlisted in the
Navy last summer is home during the
holidays on furlough. He is stationed
at the Great Lakes Naval Training
Station. The young man has been
discharged from the hospital where he
suffered an attack of scarlet fever.
I
NfAGARA
FALLS
SPECIAL
335 P.M
'WON ME BUT IS YOUR TRIP ESSENTIAL?
Marine Captain Richard M. Back
ensto, 25, a Bluffton college graduate
who was wounded twice in invasion
action in the South Pacific, was a
visitor in Bluffton during the last
week.
Captain Backensto has returned
to this country for treatment for in
juries received in action against the
enemy on Guam,
area to spend the
wife’s parents in
Backensto is the
Jones, also a Bluffton college gradu
ate.
Captain Richard Backensto, College
Graduate, Wounded Twice In Pacific
but was in this
holidays with his
Venedocia. Mrs.
former Frances
Following his return to this coun
try, the captain received a Gold Star,
awarded in lieu of a second Purple
Heart medal. Presentation of a
Purple Heart medal earlier had been
made in the Pacific before the battle
on Guam, after Captain Backensto
had been wounded at Bougainville.
In the invasion of Guam, the
Bluffton college graduate was wound
ed on the second day of the assault.
An artillery liaison officer, he was in
the front lines with the infantry,
directing the fire of heavy guns
when the Japs opened with a mortar
barrage. One of the Nipponese
shells exploded near his position,
Bluffton In First World War
What Happened Here Twenty-five Years Ago This Week
Harold Woods of Detroit spent the
We Take This Opportunity To
Wish Each and Every One A
Leiber's Jewelry Store
GBEETIHGS
We Wish Them Luck
Where E’er They Roam—|
May The New Year
M-Ill]
scattering shrapnel which wounded
him about the
During the
ville, Captain
back injury
USS McKean, was hit
aerial torpedo and sank
nearing the beach.
face and one eye.
invasion of Bougain
Baskensto
when his
week end with his mother, Mrs.
Bertha Woods of college avenue
Since his discharge from the overseas
service in the army, the young man
has been employed at the Ford Plant
in Detroit.
David Cramer who is in the service
of the U. S. N. is home with his folks
at Pandora for a short furlough.
ifewwffi
and Victory in ’45
TO
Send Them Marching Home!
Happy New Year To All Our
Friends and Patrons
C. F. NISWANDER
McCormick-Deering Implements
ALLvj
Our
boys
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
received a
ship, the
by a Jap
as it was
In addition to the Purple Heart
won in that engagement he also
received the Bronze Star for indi
vidual heroism for assisting in sav
ing the lives of several companions
in spite of his own injuries.
Captain Backensto entered the
service in July, 1941, as a Marine
private, and was commissioned a
second lieutenant in June at Quan
tico, Virginia.
After spending the holidays with
his wife’s parents he will return to
the Naval hospital at Philadelphia
for additional medical treatment.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. V.
C. Backenston, of Allentown, Pa.
He stopped here for a few days last
fall while enroute to the East,
shortly after landing on the west
coast. His brother, John Backensto,
who also graduated from Bluffton
college, married the former Lavon
Kohli, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Aldine Kohli, of this place.
Your Third
NNONITE
ply Pastor
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dy and prayer
large, red
cherished
Yuletide
practice.
However,
cipi
K*ay
’J’nts
’s practice for
celebration
begin to fa
sons would
how to save
them again for the next season.
school
information on
the plants and grow
The Ohio Agricultural Experiment
Station has given some suggestions
for keeping the plant through
year in a manner which should
duce blooms.
the
pro-
con-
Due to the drastic change of
ditions from greenhouse to the home,
the plant dies quickly. Dry atmos
phere, changing temperatures be
tween daytime and night and expos
ure to draughts cause the leaves to
yellow and fall.
As soon as the petals drop, the
plant should be placed in a dark warm
basement and kept dry. Some water
should be added about once every
three weeks so that the stem re
mains plump.
In May the plant should be repot
ted in fresh soil, and the stem cut
down to within 12 inches of the
ground. By keeping the soil moist
and spraying the stem with water,
several times a day, the new growth
will start.
