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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, April 19, 1945, Image 8

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PAGE EIGHT
The Bluffton News presents
another in the series of unusual
and interesting aspects of South
A merica.—Editor.
Sports and games are undoubtedly
one of the common denominators of
all countries and the world at ay
has practically no feeling of national
differentiation. V hen a little Latin
American tries to catch a ball in
Costa Rica, for instance, he probably
does so very much in the same way
as a North American child would in
the United States.
However, the rules and forms in
which games are played differ often
according to regions and some sports
may be definitely classified as being
native to one country in particular.
One of the earliest games on the
Western Hemispheres must have
been a certain ball game played by
the Mayans and later by the Aztecs.
The ball, when in play, was not
thrown with the hand but struck by
the hip, around which the player
At each end of the court was a
great stone disk with a hole in the
scored. Very naturally
.vas used, since rubber
id the forests.
amateurs
In primitive times, this was some
times considered a training for war
in which the members of the Arau
canian tribes brandished a very
heavy club, the famous “maza arau
cana”.
Many Sports Unknown In This Country
Are Popular Pastimes In Latin .America
jf Maya
it seem
*st Indies
Some of the wild tribes of the
Brazil have a bal
,vn that closely rese
ton. The rubber
yers strike with th
ust like shuttle-coc
1 gam
mbles our
balls that
ers affixed to them for greater ac-
curacy. The Indians generally in
dulge in this game at their return
from the day’s fishing or hunting
and the end of the period of play
is marked invariably by sunset.
Again a different variety of ball
game is played by the Araucanian
Indians of Chile. There, of course,
we are no longer within the rubber
tree zone so the ball becomes a
wooden one and the game—the
“chueca”—is similar to la crosse or
field hockey.
To train warriors to avoid the ar
rows and spears of the enemies was
also, to a certain extent, the object
of another Araucanian traditional
game: “pilma”. In this, two players
stand several feet apart and one
tries to hit the other with a light
fiber ball, his opponent endeavoring
to dodge the ball by leaping, falling
to the ground, etc.
Every five balls the position is re
versed and the player securing the
first twenty hits is the winner Spec
tators surrounding the contestants
return the ball to the server, show
ing great appreciation of skillful
play.
A certain type of bone dice is
known to have been used by South
American Indians in an indigenous
game, while another local pastime of
the natives is the use of a “bola” or
“boleadora” to pursue wild ostriches.
mals are lassoed by
if a Y-shaped arrangement of
two or three rawhide covered balls
with connecting ropes of hide.
The arrival of the horse in the
Western Hemisphere prompted a ser
ies of games of cow-boy type espe
cially in southern South America
where the boleadora was soon tried
on the equine species
There was enough danger in this
sport to thrill even a gaucho’s ad
venturous heart, but it was hard on
horseflesh. Even today when the
majordomo, or superintendent of the
estancia, is not looking, the gauchos
are at it again, bolas whirling, horses
and horsemen rolling in the dust
Another popular Latin American
game in which the horse takes part
is the “topeo”. Played in front of
wooden crossbars, the game consists
of having one horseman press his
Housework—cleaning, washing,
cooking—takes a lot of energy. It’s
hard to work with a smile if one
lacks energy and feels just able to
drag around. If that’s the way YOU
feel—start taking
NYAL IRON & YEAST
TONIC TABLETS
Iron has long been recognized as an
excellent tonic for the blood. Com
bined with yeast, it improves diges
tion and elimination, builds up
appetite and energy.
A. Hauenstein & Son
«_
mount’s head over that of another
horse whose rider endeavors to dis
entangle himself as quickly as pos
sible.
The horses are as highly trained
as our polo ponies and when matched
with skillful riders a single struggle
may last an hour A good topeo
horses and spectators.
Traditional in Paraguay is the
game of “la sortija” in xvhich the
rider gallops by cross bars from
which is suspended a small ring
which he tries to tilt.
In other parts of Latin America
a variation of this sport consists in
endeavoring to pull away, while rid
ing by at a gallop, a ring hanging
from a piece of ribbon whose colors
correspond to those worn by a young
lady in the audience.
