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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, September 04, 1947, Image 3

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THURSDAY, SEPT. 4, 1947
DIRECTORS MEETING PLANNED
A. E. Kohli, Sportsmen’s Club pres
ident, announces a directors meeting
scheduled for Wednesday evening of
next week at Buckeye park. Directors
will discuss plans for the fall and
winter program. A windup of the
membership campaign will be held
the same evening. Team captains
urge all members entered in the con
test to make a big effort to write up
the balance of the membership be
tween now and next Wednesday. Los
ers of the contest are pledged to give
the winning team a big feed and en
tertainment.
JJe
The fishermen who vacationed at
the Muskingum river near Everett,
Mich., brought home a big 20 pound
turtle which is to be the main bill of
fare at a party planned at the home
of Frenus Herrmann this Wednesday
night. Frenas will demonstrate his
ELECTRICAL WIRING
Repaired and Installed
Faulty Wiring is hazardous
Estimates without obligations
New Electric Water Pumps
for Sale
EUGENE HAAS
Licensed Electrical Contractor
Box 51, Beaverdam, Ohio
Bluffton phone 532-G
Paul ^choenlein. Mgr.
Market & Elizabeth, Lima
Phone 73511
CONSERVATION AFFAIRS
Happenings Affecting Woods, Waters and Wildlife
By THE BLUFFTON COMMUNITY SPORTSMEN’S CLUB, INC.
culminary skill in preparing the snap
per for the feast.
On the first day at the river the
boys landed 41 fish and luck held
out until they headed for home on
Labor Day. Jerry Clever brought
home the turtle and a big pike which
measured over two feet in length.
Lots of crappies and pike were
caught. The gang had fish for nearly
every meal during their stay in
Michigan.
Other members of the fishing
party who will attend the turtle feed
are Oliver Steiner, Lewis Weyer and
Charley Lloyd.
Six Allen County groups, including
the Bluffton Community Sports
men’s Club, have proposed bounties
on crows, hawks and foxes for 1948.
A petition filed with Allen County
commissioners asks for 1948 a 25c
crow bounty, a $1.00 hawk bounty
and a $5.00 fox bounty. Chairman
Morris of the board of county com
missioners said Saturday no im
mediate action on establishment of
bounties is planned.
Charley Aukerman and family en
joyed the best of luck on their two
weeks’ fishing trip to Wisconsin.
Fishing Minocqua lake the trio
caught an abundance of 12 to 14 inch
crappies which bite rapidly and Rex
snagged a 17 inch pike. Bass fishing
was excellent and Charley said they
actually caught so many fish they
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Your Friendly Store
tired of cleaning them. Natives in
the area aren’t much interested in
fishing of this type but spent their
time trolling for muskies.
The lake is well known for muskie
fishing, but the Aukermans were not
equipped to battle such monsters.
Charley says a fisherman in the
neighboring cottage snagged onto one
of the Junkers and after a half-hour
of fighting was unable to bring the
big fish to the boat. The Aukermans
watched the spectacle from their cot
tage. Several times the neighbor shot
at the big fish with a revolver, which
is a legal procedure in Wisconsin.
The muskie at times actually towed
the boat around.
Amos Klingler who has also fished
the area says the lake can be reached
in one day traveling by driving up
into Michigan and ferrying across
Lake Michigan at the auto ferry near
Petosky. The trip is reasonable and
much time is saved. By way of Chi
cago the lake is 750 miles from Bluff
ton.
Lowell Scheaublin is on a super
deluxe fishing trip to Canada. From
the report we heard Lowell left by
plane for the Soo, last Thursday. At
that point he plans to board a pon
toon plane which will carry him back
into the wilds of Ontario to lakes
seldom if ever fished by other than
the natives.
Ezra Basinger and wife, daughter
Ann and son Hubert and Josephine
Haller have returned from a vacation
at Crystal Lake near Shelby, Mich
igan, where they visited the Wesley
Near family.
As usual Ezra had the fish nearly
jumping in the boat. While there the
group snagged 23 bass. The fish all
large in size, ranged from 16 to
22 inches in length. Ezra says the
fish Hit best between the crack of
dawn and about 9:00 in the morning.
After that time very few fish were
taken. Crawlers trolled from a drift
ing boat did the trick.
3k
Mr. and Mrs. Amos Klingler and
Mr. and Mrs. George Klingler leave
this Wednesday for a two weeks’
fishing trip to Minnesota where they
plan to stay near Park Rapids. They
will fish the Crow Wing lake area.
Hope they catch more fish than Ernie
Bigelow who stayed a month in Min
nesota this summer. All Ernie snag
ged was one eight inch fish we hear.
The license cost him three bucks.
But, Ernie is a “fisher of men” and
probably was just demonstrating the
art of “fishing for fish’* for the bene
fit of son Bruce.
According to game protector Lloyd
Hughes, approximately 1,000 pheas
ants have been released in Logan
county to date this year. Of 700
young chicks turned over to persons
to raise for liberating, 624 survived.
The projects were under the sponsor
ship of the Logan County Game and
Fish Ass’n.
