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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, April 17, 1947, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076554/1947-04-17/ed-1/seq-8/

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PAGE EIGHT
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FIELD DEMONSTRATION
High School Nine Drubs St.
John, 18-7, In First Season Tilt
Bluffton High’s 1947 baseball sea-1 St. John hurlers for an 18 to 7
son opened auspiciously Tuesday I victory, in a Lima league tilt played
when the Pirates clubbedthree Lima] on the Johnnies’ diamond.
trnmoa nO.*oos
New Idea
Power Take-Off Driven
TRACTOB'M
Ask us about fi«ld demonstration of
rsmorkablt mow«r. You'll certainly
to s»« it work.
HAY EAKES
FARM WAGONS
W
HAY
MT
o
LOADERS
'/u.^^ii
NOW ON DISPLAY
O. €. IIIKNEY & SONS
John Deere S^les & Service
Phone 173-W Vance St., Bluffton
AUTHORIZED DEALER
BIRDS EYE
SPECIAL SALE
Garden Fresh
Peas Pack 31c
Sliced
Peaches Pack 32c
Whole Kernel
Corn Pack 19c
Apple Sauce Pck. 23c
Spinach Pack 21c
Strawberries Pck. 59c
Dole Chunk
Pineapple Pack 59c
Raspberries Pck. 69c
CHEESE DEPT.
A to Z
Meat Market & lecher Service
Home Killed Meats
BEEF PORK VEAL LAMB
We have a large variety of
Cheese
All 2 Lb. Package
Cheese 89c
.POTATO BREAD
v-^urr
S AVEHtofftoTMCHICKS
•■■«V_ ^■E3223EES!SIE2E33ESC3S5ZSESwtB
cbfc
Warner Electric way!
COME AND SEE OUR DISPLAY OF WARNEE3S
Save money, work, worry by brooA
ln under Warner radiant beat. Oh*.
maioi beat units and patented
I,j reflector* really rare tboee extra ebbamt
Amstutz Hatcheries
Bluffton and Pandora
V
New
Orig in al
Better
dependable, easy working
A speedy,
mower which can be quickly hitched to
any make or model of tractor equipped
with standard power take-off and stand
ard drawbar.'AbMlul.ly unl.malr no
complicated change-over or adjustments.
Tho many notable features in thia mower
include a power lift that raises cutter
barI
over obstructions unique safety release
special equalising
power shaft simplicity
of design quick, easy*
adjustments. You never
saw a better mower..
Ar
BABY BEEF
No (at—No bone
Roasts lb. 45c
Well Trimmed
Sirloin Steak lb. 55c
No heme—No fat
Cubed Steak lb. 55c
Extra Lean
Beef Ground lb. 43c
No bone—No fat
Rib or Rump
Roast lb. 55c
Fresh Dressed
POULTRY
HRNS OR FRYERS
Ready to Eat
Hams lb. 55c
Our Own Make Ring
or Large Bologna,
Pudding, Paunhaus,
Fresh or Smoked
Sausage.
No Limit
Oleo lb. 39c
Dry Beef Vz lb. 45c
Pressed Ham lb. 55c
WHITE
WHOLE WHEAT
RYE
Steaks—Club Steaks IL ft/*
vlCdll (Lean and Meaty) 5
.^though St. John led at the end
of the first inning, 5 to 1, the Bluff
ton veterans soon got their big bats
working, and 18 Pirate tallies had
crossed the rubber by the time the
seven-inning tilt ended.
Catcher inf Howe was the most
potent factor in the Bluffton team’s
slugging attack. Bob Wilch, a let
terman from last year, went all the
way on the mound for the winners.
The Bluffton lineup included Larry
Miller, first base Keith Kirtland,
second Maynard Pogue, shortstop
Keith Moore, third Mike Reagan,
left field Jim Lewis, center field
Kent Stonehill, right field. Ray Lee
Wilch entered the game as a pinch
hitter.
BY HAR.R.Y L. HA
is one
appear
Editor’s Note—This
of a series of articles to
in the Bluffton News dealing
with early Ohio history,
will appear
issues.
Others
in forthcoming
The College In
The Woods
If you did not eat meat you could
board in the college dining hall for
seventy-five cents a week. If you in
sisted on meat and got it twice a
day, your .board would cost you 25
cents a week additional.
That was a little more than 100
years ago at the College in the
Woods.
The entire expense of living during
the 40-week school year was $58 to
$89 not counting the clothing worn.
WANTED
Girls for
Sewing
and Examining
APPLY AT
Boss Mfg. Co.
Have you a MONEY
Problem?
Such as:
—Investment for income
—Retirement income
—College educational plan
—Accumulation of a sum
for any definite purpose
Let us talk over your problems.
We may be of service to you.