Twisting a bull’s tail to make him
tumble over is in innocent, bloodless
yet exciting form of bullfighting pop
ular in Venezuela and Colombia,
while another indigenous game of the
Americas is a form of cup-and-ball
played in Mexico with a wooden pin
to which is attached by a string a
ball or small wooden cylinder which
is supposed to end up impaled upon
the pin after a series of flip-flops
and whirls in the air. A hundred
variations, immense skill in the num
ber of somersaults and rapidity of
:i the ra
■omplete
sports
'WAY BACK WHEN
by Jeanne
E
GENERAL WAS SCHOOL
TEACHER
SOMETIMES
one small incident
changes^a whole life’s trend, and
leads to prominence beyond all
previous dreams. We all recall one
or two unexpected happenings in
our own lives which changed their
whole course.
John J. Pershing, who rose to be
general of all the United States
army, might have had an entirely
different life had he not taken ad
vantage of a lucky opportunity. He
was born in 1860 at Laclede, Mo.
His father was boss of a railroad
gang and, later, a farmer. John
quit school when he was thirteen to
work on the farm, digging fence
holes, herding sheep, planting corn,
all the usual jobs that are the lot of
a farm boy. Ambitious to be a law
yer, he studied night after night.
In 1879, he got a job as teacher
in Prairie Mount, Mo., and saved
most of the $40 per month he re
ceived to study law at Kirksville
Normal school.
Then came the incident which
changed his whole life. Jack Persh
ing saw an advertisement announc
ing competitive examinations for
West Point. He had only two weeks
to prepare, but he won the appoint
ment. At West Point he won prom
inence as president of his class and
as first captain of the corps of ca
dets. Possessing the characteristics
of a perfect soldier, his assignments
after graduation into the army
were marked with success. While
a military instructor at the Univer
sity of Nebraska, he resumed his
law studies and took his degree.
Since the army conducts its own
military courts, this gave Pershing
an opportunity to combine his busi
ness love with his soldierly success.
When the World war broke out, he
was made general of the U. S. army.
WNU Service.
Inhale Snuff
The practice of inhaling snuff be
came common in England dur
ing the 17th century.
From Circuses
Hammering out 11 runs behind the
steady three-hit pitching of Spike
Hartman, Bluffton High’s baseball
team won its second start of the sea
son Tuesday evening by conquering
Lima St. Gerard, 11 to 0, on the
Bluffton college diamond.
Hartman’s shutout was well-de
served, for he was master of the
visiting batsmen all the way and
struck out nine men.
At the same time his mates were
combing two Lima hurlers for 11
hits, all but one of which came in
the last three innings.
Except for a scratch hit in the
first stanza, Bluffton batsmen were
unable to connect squarely with the
ball until two men were out in the
fourth inning. They then uncorked
a two-run splurge when Swank, who
had walked, scored on Moore’s sharp
double, following which Gratz singled
to send Moore home.
In the fifth inning, four more
Bluffton runs were made, as the
Lima pitcher passed three men and
Basinger rapped a double and Gratz
With poultry and eggs taking an
ever-increasing place of prominence
on the menu of Bluffton area fami
lies, replacing rationed meat, local
chick hatcheries report a deluge of
orders this spring.
Meat shortages and continued good
prices for eggs have created a de
mand for chicks which may result in
a record hatchery season, and a
backlog of orders is steadily piling
up for baby chicks.
Poultrymen who were warned last
fall and winter that a surplus of
eggs would be inevitable this spring,
have seen a continued steady demand
at good prices resulting from string
ent rationing of meat.
A third factor in the demand for
chicks is an improvement in the feed
situation, which has made it possible
Victory gardens must pinch hit for
farmers who in normal times pro
duce the bulk of the vegetable crop.
This is becoming increasingly ap
parent as reports from over the
state indicate that Ohio farmers this
year probably will grow 60 per cent
fewer vegetables than last year.
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
to
The peanut-brought from Africa in a slave ship
HAS BECOME AS AMERICAN AS BASEBALL AND THE CIRCUS.
TRADITIONALLY ASSOCIATED WITH SMALL BOYS AND
ELEPHANTS, THE PEANUT IS TODAY A STAPLE FOOD,
INCLUDED IN THE RATION KITS OF OUR ARMED FORCES.