Notice
Persons planning to erect monu
ments in Maple Grove cemetery this
fall must leave orders and specifica
tions for the foundation with the
Cemetery Board not later than Sep
tember 25.
By order of
Cemetery Board of Trustees
Samuel Bixel, Clerk
BROWN SWISS SOLD
Cecil Hartman, Bluffton Brown
Swiss breeder, recently sold the bull,
Pride of Lincoln View, to W. WT.
Wood, of Columbus Grove, according
to a report from Fred S. Idtse,
secretary of the Brown Swiss Cattle
Breeders association, Beloit, Wis.
News Want Ads get results.
Willis Crawford
Alvin Heldmqn
Auctiorleers
Complete Modprn
Servic
Sales
Phone Bluffton 597-T or
Findlay 1| 53-W.
AU Mm* ay
KODAK. FILM
Hara
OTART picturo
maldng right with depend
able Kodak Film in the yel
low box—the film that got*
the picture. Then send u»
the exposed roils for expert
developing and printing.
SIDNEY’S DRUG SHOP
THE BLUFFTON NEWS, BLUFFTON, OHIO
LtV£ AND ARTIFICIAL
BAIT FISHERMEN BOTH
^EEK LA R&EMOUTH SASS
FOUND ALL OVERDID
IN LAKES AND PONDS'
THEY PREFER MUD
BOTTOMS '-SLUGGISH
WATER "-AND VEGETATION
Deep hotcm
Black
Correctvay to
A BLACK SASS
TsWITH A FIRM
GRIP ON THE IR.
IDWER JAW-
BY HARR.Y L. HALL
Editor’s Note—This is one
of a series of articles to appear
in the Bluffton News dealing
with early Ohio history. Others
will appear in forthcoming
issues.
Louisa And The Chief
“You best shotild stop lere and re
turn 1 o Marietta,” Louisa St. Clair
told tlle lone guardsman Aho had ac
companied her on the w id all-night
gallop into the ndian cc untry. "We
now are in the 1 and of t]le Mohawks
and I will ride on alont into their
camp. I think I shall be safe, but for
you—if you were taken by the
Indians it would be certain death,”
the girl said in dismissing him.
Reluctantly the ranger turned back
towards Marietta and Louisa rode on
alone into the country of the hostile
Mohawks—now Mahoning County.
Before her winded horse had covered
two miles she was captured by the
Indians and taken on to Duncan’s
Falls where the chief town and
counc il house of the tribe was located.
Louisa was not distressed y that be
cause it was just where she was go
ing anyway.
It was the winter of 1790 and that
year Louisa, daughter of Arthur St.
Clair, first governor of the Ohio
country, was 19. With her brother,
Arthur Jr., 21, and two younger
sisters, she had come with her father
to the then Ohio capital immediately
after his appointment the same year.
Louisa was pretty, and more, she
was vivacious, athletic, full of life and
had a figure rivaling that of Diana
the Huntress. “Healthy, fond of frolic
and ready to draw amusement from
everything and anything, Louisa was
an excellent horsewoman, an expert
skater, a born huntress and a dead
shot with the rifle,” a Washington
County historian related.
She liked to roam the woods and
often went alone into the forest un
mindful of the savages who sulked
among the trees. She would mount
the wildest horse and with only a
blanket for a saddle, keep her seat
with surprising skill much to the
astonishment and admiration of
friendly Indians who might be visit
ing the white settlement.
Once, visiting in Philadelphia,
Louisa had been introduced to a
young Indian chief, Joseph (Little
Chief) Brant, whom his father, Big
Chief Joseph Brant had sent there
for a partial education.
The Little Chief, after he had ab
sorbed a bit of the white men’s
learning, was to be taken to his tribe
where he might succeed his father
in the leadership of the tribe and per
haps eventually advance to command
of the whole, newly-formed Federa
tion of Western Tribes. St. Clair’s
daughter never forgot the look of
open admiration in the flashing black
eyes of the slim young brave—per
haps often wandering if the young
savage too, remembered the meeting.
For a week before Louisa’s night
long gallop into the territory of the
warlike Mohawks, Indians from all
parts had been gathering at Marietta
in response to Governor St. Clair’s
invitation to come in and try, with
the whites, to make a satisfactory
treaty of peace.
Chiefs of every tribe were there
and busily were arguing in the white
men’s council house—that is, all ex
cept the Mohawks, most warlike of
all, whose chief, scorning the white’s
request, had remained away. With
out the Mohawks a peace treaty
would mean little or nothing.
Goes to Meet Mohawks
With their chief, Joseph Brant, the
tribe was camped at Duncan’s Falls,
high in the Indian country, the gov
ernor was told. Some way that in
formation found its way to Louisa
and early that night the girl, attend
ed by a lone ranger and unknown to
any other in the settlement, started
on her wild ride through the forest.