Only Federally Registered certifi
cates sold,
G. T. Soldner
409 Cherry St. Phone 163-Y
Fresh Drugs
and
Quality Drug Store
Merchandise
of All Kinds
—,—
Prescriptions Care
fully Compounded
—,—
Sidney’s Drug Shop
Phone 170-W
OTART year pictore
majduR right with depend
«M« Kodak film in the yel
low box—the film that get*
the picture. Then tend u*
the exposed rolls for expeit
developing and printing.
SIDNEY’S DRUG SHOP
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
Incidentally, students did not smoke
or use tobacco—to do so meant sum
mary dismissal.
Little more than a decade old, the
long, one-story log college was in an
Indian clearing on 500 acres of do
nated land—virgin forest and almost
inaccesible by roads. The students,
most of whom earned their keep by
school teaching or laboring, called it
“Slab Hall.”
Three Professors
In one of the small log cabins in
the clearing the three professors
lived. One of th in did the cooking
and housekeeping. All taught the
students literary subjects and music.
There were no monitorial stipulation,
grading of papci stributions of
honors.
That was Oberlin during the first
years following its foundation in 18
34. By 1864 Obr had, besides the
college, three general stores and a
book store, one cl: and about 150
homes. The colie as co-education
al and then had ah nit a hundred stu
and board was up to $3 a week.
When the college was one year old
its student body ived a great ad
dition when four-fifths of the stu
dents at Lane Sen nary, Cincinnati,
quit and came to Oberlin.
Slavery Issue was Hot Potato
The Cincinnati institution had for
a time been broken up because the*
students had been forbidden to dis
cuss slavery.
Oberlin was not designed as an in
stitution for negroes but its found
ers saw no reason to exclude them so
they were admitted.
two
one
de-
With the Lane students came
of the school’s professors and
from New York. A theological
partment was then established.
From its beginning up to the turn
of the century, of the 20,000 students
admitted 19,000 were white. Of the
colored students, only sixty, 32 men
and 28 women, pleted a course.
Oberlin Anti-Slavery Hotbed
At Oberlin the abolition of slavery
was freely discussed with the result
that the village, which not until 40
years later attained a population of
3,000, became converted to abolition
ism and was a hot bed of anti-slavery
sentiment that spread throughout
northern Ohio. Lecturers from there,
sent out by the American Anti-Slav
ery Society, swarmed everywhere.
So did missionaries, for that mat
ter. The use of tobacco still was tab
oo in the college and the sale of in
toxicants, in the village. Enrollment
at the school in the ’40’s reached 432.
There were 18 professors.
Oberlin College, opened by John L.
Shepherd, a Presbyterian preacher
from Elyria, and Philo P. Stewart, a
missionary to the Indians, in 1834
with 29 men and 15 women students,
now has an average enrollment of
1,800 and a faculty of 275. It also
has an endowment of $18,000,000.
Its 39 buildings are spread over a
wooded campus facing .the public
square of the town. In fact, it is the
public square. In
buildings, counting
bered seven.
1845 the college
the cabins, num
Settled There
Many Negroes
Because the school did not hew tc
the color line and due to the village
abolitionistic activities many colored
people settled there. At present only
about one-fourth of the town’s popu
lation is negro.
Most of the college’s endowment
came from Charles Martin Hall, a
graduate frotn the school in 1885
who later discovered the electroly-
TRAP SHOOT
Sunday, April 20
1:00 P. M.
Merchandise Prizes
Plenty of 12 gauge shells.
BLUFFTON GUN CLUB
2 miles north of Blufftoij on Dixie
highway at Gossard Filling Sta
tion and store
Lloyd Hardwick, President
C. V. Stonehiil, Sec,-Treas.
v a i
u s a
POWER
LAWN
MOWER
rStE-WHUtINO
'HHMIwdUaaiM
AU StMtaf
KODAK riLM
ji
UKmI-TO
omuh
mm
mows
VOw UM
»un
livery
dt
Immediate
$148.(0
FARM
BLUFFTON
EQUIPMENT CO.
Massey-Harris Saks & Service
E. F. Schmidt, Prop.
105 E. Elm Street
Bluffton phone 260-W
Open Saturday Evenings
tic process of making aluminum. 11
During the next three years Hall de-1
vised, in a woodshed behind his home, I
64 E. College St., the Hall process!
which has been of great sendee to I
the industrial, architectural and do-1
mestic life of the world. I
Oberlin was an important station I
on the “underground railroad.’’ Of I
the many fugitives who went there!
none ever were returned to slavery. I
This exposed both the town and the I
college to much criticism and morel
hostilit y among other parts of the I
state. I
It was 24 men from Oberlin who I
received the blame and the longest!
jail terms in the rescue at Welling-1
ton, of John Price, a fugitive slave I
from Kentucky, from a United States I
marshal who had arrested the negro!
at Oberlin. I
Price had been at Oberlin for I
some time before he vyas apprehend-1
ed and seized by two marshals from I
Columbus and two men from Ken-1
tucky who showed a writ from his I
master. It was September 13, 1858.1
They drove the eight miles to Well-1
ington, where they were waiting at I
the Wadsworth Hotel to take the I
prisoner south on the first train. I
Because of fire there was quite al
crowd in Wellington that day and 131
of the men, joined by the two dozen I
who had followed the officers from!