A CROP THAT IN THE SOUTH IS SHARING INTEREST WITH KING COTTON,
THE PEANUT NOW PROVIDES OIL FOR MANY USES AS WELL, AND
LOOKING AHEAD-PLASTICS. ONE OF THE MEN IDENTIFIED WITH
THIS DEVELOPMENT WAS AN AMERICAN NEGRO BORN IN
SLAVERY-GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER. A SELF-TAUGHT
BOTANIST, HE DIRECTED HIS RESEARCHES TOWARD THE
WELFARE OF THE SOUTH
Bluffton High Nine Wins Over St.
Gerard, 11-0, For Second Victory
Hatcheries Flooded With Chick Orders
As Answer To Rationed Meat Shortage
Available farm labor will be ex
pended principally upon grain crops
which should be somewhere near
normal.
Elmer Kruse, state AAA chair
man, predicted that Ohio’s crop pat
tern would undergo its greatest
change in recent years during 1945
because of labor and machinery
shortages, but he asserted the in
crease in idle acres would be smaller
than reports indicated.
Hardest hit by the exodus of agri
cultural workers to the armed serv
ices and war plants are the pro
ducers of tomatoes, peas, sweet com
and similar crops requiring “stoop”
labor, Mr. Kruse reported.
A total of 34,000 acres were plant
ed to tomatoes last year and the 1945
Victory Gardeners Must Now Supply
Vegetables Formerly Grown On Farms
Plastics
DRAWING SHOWS THE WAY THE
FLOWER.-STEMS DROOP AND
ALLOW THE RIPENING SEED PODS
TO ENTER THE GROUND WHERE
THEY MATURE INTO PEANUTS.
a single.
Two men were out in the sixth in
ning, when Basinger doubled again
to provide the spark for a five-run
rally.
Lee, who followed him, singled,
Miller was safe on an error, and
successive singles then were made by
Swank, Moore, Gratz and Hartman.
Bluffton AB E
Moser __________ 3 1 1 0
Basinger-- ------------..... 4 2 2 0
Stonehill __ 3 0 0 0
Lee ________ __ 1 1 1 0
Miller ...................... __ 3 0 2 0
Swank ... __ 2 1 3 0
Moore----------- __ 4 2 2 1
Lewis __ 2 1 0 0
Gratz __ 2 2 0 0
Hartman _______ ___3 2 0 0
Reagan __ 2 0 0 0
Wilch______ __ __ __ 2 0 0 0
■..."
Totals..... ..............__ 31 12 11 1
St. Gerard .. .......— ..—...20 3 0 2
Score by innings:
St. Gerard________ -000 000 0-- 0
Bluffton ...... ...000 245 X—-11
for poultrymen to get most of the
feed they require.
Scarcity of feed and transporta
tion bottlenecks were so troublesome
in 1944 that many flock owners be
came discouraged.
State agricultural authorities have
recommended the feeding of Leghorn
cockerels for broilers, pointing out
that the lightweight birds can make
very efficient use of feed until they
weight two and one-half pounds.
Chief enemy of poultry profits is a
high death rate caused by disease or
parasites. However, state authorities
point out that losses can be cut
down by providing plenty of room in
brooder houses and range shelters,
and by allowing the growing birds
to range on grass or legume pasture
which has not been recently used by
adult poultry.
goal is 35,000 acres, but indications
point to about half that amount, ex
cept in the northwestern portion of
the state.
Apparently anticipating an in
creased labor shortage, farmers last
fall seeded 2,284,000 acres to winter
wheat, an increase of 226,000 acres.
Many farmers are turning to soy
beans because that crop can be plant
ed and harvested with machinery and
requires no care during the growing
season.
Solution of the cannery labor situ
ation will depend largely upon the
amount of volunteer labor available
it was stated by Paul V. McNutt,
chairman of the War Manpower
commission.
“If youths, housewives, merchants,
ministers, retired persons and others
respond this year as they did last
year we should have no great diffi
culty in canning and otherwise pro
cessing the fruit and vegetable
crops”, McNutt said. “We are still
at war and need all the processed
foods we can get”, he stated.
