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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, March 01, 1945, Image 8

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PAGE EIGHT
l:.
Aldine Basinger bought a hound
from Frank Steiner. Aldine expects
to get some game yet this winter.
Noah Moser and his neighbors had
quite an exciting time trying to kill
a beef for the family slaughtering.
The first shot failed to kill the
animal and it ran away, going as
far as the Mrs. Anna Amstutz farm,
a distance of three miles. The men
and boys followed trying to capture
or shoot the animal. Finally Cleo
Steiner was able to kill the critter
and P. T. Steiner and neighbors
butchered at that place.
Miss Emma Messinger slipped on
the ice at the home of Mrs. Anna
Niswander and broke her hip.
The horse driven by Mrs. Sam
Gratz became frightened west of
Bluffton and upset the rig in the
ditch. The accident occured near
the Watkins home and luckily the
men were out butchering and rushed
to her assistance. Mrs. Gratz broke
FOR
Thanks for Manila’s Liberation
.y _'A
SEVERAL HUNDRED FILIPINO RESIDENTS of Washington, D. C. attended. Ma„ of Thanksgiving at St.
Alovsius Church, February S, following the liberation of Manila. Kneeling in Pr*Yer (L r*) ®re: Mr«. Filar H. Lim,
Member of the’ Filipino Rehabilitation Commission, Mrs. Hernandez and Hon. Jaime Hernandez, Secretary of
Finance^ in c£rge of th. Philippine Government in Washington^ the ebswce of President Osmena. The Prestdent
G*n»nl MacArthur in the Philippines.
News Our Grandfathers Read
From Issue Of December 16, 1909
one of the bones near the right
wrist. Her little daughter who was
with her was not injured.
The Misses Carrie and Lulu Doriot
entertained the S. L. P.’s and their
friends at their home near Pandora
last Wednesday evening. A two
course diner was served. Those
present were the Misses Caroline
and Maggie Sommer, Ethel Krohn
and Messrs C. O. Altman, Louis and
Edwin Risser, Tony Frantz and Dr.
M. 0. Van Stronder.
Hall and Lugibihl our wide awake
stock buyers had one of their busy
days last Saturday. They shipped
12 car loads of stock on that day,
weighing 204,110 pounds, paying
$14,237.27 for the same. And they
were not the only shippers that sent
stock from the Bluffton market on
that day.
The work of laying out the upper
part of Maple Grove cemetery has
been completed. Two hundred and
READING I
Bargains,
THE BIG 7 VICTORY SPECIAL!
THIS NEWSPAPER
SIX GREAT MJ
FARMER’S WIFE ....
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FILL IN AND MAIL TO
THIS NEWSPAPER TODAY
UN
Harris & Ewing Photo
eighty-two lots have been added
leaving an open space for free burial
in the northwest corner. The cir
cular drive thru the same has been
macadamized. Each lot contains a
numbered marker. The small tool
house has been moved to the north
ern part of the cemetery.
Moses Steiner and J. I. Lugibihl
our real estate appraisers are at
Columbus attending the state con
ference of quadrennial land apprais
ers.
Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. John Von Gunten left here
Wednesday morning for Seattle,
Wash., where she will take the
steamer Minnesota for Wuhu, China,
ariving in China at that city, Jan.
28. Miss Van Gunten has been home
on a years vacation. She will resume
her missionary labors in China.
W. E. Harris suffered a painful
accident while unloading fodder. In
some manner Mr. Harris stepped
from the wagon and fell against the
gate and disclocated his shoulder.
News Want-ads brijig result*.
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lewspaper,8oth for Price Shown]
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NEWSPAPER AND MAGAZINES
1
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Check magazine/ detired and enclose with coupon.
Gentlemen: I enclose $ ........ Please send me the offer checked,
with a year’s subscription to your paper.
NAME... .................................................. .................................