Oberlin, surrounded the hotel and I
took the negro away from them. I
All were indicted under the Fugi-1
tive Slave law of 1850, by a grand I
jury of the United Spates District!
Court. The Wellington men, pleading!
guilty, were fined $20 each and given I
24 hours in jail.
The Oberlin men, choosing to fight!
the case, were held in jail in Cleve-|
land for months awaiting trial. Two,
were sentenced, Simon Bushnell to 60
days imprisonment and $600 fine and
Charles H. Langsten to 20 days in
jail and $100 fine. Langsten was a
negro.
Though it was July before they got
out, the Oberlin men had a fairly
good time in the jail. There were
mass meetings, parades and banners.
Even Governor Salem P. Chase made
one of the speeches—on their side.
One prisoner, a man named Fitch,
was a Sunday school superintendent
in Oberlin—and had been for 16
years. Four hundred of the Sunday
school children went to Cleveland,
where they were joined by children
from Plymouth church, Cleveland,
and all swarmed into the jail. A gen
eral celebration followed.
Price was released when the court
held the Kentuckians showed insuffi
cient proof of ownership, and the
prisoners from Oberlin went home,
where they were met by a procession
headed by Hecker’s band, playing
“Home Sweet Home.” A general cel
ebration followed.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish* to thank sincerely all the
friends and neighbors for their aid
and sympathy extended in the illness
and death of our wife and mother al
so Rev. Cramer who officiated and
those who assisted at the funeral ser
vices and all those sending flowers.
George Klay & Family
LEGAL NOTICE
Carl Smith whose last known address was
DeSoto Hotel, Lima. Ohio, is hereby notified
that Jessie Smith has filed her petition for
divorce, alimony and costs of her suit, in
Case No. 37554 in the Common Pleas Court,
Alien County. Ohio, and that her/ suit will
be heard on or after sbe full weeks after
the first publication of this notice, iiamciy on
or after June 2, 1947,
ELMER MfCLAIN,
Lima, Onio.
5 Attorney Sir Plaintiff
...............I.—, ................................-..... ~............... .............
FORGOT A BIRTHDAY?I
^Thoughtful greeting* from
I
I
lj
BELATED*
BIRTHDAY
CARDS
St
A. Hauenstein & Son
LITTLE z
you help Io break up »kk-
o-bsd blue*. You will find
ju»t the greeting you want
in our »election of card* by
Gibion an outstanding
_nqme on greeting card*.
Sidney’s Drug Shop
N. Main St.- Phone 170-W
n
I
I
High Gloss
Porch & Deck
PAINT
$1.54 qt.
^OSfc-ii
It’s Back-
Old Fashioned
Blood-Orange Soda
THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 1917
TIME TO THINK ABOUT
FENCE
-j ___ :____ ‘____ L_
■nulhiii
snK!fjarjrifl^ffi*ri
■MBIIKKMraiKM
It’s time to replace those sagging,
war-weary fences. Your local Farm Bureau Coopera
tive is in a good position to help you with most of
your fencing requirements.
Allen Farm Bureau Co-op Ass’n
Bluffton, Ohio Phone 377-W
Like you enjoyed before the war
Better than ever
at your favorite dealer
Bottled by
Kenton Bottling Works
KENTON, OHIO
hSSHSQhl^NEWiL gglBMBi NBilf gglfiSSg
H's CLEAN-UP TIME Again!
Springtime ond cleon-up tme go to
gether—just like horn and eggs! It's
jn American custom soon qfter the
official signs of spring apfear for 1 supplies you need at our store. ’*.
'KITCHEN
STEP
STOOL
Streamline^. ell
metal solidly built
stool. Has hund
red* of uses about
the house.
Price
$4.95
PORCH
& DECK
PAINT
Q—, 7 .. MQ 1
n h'i
WOOL
DUST I
MOP
$1.50 i
4
------------------------r »,
housewives ond home owners to do o
really big annual clean-up job. For //,
efficiency ond lasting results, get the
STAIR TREADS
Save your stairs from wear and
scuffing. These long-wearing
rubber composition treads are
attractive and easy to tack on.
Price 39c
READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
Electric and Gas Water Heaters
Monarch Combination Bottle Gas
and Coal Range
Speed Queen Washing Machines
Three Burner Florence Oil Stove
Used Electric Stove in A-l Condition
FETT’S HARDWARE
Since 1893
An Old Name in Dependable Hardware
LAWN
BROOM
22 springy
steel tines do
the job effici
the job effi
ciently! Will
not scratch up
Price 85c

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