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The Bluffton news. [volume] (Bluffton, Ohio) 1875-current, September 04, 1947, Image 8

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PAGE EIGHT
Funeral Wednesday
For Mt. Cory Man
Funeral services were held "Wed
nesday for Charles Henning, 34, at
his home in Mt. Cory with Rev. Seth
Lenhart officiating. Burial was in
Flick cemetery.
Mr. Henning died Monday morning
at Bluffton hospital following a
two weeks’ illness. He was a form
er employe of the Triplett company
here.
He was bom in Mt. Cory the son
of Edward and Matilda (Kerns)
Henning. ....
Surviving are his wife, the former
Beulah Keel, a daughter, Mrs. Rich-
I KNOW YOUR V-s.
MOTHER WILL SHOW
GOOD JUDGMENT AND
GET EVERYTHING THAT
YOU NEED AT
SIDNEY’S
DRUG SHOP
ITS SOARE PLACE AND
YOU'RE SOME
8ABY/
BEEF PORK
Herzog’s
PULVERIZED LIMESTONE
I made by
The Herzog Lime and Stone Co.
Forest, Ohio
Delivered and Spread by
Russell Amstutz Harold Marshall
Phone 533-T
Order now for early Fall Delivery
ard Scoby, Findlay three half
sisters, Mrs. Roy Siane, Swanton
Mrs. Raymond King, Perry and Mrs.
Cleland Fisher, Toledo and two
granddaughters.
Floyd
Meat Market Lecher Service
Home Killed
Fresh Dressed Fryers lb. 55c
AUTHORIZED DEALER
arBIRDS EYt®
y _bran
vi
o
__ __
OUR
CHEESE DEPARTMENT
’/z or Whole
Brick lb. 49
Swiss Cheese lb. 69c
Wise. Cream lb. 49
Sharp Cheese lb. 49
2 lb. Loaf Cheese 78
PLj^raL
POTATO BREAD
WHITE
Herr And
Wed
Reba Towner
Wedding of Floyd Herr, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Herr of North
Lawn avenue and Miss Reba Town
er, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James
Townei* of Fairport, New York, took
place in a double ring ceremony
Saturday afternoon at 4 oclock at
the Baptist church in Fairport.
Both Mr. Herr and his bride are
former Bluffton college students.
The bride was attended by Miss
Harriet Schertz of Peoria, Ill., a
college friend and Evan Herr, bro
ther of the bridegroom was best
man.
Among those from Bluffton in at
tendance at the wedding were Mr.
and Mrs. Nelson Herr, David Tosh,
Raymond Schumacher, Mr. and Mrs.
Winkler, Kenneth and Robert Ober
ly and Miss Marguerite Jones.
Following the wedding the couple
left for a week’s trip in northern
New York. They will return to
Bluffton where Mr. Herr, a former
veteran of World Warr II will re
sume his studies in Bluffton college.
Pullets which were not immunized
early against fowl pox may be pro
tected for limited periods in the lay
ing house by vaccination with pigeon
pox vaccine. Use of fowl pox vac
cine will cause such severe reactions
that egg production will be delayed
or reduced.
-. .............. ....
A 1:oZ
Meats
VEAL LAMB
Beef Ground lb. 45
NuMaid Oleo lb. 32
CITY CHICKEN
BACON lb. 45c
HAMS *-*4 lb. 59c
STEAK 'Ur |b. 55c
Beef Loin lb. 39
Pork Loin lb. 39
Shoulder Rib lb. 25
Bulk Sausage lb. 45
Beef Hearts lb. 35
Beef Tongue lb. 39
whole wheat
Beef by the Quarter
Custom Butchering Any Time
All Kinds
RYE Jb IV
Price Of Houses Soars
Building Costs Up
(Concluded from page 1)
ready for occupancy* in the fall.
At the same time, Russell Tripple
horn moved into the Fred Mueller
addition on Jefferson street a house
he purchased on the former Milton
Pifer farm in Orange township, east
of Orange Center.
Remodeled Home
The house is being remodeled and
replastered, and will be ready for
occupancy within the next month.
Trippiehorn’s home is the fifth in
the Jefferson street area which has
been moved in from country districts.
Two other home owners in other
parts of the town followed the same
procedure as one way to beat high
costs of building, but it is becoming
extremely difficult to find empty
residences in the rural areas.
In the meantime, the building sit
uation represents a paradox. Altho
there is a continuing need for new
housing Bluffton construction activ
ity has petered away to virtually
nothing as materials remain hard to
get and prices keep on going higher.
Cut Costs
In the early part of the summer,
builders of new homes resorted to
procedures that resulted in cutting
costs wherever possible in an effort
to beat the soaring cost of construc
tion. As prices continued high, how
ever, the building program slackened,
then virtually4 came to a standstill,
with no new activity of any kind
coming in the last two months.