Wheth^- the chief was Big Joe or
Little e, the girl probably was un
certain but she did remember as if
Under onto Skies
TOLD BY CONSERVATION DIVISION
OF SCALES
Uf»ee«.
bone
bass excF‘«^t*c*“
ARE NOT BLACK
THEY ARE GREEN
LAR&EMOUTHS HAVE A
DARK STRIPE LENGTH
WISE OF THEIR BODY*
/Al 'YEPJZS
A /0-INCN LARGEMOUTH
THREE YEARS
OLD BUT IT TAKES
FIVE MORE YEARS TO
ADD ANOTHER. 10 INCHES-
only a day ago, a flashing Indian
At daybreak when the Mohawks
captured her up in Mahoning County,
they were astonished at what they
saw. This girl was white but she was
in full Indian dress. And she rode
her pony like a warrior. Slung to her
shoulders was a short rifle. This wo
man, young as she was, appeared
warlike and formidable. Such a
prisoner should be taken at once to
the council house and into the chief’s
presence.
When her guards pushed Louisa
up to the chief the great warrior, in
feathered head-dress and full war
paint, barely could believe what he
saw. His mouth dropped open and his
eyes showed a light of dazed disbe
lief.
It was Little Chief Brant and he
remembered all right. Once more,
war paint and head-dress forgotten,
the haughty and dignified chieftan
was the schoolboy whose smile flash
ed on the ‘teen-age girl in Philadel
phia.
“I have ridden all night and have
risked my life to see you,” the girl
told Chief Brant. “I have come alone
through the forest but must insist
that you send a guard with me to in
sure my safe return to my people,”
she said.
“I have brought you a letter from
my father, who now is governor of
the whole Ohio territory,” Louisa
told the chief and gave him a paper.
Brant read the paper without com
ment other than he, himself, would
be her guard back to Marietta. Soon
after, having eaten and rested, the
two started on the long ride back to
the white settlement.
She Brings in Chief
On their arrival Louisa introduced
Little Chief Brant to her father. She,
alone, had brought in the warlike
chieftain whom all the white soldiers
had failed to take and who had
spurned the governor's request to
attend the peace council.
Brant sat in the peace council but
though the negotiations came to
nothing, the Indian fell in love with
the governor’s daughter. He remain
ed at Marietta several days and
pressed his courtship again and a
gain but Louisa refused to marry him
and the Indian chief went back,
In
SAEETV
LEGION TOGS
Your
bo/is
DRESSED
A$ WELL AS
TUF 8EST
AMO SAFER W
WE REST!
MM
CION TOG*
BOYS who wear Safety Legion
Togs and the Mothers of these
Safety Legioneers write our
best ads. A card from one
says:
—I’m.
alias J*________________
Mrs. B. T. 3.
JUST ARRIVED:
Fall issue of Pilot Magazine
now available—get your copy.
GEIGER & DILLER
Bluffton Distributor of
Safety Legion Togs
crestfallen, to his tribe.
Though historiaiis nave missed it.
Indian legend and St. Clair family
tradition attribute the increased fer
ocity of the Indian s in their fight to
the finish at St. Clair’s disastrous
defeat, November 4, 1791, on the
Pickaway fork of Omee creek, near
Ft. Recovery, Mercer County, to the
soreness in the heart of Little Chief
Brant, commander of the Federation
of Western Tribes who opposed the
whites there.
Though greatly outnumbered the
Indians killed or
eluding half the lale population of
Cincinnati, their 1 oss in the victory
was never ascertai ned. Though 37 of
his officers were killed and 31 others
injured, and four horses were shot
out from under m, St. Clair, who
was in the midst of the fighting was
unhurt. Brant had told his warriors
to spare no one eIse but threatened
dire consequences should St. Clair be
hurt.
Outbreaks of late blight of to
matoes have been found in Ohio.
Fungicides should be applied before
the disease gets a foothold, Ohio
State University plant pathologists
recommend fixed copper, Dithane, or
bordeaux mixture to prevent losses.
Dusts or sprays can be used, and ap
plications should be repeated at 5
day intervals.
For Those Who Want The Best
in Bluffton it s....
It Costs No More
At Your Store
or
At Your Door
Per Quart 17c
Coffee Cream
Half Pint 17c
The
Best
Costs
No
More
/It MM dooA. LL
**NS3*
goods and books. See display at our store
PAGE THREE
DDT has been effective in tha
control of Japanese beetle larvae in
Ohio. Three different rates of ap
plication, 25 pounds, 50 pounds, and
75 pounds per acre, were tested.
Even the 25-pound rate produced a
100 per cent kill when applied in
October.
give
chocolates
They’re fresh—direct from
the makers
The Corner Drug Store
Page s Milk
Farm-Herd Inspected
All Page’s Milk
Sold In Bluffton
is City of Findlay
Farm and Herd
Inspected Milk
Only Page
Can Make This
Statement About
Milk Sold In
Bluffton
nt tfruui iltPie Que/uptcuj.!
gm
The Page Dairy Co.
Bluffton, Ohio
For Home Delivery .... Phone 489-W
Page Is A Bluffton Industry
I USED ONLY A SCREWDRIVER TO ASSEMBLE T^ESE
HANDY SHELVES
FOR
L&uuce!
STORAGE
Two regular unih—»et up meoturet
Steinman Bros. Lumber Co.
236-246 Cherry Street Phone: 360-W
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C)Q

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