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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, January 31, 1946, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1946-01-31/ed-1/seq-4/

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PAGE FOUR
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES
Ernest N. Bigelow, Minister
Rockport:
Morning worship 9:30
Church school 10:30
Mr. Glen Mayberry, Supt.
Bluffton:
Church school 9:45
Mr. Norman A. Triplett, Supt.
Morning worship 11:00
Tuxis, 6:00 .m..
Rev. Chas. Donaldson will be
charge of worship service.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
Sunday services at 10:30 a. m.,
Subject: Love.
Testimonial meeting at 7:30 Wed
nesday evening.
The reading room at the church
open every Wednesday from 2:00
4:00 p. m. The public is invited
Childrens meeting in basement.
7:30—Evening Sendee.
Everyone is welcome.
FIRST .METHODIST CHURCH
J. A. Weed, Minister
Thursday—
6:30 p. m.—Church Family Night,
beginning with a potluck supper,
sponsored by the Men’s Brotherhood.
(Each family to bring a covered disn
and own table service.) A sound
film—“Abraham Lincoln” will
shown after the supper.
7 p. m., Junior choir rehearsal
Sunday—
9:30 a. m. Church school
10:30 a. m. Morning worship. Mes
sage based on Ohio State Pastor’s
Convention in Columbus this week.
10:30 a. ni. Meeting of King’s
Guards downstairs.
11:30 a. m. Girls’ Choir rehearsal.
6:30 p. m. Youth Fellowship even
ing meeting.
7:30 p. m. Union service in this
church. Presentation of two sound
films:—"The Story of the Prodigal
Son,” and “Who Is My Neighbor?”
This Sunday in
hutchesAe
WFIN Findlay, Ohio
No evening service,
St. John
Christian
in
18
to
to
all sendees and to visit the reading
room.
This society is a branch of the
Mother Church, the First Church of
Christ Scientist, Boston, Mass.
EVANGELICAL & REFORMED
CHURCHES
V. C. Oppermann, Minister
Emmanuel’s:
9:30 a. m.
10:45 a. m.
Church school
Morning Worship.
Brotherhood meets
on
The Men’s
Thursday evening
church at 8:00.
J. Fischer will be the guest speak
er. All are cordially invited.
St.
at St. John’s
Attorney Clarence
The Girl’s Guild meets at the home
of Beatrice and Dorothy Leiber on
Thursday evening at 8:00 o’clock
All girls are urged to come.
The choir of the church will not
meet for rehearsal this week.
Catechisnj instruction Saturday
morning at 9:30 a. m.
Sunday
at
be
Union church services
evening at the Methodist church
7:30 p. m. Religious films to
shown.
St. John’s:
9:30 a. m. Morning worship
10:30 a. m. Church school
the
The Men’s Brotherhood of
churches meets on Thursday even
ing of this week at 8:00 at the
church. Attorney Clarence J.
Fischer will be the guest speaker.
All men are invited to attend.
The choir of the church meets on
Thursday evening at 7:00 p. m. All
members are urged to be on time.
Catechism Instruction Saturday
morning at 9:30 a. m.
Union church services will be held
next Sunday evening at the Method
ist church at 7:30. The Ministerial
Association is sponsoring the show
ing of two Religious films,
should plan to attend.
All
MISSIONARY CHURCH
Robert R. Welch, Pastor
Wednesday—
7:30—Prayer meeting
Thursday—
2:30 Women’s prayer meeting
the home of Mrs. Fox.
1 Sunday—
9:30—Sunday school
10:30—Morning worship
6:30—Prayer meeting
7:00—Young Peoples Meet i n g.
in
be
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH
J. N. Smucker, Pastor
Thursday—
7:15 Choir
8:15 Bible
Sunday—
9:30 Sunday school, with classes
for all ages. John Boehr, Supt.
10:30 Worship Service
6:30
vor.
7:30
7:30
religious pictures, "The
Son” and “Who Is My Neighbor”.
(See announcement elsewhere.)
Rehearsal
study
Intermediate Christian Endea-
Junior Christian Endeavor.
Evening union sendee: Two
pictures, "The Prodigal
EBENEZER MENNONITE CHURCH
Thursday—
8:00 p. m. Bible study I Thes. 3
and prayer meeting.
8:30 p. m. Choir practice.
Sunday—
9:30 a. m. Sunday school. Joseph
Thompson, Supt.
10:30 a. m. Morning worship
3:30 p. m. Radio broadcast from
joining tne
church, Pandora, Ohio. The
Commandments.