In many cases, increased costs of
building partially have been over
come by much of the work on the
house being done by the owner, with
some of his family pitching in as as
sistants. At the same time, the type
home being built is smaller in size
generally, as another means of con
serving expenditure.
Increased costs which have hiked
the price of new homes also are re
flected in higher prices for all real
estate in Bluffton, and houses al
ready built are selling at new high
levels.
Pre-war prices here for homes
ranged from $4,000 to $8,000, but
recent sales of real estate in the
same class of houses are spiralling
upward from the $9,000-mark, more
than double the level prevailing prior
to 1941.
With little prospect for additional
building here this summer and fall,
the fate of Bluffton’s building pro
gram next spring is equally un
certain. Should high-priced construc
tion keep the cost of building a home
at two or three times pre-war prices,
fewer new houses will be started than
if the costs of erecting a home fall
off over the winter.
Lack Hospitals
Forty per cent of our counties
predominantly rural, in 1940 were
without a single recognized genera,
hospital.
In honor of his 34th birthday an
niversary, thirty friends and rela
tives surprised Aldine Kohli at his
home on College avenue.
New municipal officers are M. M.
Murray, mayor Ed Reichenbach,
clerk Cliff Stratton, treasurer
Henson Good, marshall.
Hiram Kohli of Camp Sherman
spent several days with his parents.
Chas. Dillman is substitute mail
carrier on routes one and three fill
ing the vacancy made by the resig
nation of Ralph Patterson, who is
now city mail carrier.
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Kimmel ex
pect to leave in the future for Olean,
N. Y. w*here he will be employed
by the Clark Bros. Co. The plant
makes small gasoline locomotives
and is under the supervision of
Eugene Kiebele.
A photograph of Ralph Steams,
who acted as clerk in receiving the
first Liberty Bond subscription at
the aviation camp at Kelly Field,
San Antonio, Texas, appeared in
an issue of the San Antonio Ex
press. The young man was especial
ly detailed to aid in the Liberty
Loan campaign and was very suc
cessful in securing subscriptions.
THE BLUFFTON NEWS. BLUFFTON. OHIO
A BIT OF SHOPPING IN PANAMA
Naval Reservists on a training cruise of the USS Wisconsin spend
part of their liberty ashore in Colon, Republic of Panama, selecting
presents for the folks back home. They are among 600 Reservists from
the Third, Fourth, and Ninth Naval Districts recalled to active duty,
voluntarily, for two weeks of training aboard the "Wisky.” The cruises
give the Reserve sailors a chance to learn of the latest developments
aboard this mighty warship. As a part of the Wisconsin cruises there
are two days of liberty in Panama for sightseeing and shopping. Many
of the men bring back perfumes, lingerie, alligator skin luggage, white
shirts, summer suits and other items which are obtainable at prewar
prices.
NEWS OUR FATHERS READ
FROM ISSUE OF NOVEMBER 8,1917
"ScrA
VW
(Official Navy Photograph)
Eight Teams In Foot
ball Preview
(Concluded from page 1)
four lettermen this year around
whom to build his 1947 Bluffton
team, and with only two weeks of
workouts out of the way the start
ing lineup for Friday’s preview tilt
with Forest is uncertain.
Coach Cotterman’s squad this
year will have as its nucleus the
four veterans: Kenneth Bracy, sen
ior, fullback James Howe and John
Klay, seniors, tackles and Keith
Moore, a senior who played end last
year but is being shifted to a back
field post this season.
Others on the squad from whom
the team will be drawn include
James Badertscher, freshman Ted
Bauman, senior Leland Garmatter,
freshman George Grismore, sopho
more Donald Herr, senior David
Hofstetter, freshman Charles Jos
eph, sophomore Charles Schumach
er, freshman Don Schumacher,
sophomore John Trippiehorn, fresh
man, and Ray Lee Wilch, junior, all
backs.
Line candidates include John Bau
man, sophomore, end Robert Bixel,
junior, end Pon Burkholder, sopho
more, end Cleo Dillr, sophomore,
guard Ronald Diller, senior, center
Ralph Dunifon, junior, tackle Rich
ard Fields, senior, end Bernard
Fish, junior, guard Joe Goodman,
junior, guard Eugene Hankish,
sophomore, tackle Dwayne Hauen
stein, sophomore, center Lee Hurs
ey, junior, end Ted Kohli, senior,
guard Larry Mathewson, sopho
more, end Dean Sommer, junior,
guard Jerry Jennings, junior,
guard, and Don Schmidt, sophomore,
center.
Forest, Bluffton’s foe in the pre
view-, also is faced by the task of
virtually rebuilding a team for this
fall, although the Hardin county
crew is slightly better off so far as
lettermen are concerned. In the
lineup of the visitors there will be
few veterans from last year’s out
fit.