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ifnu
i«Oi
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
The Bluffton News presents
another in the series of inter
esting and un tail'll features on
Latin America.-—Editor
No visitor has smelled the perfume
of Cuba or heard the heart of Cuba
beat until he has scented the sweet
and heady smell of boiling molasses
and heard the rumbling of the engin
es of a sugar-mill.
While everything in Cuba revolves
around the sugar-cane industry, a
around this, cane- sugar industry, a
commodity of which the little island
is the world’s greatest exporter, the
hub of sugar production is undoubt
edly the sugar-mill or central.
It is here that the juice of the
sugar-cane is actually turned into
sugar here are brought the tall
stalks of cane ripened under the
tropical sun and from here leave fat
bags swollen with the product that
may sweeten a cup of coffee many
thousand miles away. Here, indeed,
the destiny of Cuba is wrought.
A central is really a unit, con
sisting of a huge mill, surrounded
by a large area planted to cane.
About 13% of the cane is grown by
the sugar mill companies themselves,
but the traditional method of organ
izing production is what is known
as the colono system, whereby an
individual rents a parcel of land
from the central company, engages
laborers to cultivate the fields and
cut the cane, and receives a certain
percentage on each 100 pounds of
cane he delivers to the mill.
Sugar-cane is a perennial of the
grass family which grows in tropical
regions and reaches a height of from
five to fourteen feet. The stalk’s
hard rind encases the juicy pit which
contains up to 20% of sugar. Slender
leaves grow off this stalk which is
crowned at harvest time by a tasseL
Cuban soil is so fertile that cane
does not have to be replanted every
year but is grown again from the
year before’s stubble in a process
that is called “ratooning”. Cane is
cut close to the ground by machetes,
the cutter developing an extraordin
ary skill which enables him to sever
the cane, trim off the dry leaves, cut
the stalk into suitable lengths, and
throw the pieces into a nearby pile,
all in one almost continuous motion.
From the pile, the cane is lifted
by the cutter to the carts and
hauled usually by four or six yoke
of oxen, to the nearest cane switch
of the company’s railway, where
by means of a crane the load is
lifted in a sling, weighed and drop
ped into a railway car for transpor
tation to the mill.
At the mill, after sharp knives
have cut the cane, it is fed to roll
ers and shredders which extract the
juice.
Bagasso—the stringy pulp remain
ing after the juice has been squeez
ed out—is used as fuel for the mill,
as a food for cattle and as the start
ing point for a number of by
products including fiber-board (celo
tex).
As for the raw juice—the actual
source of sugar—it is purified and
clarified by being treated with chemi
cals (lime milk is one of them) and
heated.
Turned into a syrup in vacuum
evaporators, it is then boiled until it
becomes a brown mass of crystals
and molasses.
The resultant ‘first’ sugar is still
moist and lumpy. The molasses
that remains in the centrifugal
machines is combined with additional
syrup, boiled again, and put through
the centrifugals the extraction
of more crystals classed, this time,
as ‘second’ sugar.
Upon undergoing the process a
third time the molasses reaches its
maximum point of crystallization
and the remaining or final molasses
is sold for the manufacture of al
cohol and rum.
The raw sugar is conveyed to a
large bin from where it is packed in
bags, weighed and shipped out.
Besides the mill itself, a central
includes a laboratory where sugar
is analyzed at every stage of its
production, and where experiments
on sugar are made as well as on
the waste products of the industry.
Furthermore, the batey—name by
which is known the little community
surrounding a sugar-mill—is compos
ed of the Administration building,
the homes of the owner (when there
is one) and of the First and Second
Administrators, of a church, a
store, a “cafe”, a school-house, some
times a club, all clustering around
a square or park, besides a series
of small bungalows which are the
employees’ and laborers’ quarters.
About this unit, surrounded ad
infinitum by the quietness of sun
baked sugar-cane fields, swarms dur
ing the mill-grinding season- -gener
ally the first four or five months
of the year—a colorful and pictures
que crowd.
Husky cane-cutters brandishing
their machetes, come together with
sleepy ox-cart conductors, sweating
engineers and white-clad laboratory
technicians while somewhere out at
the club the pretty daughter of the
Administrator may be entertaining
a visiting sugar-broker.