To Resume War
Plan
Interrupted Building
Of Homes
(Concluded from page 1)
nounced that he already is booked
to capacity for all of next summer.
Continuing Boom
Pent-up demand for new houses
probably will keep the boom going,
for the 36 new residences erected in
the four years preceding the war
had not succeeded in easing an acute
housing shortage prevailing in the
town since 1936.
Outbreak of the war and the
resulting restrictions on building
served to intensify the shortage of
dwellings here, and with no new
construction available during the
conflict the price of houses sky
rocketed to the highest
Bluffton history.
level in
affecting
impetus
in which
In the inflation spiral
property value, principal
was provided a situation
families who found themselves with
no place to live were obliged to buy
a property when they found none
available for rental.
Spurred By Shortage
Relaxation of building controls
will find the housing shortage spur
ring the post-war building program,
and, in turn, as new homes are
completed the high prices command
ed by “distress buying” are expected
to fall rapidly.
Going into the post-war period,
however, there are fewer
available for rent in Bluffton. Many
properties rented for years were sold
during the war because rent con
trols cut into the landlord’s income
and because many families usually
in the “renter class” had to buy
houses
In contrast to the scarcity of
houses available for rental, many
local residential properties are for
sale, a situation that is expected to
continue until next summer or later.
Prices V ary
Older properties hav’e figured in
the bulk of the sale transactions,
and prices have varied widely.
In addition to the intrinsic value
of houses for sale locally, two other
factors have considerable bearing,
with the degree of the urgency for
the owner to liquidate and the neces
sity for the purchaser to
ing most transactions,
are changing hands at
prices ranging from
$10,000.
buy affect
Properties
present at
$5,000 to
In real estate tranactions over the
ast several
ally have
roughly 50
level they
before the
fleets more accurately the scarcity
of rental properties than it does the
value of
years, properties gener
been selling at prices
per cent more than the
would have commaded
war. This situation re-
the house.
Vicious Circle
Under prevailing conditions a vici
ous circle is started for a renter
when someone buys the house in
which he has been living and moves
into it. The only recourse for the
ousted renter is to purchase a place
of his own, and this transaction in
turn displaces another renter.
Those buying now because it is
their only way to obtain a dwelling
are caught in the inflated prices
brought on by a seller’s market.
In the meantime, the housing
shortage affecting renters is expect
ed to continue until the building
boom projected for next spring has
made sufficient headway to ease the
situation.
STOCK SALES
6m Here
wiss. Ira
tf
ee $2 plus
setive Sep
Jon, phone
tf
ill G. H.
For rent—Bulls: Short,)
ford, Angus and Brown
Moser.
Service bulls delivered. 1
10c per mile one way. Eff
tember 1. C. N. Long &
Ada Red 1360.
For cattle dehorning
Edwards, the dehorner,
Ohio. Arteries masculatec
ing.
Findlay,
no bleed
51
For sale—Jersey hull 18.months old
eligible to registry, T. B.,and Bangs
tested. Claribel OwenN, Bluffton
phone 547-R.
For sale— krses 2 hogs avg.
80 lbs. one vt. 150 lbs. John
Dunbar, first h^Use south of 30-N on
county line, U‘h side of Toad. 42
For sale—Purebred Hereford male
hog. Lyman Barnes, Bluffton phone.
For sale—Week old ^iolstein bull
calf from registered low. Harold
Badertscher, 1 mile west and 2
miles south of town.
For sale—Holstein b^ill old enough
for service. Wm. A.ltjiaus, Bluffton
phone 623-W.
For sale—12 year old black geld
ing. Boyd Clapper, 1 mile south
and mile east of Olange Center.
Public sale of livestock, machinery
and household goods on Thursday,
Feb. 14 beginning at
Watch for complete
next week. Marion
F. C. Badertscher.
12:JJ0 p. m.
advertisement
Uehstettler &
THE
LaFayette
Lester Hall and Mrs. Josie Hall
were Saturday guests of Mr. William
Grant of Ada.
David Hefner spent several days
w’ith his family.
Mrs. Bess Hefner is visiting her
brother, Otto Kidd in Texas.
Mrs. Bess Brackney, Mrs. Inez May,
Mrs. Dorothy Bierly attended the
Shakespeare Club at the Y.W.C.A. in
Lima, Wednesday.
Miss Shirley Jackson of Lima and
Mrs. Bettye Herr were Saturday
evening guests of Mrs. Chester Pat
terson.
Allen County Advisory Council No.