Arthur Santschi has accepted a
position in the department of
Physics at Purdue University. He
recently graduated from Miami
University.
Mrs. Illa Close returned from an
extended visit to West Mansfield
and Lewisburg.
C. B. Kauffman will open a new
restaurant in the room formerly oc-
cupied by the Star Restaurant. L.
Block will be in charge of the Kauff
man cigar store. The new restaur
ant will be known as the Dixie
Highway restaurant.
Aldine Kohli purchased a house
on College Avenue.
Shirley Nonnamaker who has been
ill with typhoid has resumed his
position in the A. D. Lugibihl and
Son Hardware.
The little daughter of Charley
Bender fell from the porch at their
JAN.
U
5
NEWS OUR FATHERS READ
FROM ISSUE OF SEPT. 14, 1916
(FOOD RATION STAMPS GOOD
RED STAMPS
THRU APR. 28
HERALD _________ 1 Yr.
COUNTRY
GENTIJEMAN ____ Yr.
TRUE COMICS______I Yr.
CHILD LIFE ____ __ 6 Mo.
QU. S. CAMERA..............1 Yr.
ECONOMY OFFER
This Newspaper,! Yr.
AND FOUR BIG
ALL FIVE
FOR ONLY
TRUE STORY_________ 6 Mo.
MOTHER’S HOME UFE.._1 Yr.
AMERICAN FRUIT
GROWER_____________ I Yr.
AMERICAN POULTRY
JOURNAL____________ 1 Yr.
FARM JOURNAL &
FARMER’S WIFE _____ I Yr.
NATIONAL LIVESTOCK
PRODUCER___________I Yr.
POULTRY TRIBUNE ____1 Yr.
SUCCESSFUL FARMING _1 Yr.
HOUSEHOLD MAG. _____ 2 Yr.
PATHFINDER______ SCIwues
CAPPER’S FARMER____ 1 Yr.
BREEDER’S GAZETTE ... 6 Mo.
home on Main street and fractured
her right thigh bone.
Clair Stettler, Lima Business Col
lege graduate, has accepted a
position with the Lima Loco as
book-keeper.
Mrs. H. B. Adams is convalescing
from an operation performed at a
Findlay hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Lantz and
daughters Lillian and Ruth are
guests at the home of their daughter
Mrs. R. L. Triplett on Kibler St.
Miss Anna Alspach and niece of
Topeka, Kansas are visiting the
O. O. Alspach home.
Horace Stratton and family and
Mrs. John Hirschfeld attended the
Van Wert fair. They motored thru
in Stratton’s classy Overland.
The gypsies who spent Sunday
near the Linwood school were quite
an attraction. The band consisted
APR. MAY JUNE
MAR.
FEB.
THRU JUNE 2
JULY'I
THRU JUNE 30
BLUE STAMPS
i i
THRU APR. 28
FROM APRIL I
THRU JULY 31
Next stamps become good in May
THRU JUNE 2
□njC
FROMAPRIL I
Next stamps become good in May
SUGAR STAMPS
i ... i i i
SUGAR
THRU JUNE 2
Another stamp will become good May
CUP THIS CHART FOR FUTURE REFERENCE
THE BIG 7 VICTORY SPECIAL!
THIS NEWSPAPER ]1 YEAR] AND
SIX GREAT MJIGAZINES
THE BIGGEST VALUE IN YEARS!!
„.I Yr.
-.1 Yr.
6 Mo.
-1 Yr.
...1 Yr.
♦TRUE STORY.......... ...
PATHFINDER ....... .....
SILVER SCREEN ____
HOUSEHOLD ..............
POULTRY TRIBUNE
FARM JOURNAL &
ALL
SEVEN
FOR
ONLY
.2 Yr.
FARMER’S WIFE .....
*Check one of these in place
AMERICAN GIRL Yr.
CHRISTIAN
of True Story if you prefer!
OPEN ROAD (Boys),
(12 Issues)........... —14 Mo.
PARENTS’ MAG.......... 1 Yr.
PROTESTANT
VOICE (Weekly) —.1 Yr.
SCREENLAND ---------1 Yr.