With the Bluffton Recreation com
mittee sponsoring the 1947 football
preview, ail proceeds in excess of
team guarantees and other expenses
will be used in furthering the town’s
year-around recreation program.
Picnic Supper
In honor of Miss Lois Geiger who
is returning to Nebraska to resume
her studies, a picnic supper was en
joyed at the home of Mr and Mrs.
Milton Badertscher and sons.
Present were: Mr. and Mrs. Mon
roe Geiger and family and Mr. and
Mrs. A. E. Keller and family of
Dayton.
Lime and fertilized pastures and
meadows would take a load off
depleted Ohio granaries and corn
cribs early next spring.
Gid Luginbuhl, Mr. and Mrs. D. W.
Reichenbach and Miss Ruth Hauen
stein of Pandora, motored to Camp
Sherman to spend Sunday with their
brother Albert Reichenbach who is
stationed there.
Ezra Moser, who is attending
Bluffton College entertained a jolly
crowd of class mates of the Sopho
more class at his home.
Mrs. William Lightner entertained
the Ideal Club at a Halloween
party at her home in honor of Mrs.
Frank Flack of Chambersburg, Pa.
Bluffton landed a county political
plum when Nahumn Basinger was
appointed deputy auditor in the of
fice of County Treasurer Tussing at
Lima. Miss Minnie Benroth also
holds a position in the office.
Andrew Herrman, John Burk
holder, Harvey Beidler, Hiram Kohli,
and Monroe Geiger all enjoyed a
furlough home from Camp Sherman.
Rev. L. I. Mercer will preach his
farewell sermon at the Church of
Christ Sunday. (.
The Sand Hill Fruit Farm in Fair
field county used 900,000 gallons of
spray materials in 10 applications
this year.
Former Justice Of
Peace Succumbs
Jesse C. Williams, 80, retired
farmer and former justice of the
peace of Eagle township, Hancock
county, died Tuesday afternoon at
his home in Mt. Cory following a
two months’ illness.
He was also a former member of
the Mt. Cory towncouncil and a
member of the board of public af
fairs of that village at the time of
his death. He was also prominent
and active in the Sandusky Associa
tion of Primitive Baptists of North
western Ohio and a pioneer school
teacher in Hancock county.
He was married three times and is
survived by his wife, the former
Mabel Prior. Children surviving are
Park Williams, Arlington Mrs. An
na Decker, Findlay Vernon Wil
liams, Ada Mrs. Martha Folk, Mt.
Cory and a step-daughter Mrs. Ho
Agin of Jenera.
Funeral services will be held
Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock
at Eagle Creek Baptist church with
Elder H. H. Hartman officiating as
sisted by Elder Ivan Hindall of
Findlay. Burial will be in Hassen
cemetery.
Bluffton Schools Have
485 Enrollment
(Concluded from page 1)
dents.
For the opening of schools, one
change was made in the teaching
staff, with Mrs. Faye Herrick, of
Ada, hired at a special meeting of
the board of education last Wednes
day night as second grade teacher.
She was employed after Mrs. Dwight
Spaythe, re-hired by the board did
not accept.
Mrs. Herrick’s calary will be $2,
000 per year, plus $150 for transpor
tation. She will live in Ada where
her husband is a student at Ohio
Northern univrsity.
School Enrollment
School enrollment totals announced
Tuesday afternoon by Supt. Ralph
Lanham were as follows:
Grade 1—44 Grade 2—40 Grade
3—49 Grade 4—45 Grade 5—40
Grade 6—40. Total 258.
Grade 7—41 Grade 8—35 Fresh
man—26 Sophomores—50 Juniors
—28 Seniors—47. Total 227.
Administrative and teaching staffs
for the coming school year are as
follows:
High School
R. S. Lanham—Superintendent
Gerhard Buhler—Principal, in
structor in science
I Calvin Leimbach—vocational agri
culture (half-time, also teaches at
Beaverdam.)
Kent Cotterman—physical educa
tion, health and coach.
Florence Duffield—commercial
Wilford Geiger—science
Wilbur Howe—English and social
sciences
Mildred Keel—Latin and English
Elizabeth Mohr—vocational home
economics
Theressa Slusser—history and
social science
Dwight Spaythe—industrial arts
Sidney C. Stettler—mathematics
William Burbick—speech
Mrs. Mabel Lantz—art
Edna Ater—vocal music i
Harold Hunter instrumental
music
Ocie Anderson—librarian
Grade School
1st—Meredith Stepleton, principal
2nd—Mrs. Faye Herrick.
3rd—Mrs. Clayton Murray
3rd-4th—Minerva Hilty
4th—Robert Ewing
5th—Adella Oyer
6th—Theola Steiner
Improved Corn Outlook
Raises Hopes Here
(Concluded from page 1)
consideration of the nation’s farm
prospects.