13 met at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Hefner, Jan. 15. Members
present were: Mr. and Mrs. Roy An
drews, and Mary Alice, Mr. and Mrs.
Russell Brackney, Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Hefner and sons Mr. and Mrs. David
Obenour, Mr. Harry Patterson, Mr.
and Mrs. Chester Patterson and
children Mr. and Mrs. John Thayer
and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hefner and
children.
Leroy Sampson spent the week-end
at home recently.
Robert Akerman, Radioman, who
recently returned from the South Pac
ific, is vsiiting his sister Miss Ann
Akerman and Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Wol
lett. He reports to Great Lakes
Naval Training Station soon.
David Hefner returned after re
ceiving his discharge from the army.
Philip Hall spent the week end with
his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. B. F.
Hall and Mrs. Grace Vorhes.
Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Robinson and
daughter o Lima were Saturday
evening guests of Mr. and Mrs. T.
M. Robinson.
Mrs. Martha Patterson, Mrs. Mil
dred Carey, Mrs. Lillian Plate, son
Errol and daughter Mrs. Ivalsen
Urich, son John Mrs. Jeanette Mor
rison and daughter Ann were Wed
nesday afternoon guests of Mrs. Inez
May.
Miss Dorothy Herr of Lima was a
week-end guest of Mr. Charles Herr
and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Herr.
Mrs. Howard Frank of Newton
Falls spent the week with Mrs. Edith
Patterson.
Rev. W. B. Arthur and Rev. N.
Walter Klingler are attending the
State Pastors’ Convention in Colum
bus.
Mr. Charles Herr and Miss Dorothy
Herr made a business trip to Colum
bus Wednesday.
Petty Officer Carlton Emerick, Mrs.
Gathyl Emerick of Galveston, Texas,
are spending a leave with Mr. and
Mrs. Marcus Emerick. Mr. Edsel
Downing, Mrs. Edith Downing, Mrs.
Rowena Sandy, daughters Gayle and
Myrna were Sunday guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Marcus Emerick.
Former Lt. Edsel Downing spoke on
“India” Sunday evening at the Me
thodist church.
“Hope is the poor mans bread,”
wrote George Herbert. Here are
seven questions in today's Guess
Again, each one providing you with
reason for hope. Merely place a
mark in the space provided and
check below for the correct answer
and your rating.
(1) The word latent means: (a)
unusual (b) heavy (c)
hidden (d) a soup spoon.
(2) If one was lewd he would be:
(a) naked (b) new (c)
unchaste (d) confused.
(3) What kind of a contest is the
fellow in the middle of the above
picture engaged in? Is it: (a) bull
fighting (b) steer wrestling (c)
broncho busting
(d) tap dancing?
(4) If someone gave you a serape
you would: (a) eat it (b wear it
(c) put a leash
on it (d) ride it.
(5) A paravane is a device used
to: (a) tell the wind velocity (b)
draw straight lines (c) keep air
planes in the air (d) cut the
moorings of water mines.
(6) Alfred Dreyfus was the name
of: (a) a French officer
English prime minister (c)
w’egian pacifist (d)
an American senator.
(7) A decalcomania is: (a)
of insanity (b) a chemical formula
(c) a process of transferring pic
tures (d) an instrument
used in the study of physics.
(b) an
a Nor­
a form
“GUESS AGAIN” ™y
ANSWERS u""
1.
9.
3.
4.
5.
6. 15 for (a) ....................................
7. (c) for 15 more big points
YOUR RATING: 90-100,
you’re stuffed 80-00. TOTAL—
have a slice? 70-80.
have a bun? 60-70. you’re a loafer.
(c) is easy, take 10 points
Again (c) for 10 more................
(b) for a good 15 points
Again (b) for 15 more
Difficult? Take 20 for (d).........
Busy people find the day too short
others think it too long.
LUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
California is experiencing its most
critical housing shortage in history
this winter, with many persons liv
ing in garages, trailers, and chicken
coops, according to a letter received
this week from
schwander, of
Calif.
In part her letter continues:
“Dairymen in Ohio would be
amazed to see the dairy farms here.
Cattle always are out in the open,
with huge stacks of baled hay in the
field often covered with tarpauline.
There are no barns to speak of, al
tho sometimes there maye be a
crude shelter.
“Southern California is a grand
place to be in the winter time, how
ever. There are many varieties of
flowers i n bloom, folks are busy
planting gardens, and you can see
them outside washing their cars in
LARGE BOX IONA
COCOA
DIXIE
Housing Shortage Also Plagues
Folks In California, Letter States
Mrs. E. H. Neuen
Huntington Park,
Neuenschwander are
residents, who oper-
Mr. and Mrs.
former Bluffton
ated the Neu-Art studio during the
time they lived here.