This seems very simple, but some
times in
grow and
This happens because in the average
home, enough electric light is used
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•ite of all care, leaves
Uqwers fail to develop.
We Wish You All A
Revivalist
REV
Victorious New Year
Veldeai 1 Cans
IW*W
^•4
George Hewitt of Berne
Indiana, who will open a series
of evangelistic meetings at the Mis
sionary church here this Wednesday
night. Services will be held every
evening at 7:30, excepting Saturday,
until January 7.
in the evenings to prevent flower bud
formation.
The poinsettia is a short-day plant.
Light at night, no matter how ’ow,
stops the buds from developing. If
the plant is moved every night to a
room where no light is used, it
should flower.
Lots of people know a good thing
the minute the other fellow sees it
.first. —Job E. Hedges
FRED GRATZ STORE
God Bless Your ew Year’s Way!
May Every Hot Within Them
Have Many Fax ors in Them,
To Fill This Seas in and New Year
With Lasting Hap jiness and Cheer!
nd
old of 1945 we extend
As we stand on the thre
to everyone in Bluffton ajid Community our best
wishes for the coming
pledge to serve to the
present conditions.
ar and we renew our
of our ability under
A HAPPY N W YEAR!
Authorized ealer
Itermire
Ed & Martha
x£/
Our Thanks To You For Your
Patronage in the Past Year
AND BEST WISHES FOR
A HAPPY AND VICTORIOUS
NEW YEAR
JORG HATCHERY
BABY CHICKS CONKEY FEEDS
POULTRY SUPPLIES AND REMEDIES
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Fred Reichenbach In Memo:
Weds Bernice Oberly
Frederick Reichenbach, son of
Henry Reichenbach, of near Pandora,
who was wounded in France, vyas
married Sunday, December 17, to
Miss Bernice Oberly, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Reno uberly, of north
of Bluffton.
The ceremony was solemnized at
the parsonage residence of Rev. P.
J. Boehr, pastor of the St. John
Mennonite church near Pandora.
Reichenbach suffered leg and
thigh injuries in France shortly
after the invasion of Normandy and
has been returned to this countey
for medical treatment.
THURSDAY, DEC. 21, 1944
He is a patient at the Veterans Before you closed your eyes.
hospital at Cambridge, Ohio, where
he will return following the holidays.
His wife will resume her work in
Toledo where she is employed.
Before going into the service
Reichenbach was an employe of The
Triplett Electrical Instrument Co.,
of this place.
Thy suffering days now ufe o’er
In heaven you are re.i
With loved ones gone be^ire.
In memory of our Wear
Mary Catherine who
away one year ago tod^’, December
28.When
GREETINGS
To All Our Customers an
way of saying “Thanks”,
ronage in the past
we may continue to serv
HAPPY NEW YEAR
THE MEADO
Serving Bluffton
HAPPY NEW EAR
and with it our
and patronage
the past year.
Basinger Bros
i J.w "ww "ww
At the old homestead wemother
But now you’reDevie^
no more th^-epassed
We have so many heart.Aes
we see your vacant char.
Dear Mother, thou ha 4 left usyou
Only God knows how we m®s
We shall cherish you all our lives
And to think you could not say
goodbye
Friends This is our
Bluffton, for your pat
ind it is our wish that
you in ’45!
Let’s Speed Victory—Bu, More Bonds & Stamps
iTAURANT
LET’S RING IN
ORY
May Health and Ha] piness Be Yours During
the New Year. Our indest hope is to help you
stay well and on le job for Uncle Sam.
FOR
V GOLD DAIRY
with Home Delivery
appreci
of fri
JOYOUS
GREETINGS
ation for the many favors
mds and patrons during
Meat Market
ir Service
EW YEAR
To Each and Evefy-Arfterican
We Wish A Happy New Year
and Peace and Happiness for
You This Year.
THE CITY MARKET
Rhoda Amstutz, Mgr.
iwiiwwwi.iiijivy"'
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We shall always remember
Never shall your memory fade
Loving thots shall always linger'
At the place where you were laid.
Sadly missed by your daughl
and sons, Mrs. Daisy Adams, Groi
C. Devier and Ernest E. Devier.

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