When the zafra,—the grinding
season—is over, the smoke from the
giant chimneys dies away, the throb
bing of the engines stops and the
heart of Cuba is still for a while,
under the glazed, cloudless blue sky.
Sugar Is Cuba’s Main Industry
Island World’s Largest Exporter
historical
iqhligh
Wafa*
(Eeleased by Western Newspaper Ihtion.)
Our Only Admiral General
FIFTY
years ago there died in
Washington, D. C., a man who is
unique in the history of America's
armed forces. He was Samuel Pow
hatan Carter and he was the only
officer who ever became both brig
adier-general in the United States
arm"y and rear-admiral in the Unit
ed States navy!
Born in Elizabethtown, Tenn., Au
gust 6, 1819, Carter was educated
at Princeton university and left that
institution to accept a commission
as midshipman in the navy in 1840.
At the outbreak of the War with
Mexico in 1846 he was assigned to
the U. S. S. Ohio and took part in
the capture of Vera Cruz.
After the war he was ordered to
the United States Naval academy at
Annapolis where he served as assist
ant instructor of infantry tactics un
til 1853. Promoted to lieutenant two
J"
tw?
REAR-ADMIRAL S. P. CARTER
years later, he saw active service
against the Chinese pirates who
were preying on commerce along the
Asiatic coast. He was on a tour of
duty in Brazilian waters at the out
break of the Civil war and, believ
ing that the navy would see little
active service, he asked to join the
land forces.
On July 11, 1861, Lieutenant Car
ter of the navy was transferred to
ffie war department and sent on a
special mission to East Tennessee to
raise troops for the Union army.
Appointed colonel of the Second Ten
nessee Volunteers, he continued his
recruiting work until he had organ
ized a full brigade and was made
acting brigadier-general in Septem
ber, 1861. Early the next year he
was glveh the full cothmission of
brigadier-general of volunteers.
“Old Horse Marine” Carter, as
they called him, served brilliantly
throughout the war, participating in
numerous battles in Kentucky, Ten-
BRIG-GEN. S. P. CARTER
nessee and North Carolina. One of
his outstanding achievements was in
1862 when he led a cavalry raid
through Eastern 1 ennessee. Because
of his success, this “sailor on horse
back” was recommended for pro
motion to major-general.
That promotion did not come how
ever, until March 13, 1865, when he
was given the brevet of major-gen
eral. Meanwhile he had been pro
moted to the rank of commander in
the navy, but, although holding com
missions in both the army and the
navy, he drew the salary of only one
of these offices.
Honorably mustered out of the vol
unteer service in 1^66, Carter was
ready for another go at naval serv
ice. He asked for active duty, was
given command of the gunboat
Monocacy and sent to the Asiatic
station where he remained for three
years. Then he was promoted to
captain. After another tour of duty
on the European station, he was
finally retired on August 6, 1881.
The climax of his naval career came
the next year when he was pro
moted to rear-admiral. Carter’s last
years were spent in the nation’s cap
ital where he died May 26, 1891.
In 1863 the “sailor on horseback,”
proved he could hold his own with
some of the South's best cavalry
commanders, including the doughty
Gen. John H. Morgan. For his troop
ers whipped the gray-clad horsemen
of “Morgan the Raider" at West’s
on August 28 and followed it up by
defeating Pegram’s forces and win
ning another victory over Morgan.
He took part in the battle of Knox
ville and in 1865 led the left wing of
Schofield’s army at the Battle of
Kingston, N. C., where Bragg was
defeated.
In Ohio trails, the average yield of
corn grown continuously for seven
years was 38.9 bushels per acre but
in a rotation of com, wheat, and al
falfa on similar soils, the average
corn yield was 70 bushels per acre.
Forcing the combination of the
Pandora Farmer’s Bank, robbers
secured U. S. postage stamps to the
amount of $8X) in a raid Friday
night. No money was secured and
Ithe large safe where the money of
the bank was kept bore no evidence
of haring been tampered with.