In her letter she pointed out that
many homes of average size house
two or three families. Altho there
is much building under way, it is
principally for business purposes.
People advertise daily for places to
live and offer as much as $100 re
ward to anyone finding them some
kind of shelter, she said.
.. Vo-xBc
CLAPP’S STRAINED
BABY FOODS ...
CAKE CONFETTI
TRiM-ETTES
A-PENN DRY
CLEAHER
MARGARINE
PUFFED RICE ...
ANN PAGE ELBOW
MACARONI
& 12c
Herb-Ox Beef and Chicken Bouillon
CUBES............ He
BOSUl'L REG. OR DRIP
COFFEE ’At 34c
When Available—Staley’s WAFFLE
SYRUP "VA 27c
STALEY'S CREAM
CORN STARCH .... 9c
SKINLESS
WIENERS 36c
PIECE OR SLICED-LARGE
BOLOGNA 32c
POLISH
SAUSAGE 47c
their bare feet.
"Most of the gymnasium work in
school is done outdoors, and one can
stay in the yard without wraps in the
daytime. Temperatures usually are
from 70 to 80 degrees at midday.
“One can see the snow-capped
peaks in the San Gabriel mountains
off to the north-east. They are a
beautiful sight, especially when you
are surrounded by green trees, flow
ers and green grass. The orange,
lemon and grapefruit trees are load
ed with fruit and are a beautiful
sight to behold.
“On Jan. 13 we attended church
at Immanuel’s Mennonite church in
Los Angeles, of which Rev. Harold
Burkholder, a former Bluffton man,
is pastor. To our surprise we met
Albert Winkler and Frank Neuen
schwanders, of Bluffton, there. Of
course, we also saw Maeanna
Steiner of Bluffton Edith Huser,
Mabel Basinger and Verdi Bixels of
Pandora.
“Mr. and Mrs. William Neuensch
wander, my husband’s parents, also
are here for the winter, and
they’d prefer to stay except for
children who remain back East.”
7c
10c
Pkg.
gal.
can
BATH SIZE SOAP
PALMOLIVE 2
57c
cakes
19c
lib.
ctn.
ARGO LAUNDRY
STARCH
CUT RITE
SHORTENING
25c
When Available—Karo Blue Label
SYRUP 14c
8c
WAXED PAPER *»Si 17c
dexo 3 c,t. 63c
SPIC & SPAN ...
ALl. PURPOSE CLEANER
bl-NN Y FIELD
23c
He
coffee
MW BETTER
1. SUPERB QUALITY
2, "FLAVOR-SAVER"
ROASTED
3. SOLD IN THI BIAN
4. CUSTOM GROUND
S. A BLEND TO
SUIT YOUR TASTE
toilet soap
CAMAY
REG. SIZE
CAKE
say
the
Lions Take Big Jump
Lions have been known to jump
as far as 20 feet. They can also
clear a barrier nine feet high.
Texas Marshseedless
80 SIZE
39c
FRESH GOLDEN
CARROTS
CALIFORNIA SEEDLESS
ORANGES
25c
A£| EBV Lgv.. Tender
vfcktn Green Stalks ea.
FRESH ICEBERG HEAD
LETTUCE I lc
New, Green. Firm Solid Heads
CABBAGE lb. 7c
A Hew Low Pike PLUS
400 Units Vitamin (Per Pint)
35c
THERE’S NONE BETTER
OLD FASHIONED LOAF lb 46c
HONEY LOAF
ib
60c
COUNTRY STYLE PURE
FROZEN
■urn
FOR FACE OR HANDS
PALMOLIVE SOAP
REG. SIZE
CAKE
Settlement
Rev. Daniel J. Unruh of
Kansas is spending 'several
this vicinity. He spoke at
College
Enroute
days in
Kuglin,
live in Chicago.
Newton,
days in
Bluffton
in the interest of missions,
home he is to spend several
the home of Mr. and Mrs.
parents of Mrs. Unruh who
Mrs. Aaron Geiger passed away at
the age of 86 in their home. She had
been bedfast for nineteen months
following a fall resulting in a broken
hip.
Funeral services were held at the
Ebenezer church Tuesday afternoon.
Rev. John Esau and Rev. P. J.
Boehr were in charge of the services.
