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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, May 24, 1945, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1945-05-24/ed-1/seq-8/

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VU1 KA it Uiivxx
The Board of Education at the
last meeting set up some rules and
regulations in which they resolve
that the students shall refrain from
the use of tobacco in any form
that the pupils shall not loiter in
tobacco stores and pool rooms that
students over 16 years of age will
be expelled if said rules are dis
obeyed those under 16 shall be
reported to the county probation
officer.
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Welty are the
proud jarents of a baby girl.
Jake Nusbaum will leave ^fpr
Wayne County where he is employed
with a farmer for the coming‘SUln
mer.
Sunday at high noon, at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Eisenbach
occured the marriage of Miss Hazel
Saunders to Julius Benroth, in the
From Issue Of February 24, 1910
NO MEATLESS DAYS
for those who raise their own poultry. Warm weather
is coming when chicks can be easily brooded. We can
supply you with chicks thruout the summer months.
POULTRY REMEDIES
Turner's CCC, Protosep, BlactJ? Renosal and Sulpha
guanidine for Chick fcoccidiosis.
Let us help you with your/poultry problems.
JORG HATCHERY
Phone 182-W Cherry Street, Bluffton
Saturday, May 26th
Boy Scout Paper Pick Up
Starting at 12:30 P.M.
Bundle and place your scrap paper, news
papers and magazines on your front porch.
MILIS BROS. CIRCUS
35c
SPECIAL STUDENT TICKET
Good For Afternoon Show Only
ON S^LE V
Geiger & Diller Store
4:00 P. M. Until Closing
Saturday, May 26
Regular Price 60c Children
Regular Price $1.10 Adults
presence of the immediate relatives
and friends of the contracting
parties. Rev. Smith officiated.
Fred Bigler is remodeling and
enlarging his cooler in the butcher
shop, also is putting in a concrete
floor.
A merry crowd of young people
were entertained at the home of
Miss Minnie Bigler on Jackson
street, last Wednesday evening.
The Hankish Brothers, proprietors
of the fruit store, have purchased
the building they now occupy from
the Commercial Bank, paying $6500.
for
same.
The contested Snavely will oas^
tfhich has been in the courts for
nine days, came to an end last
Saturday evening, the jury failing
to reach an agreement. Much
interest is manifested in this case
NOTICE! The times shown i
Service between Cincinnati
NORTHBOUND |D5y
TON
YTON®
'Bluffton ____
Mt. Cory Rd
Gilboa Rd
'Bowling
‘TOLEDO
LIMA—OTTAWA—BLUFFTON—Fl N DLAY—
NORTH BALTIMORE—BOWLING GREEN—TOLEDO
Hol lol
Hol
iSun&
I Hol
■.Ml
and the trial was largely attended.
The case involves the contest of the
will of Mrs. Louise Snavely, a
former resident of this township,
who left an estate valued at $60,000.
Conrad Danner and Son purchased
the Keel in grocery in Columbus
Grove last week and took possession
last Monday.
Plant diseases cannot be cured so
control depends upon applying
sprays or dusts before a disease
appears.
Ohio farmers bought 337,079 tons
of fertilizer for spring applications
in 1944 and 238,932 tons in the fall.
An additional 17,846 tons were
furnished during the year by the
Agricultural Adjustment Adminis
tration. The 593,857 tons had an
analysis of about 3-15-8.
The recently announced support
price of $13 per hundred weight
(Chicago basis) on hogs will apply
to weights up to 301 pounds, and
the price will continue in effect
until September 1, 1946. The
weight limit was raised after the
K
2
2 2 2 2
schedule between Lima
ima is Eastern Standard
Dly Dly Dly Dly Dly Dly Dly Dly
30
l.M
ANDARD
THE LAST OF THE NAZIS’ BIGGEST BATTLESHIPS art now shown
by these photographs to be lying, capsized as the result of bombing by the
British Royal Air Force. The top picture shows the underside of the "Admiral
Scheer” at she lies in her dock basin at Kiel after a heavy raid by the R.A.F.
Bomber Command. The lower picture shows the “Tirpitz” in a Norwegian
fjord with salvage ships alongside (she was sunk by British 12,000-pound
bombs). For comparison, note the size of the houses at the very bottom of
the pictures. The R.A.F. has now also sunk the Nazi battleship "Luetzow” in
a Baltic port.
FOOD RATION STAMPS GOOD
FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE
1"""
THRU JUNE 30
UFV
SUGAR
SOUTHBOUND
‘TOLEDO
Maumee. ..
Rossford.___
Perrysburg
•Bowling Gre
Portage_____
Cygnet_____
•North Baltin
'iwt Buren
Ulboa Rd,
Wapakoneta
v A V
I
(United Notion* Pholo
support price was announced because
it became apparent there is a great
need for fats and oils which can be
obtained by fattening hogs to higher
weights.