On Tuesday evening of last week
at the home of the bride’s brother,
Guy Corson, occured the marriage of
Miss Virginia Corson to Ellis Davis.
Rev. Brundige of the Christian
church received the vows.
A surprise party was held at the
home of David Niswander in honor
of their daughter Blanche. About
15 of her young friends were there.
The occasion was her ninth birthday
anniversary.
Miss Geneva Steiner entertained
at a beautifully appointed dinner
party Saturday for the pleasure of
her sister Bonnie. Covers were laid
for 12 and the occasion was in honor
of Miss Bonnie’s 18th birthday. The
following guests were present Faery
Huber, Beulah Temple, Mabel Hawk,
Eddyth Bogart, Steiner Geiger, Orio
Bixel, Donavin Baumgartner, Lyle
Baumgartner, Donald Augsburger,
Wilbur Houtz of Middlepoint.
Mrs. F. L. Todd and daughters
Eileen and Cathryn of near Ottawa
visted her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.
H. McKinley.
Mrs. Lou Eaton has moved from
her home on the corner of Main and
Elm streets to the Dearth property
adjoining the Romey insurance office.
The house vacated by Mrs. Eaton
will be occupied by Mr. and Mrs.
P. A. Weikel.
Shirley Nonnamaxer, clerk in A.
D. Lugibihl and Son hardware, is
recovering from a mild attack of
typhoid fever at the David Ander
son home in Orange Township.
Mr. and Mrs. Asa Stratton and
Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Stratton left
Wednesday morning on a motor trip
to attend the Wayne County home
coming.
N. W. Cunningham wil Ibe the
speaker at the Allen County Pioneer
picnic near Elida.
Lewis Dukes returned home from
Talequah, Okla., where he has been
spending the past 6 months with his
sister, Mrs. Harry Mohler.
Miss Helen Kibler who taught in
the grade schools for several years
has resigned her position. Miss
Kibler was hired to teach the fourth
grade for the coming year.
Mrs. W. J. Staater who fell down
the cellar stairway at her home on
South Main street last week break
ing a bone in tier ankle is still un
able to walk.
Cf I .. If
THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1945
NEWS OUR FATHERS READ
FROM ISSUE OF AUG. 10, 1916
edgar mcelwain
'owesf
Fun for the fisherman—but not so
pleasant for the fish. And yet a fish
hook in the nose might not feel so
much worse than the congestion and
irritation caused by a bad head cold.
NYAL NASAL DROPS
shrink congested membranes, open
up the air passages so you can get
a deep breath right to the bottom of
the lungs. Try a few drops to relieve
the discomfort of your next head cold.
A. Hauenstein & Son
OULD that I
had died in de-
fense of my country!
Com. Stephen Decatur
Decatur died at hit home in
Maryland with these wordstn
his lips. Hero of many ex
ploits against the corsairs of
Algiers. Tunis and Tripoli, he
was mortally wounded in a
duel which resulted from a
misunderstanding.
Fresh Drugs
and
Quality Drug Store
Merchandise
of All Kinds
Prescriptions Care
fully Compounded
Sidney's Drug Shop
Phone 170-W
I Mi ii
ATTENTION!
The A. E. Shrider sale, Thursday,March 8, billed
in this issue of the Bluffton News offers two Jerseys.
The 7-year-old cow has a former county record to be
proud of.
Prices of the Season
It’s worth a lot to us to be able to set ac
cording to orders. So to show our appre
ciation for early orders, we're offering lib
eral early order discounts! You can save
plenty by placing your chick order right
now. You can also be suie
pt
the lowest
prices of. the season ri^ht r. w n our fa
mous high-livab'lity, egg-bred chicks.
Protect yourself, as Mell as save! Order
New! Make sure of gett’ng your chicks
“ben you veaat iiic.n!
Amstutz Hatcheries
Bluffton Pandora
i I
MASAI
DROPS,

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