Price of corn, which already has
set an all-time high so far this
summer, is the determining factor
in the cost of pork chops, milk and
other dairy products, beef, eggs and
poultry.*
In fact analysis of the general
food picture will show the h?usewife
that from eggs and bacon for break
fast thruout the meals of the entire
day, com more or less sets the pace
for the American standard of living.
Reflects Record Price
Com meal and poultry feed al
ready have gone upward this sum
mer, to match surging prices of com
on the open markets, and meat
prices can be expected to follow
suit next winter if com yields are
abnormally low.
Discouraging outlook for this
summer’s national com yield, follow
ing a date seeding season, for a
long time indicated that much higher
prices for staple food items could
be expected next winter. Present
improvement in com prospects have
to some extent offset initial fears,
but there still is plenty of chance
that the crop may be short enough
to force prices sharply upward.
Sales Stopped
Unlike wheat, which must be kept
under cover, com can be stored in
the open, and most of the crop is
held by the farmer. When he takes
a pessimistic view of the future, as
he has this summer, he halts sales
and without full elevators to cushion
the shock, the price of com reacts
violently.
Most noticeably affected when
com prices go up are poultrymen,
who must sell their flocks or get
more for eggs and meat producers
who fatten hogs and cattle.
As corn prices go next winter, so
will go the cost of many food items
on the everyday menu, and more
than just the farmers’ concern over
crop prospects hangs in the balance
in consideration of this year’s com
yield.
In Horseback Wedding
Former Bluffton Man
Robert Bassitt, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Carl Bassitt, former residents
of Bluffton Rural Route One, was
the bridegroom in a “wedding on
horseback” at the Ada saddle club
rodeo, Monday afternoon.
He was wed to Laura Faye John
son, Lima Route four, in a ceremony
witnessed by a crowd of more than
3,000 persons. Rev. Raymond Peter
son, of Marion, received the vows.
All members of the bridal party
were on horseback in the unique
event.
SHORTS AND MIDDLINGS
Disease and insect damage in
1948 gardens can be reduced if the
trash left from the 1947 crops is
gathered and placed in compost piles
or is destroyed by fire.
A mineral mixture for Ohio hogs
can be made from 20 pounds iodized
salt, 40 pounds of pulverized lime
stone, and 40 pounds of steamed
bone meal. It can be fed by mixing
eight pounds of the combined miner
als with 92 pounds of the protein
supplement being used. This mineral
mix supplies iodine, calcium, and
phosphorus.
Some dairymen retain a prejudice
against cottonseed meal as a high
protein feed and claim it causes
constipation, breeding difficulties,
and undesirable milk. Feeding trials
at experiment stations prove cotton
seed meal cannot be justifiably
LVs Something New In
Fluorescent Lighting
THURSDAY, SEPT. 4, 1947
blamed for any of those troubles.
Cottonseed meal lacks vitamin A so
that essential should be supplied by
other feeds in the ration.
Ohio poultry men who have good
flocks might find a good outlet for
spring eggs by contracting with a
local hatchery to supply hatching
eggs.
A course to train men as test
supervisors for dairy herd improve
ment associations and as laboratory
technicians in artificial insemination
associations will be given at Ohio
State University, September 15-Oc
'tober 4. R. R. Starbuck, dairy hus
bendman, Ohio State University,
says young men with general or dairy
farm background can qualify them
selves for good jobs now open.
Fresh Drugs
and
Quality Drug Store
Merchandise
of All Kinds
See us for all kinds of store factory lighting
—no job too large—no job too small.
Estimates without obligation!
II. A. Dunifon
Phone 280-W 114 Garau St! Bluffton, Ohio
America’s most famous mageta
newspaper. Make big savings
ingl Look over this fine list cl
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lions to newspaper and magaziii
Any MAGAZINE Listed and
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Mark
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American Fruit Grower„..$2.75
American Girl 8.50
American Home 8.60
American Poultry Journal.. 2.65
Boy’s Life 4.10
Child Life 4.00
Christian Herald 4.00
Coronet ________________ 4.50
Country Gentleman (5 Yrs.) 8.50
Etude Music Magazine...... 4.40
Farm Journal and
Farmer’s Wife 2.75
Flower Grower 3.75
Front Page Detective. 3.55
Household 3.00
Inside Detective 3.55
Jade and Jill................ 4.40
Judy’s (News and Views) 4.00
Modem Romances 8.75
Modem Screen 3.75
Mother’s Home Life... 2.65
Movies in Review 4.00
Prescriptions Care
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Sidney’s Drug Shop
Phone 170-W
Circling
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Magazine ...
Science Monthly.. 4.50
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