SPORTS AFIELD------ 1 Yr.
THE WOMAN ..........1 Yr.
SCIENCE ILLUS........6 Mo.
FILL IN AND MAIL TO
THIS NEWSPAPER TODAY
THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 1945
a
of 40 men, women and children. They
claimed to have come from Okla
homa and were of Indian origin. As
beggers the women ranked very
high this was demonstrated by the
amount of feed conveyed from
various farm homes for their 20
head of horses.
James Coon, Ed Good, W. P. Mat
ter were each allowed a dollar for
hawks killed the past week.
Dr. C. B. Luginbuhl will sail for
Germany to be a surgical attache
to the American legation at Berlin.
Clean Screens
If your screens make dark streaks
on your window sill, give them a
good scrubbing with moistened
scouring powder and a stiff brush.
Rinse well and allow to dry. Wipe
with benzine, being careful of fire.
It is best to do this part of the job
outdoors on a cloudy day. Then ap
ply a coat of two parts top quality
spar varnish and one part each of
linseed oil and turpentine. Or you
use a very thin kind of varnish
that can be wiped on with a clean
rag. Use a dry’ brush to clear
‘“blobs” of varnish out of the
mesh. If you wish color, use screen
enamel instead of varnish.
Turnip Greens
Turnip greens grown on soils rich
in organic matter are high in iron.
Turnip greens grown in the spring
generally contain more iron than
those grown in the fall. The iron
content in turnip greens decreases
with the application of nitrogen fer
tilizer, the specialists explain, al
though such applications increase
the yield of the greens.
NOTICE
We have opened the Nickel
Plate Stock yards at Bluffton
and will buy Hogs, Calves,
Sheep and Lambs on Monday,
Wednesday and Saturday.
Daily market on cattle.
Quotations today:
HOGS—
170 375
130 160
ROUGHS—
350 450
STAGS—
400 Down ..
CALVES—
Choice ..
Good
EWES—
Good
Old,
NEW L3N
1450
1425
1325
1250
1600
1500
.............. 700
.............. 400
at 1 p. m.
Markit close:
Any Magazine Listed and This
Newspaper, Both for Price Shown
NEWSPAPER AND MAOAZINES
1 YEAR, UNLESS TERM SHOWN
& Son
Yards 307-W
hone
on, i
Home 189-W
Ohio
Blu
American Fruit Grower.....$2.75
American Giri ... ................ 3.50
American Home, 2 Yrs.... 8.75
American Poultry Journal 2.65
Aviation in Review........... 4.00
Better Cooking & Hmkg... 4.00
Capper’s Fanner................ 2.65
Child Life ................—..... 4.00
Christian Herald ...... 3.50
Coronet .......-........ ............. 4.50
Correct English ..... 4.00
Country Gentleman, 5 Yrs. 3.00
Etude Music Magazine..... 4.50
Farm Jrl. & Fanner’s Wife 2.65
Flower Grower ......... 3.75
Household ............ 2.65
Hygeia ........................... 3.75
Magazine Digest ............... 4.00
National Digest Monthly.. 4.00
Nature (10 Iss., 12 Mo.).... 4.00
Open Road (12 Iss., 14 Mo.) 8.50
Outdoors (12 Iss., 14 Mo.) 3.50
Parents’ Magazine ............. 3.75
Pathfinder.... ........... 3.00
Photoplay ......... 8.50
Poultry Tribune .............. 2.65
Reader’s Digest ....... 5.25
Redbook ................... 4.25
Science Illustrated _____ 4.00
Scientific Detective 4.00
Screenland ______________ 3.50
Silver Screen ......... 3.50
Sports Afield .............. .... 3.50
Successful Farming-------- 2.75
The Woman _............... 3.50
True Story ............ 8.50
U. S. Camera........... ..............8.15
Walt Disney’s Comics....... 3.35
Your Life....... ...................... 4.00
“u
isCji
■"'W
Check magazines desired and enclose with coupon.
Gentlemen: I enclme $.................. Please send me the offer checked,
with a year’t subscription to your paper,
NAME------------------——--------------
STREET OR D.— ..............................................................
POSTOFFICE............ ................. -.................-..................... ............
QQM

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