Mr. and Mrs. John Keller are the
proud parents of a baby boy born to
them Sunday in Lima. Mrs. Keller
will be remembered here as the oldest
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Bas
inger.
David Schumacher who has recently
been quite ill has improved consider
ably.
Amos Gratz, retired farmer and for
fifteen years a grocer passed away
unexpectedly early Monday morning
at the home of his daughter Mrs. Mel
vin Zimmerly. He had suffered from
heart ailment for quite a number of
years. Funeral services are to be
held at the Emmanuel Reformed
church, Thursday afternoon at 2:30
o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Diller were
Sunday dinner guests in the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Amstutz and fam-
Sweet and Tender
Sweet and Juicy
FLORIDA, LARGE SIZE
ORANGES Yxr 37c
JERSEY SWEET POTATOES OR
GOLDEN YAMS4,,.. 43c
MAINE—I .8. NO. 1 GRADE
Dairy Department
CHED-O-BIT 2 Tic
PHILADELPHIA CREAM
CHEESE I lc
KEY KO
MARGARINE 23c
ARMOUR’S STAR PURE
LARD 2 X-
SINNYBROOK
Grade A 1-doz.
hUUv Large Size ... ctn.
SINNYBROOK
Grade A 1-doz.
EiUUw Medium Size ctu.
PORK
SAUSAGE
FRESH CAUGHT
COD FILLETS ....... "34c
AtP COFFEE ($!
VICOtMS
AMD HMt
ttCK ANO
rouwoua
3 Bog 59c 1 Bag 24c 3 Bog 75c
42c
....... ,b- 41c
PERCH 39c I
DEL MAIZ
NIBLETS
14c
THURSDAY, JAN. 31. 194G
ily.
Howard Lugibill expects to operate
the farm owned by
old, this season.
his brother Har-
No. 2 met at the
Mrs. Samuel A..
Advisory Council
home of Mr. and
Schey Monday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rodeheffer and
family of Celina were Sunday visitors
in the home of Mrs. Sam Locher and.
daughter.
CARD OF THANKS
wish to express our sincere
We
thanks to the ministers, singers and
those who sent flowers also to ladies
of the Missionary society for their
services and all others who assisted
in any way during the illness and
death of our mother.
The Geiger Family.
News Want-ads bring results.
fresh
SWEET
flaM2rful
mnRGsainE
Produced by the Matfers of
KINGTASTE GE INE
MAYONNAI
euNcH Be
5-55c
BROCCOLI 25c
MICHIGAN—U.S. NO. 1 GRADE
POTATOES A S1.69
SWEET GREEN ONIONS, ERESH
POTATOES 81.99 SHALLOTS 3M„. 23c
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!llt!i
Bakery Department
ENRICHED MARVEL WHITE
BREAD .... 3 32c
JANE PARKER FUDGE SQUARE
CAKES ,.ch 37c
JANE PARKER STREl SSEL
COFFEE CAKES 18c
Marvel Hamburger or Hot Dog
36c 21c
41c 29c
19c
ROLLS 2 &“,u
JANE PARKER POUND
A A if EC Marble, Plain
UMlkCQ or Raisin ..
AAP BAKER’S DROP
HARD
DOG FOOD
SOPADE
STOKELY
CHILI SAUCE
SULTANA
each
l-lb.
pkg.
COOKIES
lie
8-oz.
pkg.
When Available—SHORTENING
PREMIUM
CRACKERS
PEAHUT BUTTER 10
FLOUR
19c
55-oz.
Pkg.
8OAP STRETCHER
12-oz.
20c
69c
SPRY 3 At
19c
l-lb.
Pkg.
28c
i-OZ.
jar
5
GOLD MEDAL
1b.
31c
bag
2
ANN PAGE ELBOW
SPAGHETTI
playfaiA
PEAS
1b.
DOLE FANCY SLICED
PIHEAPPLE
BAKER MAID
CRACKERS
21c
cello
AY WON CUJ* GREEN
lie
No. 2
can
BEARS ..........
He
can
21c
can
KEMP’S SIN RAYED
TOMATO JUICE
IONA CUT
19c
l-lb.
Pkg.
23c
BEETS ................. N°.„2
FOR WINTER FEEDING
MEDIUM SALT ..’X SLOT
CALIFORNIA
CORONET BAKING
SULTANA SALAD
MUSTARD 2
KRAFT VELVEETA
53c
13c
22c
PRUHES 4 At
CHOCOLATE 8S
LIPPINCOTT
PRUHE BUTTER
21c
21c
CHEESE X’
"JUNKET"
RENNET POWDER
PKG.

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