Bitter flavor in milk may be
caused by stripping a cow up until
just before freshening, by contam
ination of bacteria which live in
open seams of milk utensils, by
holding cream too long or not cool
ing it promptly enough, or by cows
eating certain weeds.
On April 1, about 46 per cent of
the 1944 U. S. corn crop remained
on farms, which meant a stockpile
of 1,339,780,000 bushels. This
carryover was 23 per cent larger
than the amount on farms April 1,
1944, and was 35 per cent above
the average amount on April 1. In
Ohio, conditions were somewhat dif
ferent as the April 1 stock on farms
of this state were more than 12,000,
000 bushels less than a year previ
ously and were about 4,500,000
bushels less than the 10-year aver
age.
JULY
RED STAMPS
THRU JUNE 2
AUG.
THRU JULY 31
FROM MAY I
THRU AUG. 31
Next stomps\become good in June
1UE STAMPS
THRU JUNE 2
THRU JUNE 30
THRU JULY-31
FROM
THRU
SUGAR STAMPS
_J--------J.-------L I
THRU JUNE 2
MAY I
AJG. 31
Next stamps become goo* in June
I
CUP THIS CHART FOR FUTURE REFERENCE
Cincinnati & Lake Erie Transportation Company
EMERGENCY TIMETABLE CHANGE
Effective Thursday, May 24, 1945
FROM MAY I
THRU AUG. 31
Toledo Eastern (FAST)
Hol
20*11.
50
25
.42111.
Die In Action Overseas
(^Concluded from page 1)
Paris Island, North Carolina, and later
in California. Basinger left this
country last fall for overseas duty.
He was a member of St. John’s Re
formed church, and is survived by his
wife, parents, one sister and his
grandfather, N. N. Basinger, who is
now in Tuscon, Arizona.
Pfc. Clark was killed in action in
Germany on April 30, just eight days
before the German surrender became
effective. He had been overseas only’
a few months.
Notification of his death was receiv
ed last week by Mrs. Clark, who was
visiting relatives in Morris, 111. She
and her two children, Gregg and Larry
moved*ffont Bluffton To St. Marys last
winter^- -after making their home here
Cor more than .two-years.
Mrs. Clark said the last letter re
ceived from her husband was dated
Aprill 22, and that in it he advised
he was getting along very well.
Farmers Race Against
Time To Plant Corn
(Concluded from page 1)
that from one-fourth to one-third
less corn acreage will be planted
this spring.
Handicapped by shortage of labor,
the fact that they have less hogs to
feed and because of the lateness of
the season, many farmers are reduc
ing corn acreage and seeding their
land in crops that require less care.
No Night Plowing
As an indication of the trend, few
tractors are seen working in fields
after nightfall this year. This is in
decided contrast to the past several
seasons when spring plowing weather
found many tractors running day
and night.
A late spring this year blasted
farm hopes which soared in March
when mid-June weather was exper
ienced for nearly two weeks. Field
work progressed merrily at that
time, but about the only real advant
age gained was the fact that many
farmers got their oats in the ground
ahead of schedule, and a little corn
plowing was completed.
Then the weatherman did an
about-face, and frosts nipped fruit
buds to such an extent that only
about half a crop is expected.
Rains kept farmers from planting
corn, and the rush now is on, for
according to the weather-wise north
ern Ohio corn should be in the
ground before Memorial Day and be
knee high by July 4, if it is to make
a crop.
Gamble
on
Late Planting
Plantings sometimes can be made
as late as June 10 and make a crop
if fall frosts hold off, but the odds
are against the farmers in such
planting procedure.
As matters stand now, rains of the
last month have cost farmers much
of their early potato crop, and in
some cases damaged early-planted
oats.
Some wheat has been hurt, evi
denced by yellow’ed straws near the
ground and the brown sheen of the
tops. However, the full extent of
damage cannot be determined until
the grain begins to head.
The strawberry crop will be very
short, and some commercial growers
say they will have only enough for
their own use this spring.
Excellent pasture conditions and
liberal feeding of grain to dairy
cows in Ohio are keeping milk
production up. The average produc
tion per cow was 16.6 pounds for
April 1, which was 1.5 pounds
more than the average for April 1,
1944, and was 1.6 pounds more than
the 10-year average for that date.
Milk produced by cows on the first
day after freshening contains four
times as much vitamin A as aver
age winter milk produced by a
dairy herd. The colostrum also con
tains more minerals and more
protein than normal milk.
.1
GREEN—NORTH BALTIMORE
W
w
►un a.SunC
Hol I Hol
Dly
Dly
Dly Dly
—rw~
Dly Ex
15
Aiunu vjuil JLzXJLlJLlLilLO IVJUuAU
ith the exception of an empty
gas tank the Studebaker touring car
belonging to Julius Wise which was
[stolen Wednesday night at Lima was
[returned unharmed to the owner by
the Lima police. The car was locat
ed near Dixon, Ohio.
The Ohio oil company is drilling
well No. 1 on the W. A. Vermillion
farm.
The Diller Mfg. Co., and the Mc
Carrell Mfg. Co. have combined their
offices and moved into the room over
the Fett Hardware.
The concrete floor in the new Dixie
Highway garage building at N. Main
and Elm Sts. is finished and the
building is nearing completion.'
Dr. and Mrs. M. D. Soash returned
from New York city where the
Doctor took a special post graduate
course in the Polyclinic Hosiptal.
Elmer Augsburger, son of Mrs.
Fred Augsburger, is a government
meat inspector at a Chicago packing
company.
D. C. Shank and family left for
Parlier, California, where he has a
position in a hardware store.
John Stull is not superstitious for
he is planning a sale on Friday,
October 13.
Mrs. Emma Plattner has moved
to Lima where she will live with her
daughter, Miss Flora Plattner.
The M. E. Tabernacle was sold to
the Bluffton Mfg. Co. for $100.
High street with its new sidewalks
will be one of the more attractive
streets of our town.
Peter Burkholder of Fulton County
who visited relatives in the Settle
ment returned home on Tuesday.
Mr. Knight of Chicago was a
guest of Aaron Geiger for several
days.
Albert Fett of Missouri is occupy
ing the John’s property on comer of
Washington and Jackson street.
East Orange
Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Boutwell and
Byron Leo Boutwell called in the
William Boutwell home, Monday even
ing.
Mrs Ralph Stager entertained the
ladies of the Dola Missionary society
in her home last Thursday.
Mrs. Ho Agin, Mary Heldman and
Ruth Heldman called on Emma Bout
well one day last week.
Mrs. Bob Roberts and sons of Lima,
Mrs. Pearl Boutwell, Mrs. Virginia
Boutwell and son Dennis of Ada, call
ed in the Rayon Boutwell home, Sun
day.
Mrs. Harry Amstutz of Versailles
spent several days last week with her
daughter, Mrs. Alice Mae Boutwell
and family.
Mrs. Mary Heldman, Mrs. Ruth
Heldman called on Mrs. Verena Bame
and children recently.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Marshall of Find
lay attended church at Riley Creek,
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Nonnamaker
nrn
FROM ISSUE OF OCT. 5, 1916
vjooo-
e cuPbo°rCSoL.to-opP'y'
*'tb ^^enorne'
■rv.dry'°9 fiicienl
As sodoces.ve°
PfeV'°
w BSAUIY WITH F.'................................. :.4T PAINTS
Pint 85c Quart $1.55 illon $5.00
Greding Hardware
The first thing in the morning or th
last thing at night—ifs good to have
an alkaline stomach—free of excess
acid which comes from slow diges
tion or intestinal fermentation.
NYAL ANTACID POWDER
is an excellent neutralizer. It
gas, counteracts excess gastric ac
ity, relieves stomach distension
curbs burps and belches. Sold only
at your Nyal Drug Store.
A. Hauenstein & Son
«_______________
and daughters Eileen and Loretta Mae
and Barbara Diller of Bluffton spent
Sunday afternoon with Mr. and Mrs.
B. J. Boutwell and son Byron Leo.
Mr. and Mrs. JohifCaris of Findlay
called on friends in this community,
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Marquart of
New Stark spent Wednesday evening
with Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Agiri and
son, Evan.
Mr. and Mrs. Von Strahm of Lima
called in the Matt Stewart home, Sun
day evening.
Frost damage to O&ki ^iL. trees
increases th# nd&F’ Jfar «pr^ymg
nitrogen to counteract the injury.
One-fourth to one-third pound of
nitrate of soda should be used for
each year the tree is old.
Nickel Plate
Steck Yards
Due to scarcity of hogs,.we
will be open Wednesday, Friday
and Saturday. We will buy
hogs, calves, sheep and lambs
other days by appointment.
Quotations today:
HOGS—
160 400.......... 1450 down
SOWS ..................... 1350 down
STAGS .................. 1325 down
CALVES—
Choice 180 240 1500 down
SPRING LAMBS 1100 down
EWES .................... 650 down
Market clos &30 P. M.
N. P. Steiner & Son
Yards phone^307-W
Home phone 89-W
Bluffton, (^hio
BIX O11'
Hog breeders why have, used Rex
Wheat Germ Oil will tell you that sows
getting this breeding aid produce larger
litters and strong^- pigs. Rex Oil will
help farrowing—help reduce pig mor
tality—and give/pigs the viability to
live through. Gome in and get full
details on RE3K. Wheat Germ Oil.
Sidney’s Drug Shop
FOR TCHENS
BATHROOM
I

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